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November 20, 2016

Celebrity Connected: a platform for the “green party”

Elyse Glickman/6.20




Elyse Glickman

After an intense, divisive US presidential season, and its controversial aftermath, Californians were ready to kick off award show season. Celebrity Connected not only got the party started, but provided some much needed pre-Christmas comfort and joy to greet the Hollywood creative community. The W Hollywood became a Garden of Eden, filled with a bumper crop of organic vegan goodies, non-dairy frozen treats, comfy weekend wear, interesting vaping inventions, yoga goods, and plants that could be planted in yards to further green up one’s neighboUrhood.

The Children’s Hour
Bears for Humanity founder Vijay Prathap spread a little early Yuletide cheer, distributing US-made Santa Bears to get his point across about the company’s multi-tiered charitable efforts. The 100 per cent certified organic, global Fair Trade elements of the bear are brought together by at-risk women looking to expand their career opportunities through the welfare-to-work programme. With every bear purchased, another bear is given to a child in need in communities throughout the country.
   There were also all-ages fashion and skin care (with lots of mother-and-daughter teamwork) served up by Royal & Reese, Swag-Eez and Sistah Buttah, as well as yoga hear from Karma and Soul. Pre-teen entrepreneurs Angels & Tomboys showed off their Shark Tank-winning, rock-inspired body sprays (including Purple Rain, a tribute to Prince reminding one of the grape soda we all loved as kids).

Green days
Although the overall progressive agenda now hangs in the balance with a conservative government coming to power in 2017, the fight to make cannabis legal in several states—including California—has moved in the right direction. Adults over 18 could sign up with MediCann doctors on the spot for paperwork that provided three months of access to dispensaries. In the immediate, they could sample several innovative products incorporating medical marijuana, cannabis, and hemp.
   Hemp Kitchen offered a Medicine Chest package through their delivery service with a variety of foods and treatment products addressing pain relief, headaches and other ailments. Chef Mike was on hand to explain how enjoy the products and the nutritional components of the goods. The Art of Edibles Cannabis Collective and To Whom It May provided chocolate aficionados with gorgeously wrapped gourmet truffles, and generous gifts from VQase and Hawaiian Vape provided extra flavour and fun for those partaking in the popular cigarette alternative.
   Souly Vegan of Oakland served substantial sustenance, while Justin’s nutty goodies added sweet relief to mid-day hunger pangs and Cocorilla had coconut water as nature intended—in its original shell. Pure indulgence was doled out by Street Churos (a food truck with a charitable element), Kokolato gelato and Yoga-urt.

Other things that rocked
Stand-out items included hand-crafted natural stone statement jewellery and minaudière handbags from Ann Ong, Rocking the Clock’s repurposed musical instrument home décor clocks and accents, and Cordcruncher, which promises to eliminate tangled earbuds once and for all. A great travel essential I look forward to trying is MAI Couture’s passport case, which can be filled with easy to use, unbreakable, and mess-proof papers with blush, bronzer, and foundation.

Finds beyond the suite
Around the same time as this suite, we found some other good products worth noting. Eufora Curl ’N is one of the best curl-defining sprays for finer hair texture going. All the definition and spring without sticky stuff weighing down hair.
   EC/BC recently rolled out its TSA-friendly backpacks and briefcases. Though the designs are unisex, these carry-on items make a statement in terms of fuss-free travel that help sort out (literally) anything that may stop a law-abiding citizen in the security line. The Barceló Hotel Group (known for its Caribbean and Mexican resorts) is also expanding its reach into Cuba, Costa Rica and other hot destinations, figuratively and literally.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor
















Elyse Glickman

November 16, 2016

Skilful execution by tomorrow’s stars at New Zealand School of Dance’s 2016 Graduation Season

Jack Yan/11.39




Stephen A’Court

Above, from top: Meistens Mozart. An excerpt from Political Mother. Pas de deux from The Sleeping Beauty.

The New Zealand School of Dance’s Graduation Season once again brings an expertly executed programme, mixing genres from classical to modern to experimental. Among the programme tonight were three premières: Helgi Tomasson’s Meistens Mozart was performed for the first time in New Zealand, while Amber Haines’s Incant and Jiři Bubeniček’s Dance Gallantries received their world premières on opening night of the season at Te Whaea.
   Meistens Mozart started the evening and showed that, with the right arrangement and choreography, the German language could be made cheerful. Songs by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf, Bernhard Flies and Jakob Haibel, sung by the Tölzer Boys’ Choir, accompanied the six dancers, the standout of whom was George Liang. Liang had previously been at Canada’s National Ballet School, and we had seen him perform last month at the Republic of China’s National Day celebration. There were no opening-night jitters from any of the six, who instantly transported us to an alpine society, celebrating springtime love, courtship and playfulness.
   The all-male He Taonga—a Gift was an energetic and intense performance where drumbeats from Whirimako Black’s ‘Torete te Kiore’ soundtrack sparked sudden moves, a demonstration of control and strength from the 14 dancers. Choreographed by Taiaroa Royal and Taane Mete, He Taonga was created for the School in 2009 and reprised tonight.
   Opening the second section, Laura Crawford and Yuri Marques were like delicate dolls in their pas de deux from The Sleeping Beauty, Act III, with the choreography after Marius Petipa. Marilyn Rowe, OBE staged and coached, while Qi Huan was répétiteur. This was a tough ballet piece to get right and the pair got stronger as they performed, gaining confidence and drawing us into their romance.
   Taking a complete tangent into modern dance was the solo performance of Glitch, a new work from NZSD tutor Victoria Columbus, whose talents we most recently saw at the World of Wearable Art, where she serves as director of choreography. The movements themselves were created by graduate Connor Masseurs, who performed the dance, playing the part of a “glitching” robotic man short-circuiting on stage with skilful, shuddering movements. Masseurs completely absorbed us with his solo: it wasn’t just his limbs that Masseurs controlled, he extended the idea to facial movements, inventively finding new ways to glitch. Masseurs first performed the dance at the Grand Théâtre at the Maison de la Culture de Tahiti as part of a gala at the Académie de Danse Annie Fayn.
   Incant was mysterious, brooding, and ethereal: this all-female work saw dancers come together to generate new shapes, conveying to us notions of clouds, trees in a forest, or tunnels, at times passing a lit sphere between them. Haines’s choreography was meant to question traditional notions of beauty and got us successfully focusing on the collective moves of the dancers. ‘This world,’ she notes in the programme, ‘invokes a mesmerizing state of collective consciousness and celebrates the power and luminous beauty of shared intention.’ A captivating work, it ended the second set of dances.
   Dance Gallantries was another more traditional work, with 10 dancers telling more playful stories of romance, complemented by Otto Bubeniček’s colourful costume design and solo violin music by J. S. Bach.
   A group of 12 performed an extract from Political Mother, the evening’s one political work with jarring music and clever choreography by Hofesh Shechter. A couple merrily folk-dances in a town square, happy to be part of their society, but are they genuinely happy or manipulated by the state? Their expressions seem to suggest the latter, fooled into believing that all is well and happy in their naïveté. The action moves on to a prison, where the music is muffled and dancers ape being restrained by either arms or ankles. The final scene, with a large group of dancers back in the town, show that the entire society has succumbed to the illusion, raising their arms in acceptance. It makes you question about the times we live in, and whether intellectual discourse is suppressed in favour of simpler ideas, a population told to be happy without really knowing why.
   Finally, Tchaikovsky’s music from The Nutcracker was excerpted for the upbeat Tempo di Valse, with the NZSD returning to a ballet to finish the evening. The ‘Waltz of the Flowers’ was instantly recognizable, the 15 dancers showing classical movements. Nadine Tyson choreographed, while the colourful traditional costumes were designed by Donna Jefferis.
   Depending on the show, the pas de deux from The Sleeping Beauty may be replaced by Jack Carter’s Pas de deux romantique, with music by Rossini; while Glitch may give way to The Wanderer, choreographed by Columbus and perforned by Liang.
   The season runs from November 16 to 26 at Te Whaea in Wellington, New Zealand, with prices ranging from NZ$18 to NZ$33. Tickets can be booked at the New Zealand School of Dance, or online at nzschoolofdance.ac.nz/book-tickets. We’d rate it another must-see, especially to catch some rising stars—we understand that some are off overseas, already snatched up by dance companies.—Jack Yan, Publisher

November 14, 2016

Green with beauty: a holistic understanding through Organic Spa Magazine

Lucire staff/11.50




Randall Michelson

Since 2007, Organic Spa Magazine has inspired and informed readers on green beauty and living. By no means limited to the world of day spas, Organic Spa educates and motivates on all aspects of a holistic lifestyle. At the famously posh Peninsula Hotel in Beverly Hills on a rather balmy October evening, members of the press were learned first-hand how Organic Spa has galvanized the once-niche market into a universally practised way of life.
   In addition to a cool gift bag filled with some of the latest and greatest in organic beauty (we’ll get to that shortly) and a tasting of some deliciously healthy food prepared with good-for-your skin enhancements, the event presented a panel and conversation with some true luminaries in fitness and eco-conscious beauty. These guest speakers included: Tracy Anderson, creator of the Tracy Anderson Method; Kimberly Snyder, nutritionist, yogi, New York Times best selling author; Christie Coleman, Head of Innovation for BeautyCounter; and Louis Schwartzberg, director, producer, and cinematographer.
   What was most impressive and refreshing is that none of them endeavoured to promote their brand or product. Instead, the exchange focused on the future of organic living and perhaps most vitally: a message of beauty from within. What can such an overused cliché mean, you ask? Simply put, ditch the celebrity and media stereotypes of physical beauty that bombard our lives. They are illusory and temporal, and have a tenuous hold on reality. Embrace balance and harmony at a slower pace of life. Remember that your beauty regimen starts from within and by respecting nature. Give back and you will be rewarded. Take it slowly, make a commitment and your beauty will be revealed.
   And now as promised, a peek at some of the hottest trending brands and products that are not merely naturally derived, but results-driven.
   When we say beauty comes from within, we’re not kidding. Neocell is a recognized leader in skin-enhancing nutritional supplements. Their DermaMatrix Collagen Skin Complex is part of their new Platinum Collection, a premium line of nutraceuticals targeting specific collagen systems. Firmer and more elastic skin is as easy as making a fresh smoothie using a scoop of the instantly dissolving powder. Other notable products in the line include berry-flavoured chewable Beauty Bursts, and the Move Matrix Advanced Joint Hydrator.
   A leader in the world of organic skin care, Mychelle Dermaceauticals introduces their most potent mask yet: the Perfect C Pro Speed Peel, a professional-level, one-step, fast-acting 25 per cent citrus fruit purée peel, formulated with 10 per cent L-ascorbic acid blended with L-lactic acid, Plant C-Stem, and retinal to deliver youthful, glowing skin. Also new from Mychelle are the Bio-Firm HydroGel Concentrate and Perfect C Radiance Lotion.
   From the UK, Earth Kiss Face Masks are energized with Himalayan shilajit, a prized ingredient in Ayurvedic medicine. Known as a potent skin rejuvenator, the 100 per cent natural masks are formulated with cherished ingredients from across the globe such as white Thai muds, ancient rhassoul clay and deeply hydrating boabab oil from Africa.
   ‘Slow beauty for a fast world’ is the motto of SpaRitual, a collection of delightfully decadent vegan body and nail products that never compromise on quality. The newest addition is a first-ever CC Crème for your nails, a combination treatment and colour that is infused with beneficial ingredients to help strengthen, smooth, brighten and protect while providing a no-polish-needed coat of sheer tint.
   Quick-drying, non-toxic, non-yellowing and vegan, Dazzle Dry is the fairy godmother of nail lacquers. For extra indulgence to relieve unsightly and itchy cracked skin, Hand & Elbows Cream contains potent bioactive ingredients to hydrate and exfoliate rapidly and efficiently, while allantoin speeds up new skin cell regeneration.—Jody Miller, LA Correspondent






































Randall Michelson

November 10, 2016

In brief: Lily-Rose Depp at Planetarium première; Bruce Weber to be honoured at British Fashion Awards; H&M in Vietnam

Cecilia Xu/10.42


Pascal Le Segretain

Chanel is heavily promoting its new No. 5 L’Eau spokeswoman, Lily-Rose Depp, decking her out fully in fashion, accessories and make-up from the brand. On Tuesday, she was at the screening of Planetarium in Paris, a film by Rebecca Zlotowski in which she co-stars as Natalie Portman’s younger sister. She wore a Chanel black cotton jacket from the cruise 2016–17 collection, and the Coco Crush ring in 18 ct yellow gold. As a rising star, and the daughter of two major celebrities, Depp is attracting plenty of attention as her own acting career takes off.
   After opening in New Zealand, Hennes & Mauritz (H&M), the international fashion brand known for offering fashion and quality at the best price in a sustainable way, has signed for its first store openings in Vietnam during 2017. More information will follow, says the company. In 2017, H&M will also open in Colombia, Iceland, Kazakhstan and Georgia.
   Finally, the British Fashion Council announced earlier this week that photographer Bruce Weber, famed for his black-and-white portraits will receive its Isabella Blow Award for Fashion Creator at the British Fashion Awards 2016. Weber will be honoured at this year’s ceremony at the Royal Albert Hall. Weber’s work has appeared in Vogue, Elle, Interview, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, and other publications, and rose to prominence with the 1982 Calvin Klein campaign featuring Tom Hintnaus in Greece.—Cecilia Xu, with Lucire staff


Bruce Weber/Calvin Klein Advertising Archive

Above: Tom Hinthaus, photographed by Bruce Weber for Calvin Klein, 1982.

October 24, 2016

Travel editor’s diary: a day at the recolta

Lucire staff/22.34




Paula Sweet

Yesterday, 10.15 a.m., reading on my tablet online the latest insult to democracy from the Republican nominee, words uttered hours earlier across the sea, and the phone rings. It’s the Principessa Zaramella asking if we can be ready in ten minutes to drive out to the country for the recolta, the annual olive-picking at a friend’s estate. I cannot refuse. The harvest happens at the last minute every year on a date which can’t be predicted, when family and friends are summoned to the orchards for a decidedly ancient experience rendered in real time. It’s a one-hour ride into a forgotten age, leaving the industrial neighbourhoods which surround Vicenza, venturing into the rolling landscapes and alluvial valleys nestled between extinct volcanoes, rambling through mediæval villages and vineyards of orange and purple leaves, into the zone of two-lane roads and ill-marked switchbacks until all we see are storybook vistas punctuated by red roofs and the occasional lofty campanile. A hard left onto a gravel road, up a wooded hill and we find ourselves surrounded by terraces of olive trees thick with ripe black fruit, an excellent harvest this year.
   Nets have been spread below the trees and people of all ages are releasing the olives from the trees, picking by hand, or raking the boughs, green and yellow and black projectiles raining down on us, the pleasurable thud-thud-thud. The Italian language surrounds us—there’s no rushing the process, and people take the time to converse, opine, joke as bins are filled.
   Unlike berry-picking, you can’t eat what you retrieve. One is made to wait: the olives won’t be pressed today, though in a month the principessa will call us (no doubt at the last minute) to say that a litre of the production is waiting for us when we can come fetch it. For the moment we exist in the present, outside the bounds of our hand-held devices, breathing the fresh air, communing with the branches, listening to the children singing folk songs among the trees.
   At no particular moment comes the call ‘A mangiare!’ Everyone drops what they are doing and trudges up the hill, where a table has been set with everything delectable in the world: local cheeses, breads, pomegranates and mandarins and apples in baskets, sausages, bottles of Nero d’Avola and Cannonau di Sardegna and wine I dare not touch from the local production in unlabelled bottles which will surely deliver the Hangover of the Century to the uninitiated. This followed by huge plates of food, pasta fagioli garlanded with fresh olive oil, an enormous salad of garden greens, pepperoncinis, radicchio di Terviso tarte, fritelli of Mozzarella, penne al sugo. The children retire to the chairs on the lawn, while the adults repair to impromptu seating under the arbor, which delivers a view of the pristine valley below. Cross-talk, teasing, the constant discussion of food, familiar faces coming and going, the casual discovery that some of these people actually speak English, at least a tolerable version of it peppered with como-se-dices and the occasional attempt at French. There is no attendant traffic noise, no recorded music, no phone sounds, no sirens, no voices of madness or conflict, only the murmur of conversation, mostly about food. Thence the dessert. Local rosegota, a hard hand-made flat cake, rum-laced crema di mascarpone, apricot tart, local thick cakes with fluffy insides, chocolate biscotti, after which a tray of espresso appears. A kind of drunken dizziness surrounds us, visions of shepherds napping under trees or vague trysts among the vines. But our host knows the rhythms need to return and with a sharp ‘A lavoro!’ we are back to the trees, back to our rakes and bins, for more time with the harvest. The light fades, we decelerate, and a languid pace for the last hours among the trees.
   Paulina, who chauffeured us out to the recolta, mentions that Arqua is not far away, a perfectly preserved mediæval village where Petrarch lived out his last days. Would we like to visit on our way home, see his house? A half-hour later we find ourselves wandering the ancient hillside streets, happening upon the Casa del Petrarca, then taking coffees at a typical enoteca. It is night when we exit the cafe and climb the old lanes back to the car. A night ride to Vicenza, back to the flat.
   As I close my eyes at home last night, I dream of the Greeks and their amphoræ, of the Romans at the harvest, and of Petrarch. I dream of compelling Donald Trump to pick olives for an afternoon, away from his Twitter feed and the screaming masses. I make him listen to other people’s conversations, rake the boughs and collect the olives and I tell him he must wait a month for his litre of olive oil.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor












Paula Sweet

September 25, 2016

Turned on, tuned in: Doris Bergman’s seventh annual Emmy Style Lounge & Party

Lucire staff/21.48




Elyse Glickman

Above, from top: Art Lewin works the room with celebrities on hand. Fibrum’s revolutionary virtual reality technology. We fell in love with True Love Skincare.

It just goes to show that you can’t stop progress. A decade ago, everybody in Hollywood was marvelling about how cable television was drawing some of the spotlight away from the Big Four networks with ground-breaking concepts that just couldn’t be shown on ‘regular TV’. Today, Netflix, Hulu and other streaming networks have eclipsed cable television with topical takes on social issues and nostalgia. Heck! It took a lot for us to pull ourselves away from binge watching The Get Down, Stranger Things, Orange is the New Black, Bloodline, and Narcos to attend Doris Bergman’s seventh annual Emmy Style Lounge & Party.
   After a decade of covering pre-awards events, we have noticed there is a similar shift in how Hollywood event planners are picking and choosing their participants. In 2006, it was all about glamour, luxury and fun touches of excess. This is, after all, how we got turned on to vacuum cleaners that double as sculpture.
   Today, the suites reflect our evolving tastes as well as those of the taste-makers around Hollywood. At Doris’s event inside the swanky Fig & Olive restaurant, we found a balance between the practical and the luxurious. There was plenty to please male attendees such as Jason Ritter, John Savage, Marsai Martin (Black-ish) and Charlie Koontz (CSI: Cyber). Art Lewin, a long-time Doris favourite, handed out silk ties and discussed his bespoke suiting services for special occasions. Single’s jewel-toned boxers for men would look and feel comfortable under these custom-tailored suits.
   A few high-tech products made their début. Dioo Audio’s pink, champagne, and black ear buds and headphones were designed for women, according to company rep Mike Kahn. However, with the sleek metallic, guitar-pick-inspired accents and comfy memory foam in the headphones, most guys would snap up the black accessories. Speaking of sound investments, celebrities were the first to get their hands on Fibrum Mobile Virtual Reality headsets, which takes smartphone gaming experience to the next level. Event sponsor EinDrink.com introduced its app, which helps users locate hot bars and cool cocktail or craft beer events anywhere in the world.
   Grooming goodies were also front and centre. Spongelle added wonderful new things to their line, including lasting pedicure bars, metallic soap sponges that leave behind a subtle shimmer, and their new all-in-one Super Buffer for men. Other products focused on those unmentionable grooming challenges that we all face: the FootMate System by Gordon Brush, a marriage between a shower mat and a pedicure brush, gently scrubs away sand, dirt, and dead skin from tired, calloused feet. Even the most follicly endowed man wouldn’t mind a little boost from Pura d’Or’s hair-growth-enhancing shampoo. Celebs and civilians who suffer from warts, age spots, and skin made crackly by the sun all found remedies within the True Love Skincare line. Essential oils, honey, and other natural ingredients gently exfoliate, disinfect, and moisturize inflamed skin, even in intimate areas. As for their True Love Private Paste, don’t be shy—go ahead and ask!
   There was enough sparkle for our favourite style stars including Jane Lynch, Kimberly Elise, Patricka Darbo, Dot Marie Jones, and Tasha Smith (Empire). Doris’s good friend Sue Wong had her camera-ready dresses waiting in the wings. The international designer–grande dame showcased eveningwear that evoked a long-gone time and place; women of all shapes could be sexy and modern with a nod to silent film era. Twisted Silver showed up with more repurposed chic costume jewellery for men and women, and My Saint, My Hero was back with an expanded range of cool faith-oriented bracelets and bangles. Celebrities seeking the real deal in jewellery were drawn to Andrea Gutierrez’s nature-inspired statement pieces. Dresses, jumpsuits, rompers, scarves, and tops by Kaya di Koko are wrinkle-free and practical, yet sexy enough for the club or resort.
   Rekorderlig’s fruit cider from Sweden and cocktails made with Royal Élite Vodka from Uzbekistan helped guests quell the late summer heat. However, the star of the show, beverage-wise, was chef–coffee importer–home entertaining maven Bryan David Scott. With assistance from LA mixologist Flairin Farron, Bryan rocked the house with his luxurious iced espresso drinks spiked with Somrus, a cardamon- and rose-scented cream liquor from India. If you insist on top-quality coffee to really wake you up in the morning, check out his news and brews at his aptly named website, cupofluxury.com.
   In the spirit of giving back, guests and sponsors donated unwrapped gifts for young adults (ages 13–18) for a Pre-Holiday Gift Drive benefiting ‘Wednesday’s Child’, a weekly segment airing on KTTV Fox 11 News, Los Angeles, with anchor Christine Devine. ‘Wednesday’s Child’ highlights harder-to-place children in the LA County foster care system who are in need of adoptive families. ‘In Los Angeles County, alone, there are over 35,000 children receiving child welfare services,’ says social worker, Prof William Wong. Doris always invites two foster children to join in on the festivities and experience what it feels like to be treated as a VIP.
   A decade ago, we just couldn’t get enough of the next big things in designer handbags and shoes, studded tank tops and embellished designer denim for the very young and thin starlet. Leave it to Doris to keep things fresh every awards’ season. This go-round, men got the royal treatment.—Leyla Messian, Correspondent; and Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor






Courtesy Doris Bergman










Elyse Glickman

Above, from top: Edyta Sliwinska with Dioo Audio. Jane Lynch with Sue Wong Couture. Jason Ritter with Ein Drink. Kimberly Elise with Personal Touch lingerie. Patrika Darbo with Footmate. Strong enough for a man, designed for a woman: Dioo’s glam audio innovations. Royal Élite Vodka quells the late summer heat. Foot Mate puts its best foot forward. Hollywood haberdasher Art Lewin. My Saint, My Hero puts its faith in gold and silver and a variety of styles. Chilling out with Rekorderlig cider. Coffee chef extraordinaire Bryan David Scott. Legendary designer Sue Wong in top form.

September 3, 2016

Tania Dawson crowned Miss Universe New Zealand 2016 in front of sold-out audience

Lucire staff/15.41




Alan Raga

Above: The moment: Tania Dawson hears the news that she’s been working toward for most of 2016, that she is the new Miss Universe New Zealand. Centre: After the announcement, Samantha McClung crowns her successor, Tania Dawson, Miss Universe New Zealand 2016. Above: Second runner-up Larissa Allen (left) and runner-up Seresa Lapaz (right) flank Miss Universe New Zealand 2016 Tania Dawson.

Secondary school drama and music studies’ teacher Tania Dawson, 23, was crowned Miss Universe New Zealand 2016 Saturday night at Skycity Theatre, taking home prizes including a stay at Plantation Bay Resort & Spa in Cebu, Philippines and the use of a Honda Jazz RS Sport Limited for the duration of her reign.
   Dawson, who is of half-Filipina extraction, was also the crowd favourite, with a large group of supporters in the live theatre audience.
   The event proved to be a Filipina one-two, with Seresa Lapaz, who was born in the Philippines but is a naturalized New Zealander, coming runner-up.
   Both ladies hail from Auckland, while second runner-up Larissa Allen comes from Tauranga.
   Dawson was crowned by her predecessor, Samantha McClung, who flew from Christchurch to join 2013 titleholder Holly Cassidy in a special parade featuring the exclusive designs of Ankia van der Berg of Golden Gowns.
   The sold-out audience enjoyed entertainment from special guest performers Stan Walker, Frankie Stevens, and Ali Walker, as well as the cast of Oh What a Night!, who appeared in a recorded segment filmed earlier on Saturday.
   The destination for Dawson, as well as the other national titleholders, is uncertain, but there have been suggestions it could be the Philippines, and already Lapaz has vowed to support her former competitor should she venture there.
   Dawson says she sees herself as an advocate for education, and entered the competition because she wanted to practise what she preached: to challenge herself and overcome any self-doubt.
   Repeating their roles from last year, Stephen McIvor and Sonia Gray hosted. Stevens was also on the judging panel (particularly appropriate given his similar role in NZ Idol), alongside motivational speaker and social practitioner Areena Deshpande, director of Head2Heels and former Miss Universe New Zealand director Evana Patterson, AJPR boss and BRCA cancer gene awareness champion Anna Jobsz, and arguably the top make-up practitioner and educator in New Zealand, Samala Robinson.
   Thanks to the support of Miss Universe New Zealand’s sponsors, including platinum partners Honda New Zealand, Bench, Skycity, the Quadrant Hotels and Suites, Golden Gowns and Beau Joie, and the fund-raising efforts of each year’s finalists, Miss Universe New Zealand cracked the $100,000 barrier with its donations to Variety, the Children’s Charity, this year.
   The stream was carried on Lucire, The New Zealand Herald and Stuff, and a delayed version will appear on 3Now.

August 23, 2016

H&M’s New Zealand store will be the first to see the Kenzo × H&M collection

Bhavana Bhim/1.45




Oliver Hadlee Pearch

H&M will retail the Kenzo × H&M collaboration announced last month, with the line joining its Sylvia Park store on November 3. With the time difference, this means the New Zealand store is the first to carry the line.
   Since joining Kenzo in 2011, Carol Lim and Humberto Leon have set their own fashion agenda with collections full of bold colours and vivid prints, revealed through high-impact shows, artist collaborations and creative digital campaigns. Global influences and traditions are remixed and fused with the energy of the street, resulting in collections that are both inspirational and accessible to their fans around the world. At Kenzo, fashion expresses freedom, joy and individuality for all.
   ‘We can’t wait to share with everyone the world of Kenzo × H&M, with all of its creativity, fun and love of fashion,’ said Ann-Sofie Johansson, creative adviser at H&M.
   Last month, the brand revealed the four first looks from the collaboration which combine vivid personalities and bright prints of the clothing for a fun atmosphere.
   Amy Sall, a student activist based in New York and founder of SUNU: Journal of African Affairs, Critical Thought & Æsthetics is photographed beside Juliana Huxtable, a 28 year old artist, poet and DJ also based in New York, wearing tiger-print jerseys, roll-neck tops and matching high-waisted leggings. They also wear black leather gloves containing a pink logo print and jacquard knitted tiger-sock shaft boots.
   The second look shows the 19-year-old musician and performance artist based in Paris, Oko Ebombo. He wears a parka with a removable printed collar, block colour tiger-print jeans, plus padded flip-flops with tabi socks. Ebombo also wears a tiger-printed cap with an attached scarf, a printed woven scarf and the tiger-printed cross-body bag.
   The third look shows Isamaya French, a make-up artist based in London, part of the London-based collective, Theo Adams Company. She wears an oversized leather jacket with pink faux shearling lining, with a matching tiger print jersey roll-neck top, and high-waisted leggings.
   The final look is revealed on Anna of the North, a 25-year-old Norwegian musician who gained global attention earlier during the year with her track ‘The Dreamers’. She wears a fresh interpretation by Kenzo’s creative directors, of an iconic design by founder Kenzo Takada: a short folkloric ribbon dress featuring various prints from the collection.
   ‘With this collaboration with H&M we want to think big, push the boundaries and bring the new energy of Kenzo to everyone around the world,’ say Lim and Leon.—Bhavana Bhim


Oliver Hadlee Pearch

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