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November 23, 2016

Porsche Design Sport by Adidas releases spring–summer 2017 collection, for year-round activity

Lucire staff/3.01


Adidas and Porsche Design, the design company founded by Butzi Porsche, have released their spring–summer 2017 Porsche Design Sport by Adidas collection.
   These sportswear items blend the idea of Adidas’ performance heritage with efficient design. Jacques Chassaing, senior design director for the label, says that wearers are active even during Europe’s cold winter months, and need items that help them stay warm and dry.
   Because customers wear the items not just at the gym, but as part of their everyday travel and commuting, the padded jacket is designed to keep them warm, thanks to PrimaLoft Gold insulation. There is also a vest that can be paired with the wool mix top, and a water-repellant, five-pocket Commuter pant.
   Porsche Design Sport by Adidas also has the UltraBoost trainer collection, again blending Porsche Design’s functional ideas with Adidas’ performance ones. Foam aids comfort, while the leather adds luxury. The Drive Team bag has an EVA-moulded compartment to protect valuables, and ventilated slits allow wet clothing inside to dry out.
   Unifying some of this season’s designs is a subtle hexagonal pattern, intended to give a futuristic look, and features reflective elements for safety, appearing on the Reflective jacket, Reflective Cap II, Seven-Eighth Tight and Endurance 2·0 shoes, and the OT back-pack.
   The colour palette is focused on dark blue and black, though some pieces are in a bright red shade, which is particularly eye-catching and fitting for this season.




November 16, 2016

Ralph & Russo, Charlotte Tilbury, Anya Hindmarch among Walpole winners; Lucy Hale named ambassador for Casetify

Lucire staff/12.50

Pretty Little Liars’ Lucy Hale has been named as a spokeswoman and creative director for Casetify, a company retailing cellphone cases, Apple Watch bands, Macbook sleeves and clutches.
   The capsule collection of 34 pieces has been launched in time for the new Apple Iphone 7, based around the idea of ‘delicate but daring,’ a motto credited to the actress. The designs reflect Hale’s tastes, including one with the quotation, ‘I like big brows and I cannot lie,’ as well as cheetah, floral and cacti prints, and one featuring her own dog, Elvis.
   Prices begin at US$40, and the range can be found at www.casetify.com/lucy-hale.
   The 15th annual Walpole Awards, presented in London on Wednesday, saw numerous fashion and beauty brands honoured for their contribution to luxury. Ralph & Russo won Outstanding Achievement in British Luxury, presented by Nadja Swarovski (right).
   Other winners included make-up artist Charlotte Tilbury, who won British Luxury Brand of the Year, and accessories’ designer Anya Hindmarch won the prize for Digital Innovation in British Luxury. Burberry and House of St Barnabas jointly won the Champion of British Luxury Sustainability award.

November 7, 2016

The Body Shop goes wild for Christmas

Cecilia Xu/2.14



Spiced apple, vanilla chai, frosted berries—all the scents that remind your heart and senses that it’s Christmas season. The Body Shop, in tune with their ‘Forever Against Animal Testing’ slogan, created their Christmas campaign ‘Go wild for Christmas’, with the concept of animals in the wild, bringing you these delicious nature-infused scents.
   I gave these a try and they smell absolutely delicious. With three scent families that include shimmer mists (NZ$46·95), festive tins (NZ$69·95), sugar scrubs (NZ$47·50) as well as the classic body butter, there will certainly be one scent you cannot ignore. My personal favourite is the frosted berries—made with cranberries from North America; one spritz of the shimmer mist and the whole room stays scented for the morning, plus adding a sparkle to your newly tanned skin.
   The Spiced Apple tin packaging is a delight, and can definitely light up (or pass as) a Christmas tree decoration. Lollipop wand sets, heart boxes … the list goes on, and to add to the ‘wild’ theme, your body butter can be customized to be ‘Wild about …,’ followed by the name of the receiver. With such a variety of options and gifts under NZ$50, these scents and animals truly love you for buying gifts that are animal-friendly this Christmas.—Cecilia Xu





October 18, 2016

Viktor & Rolf, Fragrance du Bois each launch a collection of six fragrances

Lucire staff/12.25




Top: Viktor & Rolf showed their Magic fragrance collection at the Upper East Side Academy Mansion, New York. Centre: Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren flank actress Taraji P. Henson. Above: The Fragrance du Bois Nature’s Treasures collection.

French luxury brand Fragrance du Bois has released its Nature’s Treasures collection of hand-blended perfumes using only sustainably sourced, natural ingredients.
   The collection comprises six fragrances: Baie Rose, Patchouli Argent, Brume du Matin, Pétales de Cashmere, Santal Complet and Zest Marin.
   Unlike earlier fragrances from the company, these six are not oud-based, but brand director Nicola Parker stresses that only the best natural ingredients feature, and each has been created by a master perfumer. She notes that the new line does not deviate from its core values.
   Parker also says Asian customers may prefer a lighter, fresher scent.
   Each perfume has a Swarovski crystal-encrusted, gold-plated cap, with prices commencing at €295 for 50 ml, up to €595 for 100 ml. They retail at Fragrance du Bois’s boutiques in Paris, Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and Genèva.
   An older, storied brand, Viktor & Rolf, has launched a new perfume line, too, dubbed the Magic Collection. Like Fragrance du Bois, there are six in the new line, which the company describes as an ‘unexpected twist on niche fragrances’.
   Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren themselves were in New York at the Upper East Side Academy Mansion to launch the fragrances on October 10, with VIPs Taraji P. Henson, Sasheer Zamata, model Sean O’Pry, Anna Baryshnikov, and others. Music was provided by DJ Mia Moretti, while celebrity magician Dan White performed live, in keeping with the theme.
   The Viktor & Rolf Magic Collection will be released in February 2017, exclusively at Saks Fifth Avenue retailers in the US, and online at SaksFifthAvenue.com.




Above, from top: Sasheer Zamata. Taraji P. Henson. Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren.

October 17, 2016

Royal New Zealand Ballet’s ’17 line-up: triple Academy Award winner James Acheson designs for Romeo and Juliet

Lucire staff/0.01



Ross Brown

Top: The Royal New Zealand Ballet’s Carmen, premièring on February 16, 2017. Above: A new version of Romeo and Juliet, premièring on August 16.

Royal New Zealand Ballet artistic director Francesco Ventriglia has announced his second full season for the company, kicking off 2017 with Two Ballets by Roland Petit: Carmen with L’Arlésienne, premièring in Christchurch. Both have scores by Georges Bizet: Carmen was composed for the opéra comique in 1875 before Petit adapted it into a ballet in 1949; Petit created the ballet for L’Arlésienne in 1974, using the score originally composed for the play. They have been performed internationally, though not in New Zealand till the RNZB performances running from February 16 to April 1 in eight centres.
   The RNZB will perform three of Alexander Ekman’s works—Cacti, Tuplet and Episode 31—in a full programme from May 17 to June 15, in Wellington, Auckland, Napier, Christchurch, and Dunedin. For Cacti, the RNZB will be joined by the New Zealand String Quartet.
   The pièce de résistance for 2017 will be the Ryman Healthcare Season of Romeo and Juliet, in a new version by Ventriglia. Using the score by Sergei Prokofiev from 1935, the new work features set and costume design by three-time Academy Award winner James Acheson (The Last Emperor, Dangerous Liaisons, Restoration) working on his first ballet. Working with Auckland Live, the RNZB will offer a live audio description of this ballet for blind and visually impaired patrons on September 3. The season kicks off August 16 and runs till September 24, reaching nine centres.
   Ventriglia said in a release, ‘Not only does this bold programme celebrate international talents like France’s greatest-ever choreographer Roland Petit and the contemporary genius of Alexander Ekman, it’s also about creating great art here in New Zealand with a new version of Romeo and Juliet. The talented dancers of the RNZB and I look forward to bringing you another year of world class productions. See you at the theatre.’
   Executive director Frances Turner added, ‘It’s a big and beautiful year which will take the incredible artists of the RNZB around New Zealand for 70 performances in 16 cities and towns. We are proud to be taking the highest quality art to the widest possible audience.’
   The RNZB will help the New Zealand School of Dance, its official school, celebrate its 50th anniversary with a season in Wellington on November 24–5, while Tutus on Tour with Ballet in a Box return to the regions through the year.
   More information can be found at the RNZB website.

October 13, 2016

Natalie Chan releases her Savoir-Faire couture millinery collection

Lucire staff/0.55



Natalie Chan’s latest couture millinery collection, entitled Savoir-Faire, has been released, inspired by the designer’s ongoing exploration of the old world meeting the present day. The pieces are feminine and confident, with headwear shapes varying from headbands to button, pillbox and percher hats. The hats themselves have clear, structured shapes, though the embellishments (butterfly wings, silk lilies, leather chrysanthemums and silk organza folds) are deconstructed—yet another point of contrast and stylistic tension. Chan has chosen colours of ivory, black, French navy and nude, with scarlet red and rose pink highlights.
   As before, Chan continues to offer a bespoke service. All are made in the traditional, artisan way, with embellishments all constructed by hand.
   Natalie Chan celebrates its 15th anniversary this year, with humble beginnings above a florist’s boutique in 2001. Today, her boutique is located at 229 Parnell Road, Parnell, Auckland, New Zealand. Her brand includes bridal wear, an extension she made in 2012, inspired by her own wedding and discovering that she had her own take on modern wedding dress design. Design and production take place above the Parnell boutique. The full collection can be tried on at the boutique, and personalized viewings are available.


September 30, 2016

Hennes & Mauritz opens first store in Auckland, New Zealand, with celebrity launch

Lucire staff/11.17




Chris Park

Hennes & Mauritz held a press launch for its first New Zealand retail store at Sylvia Park, Auckland, on Thursday—and as the New Zealand-headquartered publication with the longest history of covering the Swedish retailer, we were on the scene.
   H&M didn’t take this launch lightly. In anticipation of the official October 1 launch, they rolled out the red carpet, metaphorically and literally, for an eclectic bunch of media, photographers, bloggers, influencers and the usual Auckland celebrity crowd. It was an incredibly well run event.
   Those spotted among the 800-plus attendees included Jaime Ridge, Maia Cotton, Jerome Kaino and Maria Tutaia, and Colin Mathura-Jeffree.
   In keeping with international standards, the H&M store is a two-storey complex, occupying a huge floor space, with separate sections for men’s, women’s and children’s wear. Unfortunately they didn’t bring in an H&M Home, which, with the absence of Ikea, would probably have done incredibly well in New Zealand.
   The concept of the launch event was to have a “luxury H&M experience”, where we were led down the red carpet, given a trademark grey mesh shopping bag, and free reign to buy any of the items at prices specially discounted for the launch. In addition to this, we were treated to bubbles on arrival, followed by bars on each of the floors each making a different cocktail, with canapés floating around the whole night.
   Gracie Taylor, Jupiter Project, Kings and General Lee, and Dan Aux were DJing on the ground floor.
   In anticipation for the crowds on Saturday (when the store is open to the public), H&M flew in staff from Australia and elsewhere to support the New Zealand-based crew and to provide training.
   Mino Kim, one quarter of the well-known New Zealand street style blog Foureyes, is the store manager, so the rest of the Foureyes team were there to provide emotional support and to do a bit of shopping as well.
   Just as there is a space for haute couture, there is equally a space for fast fashion. H&M built its global fashion empire through making basic, affordable clothing which were durable and the store in New Zealand was no exception. It remains to be seen how H&M’s expansion in the New Zealand market will affect other clothing retailers who operate in the same space and price brackets.
   Perhaps in anticipation of the launch, there have been some critical coverage of H&M being implicated in using child labour and outsourcing its production work to countries where workers are underpaid and exploited. However, it is worth noting that H&M has been one of the more proactive clothing companies when it comes to upholding workers’ rights in comparison to many other comparable brands who already have retail operations in New Zealand, including Glassons, Industrie and Forever 21.
   My understanding is that H&M intends to monitor how the flagship store in Sylvia Park goes before considering whether to open additional stores in other centres around New Zealand.
   I anticipate that for those in Auckland at least, H&M will become the go-to place particularly for basics or cheap and cheerful accessories.—Chris Park, Guest Contributor




Chris Park




Courtesy Mango


Chris Park


Courtesy Mango


Chris Park





Courtesy Mango











Chris Park






Geoff Hedley; courtesy Mango


Chris Park

September 23, 2016

Gillian Saunders takes top honours at 2016 World of Wearable Art Awards’ Show, with Supernova

Lucire staff/11.00




WOW

New Zealand designer Gillian Saunders has scooped the Brancott Estate Supreme Award at tonight’s World of Wearable Art (WOW) Awards’ Show. Saunders, who had entered 15 garments before her winning entry, Supernova, has won eight awards prior to 2016, but this is the first time she has taken out the top prize.
   Saunders, who was born in England, has been involved in television and theatre for most of her working life. She was trained in Yorkshire, and went on to Christchurch, New Zealand, where she worked as a props’ maker for the Court Theatre.
   â€˜I had been making stage props for theatre and TV for years. WOW was the perfect challenge—could I make props for the body as well?’ she said.
   Supernova was inspired by ‘Thierry Mugler’s Chimera dress [from the autumn–winter 1997–8 collection], … the iridescent spiny fins of the Hippocampus from the Percy Jackson movie The Sea of Monsters, and some incredible NASA images taken by the Hubble Telescope,’ she noted. ‘Once all these elements were combined, Supernova was brought to life.
   â€˜The large gems represent new stars being born and the dark shadows represent deep space. Each scale has been individually cut, shaded with marker pens and then hand-sewn on to the garment. Each gem has had its sticky backing removed and then glued on by hand.’
   Saunders also won the Avant-Garde section in this year’s competition, judged by WOW founder Dame Suzie Moncrieff, Zambesi’s Elisabeth Findlay, and sculptor Gregor Kregar.
   Dame Suzie said, ‘Supernova has the design innovation, the construction quality and vibrant stage presence in performance to win WOW’s top award.’
   Saunders’ 2013 design, Inkling, won the Weta Creature Carnival Award and an internship for her at Academy Award-winning Weta Workshop. It is currently part of the WOW international exhibition, touring around the world, and presently at the EMP Museum in Seattle, Washington, where it will be displayed till January, after which the exhibition will head to the Peabody Essex Museum in Boston, Mass.
   She also won the Avant-Garde section in 2007 with Equus: behind Closed Doors, while in 2009, Tikini was second in the Air New Zealand South Pacific section.
   Designers from New Zealand, China, India, England, Australia, and the USA won awards in each section.
   The American Express Open section this year saw Renascence, by Yuru Ma and Siyu Fang of Shanghai take first place. The Spyglass Creative Excellence section was won by Mai (I), by Pritam Singh and Vishnu Ramesh of Gujarat. Queen Angel, by Adam McAlavey of London, won the MJF Lighting Performance Art section.
   Baroque Star, by Natasha English and Tatyanna Meharry of Christchurch, won the Weta Workshop Costume and Film section, netting the duo a four-week internship at Weta Workshop, plus travel, accommodation, and prize money.
   The Wellington Airport Aotearoa section was won by Maria Tsopanaki and Dimitry Mavinis of London, with their creation Princess Niwareka. The World of Wearable Art and Classic Cars Museum Bizarre Bra section was won by Julian Hartzog of Tarpon Springs, Fla., with Come Fly with Me.
   Of the special awards, Dame Suzie chose Incognita, by Ian Bernhard of Auckland, as the most innovative garment, giving it the WOW Factor Award. Renewal, by Alexa Cach, Miodrag Guberinic and Corey Gomes, won the First-Time Entrant Award. The Knight by Jiawen Gan of the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology won the Student Innovation Award. The Sustainability Award, recognizing the protection of our environment and the use of materials that would otherwise be discarded, was won by Bernise Milliken of Auckland, for Grandeer. Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder of Wellington, won the Wearable Technology Award. The Wellington International Award, given to the best international entry, was won by Daisy May Collingridge of Woldingham, Surrey, England, for Lippydeema. Collingridge also won the UK–Europe Design Award with this entry.
   Khepri, by Miodrag Guberinic and Alexa Cach of New York, NY, won the Americas Design Award. Yu Tan of Shanghai won the Asia Design Award with The Renaissance Happens Again, while Cascade, by Victoria Edgar of Geelong, Victoria, won the Australia and South Pacific Design Award.
   The David Jones New Zealand Design Award was won by Voyage to Revolution, by Carolyn Gibson of Auckland.
   The Cirque du Soleil Performance Art Costume Award, chosen by Denise Tétreault, Costumes Lifecycle and Creative Spaces Director of the Cirque du Soleil, was won by Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder. Mulder receives prize money, flights and accommodation for a one-month internship at Cirque du Soleil’s headquarters in Montréal, Québec.
   WOW runs in Wellington, New Zealand, through to October 9, and will be seen by 58,000 people live during its run. It employs over 350 cast and crew.
   This year, 133 entries by 163 designers (some worked in pairs) were received, competing for a prize pool of NZ$165,000.



WOW


Renascence, by Yuru Ma and Siyu Fang, Shanghai.


Mai (I), by Pritam Singh and Vishnu Ramesh, Gujarat.


Queen Angel, by Adam McAlavey, London.


Baroque Star, by Natasha English and Tatyanna Meharry, Christchurch, New Zealand.


Princess Niwareka, by Maria Tsopanaki and Dimitri Mavinis, London.


Come Fly with Me, by Julian Hartzog, Tarpon Springs, Fla.


Incognita, by Ian Bernhard, at AUT, Auckland.


Renewal, by Alexa Cach, Miodrag Guberinic and Corey Gomes.


Grandeer, by Bernise Milliken, Auckland.


Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder, Wellington.


Lippydeema, by Daisy May Collingridge, Woldingham, Surrey.


Khepri, by Miodrag Guberinic and Alexa Cach, New York.


The Renaissance Happens Again, by Yu Tan, Shanghai.


Cascade by Victoria Edgar, Geelong, Victoria.


Voyage to Revolution by Carolyn Gibson, Auckland.

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