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Chanel retrospective opens at Paris’s Palais Galliera: Vanessa Paradis, Marion Cotillard, Angèle attend

Filed by Lucire staff/October 2, 2020/0.03



Chanel celebrated the opening of the retrospective exhibition Gabrielle Chanel: Manifeste de Mode (Fashion Manifesto), held at the newly renovated Palais Galliera, the City of Paris Fashion Museum, with its ambassadors Vanessa Paradis, Anna Mouglalis, Angèle, Caroline de Maigret, Charlotte Cardin, Gaspard Ulliel and Sébastien Tellier. Other celebrities included Irène Jacob, Camille Razat, Karidja Touré, Lyna Khoudri, Diane Rouxel, Alexa Kapranos, Anne Berest, Clara Luciani, and Bianca Li.
   The exhibition comprises over 350 pieces dating from 1910 to 1971, with pieces owned by the Galliera itself, the Patromoine de Chanel, international museums and private collections. Some of Chanel’s most significant designs are present, as well as an original 1921 No. 5 bottle.
   It has been organized with the support of Chanel.
   The exhibition runs till March 14, 2021.






















Exhibition











Olivier Saillant

 


H&M Studio channels the 1970s, with Irina Shayk, Jameela Jamil, Sasha Lane, Indya Moore

Filed by Lucire staff/September 24, 2020/14.24




The 1970s have well and truly returned, and we don’t just mean with the uncertain economic mood. H&M’s Studio collection for autumn–winter 2020–1 reflects this, too, with a collection called The Refined Rebel, inspired by the 19th-century writer, Violet Paget (who used Vernon Lee as her nom-de-plume), and her residence at the Palmerino villa in Firenze. Despite officially referencing Paget, the style is very much 1970s, with big lapels and a slight flare for suits, including some outlandish colours in green and blue; big-shouldered coats and dresses in a multi-coloured print resembling splashes of paint; recycled polyester frilled blouses; a grey deconstructed sleeveless coat; and chunky-heeled boots. The clothes are gender-fluid, suiting the times, but in the mode of 1970s David Bowie, who was there well before the mainstream. The colour palette is azure blue and malachite green, says H&M, with champagne pink and marbled prints.
   The campaign has been shot separately from different parts of the world, given distancing rules and travel restrictions in place. Barbie Ferreira, Veronika Heilbrunner, Celeste, Alton Mason, Young Emperors and Mia Kong have each done their own interpretations of the collection and the imagery brought together by H&M. Meanwhile, Irina Shayk, Jameela Jamil, Sasha Lane and Indya Moore have donned designs from the range in a series of celebrity images.
   Customers are invited to share their own images from the range.
   ‘The AW20 Studio collection muse is not afraid to challenge the status quo. This collection is for those that celebrate being oneself above all else. We hope our customers feel inspired to dress with a carefree, rebellious attitude,’ said H&M’s creative adviser, Ann-Sofie Johansson.
   ‘In keeping with H&M’s strive for innovation, the H&M Studio team experimented with an exciting new campaign format for AW20. Adapted for today’s climate, this new way of working gives our global cast the creative freedom to style, photograph and express themselves in the comfort of their own space. We hope the new collection and campaign encourages everyone to celebrate their style,’ said Kattis Bahrke, H&M’s head of creative marketing and communications.




 


Deeper commentaries about our society on day 9 at Venezia

Filed by Lucire staff/September 11, 2020/18.03




Iosip Mihail

Michel Franco’s New Order, which had its première on day 8 of the 77ª Mostra internazionale d’arte cinematografica di Venezia, the 77th Venice Film Festival, was the talked-about movie the following day when its cast turned up at the Corradi Cinema Lounge on day 9. The near-future dystopian film, dealing with a coup d’état where the rich are replaced by a militarized régime, is the only Latin film that is part of the main competition at Venezia. Shot in México, the film is a commentary on the country, Franco’s homeland, and its social disparity.
   Franco was joined by Diego Boneta, Darío Yazbek Bernal, Naian González Norvind and Mónica del Carmen at the Ausonia Hungaria hotel.
   Stefano Calvagna presented his documentary film Distanziati, a work very much of our times, as it looked at Roman citizens during phase 1 of Italy’s COVID-19 lockdown.
   Claudio Giovannesi, president of the competition’s jury, also visited the Lounge, as did Jasmine Trinca (in Giorgia Farina’s Guida romantica a posti perduti), and Gianfranco Rosi, director of Notturno, who received 10 minutes of applause for his film on day 8. Actor Stefano Accorsi visited as the day drew to a close.
   Other celebrities on day 9 included Und morgen die ganze Welt’s (And Tomorrow the Entire World) Julia von Heinz, Mala Emde, Luisa-Céline Gaffron, Noah Saavedra, Andreas Lust, and Tonio Schneider.

 


Directors Gia Coppola, Peter Marcias, Susanna Nicchiarelli hosted at Corradi Cinema Lounge at Venezia

Filed by Lucire staff/September 6, 2020/23.03




Iosip Mihail

The Corradi Cinema Lounge at the 77ª Mostra internazionale d’arte cinematografica di Venezia, the Venice Film Festival played host to Gia Coppola, niece of Francis Ford Coppola, and Romola Garai and Susanna Nicchiarelli (Miss Marx) on day five.
   Coppola directs Mainstream, which she calls a ‘satirical fable’ about young Angelinos who aim to create viral content on YouTube, with parallels to earlier films such as Network.
   Director Peter Marcias (Nilde Lotti, the Time of Women), film critic Nick Vivarelli, and Brazilian singer–songwriter Caetano Veloso (Narciso Em Fèrias) also had stints at the Lounge.


Iosip Mihail

 


New Zealand labels Ketz-ke and By Mishco show off designer masks

Filed by Lucire staff/August 31, 2020/23.12


Top and above: By Mishco’s limited-edition masks have proven to be strong sellers. Below left: Ketz-ke’s bold mask designs.

New Zealand label Ketz-ke, featured in Lucire KSA’s September 2020 issue, has, like numerous other fashion labels, created designer masks. Masks—as predicted in Victoria Whisker’s recent story—have become a fashion item, and Ketz-ke’s more than qualify, with their bold designs. They’re retailing at three for NZ$36·50.
   They’re not alone. A new label set up in August reached a milestone when it sold 50 limited-edition masks per hour. By Mishco, founded by Ayla Bligh, set up to provide work for six women made redundant or suffered reduced hours because of COVID-19, sold out of its limited-edition lines within a week.
   Bligh referred to recent statistics that revealed that over 90 per cent of the 11,000 redundancies in New Zealand during the second quarter of 2020 were faced by women. It was her aim to empower women and keeping production local.
   By Mishco has scaled up production of its cotton–linen blend masks to meet demand, and is launching a line of children’s masks. Locals can collect using contactless methods. The company sold through a Facebook group called Chooice and more information can be found at bymishco.co.nz.

 


Putting the brakes on fast fashion

Filed by Jack Yan/August 15, 2020/9.10

Lucire is UN Environment’s first fashion industry partner.

Abigail Beall’s statistics in a recent BBC report about clothing recycling make sobering reading. She writes, ‘Around 85% of all textiles thrown away in the US—roughly 13 million tonnes in 2017—are either dumped into landfill or burned. The average American has been estimated to throw away around 37kg of clothes every year. And globally, an estimated 92 million tonnes of textiles waste is created each year and the equivalent to a rubbish truck full of clothes ends up on landfill sites every second.’ Her other statistics show that only 12 per cent of the material for clothing gets recycled, and that the fashion industry is responsible for 10 per cent of all greenhouse gas emissions and 20 per cent of global waste water.
   Meanwhile, on the consumer end, our need for gratification (at least in the UK) has seen us buy 60 per cent more clothing than we did 15 years ago, and no one wants to wait six months after seeing something on the catwalk.
   Beall says that recycling is difficult because while there may be one dominant material, such as cotton, threads and labels are made from other materials. Jeans are usually made of cotton yarn blended with elastane. This makes them all difficult to recycle, and sorting textiles into different fibres is still usually done manually. Techniques to chemically separate blends without losing either natural or synthetic fibres are not yet scalable.
   And what’s donated to charity shops is now of poor quality, with most reaching Oxfam’s Wastesaver plant unsellable, and six tonnes a week are torn up to be used as cloths or stuffing.
   Many fashion labels are recognizing these difficulties, especially as consumers realize the harm the industry is causing the environment. Some have been choosing recycled materials, including ocean plastics that have been turned into new materials in clothes and shoes—over the years Lucire has devoted plenty of space to these. Others are inventing new, sustainable materials.
   There is some hope that the lockdowns that various countries have had to endure during the COVID-19 crisis might wake populations up to the preciousness of the environment. Many enjoyed watching nature return, something covered in an earlier issue of Lucire KSA. And, with many now opting to work from home—and companies adjusting to the new reality of allowing staff to work remotely—the need to dress up for the office has diminished. Casual clothes are very much the norm in many societies now. In such cases, people might not be quite as willing to push for the latest in attire if it isn’t going to be seen in public, and only in the virtual world. Might we embrace quality over novelty once more?
   Beall shows that the rise in consumption is a relatively recent phenomenon, something within living memory for most consumers. It can only be a good thing for the planet if we reduced our clothing consumption to the levels they were at 15 years ago, and even then labels were making money in the clothing business.
   We weren’t so obsessed with fast fashion, and while retailers like H&M and Zara were making headway around the world with cheaply made garments, there were still enough consumers happy to pay more for quality. Until 2004 there was a difference, too: high-end designer style hadn’t been democratized, not until Karl Lagerfeld began the first of many designer collaborations with H&M, giving rise to what this magazine called ‘accessible luxury’.
   We also weren’t as obsessed with the new. When Lucire was first established, some fashion labels were deeply wary of allowing online media to cover their catwalk shows. They were scared of counterfeiters: the sooner they could see something, the sooner the knock-offs would appear. The designers were used to having the advantage, and old media were willing to comply. Lucire, for its part, never ran the catwalk stories live: internet connections weren’t that great then, and neither was digital photography. By the time the film and prints got to New Zealand, and everything was manually laid out, there was a delay. But as coverage democratized, and as designers themselves delighted in showing every­thing live, often to “influencers” who beamed the shows instantaneously via social media, consumer demands also shifted. In an Instagramming generation, being seen with the latest is more vital than before—yet, again, one hopes that the perspective we’ve gained with the pandemic will put the brakes on that.
   We’re not exactly in Luddite position or pining for a return to the past. We’re excited about the innovations, such as Bionic, a polyester made from recycled shoreline waste that H&M, recognizing the shift, has promoted [Natalia Vodianova modelled one such dress three years ago, shown at top]; and the new sustainable materials that our clothes could be made from. But we would like to see the end of the race to the bottom which fast fashion and the insistence on novelty have driven, where garment workers are paid less and less to satisfy the profits of some brands and the appetites of some consumers.
   If we value good design, ethical sourcing and quality over novelty and low prices, then we may be able to reverse some of these frightening statistics. It might even be unfashionable, as the pandemic affects certain countries worse than others, to flaunt the fact you’ve been able to head out shopping (real or virtual) to get the newest. Influencers will need to find something else to promote.
   Even filmmakers are sensing it. The Michael Winterbottom-directed Steve Coogan–Isla Fisher comedy, Greed [covered earlier in Lucire], is a satirical tale about a thinly disguised version of Sir Philip Green, the head of Arcadia Group, who stood accused by British government committees of plundering British Home Stores while under his company’s control. Sir Philip also did not escape criticism in this magazine.
   Coogan plays Sir Richard ‘Greedy’ McCreadie, who spends his adult life pushing suppliers in Sri Lanka (with India standing in for the country in the film) into a race to the bottom. The last act wraps up the film neatly: namely that for all the lessons that we might have learned, the fictional McGready family ticks on, little changed. No, the outcome isn’t funny, but it is a call to action—it’s Winterbottom exercising pathos. Showing statistics about fast fashion, the income gap, and the single-digit earnings of Asian garment workers takes that one step further. Are we choosing to fund these lifestyles and the fast-fashion machine, or should we opt for the sort of designers often championed by this magazine, who work with Fair Trade, eschew seasons, and emphasize quality?
   With such a film part of our 2019–20 Zeitgeist, then it appears that we should call time on the excesses the industry has created, opening the door to those independent designers, many of whom have appeared in this magazine, who invest heart, creativity, and time to make quality fare.—Jack Yan, Publisher

 


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