Lucire: News


October 1, 2015

Ikea extends itself into fashion: you read it here first last year

Lucire staff/23.16

Pin It


September 29’s Ikea Fashion Show at Moda di Milano (hashtagged both #IKEAfashion and #IKEAtemporary) showcased work from two designers who collaborated with the Swedish-founded furniture conglomerate.
   ‘With a number of new collections that have been developed in collaboration with fashion designers, Ikea is stepping into new territory—one from which we can learn a lot,’ according to the company.
   Giltig by Katie Eary and Svärtan by Martin Bergström will see their collections retailed in 2016, but they received a boost in profile thanks to their appearance at one of the top fashion weeks in the world.
   For us, the first thing that came to mind when seeing Ikea fashion was Stefan Engeseth’s (below right) prediction, published in Lucire first last year, and later in, the Daily Mail, The Guardian and Flare, plus a number of newspapers and news websites: that fashion should be Ikea’s next industry.
   At the time, Ikea had no such plans officially, but it isn’t surprising to see another one of Engeseth’s predictions come true. He came up with the idea of Coca-Cola being served through taps at home before Coke itself actually trialled that idea, plus another, over 15 years ago, on how cellphones could connect two strangers, albeit not through an app.
   We wrote: ‘Engeseth says that Ikea’s expertise lends itself easily to the world of apparel …
   ‘He believes that fashion is in a repetitive cycle, stuck in history and needing renewal.
   ‘Ikea could offer both complete apparel items and composite parts that customers could assemble themselves, says Mr Engeseth. The parts could be “tailored” at home in inventive ways without the need for complex sewing.’
   Last year, Lucire publisher Jack Yan added, ‘This taps in to its existing fan base, and just as importantly, Ikea can make full use of its channels, outmanœuvring many existing fashion labels. Ikea has an international retail base and it has distribution down to a fine art.’
   When we asked him about the Ikea show in Milano yesterday, he had his reservations about some of the designs, but stated, ‘It’s good that Ikea takes its first step into fashion, and rewarding to see them developing the concept more now.’
   He was also buoyed by seeing that, after the show, Ikea’s official Twitter account went back to his blog post late last year about Ikea fashion, and “favourited” a Tweet about it. Engeseth even preempted the hashtag used back in 2014.
   There’s no sign that Ikea fashion will be in a composite format, ready for its customers to assemble, but Engeseth appears to have been right that the brand would extend itself into the new segment.

September 30, 2015

Bar Refaeli, Pelé and Lapo Elkann celebrate Hublot’s Big Bang watch anniversary at new production warehouse

Alex Barrow/10.17

Pin It

Hublot, the luxury watch company, opened an expansive new production warehouse in Nyon, Switzerland on the 10-year anniversary of their iconic Big Bang watch on Tuesday.
   Three hundred guests from around the globe attended the opening event including ambassadors, VIP guests, friends of the company and journalists. The milestone ceremony was further endorsed by notable Hublot ambassadors Pelé, Bar Refaeli and Lapo Elkann who contributed to the handing over of keys ceremony.
   To celebrate the sweeping popularity of the large watch, the warehouse was developed to keep up with enormous production demand. With the first major production centre being built just six years ago, this feat recognizes and celebrates the vast success the company has had with their luxury watches.
   Owned by big-brand conglomerate LVMH, Hublot has consistently enhanced and cemented their reputation as high-quality, skilled watchmakers recognized the world over. Over the past decade the Big Bang watch has been celebrated at various award ceremonies internationally in Genève, Japan and the Middle East. With the rapid success of the company in such a short time, the decade anniversary celebrations of the Big Bang watch indicates that Hublot aren’t even considering slowing down their economic boom.
   Based in Switzerland, the new warehouse is destined to house over one hundred work stations which will bring Swiss employees up to over 400 people working for the company. Due to the high sales of the last decade, the company have afforded SFr 20,000,000 into the project. To further celebrate the acheivements, the company has launched a “decade of success” campaign across the 73 Hublot stores worldwide.—Alex Barrow

September 29, 2015

Huawei, Vogue China and Fornasetti collaborate on custom smart watch, released at Milan Fashion Week

Alex Barrow/23.17

Pin It

Vittorio Zunino Celotto

A collaboration between big names Huawei, Vogue China and Fornasetti sparked the creation of the Fornasetti smart watch, the unveiling of which was done at Vogue China’s 10-year anniversary celebrations. Celebrated at the closure of Milan Fashion Week, the introduction of the special edition watch has allowed for it to be seen in the limelight of the fashion world.
   Huawei, a global innovation company, works towards bettering and expanding on telecom networks. With a focus on consumer product, technical innovation and research and development, the company has expanded through Asia, Europe, the US and Russia. Huawei’s crowd-sourcing specialists have opened up a platform for outside artists and designers to contribute designs for appropriate accessories to complement the watch such as customized skins, or potential ideas for future technologies such as smart phones or smart watches.
   The watch itself is a product of Huawei Business Group, but the design was customized by Fornasetti, the celebrated interior design and fashion label. The watch has all the traditional makings of a high-quality, sophisticated watch such as the scratch-resistant sapphire crystal class and stainless steel frame, as well as the traditional 42 mm diameter of the watch face itself. What makes this accessory stand out is its technical capabilities, inclusive of playing music downloads offline, Bluetooth connections and a heart rate and motion sensor. These make it the ideal companion for monitored physical activity without the bulk of other smart technologies.
   Designer Barnaba Fornasetti said his design had a multi-dimensional inspiration to it which contributed to the final product. ‘The Fornasetti brand is built upon the revival and reinvention of its classic designs and objects, giving them a new purpose and always keeping its artisan approach. The Lina face is a part of my father’s legacy and to reinforce its timeless design, I paradoxically decided to apply it on a cutting edge product that keeps time.’ The image on the watch face is a vintage-style depiction of a woman’s face, namely inspired by that of Lina Cavalieri, an Italian opera singer. This image is an established symbol of Fornasetti and has been used in a similar fashion in the label’s past designs.
   The collaboration between the three large names has allowed space for future business endeavours, opening up each other’s company networks. Glory Zhang of Huawei said, ‘This collaboration with Fornasetti is the start of an exciting journey for Huawei, delivering connections between innovative technology and art, design and culture. This is the first of many exciting cultural collaborations as we move to become an innovator within the arts’.
   Notable attendees of the event included models Karlie Kloss and Sean O’Pry, AC Milan footballer Riccardo Montolivo and model Cristina de Pin, fashion photographer Mario Testino, Giorgio Armani, Vogue China editor-in-chief Angelica Cheung. Representing Huawei was Glory Zhang, its chief marketing officer. All attendees of the event were gifted with the smart watches and modelled them for the evening.—Alex Barrow

Vittorio Zunino Celotto

September 23, 2015

Fila Australia teams up with Lauren Phillips to launch spring–summer 2015–16 sportswear line

Alex Barrow/13.09

Pin It

The Australian branch of international sportswear line Fila has welcomed TV host Lauren Phillips to be the new face of its spring–summer 2015–16 line. The conglomerate, which originated in Italy in 1911, has developed into one of the leading lifestyle and fitness wear companies in the world and maintains fashionable yet practical sportswear.
   The innovative materials used to create Fila sportswear allow the skin to breathe, with lightweight fabrics which stretch appropriately with the body’s natural movement. As “fitspiration” has become somewhat of a global phenomenon, FILA understands and adheres to the demand for sportswear to be fashionable, as well as practical and versatile. Furthermore, there are various collections which cater to different lifestyle needs. The Barre collection, for example, is designed and inspired by dance, featuring cardigan wraps, tulle overlays and cropped Ts which suit lower intensity workouts such as yoga and Pilates. Other sportswear includes leggings, fun coloured tops and Ts, as well as accessories such as bags, hats and microfibre towels to provide for your everyday active needs.
   The company hired Phillips due to her passion for living a healthy lifestyle by eating responsibly, engaging in regular active exercise, and being a good role model for children and adults alike. ‘Living a healthy and active life is hugely important to me and having fitness gear that caters for all types of training, but also has plenty of fun and colour injected into it is a perfect fit for me,’ says Phillips. The spring–summer range is in store now Australia-wide, as well as online.—Alex Barrow

September 3, 2015

Misha Nonoo × Aldo Rise fall–winter 2015–16 footwear and handbag collection débuts

Lucire staff/20.35

Pin It

Misha Nonoo and Aldo Rise have collaborated for a second time on a new collection of footwear and handbags for fall–winter 2015–16.
   Previewed at New York Fashion Week last February, the Misha Nonoo × Aldo Rise collection comprises four key items that bring together both Nonoo’s and Aldo’s æsthetic. The designs began with sketches by Nonoo, resulting in what Aldo’s chief brand officer Douglas Bensadoun calls ‘artful yet functional pieces.’ She was in part motivated by getting her pieces to a wider audience and, in her words, to ‘speak to more women.’
   The Newhaven chunky heel pump with multiple straps (US$160, £110) is a design that bridges work and social lives, with a croc-embossed pattern on the counter and heel; the Northampton pointy-tow ballerina with T-strap heel (US$120, £85) is a modern style with plenty of practicality; the Newyork structured tote with croc-embossed synthetic leather (US$85, £75) features a classic style; and the Midtown cross-body bag (US$60, £55) features hidden pockets for today’s lifestyle, with faux fur lining and faux shearling.
   ‘I believe in the power of women and their endless capacity to achieve the life story that they wish for,’ said Nonoo. ‘Aldo’s innate understanding of the multifaceted woman is unparalleled. It has been an honour to collaborate with the Aldo team on a line of collectibles that are easy yet composed. Designed with the intent to make life easier, seamlessly taking women from day to play.’
   ‘Witnessing the evolution of Misha’s vision as she works with our designers has been a truly rewarding experience. It continues to be a privilege to collaborate with Misha at such a pivotal point in her career,’ said Bensadoun in a release.
   The collection is available at select Aldo stores and online at

August 20, 2015

Tiffany & Co. to open store in Britomart, Auckland in late 2016

Lucire staff/2.32

Pin It

Tiffany & Co. will open its first company-operated retail store in New Zealand in late 2016, to be located in Britomart, Auckland.
   It will be located at the ground floor of the Historic Places Trust-registered Australis House, 36–8 Customs Street, and occupy 430 m² of space. There will be the usual hallmarks: the use of Tiffany blue; polished stainless steel details with a wheat-leaf pattern, identical to that at the Fifth Avenue, New York store; marble and amazonite floors; and custom furnishings inspired by the stained-glass works of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the founder’s son.
   Glen Schlehuber, vice-president and managing director of Tiffany & Co., said, ‘We have many loyal Tiffany customers in New Zealand and have been looking to establish a presence for some time, and the location at Britomart is perfect. We look forward to welcoming everyone to experience our iconic jewellery collections, heritage and craftsmanship that have distinguished Tiffany for over 175 years.’
   Tiffany’s has an existing presence in Auckland through DFS, its trade partner. It has seven stores in Australia, as well as an online presence at

August 18, 2015

Fan Phenomena: James Bond gives 007 fans more; while Sugoi invites you to the world of Bill Murray

Jack Yan/12.09

Pin It

In the year of a new James Bond movie, many books emerge. Invariably, there’ll be one on the films themselves, taking readers through the 50-plus years of the Eon Productions’ series, and, if it’s very comprehensive, the 1950s CBS TV version of Casino Royale, the 1967 spoof of the same name, and Never Say Never Again will rate more than a mention. There’ll be something about Ian Fleming, and another book on one aspect of the Bond world (gadgets, stunts, music, or something else). Seasoned Bond fans will think the circus is in town again, because the new book about the films adds little to their existing knowledge.
   Claire Hines’s Fan Phenomena: James Bond, from Intellect Books (£15·50, US$22, releasing November 15), is something different altogether: Bond from an academic and completely cultural viewpoint. Intellect is famous for its titles on popular culture and creative practice, with a rigorous academic bent, and Fan Phenomena: James Bond continues the series but takes the reader into the world of Ian Fleming’s super-spy.
   Hines serves as editor, and there are 11 very distinct contributions to her volume, dealing with everything from canonicity to 007’s appearance as ‘Ladykiller Jimmy’ in Alan Moore’s comics; Bond as a cult brand and cultural phenomenon to the clothes he wears; from the James Bond films through a feminist viewpoint to analyses of his masculinity and identity. Interspersed between these are four ‘Fan Appreciation’ sections, featuring an interview with über-fan and former Bond novel continuation author Raymond Benson, artist and collector Peter Lorenz, 007 Museum owner James Bond (who had his name legally changed by deed poll) and cross-players CousinCecily and Winter.
   Even the most seasoned Bond fan might not have considered the impact of the character, books and films, and the book fulfils a very important role: it gives them something new. William Proctor’s analysis of continuity gets the book off to a healthy start after Hines’s introduction, though typographically it suffers: the type is inexplicably small, though the layout is modern and the visuals help lift things. Getting Raymond Benson in there early on also helps position Fan Phenomena: James Bond as a book for the cognoscenti as well as those who want an academic examination, and Benson reveals a little more behind the scenes of his years as the official continuation author.
   Matthew Freeman, in considering the many media in which Bond occupies, including the gaming world, shows just how the phenomenon breaks the established rules and succeeds, while Jesús Jiménez-Varea and Antonio Pineda’s chapter on Moore’s comics is bound to take many fans into uncharted territory. Joshua Wille’s chapter on fan edits does the same: while many know about ABC-TV’s cutting of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service when it aired on US TV, but there are numerous fan edits made in the digital era that had this author hunting the forums.
   Artist Peter Lorenz’s Bond film posters are stunning and present a nice visual break before Lucy Bolton’s chapter analysing the phenomenology of Bond. Bolton’s piece is perhaps closest to those Bond “collectable” books that come out with the films as she analysed the films from Dr No to Skyfall, and fans may have their own interpretations of their cultural significance through the years. Editor Hines’s own chapter looks at Bond as cult brand, and is fascinating in her study of the 1960s Eon films. Hines reconciles how cult and mainstream come together with the Bond series, successfully. Lisa Funnell gives Bond a feminist slant and the enjoyment she derives as an assistant professor teaching women’s studies.
   Stephanie Jones looks at the Bond lifestyle but primarily through the analysis of one work, The Complete James Bond Lifestyle Seminar, which she reveals is relatively light on Bond references, leading to a less satisfying chapter—though it could hardly be blamed on Jones. Llewella Burton’s chapter on Bond and fashion, and how it became a style through the rise of merchandising as the movies became blockbusters with Goldfinger is punctuated by photos from Galeries Lafayette as it opened a James Bond boutique in 1965, again gold dust for Bond fans. Karen Brooks’s and Lisa Hill’s chapter analyses the new and old masculinities through the three Daniel Craig films of 2006, 2008 and 2012.
   Crossplayers CousinCecily and Winter talk about their love of James Bond and Q, leading neatly on the final chapter by Elizabeth J. Nielsen, which deals with Bond’s homoerotic moments and subtexts. She traces them to Fleming himself in the torture scene in Casino Royale, before covering the flirting between Bond and the new Q in Skyfall, which itself has a phenomenon, attracting both women and the LGBTQ community.
   This is a volume for the intelligent Bond fan, someone who appreciates learning about the impact of Ian Fleming’s creation. Of course the films are covered more, as it was through them that Bond became a global phenomenon. The reader walks away having been better informed: this is not a Bond book for the light reader who wants reassurance of the facts they already know, but one which gives them something more satisfying to consider.

Top A scene from What About Bob?, by Jon Boam. Centre Lost in Translation, by Grace Danico. Above Lost in Translation, by Henry Kaye.

On a briefer note, but still tied with film, Sugoi Books has released an A5 book called Cook Your Own Food: a Bill Murray Scratch and Sniff, retailing at £6. There are 20 pp., with 10 smells, with some stunning illustrations, with artists reinterpreting key moments from Murray’s films, focusing on his culinary habits. ‘Scratch the smelly pads at the top right and enter the world of Bill Murray,’ the publisher asks, and you are spoiled with scenes from Lost in Translation, Caddyshack, Groundhog Day, What About Bob?, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and others. For £6, the illustrations are so good it doesn’t even matter if you have a poor sense of smell.—Jack Yan, Publisher

June 25, 2015

MAC Cosmetics celebrates München store, with Franziska Knuppe, Victoria Swarovski, Lisa Tomaschewsky

Fenella Clarke/13.50

Pin It

Gisela Schober

MAC Cosmetics celebrated the opening of its new store in München, Germany by having an Art of the Lip party.
   MAC, which was founded in Toronto in 1984, has since then taken the make-up world by storm, featuring in almost all runway shows and sold in 150 countries. This party is one of many that have been hosted around the world, each celebrating the many ways your can paint your lips. Lily Allen performed as well as drag queen Miss Candy and DJ Pierre Sarkozy.
   At the party were MAC make-up artists showing the guests different ways of doing their lips, for example defining your lip line with lipliner, and making your lips look bigger with a bit of lip-glass in the middle of the lips. True to form, a fashion show also took place, with models wearing designs by Zaldy, giving an avant-garde vibe at the event.
   Guests included Viktoria Lauterbach, Josefina Vilsmaier and her sister Thérèsa Vilsmaier, Verona Pooth, Alicia von Rittberg, Franziska Knuppe, Melissa Faber-Castell, Victoria Swarovski, Katja Riemann and her daughter Paula, Palina Rojinski, Nadine Warmuth, Bettina Zimmermann, Lisa Seitz and her daughter Luzie Seitz, Sophia Thomalla, Mina Tander, Lisa Tomaschewsky, and Tom Wlaschiha. General director Gabriele Medingdörfer was also there as was Bettina Zimmermann, who hosted the event.
   München now has two stores (in Pasing and the OEZ), with a pro store set to open in August. MAC is also planning on opening more free-standing stores throughout Germany in the autumn.—Fenella Clarke

Gisela Schober

Next Page »


Get more from Lucire

Our latest issue

Lucire 34
Check out our lavish print issue of Lucire in hard copy or for Ipad or Android.
Or download the latest issue of Lucire as a PDF from Scopalto

Lucire on Twitter
Lucire on Instagram