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December 19, 2015

Jean Paul Gaultier reveals criteria for his ideal Miss France 2016

Lucire staff/12.56


Franziska Krug/Getty Images

Above Jean Paul Gaultier earlier this year at Installations by Designer Jean Paul Gaultier at the Swarovski Kristallwelten Store in Wien.

Miss France 2016, which will be decided Saturday night in Lille with a televised final on TF1, has a very different judging line-up, with fashion designer Jean Paul Gaultier chairing the panel this year.
   Gaultier takes over from Patrick Bruel, who had replaced Québecois singer Garou last year. Garou had stepped in to the chair when long-time chair Alain Delon quit the position after his remarks supporting the National Front political party in France.
   Gaultier had revealed that he had a favourite segment from the night—one where contestants came out in folkloric costumes—and may have an early favourite contestant already.
   He gave no clues to her identity, but says, ‘Miss France has an ambassadorial role. She must be a diplomat. It is very important that is able to express her ideas well, and that she has ideas. And image must count, too.’
   He told Non Stop People, meanwhile, ‘I always look for characters who can inspire me. I love to highlight different beauties.’
   Gaultier is joined on the jury by actress Laetitia Milot, The Voice: la plus belle voix winner Kendji Girac, Miss France 2009 Chloé Mortaud, singer Patrick Fiori, singer–songwriter Anggun, and rugby union player Frédéric Michalak.
   Gaultier said that he has kept the terrorist attacks of November 13 in mind, and that the competition is timely as something that the French people know and can enjoy.

November 27, 2015

Op–ed: Kiribati’s waking nightmare

Lucire staff/11.22

November 27, 2015

Rt Hon John Key, MP, Prime Minister
Hon Bill English, MP, Deputy Prime Minister
Parliament Buildings
Wellington
New Zealand

Dear John and Bill,

I’m having a nightmare. I want to tell you guys about it—to tell you to wake me up; shake me if you have to. Scream me awake, and when I am, I want you to tell me it’s not as bad as it seems.
   I’ve landed in Tarawa, Kiribati, where news from New Zealand awaited me that John has declared his faith that climate change can be addressed with technology—scientists have told him the technology isn’t far off.
   At an official dinner, people look at me as though I have some glorious technology news to pass on. I don’t. I went to bed that evening feeling hollow; figures screaming through my head, the voice of that pesky Jim Salinger uttering the most terrifying words I’ve heard in many years: ‘The world has now entered abrupt climate change.’ You know Jim right, the guy with the Nobel Peace Prize? Gosh, I wish he would shut up with all that sense he talks.
   In the same nightmare I wake the next day to be told that 90 per cent of drinking water wells have been contaminated with E. coli, that the crops at vital plantations are no longer growing due to saltwater poisoning the ground. That lagoons which once fed villages have become infested with E. coli, killing a large bounty of marine life. That the ocean-warming and acidification has killed a majority of the coral atoll that forms the very ground I’m stood on. It’s like a really bad apocalypse video game—I’m anxious that zombies are going to duck out from behind the door. I look around at homes whose front doors the ocean now laps, at dead fruit trees once laden with produce killed by the salt seeping into the soil. I’m failing to see what Tony Abbott found so comical about this situation.
   In this nightmare I wonder what kind of technology could possibly solve this. I then remind myself of John’s track record of absolute reliability, and I feel comforted. The law can’t solve this. I mean, even if it could and there were laws to protect these people, there are no lawyers, and they’d be unaffordable for these people if there were. So, technology must be the saving grace.
   I visited the hospital to witness first-hand what an infant mortality rate 10 times that of New Zealand’s looks like. Have you ever seen such a thing? It’s completely shocking; it hit me with a force a hundred times that of any image of a child lying washed up on a shore a world away. I tried to fight back the tears, and the numbing coldness that consumed my body. I tried not to vomit—but later in the privacy of my room I did find solace in a Fiji Airways sick bag. I sat there and waited for the moment I’d be shaken awake. I desperately wanted John to ride in and tell me that the threat of climate migration is many years off and not something to be worried about. I wanted Bill to sit down and tell me that none of it was real, and the sea levels were not rising.
   John, could you go tell that mate of yours Obama to stop being a bloody alarmist; that according to Bill, there’s no proof Alaskan villages are vanishing into the ocean. That entire nations are not facing forced-extinction from the ocean swallowing them alive. You go tell that puffed-up American know-it-all that he’s alarming the masses, causing me nightmares and unwanted anxiety.
   Bill, could you go tell all those apparently credible scientists who’ve won those fancy awards, that 2015 is not the hottest year in history and they’re just plain wrong. Round them up with Malcolm across the ditch (because they give him a hard time as well) and be done with them. Bully them into submission a bit harder. Just shut them up.

Thanks in advance,

Pearl

§

I imagined the response coming back something a little like this.

Dear Pearl,

You are far too much of a pretty wee thing to be travelling to such far-flung and irrelevant places like Kiribati in your nightmares; to spend time worrying about such things. Why don’t you pay heed to the advice I gave Keisha Castle-Hughes: try visiting the salon for a bad blow-dry instead?
   Don’t worry about other people. By the time New Zealand starts feeling the full effect of climate change we’ll have the technology available to deal with it.
   I’ve also got Malcolm under control—he’s going to share Nauru so we’ve got somewhere to put all those helpless fellow human beings in the Pacific fleeing the rising sea-levels and food shortages. The ones who think they’re right to turn to us for help. I’m going to stop the boats.
   Meanwhile, the Kardashians have a new season, vote for the fern, and use our new buzz word: technology.
   In the meantime, here’s a Live Lokai bracelet. Hold on to it, because before long the Dead Sea and Everest will be things for the history books.

Merry Christmas,

John

§

That’s kind of how this piece came about. I thought I’d write a wee letter. The problem is, the more I wrote and decried the blind buying-in of the latest spin to come out of the ninth floor, the more ridiculous it felt, and the more scared I became in turn. If I’m completely honest, the realization that many—possibly even some reading this piece—didn’t know how absurd the spin had become, worried me to the point of physical sickness. Thanks again Fiji Airways, your sick bags are truly first-class.
   I’m writing this from Kiribati. I’m fully awake. I’m awake in a nightmare. I went to the hospital. I waded through water at high-tide to cross the road infested with human fæces to get there before what they call the ‘morgue’ closed. In a bag at the other end of the room was a pile of clothes and a pair of trainers I never want to see again. I was going to turf them out, but a young woman tasked with showing me around asked if she could have them, since for her wading through the stench of death and fæces was an everyday reality.
   Don’t get me wrong, Kiribati is absolutely beautiful and if it weren’t for the damage wreaked by rising sea levels and climate change, I would focus only on its beauty, but the reality is these threats make the situation people face here far from idyllic. It’s a dire situation, it’s a nightmare.
   A real-life nightmare, there is no amount of shaking that can wake me; though shaking I am, believe me. Shaking from incredulity at the sheer scale of the situation. The problem is I’m not the who needs to be screamed awake. That’s right: if you have ever for one moment entertained the illusion that sea-levels are not rising; that climate change is not the single biggest threat facing humanity; that you can carry on shirking the responsibility to aid in the fight for human survival and dignity, you need to be screamed awake. Will the humanity in you please wake up?
   I’m not saying this with any political leaning. I believe that most of our politicians are drastically failing us all. Who knows what will happen if we leave this to them. I mean, half of those reading this may freak out at the thought of the Green Party controlling the economy, but don’t blink an eyelid at them leading on the issue defined as ‘the single greatest threat to mankind’ by every serious world leader. Why is that? How will the economy exist without our planet?
   Climate change is no longer some far-off theory or problem. It is happening right here and widely through our Pacific backyard. Right now. As you read this climate change is already disrupting our agriculture and ecosystems, our food and water security, our energy, our infrastructure, our health, our safety. Today. Tomorrow. Some more than others but make no mistake it is happening to all of us. It is the issue. An issue that affects all issues, economic included. Everything is and will be impacted. And it becomes more damning with each passing year.
   This matter is far too important to be surrendered to the political domain. This is about humanity. If you think the devastation wreaked by ISIS is as bad as it gets, then please contemplate Mother Nature.
   If the images of parents putting their children into boats because the water was safer than the land left you reeling, then please consider that in the not-too-distant future this will become a reality for many small island states; that many nations in the Pacific will not survive the two-degree cap that Paris is gearing up to gain commitment for in the coming week. They will have to put their children into boats because the water is safer than the land. We have already signed them up for that, and every moment that each of us stands by maintaining the status quo we sign them up for worse—exponentially.
   They will have to flee their homes, forced to migrate due to the lack of food security. Rising sea-levels, along with drastic weather disturbances will make a boat safer than their homes, and these boats will head for our shores.
   Despite this cold hard reality our leaders head into Paris in support of watering a climate agreement down. There’s talk of steps to make the agreement not legally binding. Not many would agree to a marriage or business deal on such terms, I wonder why we are willing to let them negotiate humankind’s survival on such flippant terms.
   During the explosion of the refugee crisis into mainstream media we witnessed both the most hopeful and depraved responses to others’ suffering. I couldn’t help but wonder about the rationale for stopping the boats, for refusing the asylum and migration of those most in need—those least at fault in the destruction of our ecologies, but who will continue to pay the highest price. What possible excuse will we give to keep them out? Do we convince ourselves they’re all terrorists, rapists and murderers to render them exempt from the right to our sympathies, to human dignity? It’s a sad state of affairs that anyone would have to wonder such a thing.
   Leading into the sustainable development goals, New Zealand took a step towards supporting the Pacific, coming out strong and vocal on Sustainable Development Goal 14 (SDG14), which focuses on the conservation and sustainable use of ocean, sea and marine resources. This focus was well warranted, and an open acknowledgement of our responsibility within the region, and our understanding of how many lives depend on the ocean ecologies. I was proud to stand in the General Assembly and hear John Key announce the Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary. It was an important step, but we must be clear that it was but one step in the marathon of steps we need to build a better world.
   In the words of Jim Salinger and virtually every other expert of climate science in the world, the world has entered abrupt climate change. We have already reached tipping-points we cannot mitigate. We are already signed up for things that are going to drastically change life as we know it, this is a cold hard fact. The question that remains now is whether we can summon the courage to turn around and fight for survival. Life is already going to change; but whether we tumble over yet more tipping-points points and the scale of the consequences we face from them is up to us. Sometimes we have little option but to wake ourselves up.
   We have a choice. We can surrender that choice to those who hold offices of power, or we can take that choice into our own consideration. Some say the whole endeavour to pull back from this is hopeless. I’m not willing to accept that. I simply refuse to stand by and let life go without a fight.
   John Key used very interesting rhetoric this week. He used the word ‘faith’. He is placing his faith in technology. Instead I am going to place my faith in humankind—the creators of technology. I am going to place my faith in our ability to comprehend the magnitude of what we face, and choose survival. I ask you to join not just myself, but others around the world in doing so. We still have a fighting chance to make things better. They won’t get better unless we take action and inspire others to do the same. No one is without power: everybody has the capacity to take a few steps.
   I’ve written this for those who know how to challenge the status quo intelligently. The doers, the thinkers, the problem-solvers. I’m not asking anyone to climb something or break laws, just that each person reading this ponders for a minute about how they can contribute, what steps they can take.
   So as we lead into the COP21 talks, billed as a defining moment in human history, at a time when recent events have given us ample reason to desert our faith in our own kind, I encourage every single person reading this to ask themselves what they can do to take action. This weekend millions of citizens around the world are exercising their rights, their freedoms, using their voices and taking to the streets to send world leaders an imperative to act and take meaningful action.
   Mark my words: a decade or possibly two from now it won’t be the Rugby World Cup final you remember with pride. What will be etched in your memory is whether you answered humanity’s call for survival, whether you were one of those who actually did something. Sometimes that something is simply the act of showing up to show solidarity with humankind. In Paris where world leaders have gathered there can be no march, because the worst of humanity put on a display that has left millions of innocent people terrorized. So in the coming week I will be keeping my eyes firmly on Paris, I am marching, I am lending my effort to reinforce the very best in humanity, because if there’s one thing the world needs right now, it’s more of the good.
   It’s only so big, it goes around and we are all on it—Earth. I believe it’s worth saving, do you?—Pearl Going


Disruption, excerpt: ‘Tipping Points’ from Disruption on Vimeo


Above Kiribati President Anote Tong with his TED discussion, ‘My country will be underwater soon—unless we work together’. Click above to watch.

Guest contributor Pearl Going is a global communications’ strategist who has worked broadly across entertainment, human rights and environmental issues. Her most recent work includes the Mercy Campaign, Rohingya Slavery and SIDS. She is an avid climber and has climbed five of the seven summits.

October 14, 2015

Nivea launches #standfirm campaign for its Q10 Firming Body Lotion: ageing shouldn’t mean invisibility

Lucire staff/13.49

Nivea has released a campaign for the Australian and New Zealand markets, promoting its Q10 Firming Body Lotion.
   Featuring lettering artist Georgia Hill and her mother, Judy, the video discusses how roles change. Mothers help their children find themselves when they are being brought up, and later in life, the video shows how children can return that sense of self-confidence to their mothers.
   Hill said, ‘My mum and I wanted to do this campaign because we both relate to it. I think it’s something you don’t realize until you are older yourself, but I’ve always had my mum there to help build my confidence in a way that is so consistent you almost forget how it shapes you—until you need to do the same for her in return.’
   The touching, matter-of-fact video reinforces a study from Nivea that polled 400 Australian mothers and daughters about ageing. Eighty-seven per cent of women feel ageism is a reality, with over 76 per cent believing it is more prevalent toward women, and over 70 per cent see Hollywood contributing to this culture.
   Sixty-eight per cent of women feel they are being made invisible by society as they age.
   Ninety-four per cent of women believe they should be more mindful of helping other women feel more visible, and 94 per cent, similarly, feel mothers need to be reminded of their worth.
   Nivea’s #standfirm campaign—very likely an intentional play on words—wants to highlight how women can share affirmations. ‘Getting older does not mean we are not getting more fabulous and wiser,’ noted media commentator Bianca Dye in a Nivea release. Nivea invites people to watch the video and to share it with their affirmations.

September 28, 2015

Video: Victoria Beckham, Charlize Theron speak at United Nations General Assembly on ending Aids by 2030

Lucire staff/13.22



UNAIDS

Top UNAIDS executive director Michel Sidibé with Victoria Beckham. Above Charlize Theron addresses the high-level UN event.

On Sunday, Victoria Beckham made her first public appearance since London Fashion Week, speaking at the United Nations in New York in her capacity as a UNAIDS goodwill ambassador at the 70th session of the UN General Assembly.
   Beckham spoke on the first day of the Social Good Summit, appearing alongside other luminaries such as HRH Princess Sarah Zeid of Jordan, UNDP administrator and former New Zealand prime minister Helen Clark, former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, Charlize Theron, Jennifer López, Laverne Cox, Alek Wek, and humanitarian Graca Machel.
   Beckham saw her platform as one where she can help the goal of ensuring that no baby is born with HIV. ‘I will do whatever I can to raise awareness. I feel very passionate about this,’ she said. ‘I recently visited South Africa and was so touched by the women I met and felt inspired. I came home and I knew I had to do something.’
   Said Theron, Messenger of Peace for the United Nations and founder of the Charlize Theron Africa Outreach Project, ‘There is a generation in jeopardy. Young people are falling through the cracks in the Aids response. But there is reason to hope, we know what works—empowering young people to take care of their health.’
   The UN has set a goal of ending Aids by 2030, as part of its ambitious Sustainable Development Goals.
   Clark noted, ‘For me it’s about peaceful and inclusive societies, because without that we don’t have the basis for any sustainable development at all. It’s about momentum, hold people accountable, hold your governments accountable, stay engaged as citizens, keep advocating on social media and not wait 15 years to see what happens.’

September 7, 2015

Huawei and futurist Sabine Seymour predict technology’s impact on fashion

Lucire staff/22.44


We know that fashion and technology will continue coming together, and we’ve seen some innovative ideas where technology impacts on what we wear—including clothing that senses a person’s mood and alters itself accordingly. If Dr Sabine Seymour, futurist, author of Fashionable Technology, and professor of fashion and technology at Parsons is right, these ideas will become mainstream, including several others that would have been science fiction a generation ago.
   Huawei, the Chinese mobile device manufacturer, has teamed up with Seymour, as it launched a new smartwatch, which it called ‘premium … with a classic design, which is also technologically innovative.’
   Huawei’s new watch, measuring 42 mm in diameter, features a touch-sensitive AMOLED display coated in scratch-proof sapphire crystal and a stainless steel frame.
   Seymour says our underwear will begin having sensors that track personal data, such as heart rate and body temperature—an evolution of some of the exercise accessories that are commonplace today.
   We will be able to change the pattern, colour, shape and style of our garments in the future, forecasts Seymour, with technology more seamlessly integrated into clothing. Clothes will become gesture- and touch-sensitive. Length and shape can change as required, and users will be able to download new designs. Newly downloaded prints can display on to the garment.
   Garments that adjust to body temperature are on the horizon, too, while 3-D printing and on-demand manufacturing will see shoes produced in the home to a perfect fit. They will also connect to cars, which will adjust the seat accordingly.
   These fashions will be sustainable and their power will come possibly from kinetic energy, rather than batteries.



June 23, 2015

Ralph Lauren and British Vogue host Wimbledon party: Matt Smith, Jessica Chastain, Lily James attend

Fenella Clarke/22.54




Chris Allerton

On Monday, Ralph Lauren celebrated its 10th year as official outfitters of the championships at Wimbledon, with a summer cocktail party hosted by British Vogue editor Alexandra Shulman and former number-one professional tennis player Boris Becker. It was held at the Kensington Palace Orangery in London and guests enjoyed a live DJ set by Chelsea Leyland, and British-inspired canapés, summer cocktails, Pimms and champagne.
   Ralph Lauren is the first brand to create all the outfits on court in Wimbledon’s 129-year history, including umpires and ball persons.
   Co-hosts of the event were Game of Thrones’ Gwendoline Christie, along with Princess Marie-Chantal of Greece, the Countess of Mornington, actor Philip Brook, former tennis pro Richard Lewis, CBE, and Ali Spencer-Churchill. Many were adorned in Ralph Lauren and Polo Ralph Lauren: Shulman in a Ralph Lauren Collection navy silk Rylie dress and cashmere cardigan; Christie wore a black skater dress with a mesh panel on top, with a orange nappa leather envelope clutch; Lily James wore a white midi-length shirt dress paired with a gold lizard strappy jean sandal; while Jessica Chastain wore a black high-neck sleeveless dress with white inverted pleats. Actress Emily Mortimer wore a simple white shift dress, while Alice Eve wore a camel-coloured long-sleeve, high-necked dress; Maisie Richardson-Sellers was there looking stunning in a metallic organza shift dress with gathered sleeve detail, Downton Abbey actress Joanne Froggatt looked like the epitome of summer in a yellow sleeveless dress. Of the stylish men present, Boris Becker wore a royal blue suit and former Doctor Who star Matt Smith wore a navy suit, a blue striped shirt and a green tie.
   Other guests included Jeremy Irvine, Lottie Moss, Lady Kitty Spencer, YouTubers Jim Chapman and Tanya Burr, Erin O’Connor, Laura Bailey, Lily Becker, Joanna Vanderham, Sophie Kennedy Clark, Jamie and Ale Murray, Mollie King, Sam Rollinson, Charlotte Wiggins, Lara Millen, Petra Palumbo, Tania Fares, Lady Helen Taylor and Tim Taylor, Lady Kinvara Balfour, Alice Naylor-Leyland, Jessica, Camilla and Emily Staveley-Taylor (the Staves), Ella Catliff, Jenny Halpern and Ryan Prince, Jade Parfitt, Viscount Althorp, Alice Brudendell-Bruce, Charlotte Dellal, Bay Garnett and Tom Craig, Emily Johnston, and Catherine Kallon.—Fenella Clarke















































Chris Allerton

May 27, 2015

Reasons to raise a glass as Stoneleigh, Mumm, Hennessy and Ardbeg celebrate around the world

Lucire staff/12.49



Victor Boyko/Getty Images

Top Mark Ronson celebrates with Champagne Mumm in Monaco. Above Julie Nollet, Raphaël Gérard, Hervé Mikaeloff, Olga Kisseleva, Bernard Peillon, Laurent Pernot, and François Xavier Desplancke pose at the ribbon-cutting ceremony during the Hennessy 250 Tour at the New Manege in Moskva. Below left The award-winning Stoneleigh Latitude Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2014.

Several wine and spirits brands have reasons to celebrate today. New Zealand’s Stoneleigh has received a gold medal at the 2015 Decanter World Wine Awards for its Latitude Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2014. This honour, from the world’s largest and most influential wine show (competing against over 10,000 wines), joins others than Stoneleigh has received lately, with the same vintage winning gold at the New Zealand International Wine Show and Easter Show Wine Awards, and a trophy at the Marlborough Wine Show.
   Maison Mumm, meanwhile, celebrated the launch of the world’s first digitally connected champagne bottle. And since Mark Ronson was in town, why not get him on board another yacht to DJ the event?
   When the cork is popped at the Formula One podium, a sensor sends a signal to the venue’s AV system, triggering the programmed entertainment. VIP guests at the event included Cara Delevingne, Poppy Delevingne, Eddie Jordan, and club owner Jean-Roch. Singtank, the duo of Ronson’s wife Josephine de la Baume and her brother Alexandre de la Baume, also performed.
   Ronson was asked to present the winning Mumm jeroboam to Nico Rosberg on the 2015 Monaco Grand Prix podium.
   The Hennessy 250 Tour has arrived at the New Manege in Moskva. This travelling art and culture exhibition, curated by Hervé Mikaeloff, in collaboration with scenographer Nathalie Crinière and Hennessy heritage expert Raphaël Gérard, celebrates Hennessy’s history and future, with archival materials, portraits and films. Artworks and installations by Xavier Veilhan, Pierrick Sorin, Constance Guisset, Tony Oursler, Charles Sandison and Anton Corbijn feature, while the Russian stop additionally sees Olga Kisseleva’s work, Dancing Spirit, and a contemporary dance performance by Farfor. The tour is open till May 30.
   VIPs at the launch include Maurice Richard Hennessy, Corbijn and Kisseleva, Gérard, Hennessy CEO Bernard Peillon, François Xavier Desplancke, Laurent Pernot, seventh-generation master blender Yann Fillioux, Interview Russia editor Aliona Doletskaya, and Tatler Russia editor-in-chief Ksenia Solovieva, Olga Karput, Sofia Zaika, Olga Thompson, Miranda Mirianashvili, and Museum of Contemporary Art director Vasili Tsereteli and his wife Kira Sacarello. The gala dinner was followed by a performance from stars from the Bolshoi Theatre and a tasting of the Hennessy 250 Collector Blend.
   Ardbeg celebrates its 200th anniversary this year, and marks the occasion with a grand Ardbeg Day on May 30, when Ardbeg “embassies” around the world hold a series of events. This year’s limited-edition Ardbeg Perpetuum will be present, and New Zealand, which will be the first to hit May 30, will hold its Ardbeg Day celebrations at House of Whiskey, 50 Courthouse Lane, Auckland; Regional Wines & Spirits, 15 Ellice Street, Mt Victoria, Wellington; and Whisky Galore, 66 Victoria Street, Christchurch.


















Victor Boyko/Getty Images

May 22, 2015

Aishwarya Rai, Karlie Kloss, Paris Hilton, Kendall Jenner, Liu Wen among celebrities at AmFAR gala at Cannes

Lucire staff/2.04


Ian Gavan


Dominique Charriau


Venturelli

Cannes’ AmFAR Gala is the big bash during the film festival, with celebrities this year flocking to the Cinema Against Aids event at the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc at the Cap d’Antibes. Over the years, the event has raised US$140 million for AmFAR’s research programmes designed to consign Aids to history.
   Celebrities attending this year included Aishwarya Rai Bachchan (wearing a mauve Elie Saab gown; husband and co-event chair Abhishek Bachchan could not be present due to work commitments), Kendall Jenner (in Calvin Klein), Toni Garrn (in Elie Saab), Irina Shayk (in Atelier Versace), Doutzen Kroes, Paris Hilton (in Yanina, with jewellery by Avakian), Selita Ebanks, Eli Mizrahi, Chanel Iman, Petra Němcová, Jourdan Dunn, Karlie Kloss (in a silver Tom Ford), Eva Longoria (in Georges Hobeika), Soo-Joo Park, Barbara Palvin, Isabeli Fontana, Antonio Banderas, Li Yuchun, Natasha Poly, Sienna Miller, Marion Cotillard, Adriana Lima, Liu Wen, Rita Ora (in Marchesa), Lily Donaldson, Dita von Teese, Lara Stone, Gigi Hadid (in Tom Ford), Noomi Rapace, Diane Kruger, Sara Sampaio, Bella Hadid, and Tom Ford. Donning jewellery by de Grisogono were Kloss, Sampaio, Joan Smalls, and Izabel Goulart. Sharon Stone commemorated 20 years of supporting AmFAR at the event.
   This year’s Black and White Collection fashion show was curated by Carine Roitfeld, with music by Mark Ronson. Imagine Dragons, Mary J. Blige and Charli XCX (wearing Vivienne Westwood) performed live at the event.
   Sponsors included Bold Films, Harry Winston (who created an Epic Cluster necklace for the auction, with proceeds going to HIV–Aids research), the Weinstein Company, and Moët Hennessy.
   L’Oréal Paris treated the evening as the perfect opportunity to showcase its support of the entire Festival de Cannes, with 10 of its spokeswomen attending—promoting its Superstar line of mascaras and eye-liners and Infaillible lipsticks and foundations that have proven to be staples for celebrities this year.
















Gareth Cattermole






























Ian Gavan; Pascal Le Segretain/AmFAR15; George Pimentel/AmFAR15; Venturelli; courtesy AmFAR

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