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SMoss’s Great Again charts the course of the Trump presidency

Filed by Lucire staff/April 11, 2021/2.08





Lucire travel editor Stanley Moss, writing as SMoss, has put together a limited edition volume documenting the presidency of Donald J. Trump, available in both a hardcover collectors’ edition and a smaller paperback.
   Entitled Great Again, the book begins with a cover showing a worn ‘Make America Great Again’ cap discarded on the pavement. Inside are images from the 45th presidency, including press coverage, artwork, memes and other cultural artefacts from the four-year period.
   The large-format version measures 30 cm square and retails for €102, with the price going up to €120 after April 15. The price includes international shipping. Its smaller counterpart measures 20 cm square, and is available at €51 (€60 after April 15).
   They are privately printed in Italy. Both are individually numbered hand-signed by the author.
   They are available only by special order through emailing the author at info@diganzi.com, and will not be made available on Amazon. There are some videos showing the books and their contents at the official page, www.secondguesspress.com/greatagain-book.


 


Van Cleef & Arpels releases six new Perlée designs in Middle East ahead of global launch

Filed by Lucire staff/April 3, 2021/10.41


Van Cleef & Arpels has released six Perlée creations, exclusively for the Middle East first, coinciding with the holy season of Ramadan. They are available now in the region, two months ahead of their official global release.
   The new Perlée additions comprise three bracelets and three rings in gold hues. These feature the sweet clover motif, which are Van Cleef & Arpels’ symbol of luck. They also feature a border of gold beads, characteristic of other jewellery in the Perlée range.
   As the jewellery can be mixed and matched, they can suit a wearer’s every mood.
   The Perlée collection débuted in 2008 and draws on the maison’s history. Accented stones and motifs appeared in the 1920s, and it was also during this decade that Van Cleef & Arpels used the round bead setting in the collection. Golden beads became more ample in 1948. From 1963, in the Twist collection, golden beads appeared in more permutations, accentuating ornamental stones such as lapis lazuli and carnelian, and pearls. Bordering golden beads also appeared in Van Cleef & Arpels’ Alhambra collection in 1968. The designs have a direct link to these earlier collections.






 


New fine art prints of celebrated American quilts

Filed by Lucire staff/March 31, 2021/20.43

Here’s an opportunity to add some authentic beauty to your walls.
   Gee’s Bend is an isolated African American hamlet in Boykin, Alabama, found along the Alabama River. The some seven hundred or so inhabitants of this small, rural community are mostly descendants of slaves, and for generations they worked the fields belonging to the local Pettway plantation. Quilts made by the residents are now part of major art collections, including the Smithsonian in Washington, DC.
   The quilting tradition in Gee’s Bend may have been influenced in part by patterned Native American textiles and African textiles. Local Black women pieced together strips of cloth to make bedcovers. They made quilts first to keep themselves and their children warm in unheated shacks that lacked running water, telephones, and electricity. Along the way, they developed a distinctive style, noted for its lively improvisations and geometric simplicity. They are remarkably contemporary and modernist, recollecting works by Klee or Matisse.
   A series of top-quality, collectible hand-signed and numbered lithographic fine art prints have been created from these timeless and distinctive designs.
   The limited edition lithographic prints are rather large in scale, suitable for bold statements in interior spaces. For more information, contact info@approx.blue.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor


Louisiana Bendolph: New Generation, 2007
Colour softground etching with aquatint and spitbite aquatint
Image: 533 × 711 mm (21 × 28 in)
Paper: 787 × 914 mm (31 × 36 in)
Edition of 50
Hand-signed by the artist
US$3,450


Loretta Pettway: Old Beauty, 2007
Colour softground and hardground etching with aquatint and spitbite aquatint
Image: 483 × 425 mm (19 × 16¾ in)
Paper: 711 × 629 mm (28 × 24¾ in)
Edition of 50
Hand-signed by the artist
US$4,025


Mary Lee Bendolph: Get Ready, 2007
Colour softground etching with aquatint and spitbite aquatint
Image: 635 × 838 mm (25 × 33 in)
Paper: 914 × 1,092 mm (36 × 43 in)
Edition of 50
Hand-signed by the artist
US$6,900

 


In brief: James Wines’s Erotica collection; limited-edition Joséphine bag; Bogner Fire & Ice for spring ’21

Filed by Lucire staff/February 14, 2021/11.40





Designer, artist and photographer Paula Sweet, whose work has regularly appeared in our pages, has announced a collection based around the work of SITE (Sculpture in the Environment) founder and principal, architect James Wines. Wines, 88, has created two drawings for the Erotica collection, comprising T-shirts, tops, leggings, pillows, stationery, cups and shower curtains. More at paulasweet.com.

Ludovica Mascheroni has shown Joséphine, a limited-edition pillow bag commemorating International Women’s Day next month. The bag is dedicated to Joséphine de Beauharnais, a patron of the arts, who brought an ancient Persian paisley pattern into vogue in Europe during the 19th century. She was reputed to be the first woman in Europe with an entire wardrobe in the paisley print. The 2021 interpretation on Mascheroni’s pillow bag is hand-made in 100 per cent cashmere, with leather and brass details, and retails for €729.

Bogner’s spring–summer 2021 Cold Hawaii campaign sees its Fire & Ice designs modelled by professional surfers Mor, Vahine, Robert and AJ in northern Denmark, in what the company calls ‘every adventurer’s dream’. There’s solitude, a rough climate and enviable waves, and the designs are equipped to take on those increasingly long days in the season ahead.


 


Jaguar turns continuation efforts to its 1953 Le Mans-winning C-type

Filed by Lucire staff/January 28, 2021/11.49




‘Continuation’ editions are a great money-spinner for car companies with a history: offer a classic based on the original plans, and wait for the well heeled collectors to snap them up. Aston Martin has done it with both the DB4 GT and the James Bond Goldfinger DB5, and Jaguar with the E-type Lightweight.
   Now it’s the turn of the C-type, with eight planned, each to be hand-built. Unlike replicas, these fetch a higher price because of their provenance, being built by the company itself. Jaguar claims the C-types are ‘fully authentic’, with the cars to come from Jaguar Land Rover Classic Works in Coventry.
   The cars will be equipped to the 1953 Le Mans winner specifications, with disc brakes, and the 3·4-litre inline six with triple Weber carburettors. The cars will not be road-legal, but can be used in historic racing and on the track.
   Jaguar used a period C-type for the basis of its new manufacturing data, and, of course, it had exclusive access to the original engineering drawings and records created by aerodynamicist Malcolm Sayer, competitions’ manager Lofty England, and engineers William Heynes, Bob Knight and Norman Dewis.
   Customers can specify their continuation C-types virtually, too, with an online configurator. These can be shared with the hashtag #70yearsofCtype, with Jaguar planning to feature them on its social media.



Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust

Top: Jaguar’s works C-type racing team before the start of the 1953 Le Mans 24 Hours, including Stirling Moss with no. 17. Moss would finish second overall, with Peter Walker. The no. 18 Jaguar C-type of Tony Rolt and Duncan Hamilton wins the 1953 Le Mans 24 Hours.

 


Wishing all a happy 2021!

Filed by Jack Yan/December 31, 2020/23.05

Happy 2021 to our readers and supporters!
   Twenty twenty was tough, and along with the rest of you, we felt it. But believe it or not, commercially it wasn’t our toughest year—you can look back at 2005–6 for that, and long-time readers will recall that by January 2006 there were preciously few articles being posted on the site while resources were used to prop up the print magazines as we removed certain negative elements from our business. A few good people, with whom I remain in touch, were caught in the crossfire, but we lived on.
   Fifteen years on we struck a far better balance, and it’s thanks to our team and all those who are Lucire’s creators—editors, writers, photographers, make-up artists, stylists, hairstylists, and many more—that that has been possible.
   And it wouldn’t have been worth doing without those who have blessed us with increasing readership, as we know our work is being appreciated around the globe. It’s always heartening to see Lucire being enjoyed, and recently we were given permission by Fatimah Ahmed, a wedding photographer in Al Jubail, in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, to show this image from her Instagram. The caption: ‘Surround yourself with the things you love.’


Fatimah Ahmed

   We thank our partners, advertisers, all those who work to print and distribute Lucire, and our supporters for coming together during a tough year and keeping everything ticking along.
   We began 2020 trying to stay positive in the wake of two deaths in the Lucire family in December 2019, and we thought our ‘2020’ graphic that adorned the January 2020 cover of Lucire KSA was a signal that things were going to be positive. It was our “keeping our chin up”. Twenty twenty, I thought, had a nice ring to it. But the superstitious would have pointed to the darkened skies from the Australian bushfires and the cancellation of lunar New Year celebrations in China as ominous, and we certainly had an unexpected year.
   Nevertheless, we count our blessings, as there still were many during 2020, and we wish everyone a happier and more prosperous 2021.—Jack Yan, Founder and Publisher


The cover from Lucire KSA January 2020, featuring Camille Hyde wearing House of Fluff, where we tried to keep our chin up—and the ‘2020’ motif was meant to signal a positive year!

 


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