Lucire: News


October 3, 2016

Summer indulgence: the Body Shop’s Piñita Colada range

Bhavana Bhim/23.24

Summer is just around the corner—why not get yourself ready with a cocktail of coconut and pineapple for the skin? The Body Shop’s Caribbean-inspired Piñita Colada body range is ready to burst your skin with summer freshness.
   The range includes Piñita Colada exfoliating cream, body butter, shower gel and Fresh Body Sorbet. All these products smell divine with the hand-harvested coconuts from the Antilles region of the Caribbean, combined with zesty pineapple from the Santo-Domingo area.
   The Exfoliating Scrub (250 ml, NZ$47·50), smooths and refines the skin with real shredded coconut and pineapple extracts.
   Wash away the heat of the day with the shower gel (250 ml, NZ$17·50). The refreshing lather cleanses the skin.
   The skin-quenching body butter (50 ml, NZ$17·50; 300 ml, NZ$38·95) hydrates the skin in the heat of summer. The butter glides onto the skin without any sticky residue. Immediately the skin is invigorated with the fresh cooling scent.
   Finally, we sampled the Fresh Body Sorbet (200 ml, NZ$27·50). This lightweight product feeds the skin with the cooling moisture of Caribbean extracts.
   Treat yourself this summer and let the happy hour come to you with this limited-edition range. All products will be available in-store in New Zealand beginning October 3.—Bhavana Bhim

September 23, 2016

Gillian Saunders takes top honours at 2016 World of Wearable Art Awards’ Show, with Supernova

Lucire staff/11.00


New Zealand designer Gillian Saunders has scooped the Brancott Estate Supreme Award at tonight’s World of Wearable Art (WOW) Awards’ Show. Saunders, who had entered 15 garments before her winning entry, Supernova, has won eight awards prior to 2016, but this is the first time she has taken out the top prize.
   Saunders, who was born in England, has been involved in television and theatre for most of her working life. She was trained in Yorkshire, and went on to Christchurch, New Zealand, where she worked as a props’ maker for the Court Theatre.
   â€˜I had been making stage props for theatre and TV for years. WOW was the perfect challenge—could I make props for the body as well?’ she said.
   Supernova was inspired by ‘Thierry Mugler’s Chimera dress [from the autumn–winter 1997–8 collection], … the iridescent spiny fins of the Hippocampus from the Percy Jackson movie The Sea of Monsters, and some incredible NASA images taken by the Hubble Telescope,’ she noted. ‘Once all these elements were combined, Supernova was brought to life.
   â€˜The large gems represent new stars being born and the dark shadows represent deep space. Each scale has been individually cut, shaded with marker pens and then hand-sewn on to the garment. Each gem has had its sticky backing removed and then glued on by hand.’
   Saunders also won the Avant-Garde section in this year’s competition, judged by WOW founder Dame Suzie Moncrieff, Zambesi’s Elisabeth Findlay, and sculptor Gregor Kregar.
   Dame Suzie said, ‘Supernova has the design innovation, the construction quality and vibrant stage presence in performance to win WOW’s top award.’
   Saunders’ 2013 design, Inkling, won the Weta Creature Carnival Award and an internship for her at Academy Award-winning Weta Workshop. It is currently part of the WOW international exhibition, touring around the world, and presently at the EMP Museum in Seattle, Washington, where it will be displayed till January, after which the exhibition will head to the Peabody Essex Museum in Boston, Mass.
   She also won the Avant-Garde section in 2007 with Equus: behind Closed Doors, while in 2009, Tikini was second in the Air New Zealand South Pacific section.
   Designers from New Zealand, China, India, England, Australia, and the USA won awards in each section.
   The American Express Open section this year saw Renascence, by Yuru Ma and Siyu Fang of Shanghai take first place. The Spyglass Creative Excellence section was won by Mai (I), by Pritam Singh and Vishnu Ramesh of Gujarat. Queen Angel, by Adam McAlavey of London, won the MJF Lighting Performance Art section.
   Baroque Star, by Natasha English and Tatyanna Meharry of Christchurch, won the Weta Workshop Costume and Film section, netting the duo a four-week internship at Weta Workshop, plus travel, accommodation, and prize money.
   The Wellington Airport Aotearoa section was won by Maria Tsopanaki and Dimitry Mavinis of London, with their creation Princess Niwareka. The World of Wearable Art and Classic Cars Museum Bizarre Bra section was won by Julian Hartzog of Tarpon Springs, Fla., with Come Fly with Me.
   Of the special awards, Dame Suzie chose Incognita, by Ian Bernhard of Auckland, as the most innovative garment, giving it the WOW Factor Award. Renewal, by Alexa Cach, Miodrag Guberinic and Corey Gomes, won the First-Time Entrant Award. The Knight by Jiawen Gan of the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology won the Student Innovation Award. The Sustainability Award, recognizing the protection of our environment and the use of materials that would otherwise be discarded, was won by Bernise Milliken of Auckland, for Grandeer. Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder of Wellington, won the Wearable Technology Award. The Wellington International Award, given to the best international entry, was won by Daisy May Collingridge of Woldingham, Surrey, England, for Lippydeema. Collingridge also won the UK–Europe Design Award with this entry.
   Khepri, by Miodrag Guberinic and Alexa Cach of New York, NY, won the Americas Design Award. Yu Tan of Shanghai won the Asia Design Award with The Renaissance Happens Again, while Cascade, by Victoria Edgar of Geelong, Victoria, won the Australia and South Pacific Design Award.
   The David Jones New Zealand Design Award was won by Voyage to Revolution, by Carolyn Gibson of Auckland.
   The Cirque du Soleil Performance Art Costume Award, chosen by Denise Tétreault, Costumes Lifecycle and Creative Spaces Director of the Cirque du Soleil, was won by Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder. Mulder receives prize money, flights and accommodation for a one-month internship at Cirque du Soleil’s headquarters in Montréal, Québec.
   WOW runs in Wellington, New Zealand, through to October 9, and will be seen by 58,000 people live during its run. It employs over 350 cast and crew.
   This year, 133 entries by 163 designers (some worked in pairs) were received, competing for a prize pool of NZ$165,000.


Renascence, by Yuru Ma and Siyu Fang, Shanghai.

Mai (I), by Pritam Singh and Vishnu Ramesh, Gujarat.

Queen Angel, by Adam McAlavey, London.

Baroque Star, by Natasha English and Tatyanna Meharry, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Princess Niwareka, by Maria Tsopanaki and Dimitri Mavinis, London.

Come Fly with Me, by Julian Hartzog, Tarpon Springs, Fla.

Incognita, by Ian Bernhard, at AUT, Auckland.

Renewal, by Alexa Cach, Miodrag Guberinic and Corey Gomes.

Grandeer, by Bernise Milliken, Auckland.

Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder, Wellington.

Lippydeema, by Daisy May Collingridge, Woldingham, Surrey.

Khepri, by Miodrag Guberinic and Alexa Cach, New York.

The Renaissance Happens Again, by Yu Tan, Shanghai.

Cascade by Victoria Edgar, Geelong, Victoria.

Voyage to Revolution by Carolyn Gibson, Auckland.

September 20, 2016

Taste of the Emmys: Celebrity Connected’s crafty suite

Elyse Glickman/10.26

Elyse Glickman

Imagine being immersed into the Food Network world for a day—that’s what VIPs and select press experienced when they entered the Great Room of the W Hotel Hollywood when Celebrity Connected took it over and transformed it into an unusually crafty Emmy suite.
   The space was awash with samples, sips, and all kinds of wonderful aromas—so many of them, in fact, that it was hard to walk around as tote bags carried by celebrities expanded and one demonstration was more eye-catching than the next. In many cases, one small space and a galaxy of celebrities cramming into it could be a recipe for disaster. However, there was just something about lively product demos, delicious bites, friendly inventors and vendors, and a few cheeky items (Clone-a-Willy; Chakrubs—let their sites do the talking) that brought out the most cheerful demeanour in the guests.
   If you could sum up this event with a popular movie quote, it would be ‘Life is a banquet.’ Celebrity Connected took that concept to heart with such intriguing offerings as the Original New York Seltzer (yup, it’s back and in tons of flavours), the Real’s Fair Trade sugar, basmati rice and himalayan salt; a world of flavours from Corine’s Cuisine’s line of hot sauces; gorgeous, hand-painted Mora Estate wines from Sonoma; One and Done seasoning replacing salt and pepper with Texas-sized flavour; fruit and veggie chips from Seneca Foods; and superfood grains from Weeds & Seeds that can be used for cooking or eaten straight. And just in time for the upcoming holiday season, Unstick offered guests cooking demonstrations and convenience all rolled up and ready to save home cooks time with their non-stick reusable surfaces that are as easy to use as aluminum foil—but much better for the environment and safer for the body.
   On the other side of the food pyramid, Canada’s the Pie Hole and Florida’s the Cake Zone offered single serving cakes in perky Ball jars, while Sheppard’s Sweets offered samples of soulful indulgences for the holidays. Several brands of ice-cream-related treats competed for guests’ attention. However, Blast Ice Cream put on quite a show and Curious Creamery just may have revolutionized the artisanal ice-cream movement by putting the creativity and decadence of gourmet flavours into the hands of consumers—and all without an ice-cream machine. The ice-cream, as well as ice-cream cakes, can be brought to life with a whisk or blender, along with one’s preference of liquid (dairy, coconut milk, almond milk, coconut water and so on). Stirrings offered a full kit that could allow home entertaining mavens to stir up craft cocktails for their Emmy or holiday party with their most popular mixers, lemon drop Martini rim sugar, and more.
   The wearable items were mostly unisex and did make a definitive statement–‘I care about Fair Trade and the planet.’ The Casery was locked and loaded with adorable protective gear for the Iphone 7 (though cases for earlier models were available). Japanese designer Akiko Shinzato offered the right mix of retro-chic and modern Asian edge with her streamlined, universally flattering Vivon eyewear collection. Uashmama, meanwhile, epitomized Italian form and function with its unisex line of cross body bags and home accessories made from high-grade paper that looks and wears like leather.
   Although there were glamorous royal jelly lipsticks launched by Los Angeles brand Jafra, most products were wellness-driven, from Theramu’s restorative cream and sublingual pain remedies, to Haiku Organics’ soaps, DeP’s two-month face mask treatments (with reusable chic leopard print mask), Elyptol hand sanitizers, the UK’s PureSkin by Vanessa Blake, French company Bioderma, and Washdolly’s reusable make-up remover towels. However, we were moved by the story behind Toronto-based the Pink House, a compact line of natural products founded by sisters Tracy Olesen and Karen Sjöberg. Sjöberg had been diagnosed with breast cancer and realized there was a need for simple but luxurious beauty products crafted without hazardous chemicals.—Elyse Glickman, US west coast editor

Elyse Glickman

September 7, 2016

The Body Shop’s new eye shadows, foundation, masks—either 100 per cent vegan or vegetarian

Bhavana Bhim/6.40

The Body Shop welcomes the southern spring with 100 per cent vegan and vegetarian products to improve skin instantly, with ingredients from all over the world.
   Its new Down to Earth eye shadow quads and Down to Earth palettes feature blendable, highly pigmented earthy hues that throughout the day. The shades are blended with babassu and sesame oils, which prevent creasing. The formula of the pigment is enhanced to bring out natural beauty. Functionality is key, as each individual shade clicks in and out of the palette casing, so you can mix and match to your own taste.
   The earthy theme resonates as the products are 100 per cent vegan, suitable for sensitive eyes with no traces of petrolatum and mineral oil. The Down to Earth palette (NZ$64·95) contains eight shades inspired by the Earth’s pale sands, cool metals, warm clays and deep gemstones. The shades are named accordingly: Sahara Dune, Aztec Gold, Provence Ochre, Bengal Granite, Peru Clay, Kilmanjaro Rock, Zawar Zinc and Black Canyon Onyx. These allow you to create looks ranging from smooth mattes, glossy satins and glimmering consistencies.
   To accompany the eight-shaded palette, the Body Shop have released new Down to Earth Eye shadow quads (NZ$49·95). The quads are available in five colour combinations, each designed to flatter every eye shade. We sampled Down to Earth quad 3, which contains the shades India Rose Quartz, Atlas Rhassoul, Cerro Rico Silver and Siberia Anthracite. The earthy rose quartz works well as a base, with seamless application. The three grey–metallic tones complement the rose quartz shade to give a statement smoky eye.
   To apply the eye shadow is the 100 per cent cruelty-free double-ended brush (NZ$33·95). The lightweight dual-purpose brush eases application: there is a buff brush to easily blend in the shadow, accompanied by a blunt-angled brush to quickly tight line the eyes. The handle is made from FSC elm wood and cruelty-free bristles. You can dampen the blending brush for a wet vibrant look, or apply dry.
   For a frantic lifestyle, the new Fresh Nude Cushion Foundation (NZ$53·50) is perfect for make-up coverage on the go. Made with 100 per cent organic Community Trade alÅ“ vera and English rose water, the foundation gives the skin a semi-matte texture and a natural yet even tone to the skin. Spare yourself time in the morning with the easy-to-blend cushion applicator which softly massages the foundation onto the surface of the skin. You simply push the cushion down to release the formula to a desired amount. This product is dermatologically tested, non-comedogenic, 100 per cent vegan-formulated, without petrolatum and mineral oil.
   You can bring the spa to your door with the new range of Superfood face masks (NZ$39·95). Superfoods are known to help the body, so why not treat the skin with the Body Shop’s new range? The masks are made from 100 per cent vegetarian ingredients from around the world, inspired by traditional beauty remedies. Formulated without parabens, silicone, mineral oils and paraffins, theses naturally made products feed the skin with goodness.
   The Amazonian Açai Energizing Radiance Mask is 100 per cent vegan and inspired by the rituals of Amazonian tribes. The mask contains ingredients from South America. Açai berry extract is rich in antioxidants and vitamin C which fights off the appearance of fatigue. Guarana extract from Brazil is known for its energy-boosting properties; Community Trade organic babassu oil from Brazil smooths and revitalizes the skin. Apply a generous amount to the skin leave it on for 10–15 minutes and, soon enough, your skin will have its energy back.
   The Ethiopian Honey Deep Nourishing Mask is made from Community Trade honey, marula oil from Namibia and hydrating organic olive oil from Italy. This indulgent mask nourishes the skin, inspired by African healing and soothing rituals. The product is easy to apply to the skin; instantly, the surface appears replenished and rested. After the facial, the skin is softer and smoother in texture. The honey sourced from Ethiopia is rich in nutrients to revive skin. Marula oil from Namibia improves the skin’s elasticity, while the olive oil from Italy is rich in Omega 3 to help prevent dryness. All three ingredients work well to nourish the skin.
   The Chinese Ginseng and Rice Clarifying Polishing Mask brightens and removes unevenness from skin. The mask balances revitalizing ginseng, moisturizing rice extract from China, and Community Trade sesame seed oil from Nicaragua. The result is a creamy exfoliating mask which softens, evens, and reveals the brightness of the skin. Ginseng extract from China has been known for its skin-enhancing properties, while rice extract has traditionally been used to moisturize the skin. The mask smells divine, tingling the skin upon application. After application, skin imperfections are immediately reduced.
   The Body Shop’s British Rose Fresh Plumping Mask enhances the skin’s natural glow. Infused with rose petals, moisturizing rose essence from the UK, toning rosehip oil from Chile and Community Trade organic alÅ“ vera from México, this refreshing gel mask restores the skin’s moisture and gives it that petal-like smoothness. The mask is fragrant with the scent of roses, inspired by European bathing rituals. The ingredients gently calm the properties of the skin for a dewy youthful glow.
   Inspired by Ayurvedic traditions, the tingling Himalayan Charcoal Purifying Glow Mask shakes up the skin’s senses. The mask combines powerful bamboo charcoal from the Himalayan foothills, exfoliating green tea leaves from Japan and potent Community Trade organic tea tree oil from Kenya. These ingredients cleanse impurities and excess oils from the skin, while the green tea leaves exfoliate the surface. This invigorating mud mask gives your skin an exhilarating new lease of life. Apply a generous amount; once the mask hardens and draws excess oil from the skin, gently remove with warm water.
   All products go on sale on September 12.—Bhavana Bhim

August 9, 2016

Estée Lauder, GHD offer special Pink Products for Breast Cancer Awareness Month this October

Lucire staff/23.42

Estée Lauder and GHD have teamed up to offer a special line of Pink Products supporting the New Zealand Breast Cancer Foundation’s (NZBCF) Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October 2016.
   Estée Lauder is supporting the campaign with, first, its Bobbi Brown Art Stick Duo, blending lipstick and liner, in two pink shades (neutral and bright), retailing at NZ$92, with 20 per cent of the retail price donated to NZBCF. The Duo are available at Bobbi Brown studios nationwide and at
   It also offers its Clinique Dramatically Different Moisturizing Lotion Plus, in a limited-edition bottle with a special keyring featuring four charms, including a Breast Cancer Awareness pink ribbon. The 200 ml lotion is retailing for NZ$100, with 10 per cent of the price being donated to the campaign. It is available at Clinique counters nationally, and online at and
   Under the parent brand, there is the Estée Lauder Advanced Night Repair Synchronized Recovery Complex II with an enamel pink ribbon pin, retailing at NZ$184 for 50 ml; 20 per cent will go to the Foundation. It is available at Estée Lauder counters nationwide and online at and Estée Lauder is also offering its Pink Perfection Color Collection of four Pure Color Envy eye-shadows, one pure Color Envy blush, and one full-size Pure Color Envy lipstick. The palette comes in a pink zip around fabric case, with a mirror on the inside, selling for NZ$79, with 20 per cent going to the Foundation.
   La Mer’s the Lip Balm, with limited-edition packaging, is also offered as part of the October campaign, retailing at NZ$120, with 20 per cent being donated. It is available at La Mer counters and online at
   Finally, GHD has a range of products raising money for Breast Cancer Awareness Month: its GHD Platinum Styler (NZ$360), GHD V Styler (NZ$310), and GHD Air hair-drier (NZ$250). For every styler sold, NZ$20 will go to the Foundation, and for every hair-drier, NZ$10 will be donated. They are available at approved GHD salons and online at For more information, telephone 0800 880-209 in New Zealand.

July 26, 2016

News in brief: new releases from Kenneth Cole and Madam C. J. Walker; London Fashion Week on Instagram

Lucire staff/12.11

Kenneth Cole’s Black Bold fragrance, from Parlux, is an evolution of the earlier Kenneth Cole Black. The men’s fragrance, on sale in August, is inspired by New York, and is aimed at ‘the man who will take on any challenge, regardless of the odds and who is brave enough to believe that they can make an impact,’ says the company. Kenneth Cole himself notes, ‘For more than 30 years, the company has embraced the essence of New York—its boldness, its energy, and its diversity. I wanted Black Bold to do just that: to celebrate the confident individuals who are the protagonists in their own personal stories of resilience, optimism, and ambition.’
   Cole collaborated with Firmenich master perfumer Harry Fremont. The new scent has top notes of citrus and herbal tones, rounded out with ground nutmeg and a touch of lotus flower, and finished with elements of wood and leathery musks. The campaign, featuring model and artist David Alexander Flinn, was shot by Gregory Harris. The eau de parfum begins at US$46 for 1 fl oz; US$58 for 1·7 fl oz; and US$76 for 3·4 oz.
   Meanwhile, Madam C. J. Walker Beauty Culture’s Jamaican Black Castor & Murumuru Oils Defining Butter Crème has launched at Sephora and, retailing at US$26. The new hair formula revives and gives body to hair, helping give soft curls. The Crème features murumuru oil, giving a conditioning coating that seals in moisture. It is paraben-, sulphate-, and phthalate-free.
   Finally, the British Fashion Council has joined the Instagram age, and invites netizens to follow London Fashion Week for spring–summer 2017 at @londonfashionweek.

July 8, 2016

The Body Shop débuts Drops of Light and Drops of Youth—healthy solutions for younger skin

Bhavana Bhim/7.32

The Body Shop has created some new gems in their latest releases. The new Drops of Light Pure Healthy Brightening range contains  red algæ extract sourced from the waters of the North Atlantic sea. Combined with vitamin C, the products help to improve the skin by correcting dark spots and brightening the skin’s natural glow.
   The first product that we sampled is the Drops of Light Pure Healthy Brightening Serum (NZ$81·95). This product has a convenient oil dispenser which distributes a drop of cooling oil when applied to the skin. It rubs in easily, instantly refreshing the skin’s surface. There is also a subtle aroma of the red algæ and vitamin C which is pleasantly invigorating. Apply twice a day, morning and night, to achieve desired results.
   The second product sampled in the range is the Pure Healthy Brightening Day Cream (NZ$63·95). This tub is incredibly nourishing: it definitely melts into the skin, without feeling heavy and sticky. The product is light with an aroma of red algæ extract, promising to reduce the size and intensity of dark spots while hydrating the skin 24 hours a day. You should apply this liberally to reap the rewards of dewy skin.
   The Body Shop may not have found the fountain of youth, but claim to have found a few drops of it in its new Drops of Youth range. Inspired by the regenerating cells from plants, the team used stem-cell technology to harness the active ingredients sourced from the globe into their products. Cells from edelweiss, sea holly and criste marine have been sourced for the youthful skin care range.
   The edelweiss plant is known for its protective properties, originating from the high alpine mountains of Trentino-Alto, Italy. Sea holly is known for its firming properties, originating from the shores of southern Bretagne, France. Criste marine is known for its skin-renewing properties. The products are infused with these stem cell properties to hydrate and regenerate the skin.
   The first product sampled is the Drops of Youth Lotion (NZ$58·50). It is infused with all the stem cell power to prepare and activate the skin. The product activates the senses with a fragrant aroma of the triple infused plants. It glides on to the skin effortlessly, softening the texture.
   To further enhance the skin’s appearance, the second item sampled is the Drops of Youth Youth Cream, (NZ$59·95). When placed on top of the lotion, the cream revives the nature of the skin, giving it a soft dewy complexion. The dual power of the lotion and cream works well to enhance the youthful cells of the skin.
   Try the complete Drops of Light and Youth range, available in New Zealand from July 11.—Bhavana Bhim

June 22, 2016

Aston Martin reveals Vanquish Zagato, with production limited to 99

Lucire staff/22.25

As expected, the Aston Martin Vanquish Zagato concept that was shown at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este at Lake Como has become a production reality, with the company saying that it will produce 99 examples at Gaydon, Warwickshire, with deliveries commencing during the first quarter of 2017.
   Aston Martin says the car is an example of its collaboration with Zagato, though its press information does not say whether the model, based on its Vanquish flagship, was styled by the Italian coachbuilder or done in-house, as it had been for the V12 Vantage Zagato in 2011.
   The company notes that the new car has ‘Aston Martin’s acclaimed dynamic and material qualities with Zagato’s signature design language.’
   At the launch of the concept last month, Zagato CEO Andrea Zagato noted, ‘We pride ourselves on our strong partnership and the creation of the Vanquish Zagato Concept was a true shared experience. It represents the essence of an important design relationship that dates back over fifty years,’ but there was no elaboration on where the design took place.
   The first collaboration began with the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato of 1960, and it was revived under Victor Gauntlett’s leadership of the company in the 1980s with the V8 Vantage Zagato. Neither car was considered attractive on launch, though both were perceived to be future classics—which they became. The DB4 GT Zagato is now valued at over £10 million and has few critics today.
   Subsequent collaborations were the 2002 DB7 Vantage Zagato, which used a lightly modified version of the donor car’s front end so it did not have to be retested for safety; and the 2011 V12 Vantage Zagato.
   The Vanquish Zagato has an engine uprated to 600 PS, with a claimed 0–60 mph time of 3·5 s. The company says the suspension set-up will be unique to the model. It features a unique carbonfibre body that has new round rear taillights, LED technology shared with the Aston martin Vulcan supercar, a sculpted rear end that has a profile similar to that of the DB11, with a downward contour and pronounced spoiler splitting the taillights. There is a pronounced side strake, reinterpreted so it now runs more deeply down the height of the front wing aft of the wheels, and, as expected, there is the famed Zagato double-bubble roof. The Vanquish Zagato is a liftback.
   Inside, the Vanquish Zagato uses herringbone carbonfibre, and shadow and anodized bronze leather, with the option of aniline leather. The seats and doors have a Z-pattern stitch, and the Zagato Z is embossed on headrests and stitched into the centre console.

Filed under: design, history, living, London, Lucire
Next Page »


Get more from Lucire

Our latest issue

Lucire 35
Check out our lavish print issue of Lucire in hard copy or for Ipad or Android.
Or download the latest issue of Lucire as a PDF from Scopalto

Lucire on Twitter

Lucire on Instagram