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Italian footwear brand DIS gets creative: an app that measures your feet for hand-made shoes

Filed by Lucire staff/May 6, 2020/12.21



In Italy, where COVID-19 has had a massive impact on daily life, Design Italian Shoes (DIS), a start-up specializing in fully customizable, Italian-made footwear, has innovated with an app that scans your feet to allow them to create made-to-measure shoes. And in the spirit of the times, DIS says it will make its technology open to other manufacturers and retailers.
   Presently, the app is only available for IOS.
   Users only need their Iphone and an A4 sheet, taking three photos of each foot. The technology takes care of the rest.
   DIS says the app is the last piece of the puzzle to create a fully digital process where one can get measured, then configure and order the shoes. Only when the ordering process is completed are the data sent to their artisans, who begin making the shoes.
   By not having stock and semi-finished products, Andrea Carpineti, CEO of DIS, says there is a 30 per cent reduction in carbon emissions in the production process.
   The company claims a 10-day turnaround.
   DIS CIO Michele Luconi adds, ‘We have developed two different algorithms. The first carries out the mathematical reconstruction of the user’s foot through photos. The second—it’s the only one on the market—matches the user’s foot with the DIS shoe models, thus recommending the exact size to purchase for each specific model.’
   To make the perfect made-to-measure shoe, the app takes 26 measurements of each foot, considerably more than existing apps, says the company.
   Francesco Inguscio, CEO of Nuvolab, which has supported DIS, says, ‘This is the best way in which Italian industrial districts can respond to the deep crisis we are going through: by sharing start-ups’ innovations and the know-how of our SMEs to evolve together and thrive in a totally different future from what we had imagined.’



Above, from top: The founders of DIS. A retail corner showcasing DIS products.

 


Lego Technic and Ducati re-create Panigale V4 R; Ferrari helps with COVID-19 fight

Filed by Lucire staff/April 18, 2020/13.25




For both adults and children alike, Lego has worked the Italian motorcycle manufacturer Ducati, to re-create the Panigale V4 R in miniature. Part of the Lego Technic range for older children, the model can teach them how the two-speed gearbox activates the V4 engine, and how the suspension and steering work. It is the first Lego Technic motorcycle to include a gearbox that simulates different speeds and riding techniques. The model measures 32 cm in length, 16 cm in height, and 8 cm in width, and comprises 646 pieces. It will be available at Ducati dealerships and its online store, and at Lego stores, both physically and online from June 1, priced at €59.99.




   With the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the organizers of Salon Privé, which showcases luxury cars, supercars, and a concours d’élégance on the grounds of Blenheim Palace in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, have shifted the event back three weeks, to take place from September 23 to 26. Ninety-five per cent of the exhibitor space had already been sold, and the organizers expect there to be numerous product launches for 2020.


Above: Salon Privé Concours d’Elegance 2019 best of show winner: a 1948 Talbot Lago T26 GS Fastback Coupé by Figoni.

   Finally, Ferrari notes that it has begun producing respirator valves and fittings for protective masks at its Maranello plant to help the fight against COVID-19. The valves and fittings are going to Mares and Solid Energy, who are altering their masks to create new ones for patients and front-line health care workers. Nuovamacut Gruppo TeamSystem is handling the logistics.

 


YOOX and Vogue Italia launch sustainable, responsible fashion programme with €50,000 top prize

Filed by Lucire staff/February 23, 2020/1.09

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Jacopo M. Raule

YOOX and Vogue Italia celebrated the launch of their mentoring programme, the Vogue YOOX Challenge—the Future of Responsible Fashion, at the San Paolo Converso church in Milano yesterday, during the city’s fashion week.
   The programme aims to support and mentor designers, creatives and start-ups who are investing in social responsibility and sustainability.
   The Challenge culminates in September when 10 finalists are selected by a group of sustainability experts. An international jury then evaluates the projects during the Milano moda donna for spring–summer 2020 in September. The winner is then announced, and their project is celebrated in February 2021, at the autumn–winter 2021–22 collections. In addition to the support, mentoring, communications and distribution, the winner will receive a cash prize of €50,000 to realize their project.
   The international jury includes Federico Marchetti, chairman and CEO of Yoox Net-à-Porter Group; Emanuele Farneti, editor-in-chief of Vogue Italia and L’Uomo; Sara Sozzani Maino, deputy editor-in-chief of Vogue Italia and head of Vogue Talents; Liya Kebede, model and women’s rights’ activist; Amber Valletta, model and actress; Lisa Armstrong, head of fashion at The Telegraph; Alice Ben Arous, chief of staff of Richemont’s fashion and accessories’ division and a member of its CSR committee; Carlo Capasa, president of the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (Italian Chamber of Fashion), Rosario Dawson, actress and co-founder of Studio 189; Orsolo de Castro, founder of Fashion Revolution; Tonne Goodman, sustainability editor of Vogue; Eva Herzigová, model and editor-at-large of Vogue CS; Suzy Menkes, international Vogue editor; Clare Press, presenter of the Wardrobe Crisis podcast; Dilys Williams, director of the Centre for Sustainable Fashion at the London College of Fashion.
   The sustainability experts are Alex McIntosh, founder and creative director of Create Sustain; Giorgia Roversi, director of sustainability and inclusion at of Yoox Net-à-Porter Group; Francesco Perrini, ordinary professor of the Department of Management and Technology of Bocconi University; Francesca Romana Rinaldi, director of the Master in Brand & Business Management and New Sustainable Fashion at the Milan Fashion Institute (an inter-university consortium composed of Bocconi University, Università Cattolica di Milano and Politecnico di Milano); Elisa Pervinca Bellini, sustainability and talent editor of Vogue Italia and a member of the Condé Nast Global Employee Council on Sustainability.
   Guests at the event welcomed by Marchetti, Farneti, Valletta and Kenede included Karolína Kurková, Coco Rocha, Bianca Balti, Anna Wintour, Suzy Menkes, Carla Sozzani, Giuseppe Zanotti, Walter Chiapponi, Maurizio Cattelan, Francesco Vezzoli, Aya and Ami Suzuki, Nataly Osmann, Miriam Leone, Greta Ferro, Arthur Arbesser, Sara Battaglia, Linda Tol, Stella Jean, Ekaterina Darma, Ilenia Durazzi, Ferdinando Verderi, Nina Yashar, Matteo Ward, Paula Cademartori, Gabrielle Caunesil, Andrea della Valle, Vogue Russia’s Masha Fedorova, Helen Nonini, Massimiliano Locatelli, Kris Ruhs, W’s Stefano Tonchi, Candela Pelizza, Vogue Japan’s Anna dello Russo, Andrea Incontri, Abrima Erwiah, and former Miss Italia Miriam Leone.
   Wines were provided by Masi Agricola.

Jacopo M. Raule

 


Twiggy returns as Bonaveri brings back Adel Rootstein mannequins

Filed by Lucire staff/February 14, 2020/12.05


Lapo Quagli

Bonaveri, the specialists in mannequins and bust forms, has launched a new Adel Rootstein collection after acquiring the brand in 2019.
   The new collection is based around 1960s icon Twiggy, the model who exemplified in many ways the spirit of Swinging London.
   Traditionally, Adel Rootstein was a forward-looking brand and considered one of the best mannequin makers in the world.
   Following the original sculpted by John Taylor, Bonaveri’s Twiggy is realistic and represents the 1960s’ æsthetic and culture. Taylor was also behind Adel Rootstein’s first mannequin in the 1950s.
   The new mannequin matches the model with a height just over 1·6 m, and a size 40 frame. Hair and make-up are included, inspired by the original.
   Bonaveri says the new Twiggy collection marries the spirit of the 1960s with current retailers’ demands.
   â€˜Rootstein represents a milestone in the evolution of mannequins, having been the first to give a form to contemporary æsthetics, inspired by models and real-life figures who perfectly embodied the spirit of the time,’ said Andrea Bonaveri, CEO of Bonaveri. ‘With this acquisition we were able to make a dream come true. It is our intention to embrace this legacy and elevate it to a new splendour, updating it with our æsthetic sensibility and manufacturing capability. This acquisition is the expression of a strategy that has led us to acquire the world’s top player in the realistic mannequin market.’
   Bonaveri will display the collection alongside its other brands, Schläppi (known for its futuristic, artistic mannequins), Sartorial (modular forms made for flexibility), and B by Bonaveri (its contemporary line) at the Euroshop triennial fair for retail innovations in Düsseldorf between February 16 and 20, at hall 10, stand 10A72.
   The display, dubbed The House of Bonaveri, showcases the behind-the-scenes stages in sculpting the products, as well as the BNatural project, featuring biodegradable mannequins made from renewable resources.
   Bonaveri showed the first biodegradable mannequin in 2016, made of B Plast, a bio-based polymer made of 72 per cent sugarcane derivative, and painted in B Paint, made of renewable, organic substances and free of any petrol-based material.
   Schläppi will show the Obsession collection, inspired by the original Schläppi collections of the 1960s and 1970s sculpted by Lorenzo Piemonti, and designed by Emma Davidge. Jason Wu’s clothes are used in the campaign.


Lapo Quagli

 


The official satchel of James Bond—Michael Kors creates a capsule collection for No Time to Die

Filed by Lucire staff/February 6, 2020/19.07


James Bond has his official car—various Aston Martin models will be seen in the 25th official Eon Productions film, No Time to Die—and he has his official watch (Rolex in the books, but typically Omega on the silver screen this side of the 21st century), and now, he has his official satchel, carry-all and duffel bag, all part of a Michael Kors capsule collection.
   The MKC × 007 Bond Bancroft satchel is the star item, complemented by the Bond Carryall and Bond Duffel. These have been made in Italy and created exclusively for the film—though from late March, fans can shop for them at Michael Kors’ boutiques internationally, at michaelkors.com, and at the official James Bond online store, 007store.com.
   Moneypenny (Naomie Harris) will carry the satchel in the film. It is made of luxe calf leather and features a polished MKC × 007 plaque inside. The other items have an MKC × 007 leather luggage tag.
   In a release, Michael Kors said, ‘Jet set glamour, sophistication, speed, energy—these are all words that come to mind when you think about the world of James Bond. They’re also at the core of our brand DNA. This collaboration was really the perfect union of fashion and film.’
   Michael Kors will host a VIP party at its new showroom in Milano to unveil the collection, followed by a dinner, during Moda di Milano later this month.
   The film, starring Daniel Craig and Rami Malek, débuts in April, released through Universal Pictures and United Artists. It is believed to be Craig’s last in the role of 007.

 


Isabelle Adjani, Angèle, Margaret Qualley, Sébastien Tellier, Pharrell Williams model Chanel eyewear

Filed by Lucire staff/February 5, 2020/4.29






Karim Sadli/Chanel

Isabelle Adjani, Angèle, Margaret Qualley, Sébastien Tellier and Pharrell Williams model Chanel’s spring–summer 2020 eyewear campaign, photographed by Karim Sadli.
   The eyewear is conceived and manufactured by Luxottica (q.v. Bhavana Bhim’s ‘Escaping the black holes’, newly online this week), but cleverly boasts Chanel’s hallmarks as always. The double-C device can be seen by the temples on Tellier’s extra-large frames and on those worn by Williams. The effect of a string of pearls can be seen in two designs for spring ’20, in the oval design with transparent frame worn by Angèle, and in the butterfly frame design worn by Qualley. Adjani’s sunglasses are in black acetate with the Chanel logotype along one of the temples. The campaign officially breaks from March 2020.




Behind the scenes









Chanel

 


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