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April 2, 2014

Emma Watson, about to graduate, ponders the next stage of her life

Lucire staff/10.05


Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

Above Emma Watson at the Berlin première of Noah last month.

Gracing the April issue of Elle Australia, Emma Watson gives readers the opportunity to realize that despite all her success, she just wants to be normal, and she doesn’t want to be criticized for calling an ‘eraser’ a ‘rubber’, a mistake, she tells Elle, she made during her first week at Brown University. In a few months, she will graduate with a degree in English, and she admits, she has no idea what the next chapter of her life is meant to look like, yet she’s optimistic about the whole ‘post-grad situation.’
   ’Look,’ she tells Elle’s Mickey Rapkin, ‘I just want to know exactly what the next 10 years of my life is going to look like, OK? And to have it organized on a colour-coordinated calendar. Is that really too much to ask for?’ And as most of her graduating class would ask the same question, it becomes clear that, although Watson has graced the film and fashion worlds, she is just like any other “almost graduate” deciding where the next chapter of her life is heading, or at least, trying to figure it out.
   But Watson admits she is jealous of other actresses, whose rise to fame have been less embarrassing to hers, citing her role as Hermione Granger as her greatest, yet not her most stylish, role.
   ‘There are these actresses who have emerged in the last year or two and they get to emerge as this complete human being,’ adding, ‘And I’m so jealous! Because everyone has seen me with my terrible haircuts and my awful teeth and all the terrible things I wore and said.’ But that’s the beauty of Watson, she’s so candid and honest about her own insecurities and afflictions that she seems unable to understand why people love her now as the style icon she is, but Watson worries that her best days are already behind her.
   ‘I’ve got so much left to do and prove,’ she tells Rapkin, adding that her absence from the screen wasn’t due to the lack of offers, but, rather the lack of a challenging character. ‘I was being offered roles that I didn’t feel were very complicated. Women that were one-dimensional. Roles that required me to be one thing, but real women never are.’
   Watson admits that she doesn’t want her real life to happen on screen, remembering a quote she once read by Elizabeth Taylor, ‘She had her first kiss in character on a movie set. It really struck me. I had this sense that if I wasn’t really careful, that could be me. That my first kiss could in somebody else’s clothes. And my experience could all belong to someone else.’ The desire to form her own identity is something that Watson emphasizes, she wants to create her own memories, and not just play the role. As the interview progresses, you get the sense that Watson is just trying to find out who she is, without all the Hollywood hype, the movies, the fashion labels; none of that seems too important to her. Emma Watson is on a course to find a “normal” life, but, as she tells Rapkin, finding answers can be tiresome, but finding a safe place is the ultimate goal.
   ‘If I’ve learned anything, it’s to stop trying to find the answers and certainties.’
   Her desire to feel safe and balanced we all share, even Watson admits her quest is a little mad, but she won’t give up on trying to build a “normal” life. ‘You might think I’m crazy,’ she says, ‘but I was like, “I need to find a way to always feel safe and at home within myself.” Because I can never rely on a physical place.’
   Whatever happens in her quest to build a “normal” life, we hope that Watson continues to dazzle us with her acting performances and that she finally discovers what all graduating students search for: the next chapter of her life.—Snjezana Bobič

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February 3, 2014

Horsing around with Sue Wong for New Year in LA

Elyse Glickman/4.31




Elyse Glickman

Sue Wong not only has it all, but can certainly share her good fortune with great gusto. She usually opens the Cedars, her 1920s-era Hollywood mansion, to serve as a backdrop for informal fashion shows. However, on this auspicious New Year’s Eve, her home (which itself had many lives, from the home of early film director Marcel Tourneur and wife Norma Talmadge, to a set for the movie Sunset Boulevard, to rock-and-roll haven for Jimi Hendrix, Dennis Hopper and other ’60s figures) was a stage for her to channel Coco Chanel and Auntie Mame (the 1958 version with Rosalind Russell), put out a fine banquet (because life is, after all, a banquet), serve cocktails and put on a show featuring traditional Chinese performances, pop music, opera and folk music.
   Sue Wong was the consummate master of ceremonies, and her guests were a colourful assortment of artists, actors, writers, socialites and musicians. It was a collection of people Mame Dennis herself would be proud of.
   While LA Fashion Week is a few weeks off, and we’re sure fashion and lifestyle empress Sue Wong has another great collection ahead of her for fall–winter 2014–15, a few hours in her stunning, jewel-toned home is one of the best representations of Old and New Hollywood coming together visually.
   Celebrities on hand included Jane Seymour, Miss Hong Kong 2014 Erin Tjoe, Carly Craig, K. D. Aubert, Kimberly Kates, legendary LA publicist Ed Lozzi, Joyce Giraud and Michael Ohoven.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor




Elyse Glickman

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January 20, 2014

Style this week: the Audrey Hepburn look—wherever you’re going, I’m going your way

Anna Deans/4.26

The concept for this week’s style profile began while I was shoe shopping at local Wellington-based store, Shoezies. This shop is full of exquisitely made, usually hand-crafted, European brand shoes. I came across these forest green, sling-back, pointy-toe, kitten heels and fell in love. I am celebrating the comeback of kitten heels as they are über-chic in every sense. The sophisticated quality of these delicate heels reminded me somehow, of classic style icon Audrey Hepburn. Audrey, coincidentally, also wore a lot of kitten heels over the years.

   Audrey’s style is timeless elegance. Simplistic, chic tailoring mixed with the exact right amount of originality. Here, I have shown some of my favourite looks of hers. Audrey was one of the initiators of the little black dress, and she really knew how to nail it with a structural cinched waist, ’60s square neckline and straight-down skirt. Her pairings were always simple. She usually matched her dress to kitten heels or flats with a classic up-do and fine jewels, usually earrings. Audrey also nailed dressed-down chic with Capri pants, sweaters, ballet flats, short-shorts and man-style shirts. Her make-up look is also to die for, consisting of super-strong brows (which I am rocking at the moment, only less extremely!), flawless skin, dusty pink lips and slight cat eyes. Gorgeous!

   Here’s the look I came up with inspired by Audrey’s timeless style and starting with my to-die-for kitty heels.

   When researching Audrey’s looks, one of my favourites was most definitely her cute-as-a-button short-shorts and shirt look. I also happen to think kitten heels look extra-good with a pair of tailored shorts. Phillip Lim 3.1 was the obvious choice to me for shorts, as in my mind, Phillip is the king of modern tailoring. I found these textured, white and tailored shorts by him and was sold. I also love the forest green-and-white combo.
   I wanted to bring in an element of pattern or texture to the look. This super-stunning Isabel Marant top I came across the other day immediately sprung to mind: the colours tie in well as it includes white and green, but in minimal amounts resulting in nothing too matchy. I also like the late ’50s–early ’60s Chanel vibe it projects, which is very Audrey, but in a modern way. Ladies will be also glad to know the inward-pointing arrows in the print will also effortlessly flatter your figure, projecting a more hourglass-like frame.
   I couldn’t resist adding the classic flap-front Chanel bag in a low-key taupe tone. It screams ’60s while still being relevant today. I would kill to have one of those babies: they literally look good with anything and everything.
   Audrey was known to wear little pearl drop earrings so I decided to incorporate a modern and more edgy version. This pair by Taranaki-based designer Jennifer Laracy combines a classic top half of pearl and silver, with a more edgy and out-there black stone and chain bottom half. I love the edged-up but still classy vibe. I feel Audrey may consider these if she were to be dressing in 2014.
   Nails-wise, I decided to just do it and go for the classic ’50s- and ’60s-style bright red. The red also brings out the other colours in the look as a contrasting tone as well as a more sexy vixen element. I like to think Audrey had a more wild side we don’t know about.
   As I love a good pair of one-off vintage sunnies, I decided not to include a specific pair. Why not go to your favourite local vintage shop and pick up an Audrey-inspired pair of your own to go with the look? Be sure to consider you face shape when picking your pair.
   How do you feel about my more sophisticated-than-usual look?—Anna Deans

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January 8, 2014

YSL, first of two bio-pics on Yves Saint Laurent, opens today amid controversy

Lucire staff/7.48



Thibault Grabherr and Anouchka de Williencourt/SND

Top Pierre Niney as Yves Saint Laurent and Guillaume Gallienne as Pierre Bergé in YSL. Above Pierre Niney as Yves Saint Laurent and Charlotte Le Bon as Victoire Doutreleau.

The first of two bio-pics on fashion design legend Yves Saint Laurent opens today in France.
   YSL, directed by Jalil Lespert, stars Pierre Niney, whose make-up is so convincing that Saint Laurent’s last surviving dog reportedly mistook him for his master. Saint Laurent’s former partner and business manager, Pierre Bergé, has also called Niney’s performance convincing.
   Women’s Wear Daily noted that Niney studied footage of Saint Laurent and took sewing and drawing classes to prepare for his role.
   Bergé has endorsed Lespert’s film, which covers the period between 1957 and 1976, and provided the producers with access to the Pierre Bergé–Yves Saint Laurent foundation archive.
   Even from the trailer, there is a sense of visual verisimilitude, and the film has already received acclaim from Paris Match and Elle.
   Bergé has said, ‘The film does not take sides, but tells the truth. All men have a dark and a light side. My life with Yves Saint Laurent was not a fairy tale, but I would not change anything.’
   However, critics of Lespert’s film claim that it glosses over Saint Laurent’s genius. Thomas Bidegain, scriptwriter for the rival bio-pic, told The Daily Telegraph that YSL was ‘simply recounted by Bergé, like Mozart recounted by Salieri.’
   One can see the origins of Bidegain’s claim. In a positive review in L’Express, Mathilde Laurelli notes that YSL recounts a ‘pygmalion du couturier,’ and that it could be more objective.
   However, she and other reviewers tended to praise the film for exploring Saint Laurent’s inner demons, and the clothes from the archive.
   The rival film, which also claims “official” status, has the blessing of François Pinault, the owner of the Yves Saint Laurent brand. Saint Laurent, to be released in May, is directed by Bertrand Bonello, and stars Gaspard Ulliel as the designer. Léa Seydoux plays Loulou de la Falaise and Jérémie Renier portrays Bergé.
   Yves Saint Laurent started at Dior in the mid-1950s and succeeded the designer on his death in 1957. He was drafted in 1960 to fight in the Algerian War of Independence. On his return, Bergé, an art dealer who had met Saint Laurent while he was in a military hospital, tried to have Saint Laurent reinstated at Dior, but the house refused. They successfully sued for breach of contract. They went on to start the Yves Saint Laurent label along with some of the Dior staff. Saint Laurent was appointed Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur in 1985. The following year, the company took control of its fragrance business and floated on the stock exchange. In December 2007, President Nicolas Sarkozy appointed Saint Laurent Officier of the Légion d’honneur. Saint Laurent died in 2008.


Thibault Grabherr and Anouchka de Williencourt/SND

Top Charlotte Le Bon plays Victoire, Dior’s muse, later at Saint Laurent. Above Yves Saint Laurent and Victoire Doutreleau in 1962.







Thibault Grabherr and Anouchka de Williencourt/SND

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January 7, 2014

Chinese film pioneer, Sir Run Run Shaw, passes away at age 107

Lucire staff/9.18




Top Sir Run Run Shaw. Centre On the set of one of the films he produced, Meteor, with Natalie Wood, director Ronald Neame, and Sean Connery. Above Harrison Ford in Blade Runner.

Sir Run Run Shaw, the Hong Kong movie mogul and founder of television network TVB, passed away today at age 107.
   He was born near Shanghai in 1907. One of his brothers, Runje, went to Singapore in the 1920s to market films to the Chinese community in southeast Asia, and eventually opened 139 cinemas in the region. Two older brothers set up Tianyi Film Productions (or the Unique Film Production Co.) in Shanghai, which produced silent pictures and the first Chinese talkie. A Cantonese film was produced in 1932, leading to Unique setting up a branch in Hong Kong in 1934, to where the entire company eventually shifted. It was renamed South Seas Productions, then Shaw Studios.
   Run Run and his brother, Runme, were also credited with pioneering the film industry in Malaya and Singapore.
   Postwar, the brothers shifted the focus to film production and the business was renamed Shaw Brothers. In 1961, they opened Movie Town, a studio in Clearwater Bay, Hong Kong, which comprised 10 soundstages. The company produced 40 movies, mostly B-grade actioners including kung fu films, each year. This built Shaw Brothers’ library of some 1,000 films, which was sold in 2000 to Celestial Pictures.
   In 1967, he started Television Broadcasts Ltd., one of the premier television network broadcasters in the British Crown Colony. It held on to its position after the 1997 handover of Hong Kong to the People’s Republic of China. It would remain his primary interest, having shut down movie production in 1983, till he retired as chairman at age 104.
   With his philanthropy, he was knighted by HM Queen Elizabeth II in 1977, after receiving a CBE three years before. After the handover, he was awarded the Grand Bauhinia Medal in 1998.
   He also produced Meteor, which starred Sean Connery and Natalie Wood, and Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner.
   Shaw Brothers helped launch the careers of directors such as John Woo, while TVB brought Chow Yun Fat, Andy Lau, Stephen Chow and Wong Kar Wai to prominence in Hong Kong.
   They had originally contracted Bruce Lee, but were unwilling to accede to the star’s salary demands. Lee went on to sign with a rival, Raymond Chow, who himself had started at Shaws. Jackie Chan was also signed by Chow’s company.
   Tan Sri Dr Runme Shaw passed away in 1985 in Singapore, aged 84.
   He created the Shaw Prizes in 2002, which gave away US$1 million to individuals who had made significant breakthroughs in astronomy, life science and medicine, and mathematics.
   Sir Run Run Shaw passed away peacefully with family by his side, and is survived by his wife, Mona Fong Yat-Wah, his three sons and two daughters.

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Grand Prix photography exhibition opens at Getty Images Gallery on February 6

Lucire staff/2.29




Rainer W. Schlegelmilch

Top Michael Schumacher comes to the Mercedes-Benz pits at the Shanghai Grand Prix, April 17, 2011. Centre John Surtees and others do the opening sprint at Le Mans, July 21, 1964. Above Nina Rindt waiting for her husband Jochen to pass by. He had a fatal accident at Parabolica just moments after this picture was taken, on September 6, 1970.

An exhibition at the Getty Images Gallery, Freeze the Speed, showcases the work of Rainer W. Schlegelmilch, the famed Formula 1 photographer.
   Schlegelmilch began his career as a Formula 1 photographer in 1962. The 50 years’ worth of images form an enviable archive of 350,000 photographs, some of which appears at the Gallery between February 6 and March 1.
   The work includes his first race at the Nürburgring in 1962, taking portraits for his final exam at the Bayerische Staatslehranstalt für Photographie, before he set up his studio 18 months later. From 1970 he began shooting only in colour. He has attended more than 500 Grands Prix, including taking candid pit and trackside shots.
   Schlegelmilch tends to rely on natural lighting rather than digital enhancement. His work has been published in, among others, Auto Revue, Auto Motor und Sport, Powerslide, ADAC, Sports Car Graphic, Car & Driver, Road & Track and Car Review. Philip Morris, Mobil, Shell, Champion, Mercedes, BMW, Tag Heuer, DHL, and Red Bull are among the clients who have featured his work.
   Louise Garczewska, Director of Getty Images Gallery, says, ‘In the run up to the 2014 F1 season, we are delighted to represent this iconic collection and bring it to a wider audience through this latest touring exhibition.’
   The Getty Images Gallery is close to Oxford Circus, London, and is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday, and 12 to 5.30 p.m. Saturday.




Rainer W. Schlegelmilch

Above, from top Swiss racing driver Jo Siffert waits with bandaged road shoes at Monza, September 8, 1968. A portrait from Monte Carlo, 1963. A recent Monaco Grand Prix.

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December 28, 2013

Ready for ’14: a new look for Lucire’s home page

Jack Yan/11.04



Above Out with the old, in with the new—with J-Law doing the honours as the first cover girl of the new look. (It was Kylie Minogue a year ago.)

Our home page has had a nip–tuck today. Well, it’s closer to a full redesign.
   During 2013, there seems to have been a trend toward longer and longer web pages, probably thanks to mobile devices and tablets, and our ease of “swiping”.
   This has changed the way we consume web publications, although the new design breaks a few rules that were de rigueur when we started in 1997.
   If you head there today, you’ll see a more impressive, “bled” home page image (Jennifer Lawrence is the ideal person to kick this off—especially if you read my ‘Newsmakers of 2013’ story) but the menu bar isn’t where you expect it to be.
   We still haven’t quite got there in terms of making the page perfect for lower resolutions—some images still don’t resize properly—but we will make these corrections through 2014.
   One of our advertisers, Vidal Sassoon, was arguably the inspiration behind the new look. While we can’t be quite as fancy—a magazine must still present easily digestible facts first, and dazzle with new products second—we began rethinking how Lucire should look. We also felt, that with how quickly blogs had caught up with magazine-style layouts, we had to differentiate ourselves again.
   It’s interesting to note that the last redesign for Lucire’s home page took place around this time last year—and at the time, we all thought the new look would last us for a couple of years (as most have). It’s the shortest stint of any home-page look Lucire has had in its 16-year history.
   Internally, we feel the new look is closer to that of the print editions of Lucire, which only makes sense. Each should reinforce the other.
   We’ll phase in the new look, as we want to wait to get your feedback.
   I mentioned my ‘Newsmakers’ story earlier. Click through here and see if you agree with our team’s top six for 2013. We didn’t include Miley.
   Have a wonderful 2014, and please let us know your thoughts on the redesign in the comments or via our social media presences (we’ve had a few positive ones on our Facebook group and our Facebook page).—Jack Yan, Publisher

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December 27, 2013

Polaroid projection: originality in the digital age

Anna Deans/0.49

In a modern context, we look to social media to promote us and to expand our visibility in the world. Images are posted and reposted, only to be reposted again. Even this blog is an attempt to promote what I want the world to see of myself, to reach more people than I see in the reality of my day-to-day life.
   I like to believe I belong outside the technological generation we live in. My mind constantly ponders the idea of living in the ’60s or ’70s. A better generation, perhaps? I like the less commercial, less complex nature of this time. Every photograph had vastly more value than in the throwaway mentality of today. This may, however, seem crazy to those who grew up at this time, as the ’60s was no question the dawn of what we would recognize as modern commercialism. They believed factories and the extreme speed of the making of new products, including the production of photography, was exciting and beneficial. And perhaps it is … or not.
   Twenty thirteen represents a time of contradictions: it continues to promote fast consumption while emphasizing the need to slow things down. This concept makes me wonder about my obsessive need for things to be both one-off, special and not designed to be used and thrown out. My 1970s Polaroid is a prime example. What do I love about it? Its tactile nature. Its reality: the touchable nature of the images, they are an object that is not purely a series of pixels inside my Mac. Maybe what I love most, though, is the inability to fake it. The images can’t be staged: they are taken once, printed out and that’s it. No Photoshop. No filter. Nothing. They are what they are and due to cost of film, it seems crazy to throw any out. Whereas on my Iphone millions of images are taken, deleted, altered, posted, etc. It’s no longer the exciting act of capturing a moment; it has become something quite different. Once posted, they become freely accessible to anybody and have the ability to be endlessly copied to the point of no longer being original. I contradict my hate of this, however, by photographing the Polaroid photos themselves, and posting. Otherwise, how would anybody see their beauty? Therefore, the same fate can fall to my photos of photos. Maybe having the only original for myself in a physical state makes me have less hate for this copying.
   The mindset I have about everyone needing to see the photos is very 21st-century, however. The ’60s saw no need for everyone you know to see your images, purely those who took the time to look through your photo albums, those close to you, not the public or, frankly, anyone in the world who wants to look.
   I find myself loving and hating the digital age. I hate the lack of original thought of how it is now, though the transmission of imagery. But I love its ability to share imagery with more people. I love that my friend Kat in the US can see what I’m doing, but I hate that she will never know if I chucked a filter on to make it look more sunny or me more tanned. In the same sense, I love my Polaroid because it is void of the perils of the Photoshop age where everyone is altered to be perfect or the same. Once again who wants to be the same: that’s not beautiful is it?
   This hatred of un-originality is repeated in all aspects of my life. My hate for chain stores: all looking like clones of one another. Copying another style, that really grills me. I open a trashy OK magazine only to find I can buy the exact outfit Kim Kardashian is wearing today. So if I shop where she shops and wear what she’s wearing I will be better or look better? Is that the point? I’m struggling to get it. This obviously is also enabled by the transmitting of imagery.
   Don’t get me wrong, I have women I admire in terms of style, but that doesn’t make me want to be them or look identical to them. Strangely enough, I want to be myself. I want to look like nobody else. My face already does that as does my voice, my personality and my life experiences so I want my fashion to be also. I like to think the way I put things together is a direct representation of me and me alone. More than anything I hate the lack of ownership over images, as well as personal style. I believe the celebrating of originality is strongly lacking in our modern context. Perhaps what I love most about my Polaroid in that case, is the one-off nature of every single image. This is how I want my style to be also: one-off, like me.—Anna Deans

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