Lucire


  latest news   fashion   beauty   living   volante   in print   tablet   tv
  home   community   shopping   advertise   contact

GHD celebrates 16th anniversary with limited-edition purple straightener


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 6, 2017/23.54



Is it really 16 years since GHD (Good Hair Day, and officially styled all in lowercase) launched its first styler?
   From Yorkshire to the world, GHD is one of the 21st century’s great hair industry successes. To commemorate its anniversary, it is launching a limited-edition version of the original GHD styler. This time, it’s in purple.
   The styler works for all hair types and lengths, and the straightening remains as easy as ever. It has ceramic heaters, a sleep mode (it switches off after 30 minutes of inactivity), a round barrel, and a 2·8 m swivel cord. It works with any voltage around the world.
   Founded by hairstylist and salon owner Robert Powls and investors Martin Penny and Gary Douglas, GHD’s reputation spread without any above-the-line advertising initially. The original styler was invented by Kim Tae-Cheol, who had sent Powls a sample of his design. Powls approached Penny and Douglas and suggested they purchase the production and distribution rights. They each put in £15,000—by the second year they profited £4 million on sales of £12 million. By the third year sales were £37 million. Today, four GHD stylers are sold every minute.
   The term GHD has entered the vernacular, and earned itself fans such as Victoria Beckham, Jessica Alba, Ella Eyre, girl group Little Mix, and Millie Mackintosh.

Filed under: beauty, hair, history, London, Lucire

London’s City Concours to show and sell rare, significant cars—Aston Martin, Ferrari, Bugatti represented


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 1, 2017/20.06


Tim Scott

The City Concours in London, taking place June 8–9, will host a selection of classic and iconic cars, some of which are for sale. An Aston Martin DB5 that had been used by Ogle Design to preview the DB6 interior from JD Classics, a DB2/4 Mk II FHC with a 3·7-litre engine and four-speed gearbox from Nicholas Mee, a Ferrari 458 Speciale with the optional Blu Nart Racing Stripe and titanium exhaust system from Romans International, and a 599 GTO from Fiskens are among those which visitors can walk away with. Organizers say there will be over 100 rare cars at the event, held at the Honourable Artillery Company grounds, near to the Liverpool Street and Moorgate stations. Tickets and hospitality are available at www.cityconcours.co.uk.
   JD Classics will also show a Ferrari 599 SA Aperta and a Mercedes 300SL; Romans will show a Ferrari 458 Speciale A and ‘two other ultra-rare modern Ferraris,’ according to organizers; and Fiskens will display an Aston Martin DB6 Volante and a Bentley 4·5-litre “short chassis”. Atalanta Motors, Clayton Classics, H. R. Owen, Stratstone of Mayfair and Will Stone Historic Cars will also participate. There will also be a Maserati Tipo 200SI, Jaguar D-type, Bugatti Veyron and McLaren P1.

Sir Roger Moore, UNICEF ambassador and longest-serving James Bond actor, passes away


NEWS  by Jack Yan/May 23, 2017/14.42


UNICEF


© Danjaq LLC/United Artists

Top: Sir Roger Moore was a UNICEF goodwill ambassador from 1991 to 2017. Above: Moore on the set of Live and Let Die, his first James Bond film, in 1972.

Actor and UNICEF ambassador Sir Roger Moore has passed away in Switzerland, aged 89.
   His children by his third wife Luisa, Deborah, Geoffrey and Christian, issued a statement today, saying that their father had had a short battle with cancer.
   â€˜The love with which he was surrounded in his final days was so great it cannot be quantified in words alone,’ they said.
   Roger George Moore was born October 14, 1927, in Stockwell, the son of George Alfred Moore, a policeman, and Lillian Moore (née Pope). An only child, Moore had a talent for art, one that he maintained through his life, and began in the film business as a trainee animator, joining the Association of Cinema Technicians’ union as a teenager. Through friends, he began doing work as an extra, and through that he was encouraged to join RADA. His father, an amateur actor, was supportive of this, and his fees were paid for by film director Brian Desmond Hurst.
   He married a fellow RADA student, Doorn van Steyn, in 1946. After World War II, he was conscripted for national service, and was commissioned into the Royal Army Service Corps. After three years in the army, Moore found himself unemployed, with Hurst soon hiring him for a tiny role in Trottie True. Television and stage work followed, as well as modelling for knitwear. His marriage to van Steyn soon fell apart. In 1952, Moore began a relationship with Dorothy Squires, the Welsh singer, who was 13 years his senior, causing a scandal at the time. They were married in Jersey City in July 1953. Moore eventually picked up a contract with MGM, beginning there on April Fool’s Day, 1954. Moore’s early films, where his highest billing was third, were unsuccessful, and after Diane, a 1956 film starring Lana Turner, flopped, he was fired, with five years remaining on his original seven-year contract.
   In 1956, the TV series Ivanhoe came Moore’s way, where he played the title role of Sir Wilfred of Ivanhoe. As the series ended, Warner Bros. called Moore, and he returned to Hollywood movies, first with The Miracle (1959), but also found himself on TV series, first with The Alaskans and then, Maverick, where he took over from James Garner. In 1961, while filming The Rape of the Sabine Women in Italy, Moore left Squires for the actress Luisa Mattioli.
   However, it was The Saint, back in the UK, that made Moore a household name. Moore had tried to acquire the television rights for the Leslie Charteris books himself, but was unsuccessful. Producers Bob Baker and Monty Berman had managed to secure them, and offered the lead role of Simon Templar to Moore. The series ran for 118 episodes, and Moore was said to have been the first British television millionaire. Thanks to his membership of the Association of Cinema Technicians, he directed some episodes of The Saint as well. When Baker and Berman went their separate ways during production, Moore became Baker’s junior partner. Toward the end of 1968, Squires agreed to grant Moore a divorce and he and Mattioli were married.
   After The Saint, Moore starred in Crossplot, a spy caper that felt much like a longer episode of The Saint, made by many of the same crew. He also starred in The Man Who Haunted Himself, which critics usually say showed Moore’s true range as an actor. Moore himself tended to be self-deprecating about his acting abilities, which potentially limited the types of roles he was offered.
   Perhaps similar to his Simon Templar character was Lord Brett Sinclair in The Persuaders, a role that Moore played for one season in 1970–1, alongside Tony Curtis. The concept had been trialled in an episode of The Saint, called ‘The Ex-King of Diamonds’, with Stuart Damon as Templar’s sidekick. Grade had sold the series before Moore had agreed to do it, and convinced him to do it by saying, ‘The country needs the money. Think of your Queen.’
   The Persuaders, at the time the most expensive show on television (with much of the money going to the leads’ salaries) was successful in most markets but the crucial US one. It was during this time that Moore was shoulder-tapped to succeed Sean Connery as James Bond, and plans for a second season of The Persuaders, and talk of Noël Harrison taking over for Moore, came to nought.
   It is possible that an obituary for Moore would be far less significant if he had not risen to take on one of the most hallowed cinematic roles in British cinema, that of Ian Fleming’s James Bond, for Live and Let Die in 1973. Moore played the secret agent seven times for Eon Productions, and even spoofed his role in The Cannonball Run in 1981, a record number of times. Moore kept working in film outside of Bond, including Peter Hunt’s Gold in 1974, Shout at the Devil opposite Lee Marvin in 1976, The Wild Geese in 1978 with Richard Burton and Richard Harris, and as the cat-loving Rufus Excalibur ffolkes in North Sea Hijack (a.k.a. ffolkes) in 1979. Moore also played a post-plastic surgery Chief Insp Clouseau in Curse of the Pink Panther in 1983. In another dramatic role, one often overlooked, Moore played Dr Judd Stevens in Bryan Forbes’s thriller The Naked Face in 1984.
   Post-Bond, Moore made fewer films. Willy Bogner’s Feuer, Eis & Dynamit in 1990 featured Moore and his son, Geoffrey; Michael Winner’s romp Bullseye, with Michael Caine, followed the same year, and featured Moore’s daughter, Deborah. Younger audiences would know Moore from Spice World in 1999.
   Audrey Hepburn invited Moore to a UNICEF event in 1991. Hepburn had been a goodwill ambassador for the organization, and Moore eventually joined, paid the sum of $1 a year. It was for his work for UNICEF that Moore was knighted in 1999.
   Moore had been diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1993. After taking stock, he and Mattioli separated in 1993, and Moore set up home with Swedish-born socialite Kristina Tholstrup in Monaco soon after. Mattioli granted Moore a divorce in 2000, and he and Tholstrup married in 2002. Tholstrup had accompanied Moore on most of his UNICEF tours.
   As Sir Roger Moore, he had authored numerous books, including My Word Is My Bond, his autobiography, and his last appearance was on stage at the Royal Festival Hall in November 2016.
   A private funeral will be held in Monaco.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Lamborghini Museum at Sant’Agata Bolognese to host Ayrton Senna exhibition from April 12


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 2, 2017/12.43

The Lamborghini Museum at Sant’Agata Bolognese will host an exhibition honouring the late Formula 1 champion, Ayrton Senna, beginning April 12 and running to October 9, 2017.
   Ayrton Senna: the Man and the Legend commemorates Senna’s test drive at Estoril in 1993, in a McLaren MP4/8 with a Lamborghini V12 engine.
   The museum will display every type of single-seat race car driven by Senna, including a white McLaren identical to the one tested at Estoril, his first kart, two Formula Fords, the Ralt F3, a Toleman, a black Lotus JPS that he drove in his first victory, the McLaren that helped him to his wins, and his final Williams.
   There will also be a photography exhibition, entitled Ayrton Senna: the Last Night, curated by Ercole Colombo and Giorgio Terruzzi. The photos show Senna’s career, from his start in kart racing, his Formula 1 début, his key victories and defeats, his friends and rivals, his relationship with Alain Prost, his personal life and faith, to his final hours on the track.
   While Senna liked the racing car, he never got to finish the season with the engine, when negotiations fell through.
   Lamborghini chairman and CEO Stefano Domenicali will host the media presentation on April 12, along with Colombo and Terruzzi, and Mauro Forghieri and Daniele Audetto, who were present at the 1993 test drive.
   Senna died on May 1, 1994, aged 34, during the San Marino Grand Prix, when the steering column in his car failed.
   Lamborghini will also display two current models, the Aventador S and Huracán Performante. The exhibition also marks the beginning of a partnership between the museum and Pirelli.
   The museum is open daily, including Sundays, from 9.30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Porsche launches video-based 9:11 Magazine, showcasing current range and history


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 29, 2017/11.59

Porsche has launched a new website, 9:11 Magazine, hosted at a subdomain on its main website, 911-magazine.porsche.com.
   Unlike most web magazines, it’s predominantly video-based, with each edition focusing on a theme that ties back into the Porsche brand. In addition, the material can be freely taken for journalistic purposes.
   The website complements Porsche’s customer magazine, Christophorous.
   The first edition, themed ‘Courage’, leads with a story starring the legendary two-time world champion rally driver Walter Röhrl. A lighter story on the most daring colours of the 911 through the years follows. Front-engined Porsches, such as the 924 and 928, feature in a third story, along with the 944 and 968 that evolved from the former. Finally, there’s a story on the Panamera 4E in the Scottish Highlands. Behind-the-scenes stories are also included, along with stills from the Panamera tour.
   Five issues will be published per annum, in German and English. The theme of the second issue is ‘Pure’, dedicated to the 911.

Converse celebrates 100 years of the Chuck Taylor All Star with a series of films


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 16, 2017/11.23





Above, from top: The Converse Chuck Taylor All Star. The All Star ’70, evoking the decade of big lapels and platform shoes. The Chuck Taylor All Star II. In black, the lightweight Chuck Taylor All Star Modern.

Converse, which began in 1908, has been making the All Star shoe, later the Chuck Taylor shoe, continuously since 1917.
   It’s the most successful type of shoe in history, with 200,000 pairs sold daily. Its nickname came after Charles H. Taylor, a basketball player for the Akron Firestones, who became one of the shoe’s biggest supporters. By 1932, with input from Taylor, it officially gained his name.
   Converse has been adding variations to the Chuck Taylor shoe over the years, including the Chuck Taylor All Star II in 2015, a premium design with more colours and a liner borrowed from parent company Nike, which bought up Converse at the turn of the century.
   There’s also the Chuck Taylor All Star ’70s model that débuts more colours for spring–summer 2017, a design that harks back to the 1970s but with more cushioning and thicker rubber. Then there’s the Chuck Taylor All Star Modern that’s lightweight, again available in an all-new version this month.
   To celebrate the centenary of the All Star, Converse has launched a digital and social media series that looks at what made the line iconic.
   Millie Bobby Brown presents a video called Chucks in Film, with excerpts showing a previous Chuck Taylor All Star appearance (Michael J. Fox’s shoes in Back to the Future) and an interview with costume designer Stephanie Collie. Long Beach artist Vince Staples, Born × Raised creator Spanto and basketball player Jordan Clarkson discuss how Los Angeles culture impacted on the Chuck Taylor All Stars’ æsthetic. Finally, model Winnie Harlow looks at the Chuck Taylor All Stars’ connection to the fashionable set and youth culture. A final film, Forever Chuck, is a nonconformist commercial that celebrates youth and the Converse brand.
   The four videos are featured below as Converse marks 100 years of its All Stars.

Opinions: what we need from media beyond ‘fake news’; looking to the stars


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 15, 2017/21.47

We need independent media


Paul Clarke/CC BY-SA 4.0, commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37435469

Above: Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web.

Earlier this month, Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote an open letter expressing his concerns about the evolution of his invention, the World Wide Web. (Interestingly, he writes the term all in lowercase.)
   It wasn’t just about ‘fake news’, which is how the media have reported it. His first concern was, in fact, about our losing control over our personal data, and determining when and with whom we share them. It’s something I’ve touched on regularly since 2011, when Google breached its own stated policies over user-preference collection for advertising purposes, something that Facebook appears to be following suit with mid-decade. This was long before Edward Snowden blew the lid on his government’s monitoring, something that’s happening to citizens of other occidental nations, too.
   Sir Tim writes, ‘Through collaboration with—or coercion of—companies, governments are also increasingly watching our every move online, and passing extreme laws that trample on our rights to privacy. In repressive regimes, it’s easy to see the harm that can be caused—bloggers can be arrested or killed, and political opponents can be monitored. But even in countries where we believe governments have citizens’ best interests at heart, watching everyone, all the time is simply going too far. It creates a chilling effect on free speech and stops the web from being used as a space to explore important topics, like sensitive health issues, sexuality or religion.’
   But the one that struck me as very pertinent to publishing is Sir Tim’s second point. It’s the one that most news outlets seized on, linking it back to ‘fake news’, a term now corrupted by the executive branch of the US Government when attacking coverage that it doesn’t like. However, Sir Tim’s points were far broader than that. And it’s evident how his first point links to his second.
   It’s not hard to see that there is biased coverage on both the right and right wings of US politics (interestingly, they call it left and right), although Sir Tim points to how ‘a handful of social media sites or search engines’ show us the things that appeal to our own biases through their algorithms. ‘Fake news’ then spreads through these algorithms because they play to our prejudices. He writes, ‘those with bad intentions can game the system to spread misinformation for financial or political gain.’ These sites are able to determine what we see based on the data we’ve given them, willingly or unwillingly.
   It’s so far from the ideals of the World Wide Web that it’s sad that the medium, which was once so expansive and inspirational as we surfed from one site to the next to read and absorb information, has come to this: a tool for becoming more insular, the first path to the idiocracy.
   Google, as I wrote last year, biases itself toward larger sites, no longer rewarding the media outlet that breaks a news item. The incentive to be that maverick medium is, therefore, lessened greatly online, because the web isn’t being ranked on merit by the largest player in the search-engine business. It’s why Duck Duck Go, which doesn’t collect user data, gives search results that are generally fairer. We think it’s important to learn alternative viewpoints, especially in politics, otherwise the division that we already see in some countries will only deepen—and at worst this can lead to war. In peacetime countries, a compatriot with opposing political thoughts is not our enemy.
   Facebook’s continued data collection of user preferences is also dangerous. Even after users opt out, Facebook’s ad preferences’ page demonstrates that it will keep collecting. Whether or not Facebook then uses these preferences is unknown—certainly Facebook itself clams up—but since the site reports journalists who alert them to kiddie porn, kicks off drag queens after saying they wouldn’t, and forces people to download software in the guise of malware detection, who knows if any of Facebook’s positions are real or merely ‘fake news’? Knowing the misdeeds of sites like Facebook—and Google which itself has been found guilty of hacking—do they actually deserve our ongoing support?
   Of course I have an interest in getting people to look beyond the same-again players, because I run one media outlet that isn’t among them. But we have an interest to seek information from the independents, and to support a fair and neutral internet. We may learn an angle we hadn’t explored before, or we may find news and features others aren’t covering. Better yet, we may learn alternative viewpoints that break us out of our prejudices. Surely we can’t be that scared of learning about alternatives (maybe one that is better than what we believe), or having a reasoned debate based on fact rather than emotion or hatred? And if you are sharing on social media, do you want to be one of the sheep who uses the same click-bait as everyone else, or show that you’re someone who’s capable of independent thought?
   It shouldn’t be that difficult to distinguish fake-news sites from legitimate media (even though the line gets blurred) by looking at how well something is subedited and how many spelling mistakes there are. Perhaps the headlines are less emotive. There is a tier of independent media that deserves your support, whether it is this site or many competing ones that we’ve linked ourselves. Going beyond the same-again sources can only benefit us all.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Stars in their eyes


Chanel

Above: Chanel continues its long-running Comète collection.

Coco Chanel is known for embracing astrology. Her inspiration is reflected in many of her jewellery creations and designs years later. The star motif is highlighted within the Comète collection and while the lion, representative of the brand, is reminiscent of the city of Venezia and symbolic of her astrological sign. The designer’s influential vision comes to life within many of the intricately detailed pieces.
   To this day, astrology serves as a tool that could provide one with knowledge and even supposed explanatory perceptions. Fashion-focused entities and individuals have contemplated to what extent one’s rising sign or ascendant, representing the door to one’s identity, is correlated to one’s wardrobe and personal style. Some inquisitive individuals ponder about personalities, style and even probable futuristic outcomes in the financial field. The AstroTwins, Tali and Ophira Edut, who have been featured in a number of outlets, have given advice to a slew of celebrities. While they focus mainly on various predictions according to the stars, some have used astrology to tap in to the financial market. The Merriman Market Analyst is one of the many prominent sites that discuss and explain transformations and changes in planets that could serve in financial as well as everyday astrology. Other than the website, they have published books for international audiences, divulging and examining the planets and geocosmic aspects. According to the website’s disclaimer, ‘The hope is … it will help the reader understand the psychological dynamics that underlie (or coincide with) the news events …’ For decades, the founder continues to ponder on certain circumstances, whether on a weekly or yearly basis, leading a team of apprentices that follow in his footsteps.—Lola Cristall, Paris Editor

In brief: Belstaff shows autumn–winter 2017–18; Chanel previews spring ’17 advertising


NEWS  by Lucire staff/January 10, 2017/19.25




Belstaff

Belstaff has shown its autumn–winter 2017–18 collection in London, for both men and women. The Jolly Roger collection, inspired by World War II Royal Navy uniforms, even has vintage wax treatments on some designs to give them a worn look. Belstaff notes that the pea and duffle coats have been re-created, while the parka is based on a Belstaff design created for the British military in 1960. Creative Director Delphine Ninous said, ‘The formal naval-inspired pieces are contrasted with a more rugged and free-spirited look appropriate to downtime on the docks. This sense of temporary escapism is reflected in edgier elements such as naval tattoo designs and the Jolly Roger flag, giving a sense of rebellion and individuality.’ Tones are red, brown, blue and military green; base colours are charcoal grey, black and navy, with highlights in spruce teal, sanderling, cardinal red and burnished gold.



Belstaff

   Meanwhile, Chanel has previewed its advertising campaign for its spring–summer 2017 prêt-à-porter collection. The campaign itself has been overseen by Karl Lagerfeld, with contrast at its core. A pop Lolita metamorphoses into a cyberpunk; a tweed jacket has an electronic circuit board as a motif; an off-white silk and lace coat covers a black babydoll. There’s a startling modernity to the images, tying in to the Data Center Chanel catwalk show in Paris last October, which saw high-tech meet the 1990s.









Chanel

Next Page »

 

Get more from Lucire

Our latest issue

Lucire 37
Check out our lavish print issue of Lucire in hard copy or for Ipad or Android.
Or download the latest issue of Lucire as a PDF from Scopalto

Lucire on Twitter

Lucire on Instagram