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Enjoying a “beauty rest” at the Mondrian; and hair revival in Beverly Hills


NEWS  by Elyse Glickman/April 24, 2017/13.03




Elyse Glickman

Award show season may be over, and the Coachella fashion parade has run its course. However, Los Angeles’ first heatwave provided a convenient excuse to play hooky from pressing writing assignments to hit Charmed PR’s friendly little showcase of beauty products and a pick-me-up pedicure or manicure. The backdrop of the Mondrian Hotel’s ever-so fashionable and busy rooftop pool provided extra incentive to try out the goodies to prep hair and skin (feet in particular) for sandals, swimsuits, and shorter skirts.
   The Better Skin Cream Company not only came armed with its multitasking Mirakle Cream, but also its new, triple-threat Lava Magik (cleanser, exfoliating scrub and revitalizing mask). Volcanic lava from France is enriched with calendula, sweet orange and grapeseed oils, cucumber, parsley, and chamomile for radiant clean that goes a little more skin deep, with its antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-yeast properties.
   Hair La Vie’s continued the multipurpose beauty theme with a less-is-more line developed by hairstylist and cancer survivor Carla Rivas. She introduced media and web influencers to her philosophy with travel sizes of the shampoo and conditioner, and full-size hair serum and vitamins, all formulated without harmful chemicals or additives. Greater value is added to customer purchases with users knowing 10 per cent of profits will go to charities such as Save the Children, Heifer International, National Breast Cancer Foundation and the Global Fund For Women.
   Even the smiles on people’s faces got a little extra love, not just from Lucy B’s lip glosses, but with Popwhite dental products. This simple system of toothpaste and mouth rinse works along the same lines as colour-correcting foundations and make-up. FDA-approved purple pigments sourced from plants and herbs cancel out yellow residue on teeth for a whiter smile naturally. Coconut oil and xylatol make the process pleasant tasting, to boot.
   Schique Skin Care by Jacqueline Schaffer, MD showcased her beauty how-to book, Irresistible You, as well as her anti-ageing product line built on sulfate and paraben-free formulas, integrating elements from daisy plants known their natural sun protection and vitamin complexes. This back-to-basics line includes a refreshing mist, colour-changing specialty beads, face mask, eye cream, sumptuous moisturizer and creamy firming serum.
   The centrepiece of the festivities was a trio of foot-beautifying items, including LVX Luxury Nail Lacquer, Baby Foot Exfoliant Foot Peel and an anklet from Sterling Forever. LVX lives up to its branding, thanks in part to its gel-like formula that’s seven-free, vegan and cruelty free. Many of the fashion-forward shades have their origins with past collaborations with designers such as Mara Hoffman, Tadashi Shoji, Tracy Reese, Rodebjer and others. I was particularly excited about Baby Foot, as Leyla Messian and Jody Miller raved about the effectiveness of this product, which was featured at Charmed’s beauty event a year ago. A formula of 17 natural extracts makes one’s feet look scary at first, but this is an assurance the product works. Glycolic acid and citric acid peel away dead skin cells softened by alcohol. Salicylic acid, lactic acid and isopropyl stimulate a flaking effect, and although your feet temporarily look haggard, healthy skin is ultimately undamaged and a fresh layer beneath reveals itself.

A couple of weeks ago, Biolage launched its new RAW collection at Beverly Hills’ Brighton Salon. Although reality television personality Ali Fedotowsky was crowned the face of the brand, the concept behind the products is pretty stellar: a sustainable, green hair care line packaged in fresh-pressed juice bottles that are themselves made of sustainable materials. While the salon itself has all the earmarks of a Beverly Hills salon, from luxury brands (Kérastase, Shu Uemura, and Oribe), it is an oasis of neighbourhood salon friendliness and sanity, amid designer labels and celebrity stylists. The laid-back, multicultural staff are more committed to steering clients towards flattering styles than of-the-minute colour and cut trends. Veteran cutter Dani Faraj and colorist Walid Chaya took a less-is-more approach with me that looked fresh and current without leaving me shorn and shell-shocked—no small feat.
   This tiny salon that could offers hair extensions, Brazilian blowouts, bikini-wax and everything else needed for a fresh look. However, they are also big on community outreach, including a wig bank sponsored by the American Cancer Society. Brighton Salon supports the cause by giving a 50 per cent discount to customers who commit to donating their hair for the cause. They also offered a sneak peak at the recently opened Prestige Skin Care (9435 Brighton Way) a few doors down, featuring locally produced luxury lines and an owner who worked at such prestige salons as Christophe before going the “friendly neighbourhood” route.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor








Elyse Glickman

Kérastase enters natural hair care market with Aura Botanica range; Toni Garrn spokesmodel


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/April 20, 2017/3.49

Kérastase has introduced its Aura Botanica line in New Zealand, featuring a shampoo (Bain Micellaire), retailing at NZ$48, a conditioner (Soin Fondamental), NZ$52, a treatment (Concentre Essentiel), NZ$79, and an oil mist (Essence d’Éclat), NZ$70. The collection is, on average, 98 per cent natural in origin—a first for this L’Oréal brand—and includes pure hand-pressed Samoan coconut and Moroccan argan oils.
   Kérastase says the Aura Botanica coconut oil has proven to penetrate deeply into the hair, leaving it soft, hydrated and strong. The argan oil, meanwhile, lasts longest on the hair’s surface, nourishing it and keeping hair soft and shiny. Development of the range began in 2013.
   The products have a fragrance with top notes of grapefruit and crushed mint leaves, mid-notes of black pepper, coriander and jasmine, and base notes of rich vanilla and warm amber.
   The products are (again on average) 97 per cent biodegradable, and its packaging is similarly friendly to the environment, with the Bain Micellaire in a 100 per cent recycled polyethylene terephthalate (RPET) bottle, and the Concentre Essentiel bottle is made with 25 per cent recycled glass.
   With interest in natural hair care growing, Kérastase expects a sizeable number of customers will chose Aura Botanica.
   As revealed in January, model Toni Garrn is the face of the Kérastase Aura Botanica range. Twenty-four-year-old Garrn, with 581,000 Instagram followers and a fresh, healthy face, is involved in humanitarian work, her image working well with the natural angle of Aura Botanica.—Nathalia Archila

Cartier announces 2017 Women’s Initiative Awards’ laureates in Singapore ceremony


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 14, 2017/23.29



Cartier announced the laureates of its 2017 Women’s Initiative Awards on Wednesday at the Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall in Singapore, the first time the event has been held outside France.
   The awards, which recognize there is a gender gap and aim to reward women entrepreneurs, began in 2006, created in partnership with INSEAD and McKinsey & Co.
   Cyrille Vigneron, CEO of Cartier, and Ilian Mihov, Dean of INSEAD, announced the six laureates, selected by an independent international jury from nearly 1,900 applicants in over 120 countries. Each walked away with a US$100,000 prize, plus a year of mentoring and a place in an INSEAD executive programme.
   Sandi Toksvig, OBE MCed the ceremony.

Latin America
Kickante, Candice Pascoal, Brazil
   Kickante addresses the lack of a crowd-funding platform in Brazil by connecting campaign creators to donors.

North America
Save Water & Co., Katie Anderson, USA
   Save Water & Co. aims to fight high wastage of water in commercial establishments and multi-family properties by using data analytics to improve business processes through water conversation.

Europe
Theya Healthcare, Ciara Donlon, Ireland
   Theya Healthcare offers post-surgery undergarments for women, made of an innovative sourced from bamboo that is more absorbent and more bacterial resistant than other materials.

Sub-Saharan Africa
Unique Quality Product, Salma Abdulai, Ghana
   Unique Quality Product works with farmers, particularly women, in producing and processing of Fonio. The company was formed with an idea of creating sustainable livelihoods for women farmers whose lands are degraded due to its excessive usage and creating a land management system. This innovation has led to sustainable food and fodder security, agroforestry and nutrition.

Middle East and North Africa
Sara and Lara’s Baskets, Sara-Kristina Hannig Nour, Egypt
   Sara and Lara’s Baskets tackles the lack of organic food options in Egypt by delivering weekly shipments of organic products directly to customers in Egypt’s largest cities.

Asia-Pacific
Naireeta Services, Trupti Jain, India
   Naireeta Services addresses the issues of drought and flash floods destroying farmers’ crops. It provides hand-made water management solutions, enabling small farmers to filter and store rainwater underground to become independent from extreme weather conditions and dry periods.


Cartier Women’s Initiative Awards 2017 by Lucire


Cartier Women’s Initiative Awards 2017 laureate… by Lucire






News in brief: Kristen Stewart behind the scenes for Chanel; H&M announces Global Change Award winners


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 9, 2017/23.52



Chanel

Chanel revealed last week the first of four films for its Gabrielle bag. The photographs had already been shot by Karl Lagerfeld, featuring Kristen Stewart, Cara Delevingne, Caroline de Maigret and Pharrell Williams, each with the ‘aura’ of Gabrielle Chanel in the film.
   The first film, starring Stewart and directed by Daniel Askill, appeared on April 3 on Chanel websites and social networks, while the making-of (as the French call it) is below on Lucire’s Dailymotion channel.
   Danish jewellery brand Pandora has announced that it will enter into a second year’s partnership with Dress for Success, committing to a US$500,000 donation this year, and donating Pandora jewellery to Dress for Success affiliates throughout North America. It will also sponsor Dress for Success events through the year.
   Dress for Success, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, is a not-for-profit that empowers women to achieve economic independence by providing professional attire, support, and developmental tools.
   Readers may remember our story in March about the finalists of the H&M Foundation Global Change Award this year. The online vote, held from March 27 to April 2, saw the €1,000,000 split as follows:

• €300,000 for Grape Leather (team lead: Rossella Longobardo, Italy);
• €250,000 for Solar Textiles (team lead: Miguel A. Modestino, USA and Switzerland);
• €150,000 for Content Thread (team lead: Natasha Franck, US and UK);
• €150,000 for Denim-dyed Denim (team lead: Xungai Wang, Australia); and
• €150,000 for Manure Couture (team lead: Jalila Essaidi, the Netherlands).

A ceremony was held at the Stockholm town hall on April 5.
   ‘We are deeply glad that such a prestigious foundation recognized the value of our innovation and strongly believed in it. Our first objectives will consist in switching from a pilot to an industrial-scale production our fabric and starting a green, cruelty-free revolution within the leather industry, finally solving its related issues and overexploitations,’ said Rossella Longobardo from the team behind wine leather (‘Grape Leather’).


Kristin Stewart behind the scenes for Chanel by Lucire

Natural selections: the best of 2017’s Expo West


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 7, 2017/19.04



Anaheim, California is, famously, home to Disneyland, the happiest place on Earth. However, hundreds of visitors who came to Anaheim on a hot weekend in mid-March found their happy place at the city’s convention centre. For the last several years, the centre and the adjoining Marriott and Hilton hotels have been home to the Natural Products Expo West.
   Although Expo West is a trade show, it has a colourful, carnival-like setting. This year, it expanded to include numerous new products’ rooms and a festive midway area that added an extra level of family-friendliness, as many paid attendees have their kids in tow. For the 2017 edition, the planners truly infused the proceedings with a healthy dash of Coachella and other hippie-chic music and arts festivals. Retailers and hospitality professionals from around the globe descended on this four-day carnival of healthy living to scope out established and emergent producers of specialty foods (ethnic, vegan, organic, ethically sourced, and so on), beauty products, pet gear, household supplies, cooking ingredients, vitamins and health aids.
   Everything that makes the business of an environmentally conscious-driven so alluring was in place, from free early morning yoga classes, to a concert stage with a steady stream of free energy bars, Late July chips, Think Thin protein bars, Kettle Chips, Pamela’s baked goods, Siggi yoghurt, Silk milk substitutes, and GoGurt. Pie Pops—possibly the most indulgent treat handed out to passers-by—was the cream of the crop with its custardy ice-cream core bathed in crumbled pie crust and toppings.

A healthy appetite for change
Pie Pops notwithstanding, there were fewer knockout ice-cream vendors populating Expo West 2017 than in past years. Sweet Lady Jane, Hollywood bakery to the stars, picked up some of the slack by rolling out its line of supermarket cakes and pies, including layer cakes that make the brand’s VIP cache accessible to markets beyond La La Land. There were almost too many excellent Fair Trade chocolates (Wild Boar and ZazuBean could give Valrhona a run for its money), and way too many reinventions of the classic granola bar (Empact, raising money and awareness for women’s causes, was among the best).
   While coconut- and almond-based beverages continued to dominate the dairy substitute drinks, Ripple Oat Milk cut in to the competition, as did Banana Wave. Carnation released its new Natural Bliss almond- and coconut-based coffee creamers. (Correspondent Jody Miller and I were partial to the coconut.) There was also a jolt of excellent coffee and tea offerings with artsy packaging, from canned coffee from hot Los Angeles desert bar BeSweet, to sublimely boxed Pukka teas and herbal infusions, to earthy Prana Chai, Maxpresso’s tasty instant coffee packets from South Korea, and Black Medicine’s powerful brews. Kombucha also flowed in abundance, and once again, we found Kombucha Dog was top dog for its balanced flavours as well as its animal welfare charity endeavours. Speaking of balanced, we loved the true fruit flavour of the blood-orange ginger ale and other concoctions from Massachusetts-based Powell and Mahoney Drink mixers, KillCliff energy drinks (which donates proceeds to US Navy Seal veterans), and bright watermelon and ginger flavours from Dry Soda, in contrast to medicinal energy drinks that still flood the market.
   As it can get very easy to burn out on nutrition bars and chocolate, ethnic and ethnic-inspired food offerings from the main floor and new products’ installations provided excitement. We loved the multi-brand and product spaces focused on México (perfect lime popsicles), Korea and Japan. New Zealand was well represented, with a large booth featuring a mix of imports from Pacific Resources International, including manuka honey items, medicinal items, and snacks from the Proper brand.
   Tamales from Arizona and New Mexico provided welcome relief from diabetic-coma overloads of sweets, as did Hummus Pods (heartier, less “chemical” variations on Hot Pockets); Yellow Bird, Tsang and One Culture hot sauces and salsas; the latest from celebrity chef Rick Bayless’s Frontera Grill; Thai fare from Koh; and Indian foods from Deep and Tasty-Bite. Better Than Pasta, which swaps out wheat and rice noodles with konnyaku (a sweet potato-based product popular in Japan) added spicier creations to their line-up of products. Arlette Tea Seed Oil, meanwhile, may truly be the next big thing: a tea-based substitute for olive oil.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor

continued below
















The bad and the beautiful
Health and beauty are big business, even in the natural products world. While many up-and-coming brands were represented, the aforementioned carnival-like atmosphere was absent from the Health & Beauty Pavilion, in favour of a more corporate trade show vibe. In fact, some popular beauty vendors were downright surly (I’m talking to you, Beauty without Cruelty and Andalou Naturals). Others were merely aloof. Hopefully their reps will take some people skills’ training next year.
   In spite of those glaring shortcomings, there were real high points and positive vibes. Quite a few brands got it right with attitude and presentation. Alaffia (getting attention with their live drummers and vibrant tribal décor, pillows and scarves), showcased their Fair Trade hair and body care. Badger celebrated new Moms with a new line of body care and new additions to their Damascus Rose facial care. Derma-E debuted sleek new packaging, while Burt’s Bees not only showcased their new Healthy Nutrition protein powders, but rewarded patient attendees with two complimentary products. As a big sunscreen advocate, it was encouraging to see Goddess Garden and Earth Science proudly display their hottest SPF products.
   One of the most refreshing trends, and a welcome respite from singular note essential oils, was holistically sourced perfume. Sow Good’s natural eau de parfum, made with premium ingredients and alcohol from organic sugar cane, were available in four distinct scents packaged in elegant bottles. Juniper Ridge, meanwhile, distils their perfumes from such free-range ingredients as wildflowers, plants, bark and other cool stuff that grows in the woods. This results in a fragrance library that authentically reflects the great outdoors.
   Taking multiple vitamins and supplements every day is a hard pill to swallow for many of us. Fortunately, drinkable and gummy-bear supplements were everywhere to help the less diligent among us. Vegan Smart, Vega One, Vegan Slim, Almased and Rainbow Light will keep the calories down and the metabolism up with shakes in a plethora of flavours. American Health, Pure Essence Labs, Oxylent, Paradise, Mega Foods, and Genesis Today, in contrast, want you to drink your way to health.
   For the more dedicated whole-food junkie, Kulli Kulli offers a pure moringa vegetable powder, while Manitoba Harvest grew on us through samples of their tasty hemp smoothie. Gummies and chewables from Bluebonnet, Solgar and Hero Nutritionals taste just like candy, so now everybody can get their daily dose.
   In the lifestyle department, Ecos gratified the weary with a free full-size product. And a big kudos to Seventh Generation for donating their display products to a shelter. We like that!—Jody Miller, LA Correspondent

Five ideas reshaping the fashion industry: H&M Foundation invites public to vote on the best


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 28, 2017/10.51

H&M Foundation invites the public to vote on the best ideas that can help revolutionize the fashion industry toward a sustainable, waste-free future.
   Initiated in 2015, the competition is now on to its second round, with €1 million up for grabs between five winners. The vote, at globalchangeaward.com, closes on April 2. The public will determine how the €1 million will be split, with the top innovation receiving €300,000. All winners receive an innovation accelerator to help realize their ideas and get industry access.
   The first of the 2016 five is a digital content thread that facilitates the recycling of clothes. By weaving an RFID thread with a digitalized ingredients’ list into the garment, recyclers will know what the garment is composed of.
   There’s a carbon-binding nylon made from water, biomass and solar energy instead of oil. The nylon also binds greenouse gases into the material, to help with a zero-emissions world.
   Third, a vegetal leather made from wine production waste helps with animal welfare, and eliminates the use of oil in making synthetic leather.
   Fourth, old denim is broken down into particles, which are turned into a colouring powder to dye new denim, saving water and energy in production.
   Finally, ‘manure couture’ takes the cellulose in cow manure and turns it into a biodegradable textile, reducing the release of methane gas and harmful substances.
   The result will be announced at a ceremony at the Stockholm city hall on April 5.
   ‘The second round of Global Change Award received 2,883 innovative ideas from 130 countries, which is even more than last year. Cross-border challenges call for a cross-border approach. I am convinced that by bringing people from different industries, with different backgrounds and perspectives together we can make a fundamental shift, speeding up the transition to a circular waste-free fashion industry,’ said Karl-Johan Persson, CEO of Hennes & Mauritz. Fifty-six per cent of the innovations came from women.
   The top five were chosen by an expert panel, comprising: Vikram Widge, had of climate and carbon finance at the World Bank Group; Rebecca Earley, professor in sustainable textile and fashion design at University of the Arts London; Amber Valletta, model, actress, entrepreneur and sustainability influencer; Ellis Rubinstein, president and CEO, New York Academy of Sciences; David Roberts, distinguished faculty, Singularity University; Lewis Perkins, president, Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute; Johan L. Kuylenstierna, executive director for Stockholm Environment Institute; and Dame Ellen MacArthur, founder, Ellen MacArthur Foundation. The late Franca Sozzani, editor-in-chief, Vogue Italia, was an expert panel member in 2015 and 2016, but passed away before helping to select this year’s winners. All members participate pro bono.

H&M: more Conscious Exclusive details and images featuring Natalia Vodianova, plus first peek at childrenswear


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 24, 2017/17.33

Hennes & Mauritz has released further images from the H&M Conscious Exclusive collections, previewed in Lucire in February.
   A plissé dress made of Bionic, a sustainable polyester made from recycled shoreline waste, was part of the preview, but H&M has revealed more about other designs made from the fabric.
   The company has screen-printed distorted peonies and mimosa on to the fabric for ‘dream-like prints’, while an image of a dreaming woman has been quilted into its jacket.
   Designers have also added sequins to a recycled polyester cocktail dress, while a tuxedo comes in organic silk and Tencel twill. There’s a fishnet bag made from shoreline waste, and earrings from recycled glass and plastic.
   Children’s designs also feature for the first time, with tulle dresses and structured blazers and trousers.
   H&M head of design and creative director Pernilla Wohlfahrt said in a release, ‘For this year’s Conscious Exclusive collection at H&M, we thought not only about the look of the pieces, but also how they feel and sound. It’s a collection to please all our senses, and also our desire to be sustainable in everything we do.’
   ‘H&M’s Conscious Exclusive collection shows how the best style can be mindful of the planet, to help protect it for the future. It’s such a desirable collection, with pieces made in sustainable materials that you want to wear for seasons to come,’ added model Natalia Vodianova, who fronts the campaign.
   Vodianova also founded Elbi, a digital philanthropy platform connecting users with a charities worldwide. H&M says it will continue to partner with the platform.
   The collections will go on sale in c. 160 stores worldwide, from April 20.







The Body Shop’s Drops of Youth and Drops of Light liquid peels: effective and perfect for sensitive skin


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/March 20, 2017/9.42


We’ve been sampling the Body Shop’s new Drops of Youth Youth Liquid Peel and Drops of Light Pure Resurfacing Liquid Peel, coming soon to New Zealand. These products claim to deliver a smoother, healthier, more youthful and lighter skin.
   I tried out both products, and they get Lucire’s thumbs-up. The formula between them both is similar, so you’d choose which one you want based on your preference. Drops of Light features red algæ extract from the North Atlantic and vitamin C. Drops of Youth is 100 per cent vegan, enriched with edelweiss, sea holly and criste marine plant stem cells. The liquid peels help skin appear brighter, refined and more even. At first, I wasn’t sure how they worked, because they are not like a traditional exfoliant scrub. After a bit of research, I found out that a liquid peel essentially takes off the top layer of dead cells from your face. The first thing I noticed when I opened Drops of Youth was the smell: it was nice and clean, and the texture was like a really refreshing cold jelly. I applied the product on my face, massaging for around 20 seconds, and noticed that these little balls of dead skin cells were forming. After I wiped the product off my face, my skin felt amazing, and appeared soft and bright.
   I am really careful with my skin routine and not to keen to introduce new products because I’ve had a very long battle with rosacea and sensitive skin. However, with the Body Shop’s liquid peels I didn’t experience any rosacea outbreaks or reactions, which tells me they are great for those with sensitive skin. I’ve kept using the products two to three times a week and I notice my skin feels much softer and glowing now!—Nathalia Archila

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