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Chanel retrospective opens at Paris’s Palais Galliera: Vanessa Paradis, Marion Cotillard, Angèle attend

Filed by Lucire staff/October 2, 2020/0.03



Chanel celebrated the opening of the retrospective exhibition Gabrielle Chanel: Manifeste de Mode (Fashion Manifesto), held at the newly renovated Palais Galliera, the City of Paris Fashion Museum, with its ambassadors Vanessa Paradis, Anna Mouglalis, Angèle, Caroline de Maigret, Charlotte Cardin, Gaspard Ulliel and Sébastien Tellier. Other celebrities included Irène Jacob, Camille Razat, Karidja Touré, Lyna Khoudri, Diane Rouxel, Alexa Kapranos, Anne Berest, Clara Luciani, and Bianca Li.
   The exhibition comprises over 350 pieces dating from 1910 to 1971, with pieces owned by the Galliera itself, the Patromoine de Chanel, international museums and private collections. Some of Chanel’s most significant designs are present, as well as an original 1921 No. 5 bottle.
   It has been organized with the support of Chanel.
   The exhibition runs till March 14, 2021.






















Exhibition











Olivier Saillant

 


Bollinger releases No Time to Die limited-edition gift box, featuring James Bond and DB5

Filed by Lucire staff/October 1, 2020/0.00

After coming to a stop earlier this year because of COVID-19, the publicity machine for the 25th Eon Productions James Bond picture, No Time to Die, is cranking up again as the movie nears its postponed November 2020 release date.
   Following Land Rover, which ran promotions earlier this year for its Defender model featuring in the film, Bollinger is next with a limited-edition gift box that features imagery of Ian Fleming’s super-spy and the Aston Martin DB5, housing the house’s Special Cuvée. The box is in silver birch, echoing the DB5 first seen in Goldfinger; replicas were made by Aston Martin to appear in No Time to Die. The bottle itself has a black-and-gold collar with the 007 logo.
   Champagne Bollinger worked with photographer Greg Williams for the imagery.
   Bollinger can trace its connection to the world of the cinematic James Bond with the 1979 Roger Moore starrer, Moonraker.
   RRP for the limited-edition champagne is £55. No Time to Die, starring Daniel Craig as James Bond and directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, is released through MGM and Universal Pictures in the UK on November 12.

 


At Venezia: Adèle Exarchopoulos, Romola Garai and Miss Marx, Mare fuori, and Mandibules premières

Filed by Lucire staff/September 5, 2020/23.52




Iosip Mihail

Day four at the 77ª Mostra internazionale d’arte cinematografica di Venezia, the Venice Film Festival, saw the Corradi Cinema Lounge at the Ausonia Hungaria host director Susanna Nicchiarelli and actress Romola Garai, there for the première of their film, Miss Marx, a biopic about Eleanor, Karl Marx’s daughter, who addressed issues of feminism and socialism.
   The Duke’s Roger Michell and Academy Award winner Jim Broadbent returned for a second day. Massimiliano Caiazzo also popped into the lounge to promote his upcoming RAI TV series Mare fuori, as did Non odiare’s Luka Žunić, director Mauro Mancini and producer Mario Mazzarotto.
   Sky’s 100 × 100 Cinema interviewed film critic Francesco Castelnuovo at the Lounge.
   On the red carpet for Miss Marx were Nicchiarelli and Garai, as well as Patrick Kennedy, Philip Gröning, and Felicity Montagu. Mandibules also had its première on day four, with Greco-French actress Adèle Exarchopoulos and her fellow cast members.




















Iosip Mihail

 


Putting the brakes on fast fashion

Filed by Jack Yan/August 15, 2020/9.10

Lucire is UN Environment’s first fashion industry partner.

Abigail Beall’s statistics in a recent BBC report about clothing recycling make sobering reading. She writes, ‘Around 85% of all textiles thrown away in the US—roughly 13 million tonnes in 2017—are either dumped into landfill or burned. The average American has been estimated to throw away around 37kg of clothes every year. And globally, an estimated 92 million tonnes of textiles waste is created each year and the equivalent to a rubbish truck full of clothes ends up on landfill sites every second.’ Her other statistics show that only 12 per cent of the material for clothing gets recycled, and that the fashion industry is responsible for 10 per cent of all greenhouse gas emissions and 20 per cent of global waste water.
   Meanwhile, on the consumer end, our need for gratification (at least in the UK) has seen us buy 60 per cent more clothing than we did 15 years ago, and no one wants to wait six months after seeing something on the catwalk.
   Beall says that recycling is difficult because while there may be one dominant material, such as cotton, threads and labels are made from other materials. Jeans are usually made of cotton yarn blended with elastane. This makes them all difficult to recycle, and sorting textiles into different fibres is still usually done manually. Techniques to chemically separate blends without losing either natural or synthetic fibres are not yet scalable.
   And what’s donated to charity shops is now of poor quality, with most reaching Oxfam’s Wastesaver plant unsellable, and six tonnes a week are torn up to be used as cloths or stuffing.
   Many fashion labels are recognizing these difficulties, especially as consumers realize the harm the industry is causing the environment. Some have been choosing recycled materials, including ocean plastics that have been turned into new materials in clothes and shoes—over the years Lucire has devoted plenty of space to these. Others are inventing new, sustainable materials.
   There is some hope that the lockdowns that various countries have had to endure during the COVID-19 crisis might wake populations up to the preciousness of the environment. Many enjoyed watching nature return, something covered in an earlier issue of Lucire KSA. And, with many now opting to work from home—and companies adjusting to the new reality of allowing staff to work remotely—the need to dress up for the office has diminished. Casual clothes are very much the norm in many societies now. In such cases, people might not be quite as willing to push for the latest in attire if it isn’t going to be seen in public, and only in the virtual world. Might we embrace quality over novelty once more?
   Beall shows that the rise in consumption is a relatively recent phenomenon, something within living memory for most consumers. It can only be a good thing for the planet if we reduced our clothing consumption to the levels they were at 15 years ago, and even then labels were making money in the clothing business.
   We weren’t so obsessed with fast fashion, and while retailers like H&M and Zara were making headway around the world with cheaply made garments, there were still enough consumers happy to pay more for quality. Until 2004 there was a difference, too: high-end designer style hadn’t been democratized, not until Karl Lagerfeld began the first of many designer collaborations with H&M, giving rise to what this magazine called ‘accessible luxury’.
   We also weren’t as obsessed with the new. When Lucire was first established, some fashion labels were deeply wary of allowing online media to cover their catwalk shows. They were scared of counterfeiters: the sooner they could see something, the sooner the knock-offs would appear. The designers were used to having the advantage, and old media were willing to comply. Lucire, for its part, never ran the catwalk stories live: internet connections weren’t that great then, and neither was digital photography. By the time the film and prints got to New Zealand, and everything was manually laid out, there was a delay. But as coverage democratized, and as designers themselves delighted in showing every­thing live, often to “influencers” who beamed the shows instantaneously via social media, consumer demands also shifted. In an Instagramming generation, being seen with the latest is more vital than before—yet, again, one hopes that the perspective we’ve gained with the pandemic will put the brakes on that.
   We’re not exactly in Luddite position or pining for a return to the past. We’re excited about the innovations, such as Bionic, a polyester made from recycled shoreline waste that H&M, recognizing the shift, has promoted [Natalia Vodianova modelled one such dress three years ago, shown at top]; and the new sustainable materials that our clothes could be made from. But we would like to see the end of the race to the bottom which fast fashion and the insistence on novelty have driven, where garment workers are paid less and less to satisfy the profits of some brands and the appetites of some consumers.
   If we value good design, ethical sourcing and quality over novelty and low prices, then we may be able to reverse some of these frightening statistics. It might even be unfashionable, as the pandemic affects certain countries worse than others, to flaunt the fact you’ve been able to head out shopping (real or virtual) to get the newest. Influencers will need to find something else to promote.
   Even filmmakers are sensing it. The Michael Winterbottom-directed Steve Coogan–Isla Fisher comedy, Greed [covered earlier in Lucire], is a satirical tale about a thinly disguised version of Sir Philip Green, the head of Arcadia Group, who stood accused by British government committees of plundering British Home Stores while under his company’s control. Sir Philip also did not escape criticism in this magazine.
   Coogan plays Sir Richard ‘Greedy’ McCreadie, who spends his adult life pushing suppliers in Sri Lanka (with India standing in for the country in the film) into a race to the bottom. The last act wraps up the film neatly: namely that for all the lessons that we might have learned, the fictional McGready family ticks on, little changed. No, the outcome isn’t funny, but it is a call to action—it’s Winterbottom exercising pathos. Showing statistics about fast fashion, the income gap, and the single-digit earnings of Asian garment workers takes that one step further. Are we choosing to fund these lifestyles and the fast-fashion machine, or should we opt for the sort of designers often championed by this magazine, who work with Fair Trade, eschew seasons, and emphasize quality?
   With such a film part of our 2019–20 Zeitgeist, then it appears that we should call time on the excesses the industry has created, opening the door to those independent designers, many of whom have appeared in this magazine, who invest heart, creativity, and time to make quality fare.—Jack Yan, Publisher

 


Karlie Kloss, Kaia Gerber, Lewis Hamilton invest in W magazine

Filed by Lucire staff/August 14, 2020/23.09


Tim Walker

Dua Lipa, photographed in March 2020 for W.

W magazine, formerly at Condé Nast, is now under the ownership of a group of investors led by Karlie Kloss.
   Variety reported that editor-in-chief Sara Moonves said she had assembled a group of investors under a joint venture called W Media.
   Other investors include Kaia Gerber and F1 driver Lewis Hamilton, as well as producer Jason Blum, Kirsten Green, Dara Treseder, Aryeh B. Bourkoff, and a talent advisory firm, Copper.
   One more issue is planned for 2020, with six issues slated for 2021.
   W began life in 1972 at Fairchild Publications, where it was a sister publication to Women’s Wear Daily. Condé Nast acquired Fairchild in 2000. It sold W in 2019 to Future Media, which suspended publication earlier this year, citing the COVID-19 outbreak.

 


Chanel shows Mademoiselle Privé Bouton watch collection

Filed by Lucire staff/July 30, 2020/11.20



Further applause for Chanel for keeping up a good pace of new releases despite the pandemic—it’s no doubt a mixture of deep pockets and a desire to be one of the few brands vying for consumers’ attention in a world with far less competitive clutter and noise. The latest is its haute horlogerie collection for 2020 called Mademoiselle Privé Bouton, paying homage to the humble button, but making it a far grander motif on the new watches, covering a small diamond-set dial set within a cuff.
   The Mademoiselle Privé line takes its inspiration from symbols that Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Chanel held dear, including the objections that she surrounded herself with. Chanel herself took her inspiration from military clothing and sailors’ uniforms when she used her button motifs.
   The watches have black tweed cuffs with a golden braid accent. The buttons come from the world of Chanel: a pearl, a golden lion, a camellia made of diamonds, a Byzantine motif, and the profile of Gabrielle Chanel in agate. The collection comprises seven watches.








 


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