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February 24, 2013

Well-being in the desert

Lucire staff/11.09


Paula Sweet

The area around Palm Springs, California has made a gradual transformation in recent history from retirement community to trendy retreat. Known internationally for its film festival, music festival, as a tennis and golf paradise, gay destination, and popular health tourism mecca, the desert community has a new aspect that goes beyond simple cosmetic surgery. Call it over-the-top medicine.
   Executive Foresight, a bespoke medical practice catering to the ultra-wealthy and luxury traveller, now quietly offers the most extensive and exclusive physical examination available anywhere on planet earth. According to the company’s website, ‘… members receive first-class, personalized, bespoke healthcare in a luxurious environment modeled after top-tier five-star hotels. The cornerstone of the practice is a comprehensive health evaluation which delivers a composite picture whose resulting data enables … specific recommendations which can optimize and improve your overall health and decrease the risk of illness and disease.’ Executive Foresight refers to itself as a very private practice, where members experience unrestricted access to a world-class medical team, 24–7–365. The clinic also has anti-ageing and weight-loss programmes, and other related services including medical evacuation and dedicated physician care anywhere in the world.
   The service does not come cheap. No Medicare or insurance accepted, and it’s US$100,000 for the first year. But low-profile, high-net-worth individuals are lining up for the practice, which scrupulously protects your privacy and will not share records without your consent. Dr David H. Tang, an internationally known ER physician who is also SWAT-certified, serves as Executive Medical Director. While the client list can’t be disclosed, suffice it to say these are individuals accustomed to the utmost discretion, names you would recognize but which cannot be spoken.
   On another therapeutic front, many talk but few act to show appreciation for returning veterans from foreign wars. Hacienda Inn and Spa of Desert Hot Springs (above), about whom I have previously written, won’t openly publicize its offers to returning vets in need of a zone of rest and healing waters, but a phone call to GM Karl is the way to find out the latest. It won’t be advertised—word of mouth only.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor

Stanley Moss is travel editor of Lucire. His novel, The Hacker, is now available in Kindle (via Amazon) and print (via Uread) formats.

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