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Reebok, Banana Republic and GMSV mark International Women’s Day

Filed by Lucire staff/March 7, 2021/23.20


Reebok has a campaign called It’s a Man’s World, but with the words struck out, for its International Women’s Day promotion, created by the all-female creative collective Madwomen. Four sneakers in two collections are promoted—the Club C Double, Classic Leather Double, Legacy 83 and Zig Kinetica. The first collection features the sneakers with multiple colours and silhouettes, representing the different facets of a woman; the second shows neutral-toned footwear, representing a clean slate to which a woman can bring her uniqueness.
   The Berlin-based collective has chosen to feature locals: model and stylist Isi Ahmed; make-up artist and photographer Aennikin, and stylist Elli Drake, who styled the campaign.
   The first collection is available from today, and the second from April 1, at reebok.com, priced from US$90.

Banana Republic is celebrating International Women’s Day with its campaign on women who break boundaries, entitled Work Where?. Directed in-house by Banana Republic’s Len Peltier, the campaign shows a montage of videos of real women doing modern work—wearing Banana Republic, of course.
   Subjects include Grammy-nominated recording artist Saint Sinner, recording artist Goapele, street artist Apexer, actor Jimmie Fails, photographer Grady Brannan, real estate developer Mari Swim, executive Todd Palmerton, café owner Lea Sabado, entrepreneur Jamal Blake-Williams, and social media manager Halee Edwards. Movement artist Jon Boogz and screenwriter and artist Chinaka Hodge return for the campaign.
   The company will also make a US$100,000 donation to CARE to help fight poverty, and advance women and girls around the world.

It’s refreshing to see that GMSV (General Motors Specialty Vehicles) has women leading the business in Australasia (Joanne Stogiannis, director; Jodie Lennon, general manager marketing, customer experience and communications; and Dahlia Shnider, vehicle supply chain and systems’ manager) as well as 45 per cent female representation in the wider team. And, of course, General Motors itself is led by Mary Barra, who broke the glass ceiling when appointed CEO of one of the largest car manufacturers in the world in 2014 and has a commitment to diversity.
   ‘It is common knowledge that the auto industry is skewed heavily towards male representation, so it’s incredibly heartening we’re making gains in changing this balance, albeit as part of a relatively small team,’ said Stogiannis.
   Stogiannis is a GM veteran of 25 years and recalls when she was one of the only women in the room when she started.

 


Bridgerton’s Phoebe Dynevor models Self-Portrait’s autumn–winter 2021–2 collection

Filed by Lucire staff/February 24, 2021/11.50



Nigel Shafran/Self-Portrait

Bridgerton’s Phoebe Dynevor is the face of Self-Portrait’s autumn–winter 2021–2 collection, photographed by Nigel Shafran.
   Given the UK’s difficulties with COVID-19, Self-Portrait forged on with showing its key looks with a more down-to-earth campaign, rather than a traditional fashion show, opting to photograph at Dynevor’s home in London. The aim was to capture a day at home with Dynevor, ‘finding joy in simplicity and solitude’.
   Malaysian-born Han Chong, Self-Portrait’s founder and creative director, noted, ‘As I was designing this latest collection, I was thinking a lot about the British sensibility and that effortless approach to British style, which I am so often inspired by. I felt we needed to work with someone to bring this to life rather than present the collection in a traditional show format, and having captured the hearts and imaginations of so many people over the last few months, I knew Phoebe would be the perfect woman. The moment I met her, I loved how down-to-earth she was whilst still having this incredible spirit and energy that perfectly emulates the attitude and values of the Self-Portrait brand. She is warm, independent, sensitive, expressive and completely captivating. It’s been a real joy getting to know and work with Phoebe and I’m incredibly excited to have her on this journey with us.’
   Dynevor added, ‘I was delighted and honoured that Han chose me to work with him and such a talented team on his latest collection. I first spotted one of his dresses on a photo shoot and it was an instant love affair. Han’s collections for Self-Portrait have always been an inspiration, I love the strong structures he creates from such delicate and stunning fabrics and this collection is a testament to his incredible work. I’m so proud to be a part of this new project and hope to have a chance to wear the pieces when life goes back to normal again!’
   Chong creative-directed the campaign, and was joined by Marie Chaix as stylist, Isamaya Ffrench on make-up, and Gary Gil on hair.
   The season sees a reworking of Self-Portrait’s staples, as well as new, relaxed styles, with an emphasis on simplicity and lightweight fabrics. Dresses, knitwear, cardigans and jumpers form part of the collection, in fabrics ranging from organic cotton to recycled polyester chiffon.
   Self-Portrait uses responsibly sourced fibres and began introducing organic cotton and recycled chiffon and polyester in 2019. Last year it introduced recycled viscose.
   The collection will begin retailing in July, both online at self-portrait-studio.com, and offline at Self-Portrait stores (including flagship stores in London, New York, Bangkok, Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu, Shenzhen and Taipei), and select retailers.

 


Net-a-Porter, Art021 seek 2021’s Incredible Female Artist; Tan Zhuo named celebrity judge

Filed by Lucire staff/February 22, 2021/10.21


Net-a-Porter, continuing to make headway in China, has announced a partnership with Art021, the 21st contemporary art fair at the Shanghai International Art Festival. On February 9, Net-a-Porter and Art021 launched a public art project to identify the Incredible Female Artist for 2021, someone who is ‘delivering the art spark for incredible people’.
   Film and TV actress Tan Zhuo (譚卓) was also announced as the celebrity judge of the project, alongside a group of luminaries from the art world. Ten female artists have been nominated: Chen Dandizi, Feng Bingyi, Lei Ziyi, Liu Wa, Liu Qinmin, Su Yuxin, Tan Xiaoshi, Wang Yuyu, Zhong Diming, and Zhang Fengyuan. Each will submit one work inspired by the theme ‘She said,’ to be exhibited at the Beijing Jingart Expo later this year. The winner’s work will be exhibited at the Net-a-Porter booth at Art021 in November, and she will also receive an award.
   The artists also created a series of limited-edition tote bags for Net-a-Porter, with profits going to the Shanghai Wenshe Art Foundation to support female artists. The bags will be available on the Net-a-Porter flagship store on Tmall, and at Art021 from early March.
   Tmall purchases will have a special, limited-edition packaging for Queens’ Day on March 8.
   Net-a-Porter says its support of the Extraordinary Female Artist Award is an example of its corporate social responsibility, providing female artists in China with a platform for dialogue, and celebrate their courage to embrace the unknown.

 


Another positive step: Living Nature certified Zero Plastic Inside

Filed by Lucire staff/January 29, 2021/23.57

Trust Living Nature to take another move on behalf of our planet. The brand is already famous for what it leaves out, and has received internationally recognized certifications for its claims, and the latest—Zero Plastic Inside—is yet another that can give consumers assurance that the product doesn’t contain microplastics and microbeads.
   Zero Plastic Inside has been organized by Beat the Microbead, an initiative of the Plastic Soup Foundation. These microplastics are often added as fillers or emulsifying agents, but once introduced into the environment, they are there to stay. They are not biodegradable and cannot be filtered by wastewater systems. Inevitably they wind up in sea animals and into the food chain.
   Beat the Microbead has identified 500 ingredients often used in cosmetics.
   Living Nature uses only natural additives, including harakeke flax gel, totara extract, active manuka honey, manuka oil, and halloysite clay. All its products do not have plastics inside.
   The company has also announced the return of several Lip Hydrators, with additional natural waxes, butters and oils, in Wild Fire (no. 11), Pure Passion (12) and Bliss (13).

 


IMM’s sustainable shoes: designed by immigrants, made by immigrants

Filed by Lucire staff/December 23, 2020/7.57


It is an empirical fact in most countries that immigrants contribute positively to the economies of their host countries and to job creation, and IMM, a footwear brand produced by immigrants using sustainable methods, seeks to build on that.
   Using surplus materials, including high-quality leathers, from luxury brands, IMM’s ‘home shoes’ are made by immigrants in Spain, while designed by immigrants in Paris.
   The company trains its staff and aims to give them hope. It believes everyone has the right to a home.
   Co-founder Joanne Tsai said, ‘Our motto is simple, the more shoes we sell and the larger we grow, the more positive impact we create for immigrants.’
   IMM’s other co-founder, Belén H. Sánchez, added, ‘With multiple crises that lead millions of people losing their homes, finding alternative ways to help is the core of our brand.
   ‘We start by nurturing and offering jobs to skilled immigrants. The goal is that through economic empowerment, they can rebuild their homes, improve their lives, and contribute to the economic growth in their host countries.’


 


British Fashion Council announces the Fashion Awards 2020, with Beijing, Shanghai screenings

Filed by Lucire staff/December 3, 2020/23.01



With the UK continuing to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, the British Fashion Council’s Fashion Awards (formerly the British Fashion Awards) announced its 20 winners with a digital film première.
   The 30-minute film went live at www.fashionawards.com today and on YouTube on the BFC’s account, and was screened in selected cities, including Beijing and Shanghai. It features some of the year’s events as well as opinion leaders and young creatives giving their thoughts on its impact. Physically appearing in the film voicing their ideas were photographer Jermaine Francis (on the work of NHS workers), entertainer Miss Jason (on the impact on younger queer people), model Salem Mitchell (on Black Lives Matter, and why activism is important), photographer Lauren Woods (that Black Lives Matter is not a hashtag, but real lives are involved), and photographer Myles Loftin (people of colour are still not represented sufficiently). Wilson Oryema, a writer and activist, followed in a later set (on building a better world for future generations), along with Kasper Kapica, a model and content manager (who recalled doing a Miu Miu campaign in the forest), Bohan Qui, communications director (China in its post-COVID mode and the world’s added interest there), Choom, magazine editor (community in the age of COVID-19), Harry Fisher, store owner (selling virtually this year), and from the class of 2020, Bradley Sharpe (Central St Martin’s), who learned he would not get a graduation show, but it turned into an opportunity.
   In the first set of award presentations for communities, Priyanka Chopra Jonas noted that people’s expectations have shifted and that the industry can directly help communities. First to be honoured was the Emergency Designer Network, set up by Bethany Williams, Cozette McCreary, Holly Fulton and Phoebe English. The Network helped create 50,000 surgical gowns and 10,000 sets of scrubs for UK health workers.
   Secondly, Michael Halpern eschewed a London Fashion Week show in favour of a tribute to frontline workers, capturing eight women from the public services in film and portraits, and contributed to the production of PPE for the Royal Brompton Hospital.
   Chanel has committed to improving the economic and social conditions of women worldwide. Its Foundation Chanel has developed a racial justice fund to support grass roots’ organizations led by people of colour. It has also committed to supporting independent artisans and ateliers. As reported earlier in Lucire, Chanel has also produced PPE. Finally, its climate strategy, Chanel Mission 1·5° aims to reduce its carbon footprint.
   Kenneth Ize has supported the communities of weavers, artisans and design groups across Nigeria, placing the country’s heritage on a global stage. He has also celebrated his Blackness and the LGBTQIA+ community with his work.
   A Sai Ta, who tells the stories from his east Asian culture through a British lens, has called for the end to discrimination against marginalized communities. His eponymous brand, A Sai, has committed profits to organizations that support the end of systemic discrimination and racism. The brand supported Black Lives Matter, in a manner which the Council labelled ‘exemplary.’
   Formula 1 racing driver Lewis Hamilton highlighted the protests against systemic racism in many countries, and believes the fashion industry has a platform on which to make change and creating a more equal society. Hamilton’s set of recipients were people who have led change by encouraging equal, diverse and empowered workforces at all levels of the business.
   Edward Enninful was the first recipient in the category, for his work contributing to diversity at British Vogue. The magazine’s covers have featured frontline workers, activists and Black Girl Magic.
   Lindsay Peoples Wagner and Sandrine Charles for Black in Fashion Council were next: launched in June 2020, the Council’s aim is to build a foundation for inclusion. It has organized a creatives in the sector to foster the change and create diversity.
   Menswear designer Samuel Ross, behind the label A-Cold-Wall, created the Black Lives Matter Financial Aid Scheme, pledging £10,000 to the organizations and people on the frontline supporting the movement. He also awarded grants of £25,000 to black-owned businesses across a diverse range of areas.
   Aurora James called on retailers to dedicate 15 per cent of their shelf space to black-owned brands. A controversial winner as far as this magazine is concerned, as James has yet to respond in depth to questions we posed to her in 2017 over a Moroccan artisan’s account, having missed her own deadline by which she promised to provide us with answers.
   Finally in this category, Priya Ahluwalia has been a pioneer in sustainable fashion, and a tireless advocate for the black community, especially this year in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement.
   Maisie Williams and Aja Barber presented the awards for the environment, calling on a united effort to making the planet better.
   First up among the winners was Stella McCartney, whose record is already well known among consumers and industry alike. She has stayed true to her brand, promoting and practising sustainability, with innovation and circularity.
   Anya Hindmarch has worked hard to reduce waste in the fashion supply chain in her business, adopting new techniques and practices. She also supported the NHS with the creation of a holster for frontline staff, as well as reusable and washable hospital gowns.
   Christopher Raeburn is a pioneer in the upcycling of surplus fabrics, proving that the designs can still be creative, premium and desirable. He believes that innovation, creativity, technical excellence and partnerships can solve current issues in sustainability.
   The Fashion Pact united top-tier fashion CEOs toward collective action on biodiversity and this year, doubled its number of signatories. It represents 200 brands and a third of the industry. It has made its first strides, notably with a digital dashboard of KPIs to measure impact, and with its first collaborative activity on biodiversity.
   Gabriela Hearst has sourced materials carefully, looking at where they come from, who makes them, and what impact they have. Her spring–summer 2020 show was the first carbon-neutral catwalk presentation. Hearst wants to make the highest-quality product with the lowest environmental impact.
   The last set of awards were for creativity, introduced by Rosalía. Jonathan Anderson was awarded for his innovative approaches to showing fashion for J. W. Anderson and Loewe during the COVID-19 pandemic, with show-in-a-box and show-on-the-wall concepts, as well as inviting people to become part of the show experience.
   Grace Wales Bonner’s fashion designs celebrated black culture, evoking its history, and challenged the norms surrounding black masculinity and identity.
   Third up were Prada, Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons, demonstrating the importance of conversation, collaboration and dialogue in reimagining fashion for the future.
   Riccardo Tisci and Burberry were honoured for their inclusivity and sustainability. The Council noted the label’s innovative use of technology at London Fashion Week in September 2020 and in campaigns and launches. In addition, Burberry donated 160,000 pieces of PPE to the NHS and health care charities, repurposing its trench coat factory in Castleford. It has also donated to aid vaccine research, and to food charities.
   Menswear designer Kim Jones, introduced by David Beckham, was recognized for his creativity. He said he felt it was important to bring joy to people in a tough year, and he intended to do so with his fashion.
   The Awards were supported by Getty Images, Lavazza, Rosewood London and Royal Salute. The trophy was designed by Nagami and created by Parley for the Oceans using Parley Ocean Plastic.

 


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