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Pamela Anderson joins Antartica2020 to advocate for the Southern Ocean

Filed by Lucire staff/September 1, 2021/22.04

Actress and activist Pamela Anderson is lending her voice to Antarctica2020, a group calling for the protection of the Southern Ocean and its wilderness.
   She joins other luminaries such as Philippe Cousteau, Sylvia Earle, Slava Fetisov, José Maria Figueres, Geneviève Pons, Ashlan Gorse Cousteau, and others, who are already members of the group.
   ‘The world is warming, and the polar regions are warming the fastest. The Southern Ocean—which has buffered humanity from the full extent of climate change—is reaching a tipping point. Thousands of the world’s leading scientists overwhelmingly conclude that if we don’t take immediate action to tackle the nature and climate crises, ice melt will accelerate, and sea water will rise and warm to terrifying levels. This will have disastrous and irreversible impacts on ocean life and threaten human existence,’ said the group in a release.
   Anderson added, ‘I have been an activist for more than two decades and see more and more how important it is to radically rethink our relation towards nature and animals. The state of our planet affects all our lives. Many people don’t realize that even Antarctica, one of the remotest parts of the world, plays a major role in how our planet functions. We need to do everything we can to safeguard it, which is why I have joined this campaign.
   ‘The climate crisis is melting Antarctica’s ice much faster than predicted. This is already having disastrous impacts on its amazing wildlife such as penguins, seals and whales, all of which are struggling to keep alive amid all these rapid changes to their home. It is absolutely terrifying, as we are speeding towards a number of tipping points, that are the point of no return for the region and the planet.
   ‘We really need world leaders to step up their game and show real political leadership. They can make history this year by protecting these areas in Antarctica and securing the greatest act of ocean protection ever. We must fight for action for ourselves and future generations because there’s too much to lose if we don’t.’
   The ocean current around Antarctica regulates the entire planet’s climate system, keeping it cool and liveable.
   Antarctica2020 works with Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition (ASOC), the Pew Charitable Trusts, Ocean Unite, Sea Legacy and Only One, among others, to protect the Southern Ocean. They have proposals to protect areas in the East Antarctic, Weddell Sea and the Antarctic Peninsula, covering 4,000,000 km², or 1 per cent of the ocean.

 


Stefania Ferrario would rather go naked than wear wool in latest PETA PSA

Filed by Lucire staff/July 20, 2021/11.08

PETA’s latest spokesperson in its ‘I’d rather go naked’ campaign is Stefania Ferrario, the Australian model who’s urging people to ‘leave wool behind’.
   Ferrario’s message is that ‘Ewe can do better! Wear vegan.’
   In the campaign video shown below, Ferrario says, ‘Workers are being paid for the volume of wool they’re producing, so when they’re shearing the sheep, they’re going really fast. The sheep can end up having horrific gashes, bleeding, and then they’ll sew the sheep up without any anæsthetic.’ Viewers are advised that there are distressing scenes.
   PETA and its affiliates’ exposés have revealed that Australian sheep have chunks cut off their backsides during mulesing, and found distressing cruelty at each of the 100 properties they visited.
   Ferrario has over 1 million Instagram followers and has modelled for some of the world’s biggest brands. She joins celebrities such as Alicia Silverstone, Arianwen Parkes-Lockwood, and Joaquin Phoenix in speaking out against the barbarism in the wool industry. PETA notes that wool is ranked on the Higg Materials Sustainability Index as worse for the environment than polyurethane, nylon, and acrylic.

 


Made out of What?!: a digital magazine considers sustainability and style

Filed by Lucire staff/July 12, 2021/16.43

How to merge sustainable vision and fashion? A tough call, and many are still rushing at the answer. A few years ago the American art visionary Denise Domergue established a not-for-profit to engage the first half of that question in the context of art.
   The Made Out of What?! initiative has mounted exhibitions, sponsored artist work, and created a library of informative videos highlighting how artists have engaged and embraced the concept of circular economy. To date they’ve launched a global movement, even going so far as to build an exhibit pavilion in the centre of NYC’s Times Square, a temporary structure made from repurposed materials which attracted global attention. Now a quarterly digital magazine from MOOW tracks the project’s progress.
   The current issue addresses sustainability and style, a topic dear to the hearts of Lucire readers. You can view and download the issue here.
   More importantly, participation, a donation or membership in support of the foundation’s work will make a difference in helping to reimagine Planet Earth in the shape we all would like to see.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor

 


Institute of Positive Fashion Forum aims to make real change for sustainable development

Filed by Lucire staff/May 18, 2021/9.35

The Institute of Positive Fashion Forum will take place digitally on June 10, and runs from 9 a.m. to a final event with Stella McCartney commencing at 6.10 p.m.
   The thought leadership event is designed to galvanize the fashion industry—one of the planet’s major contributors to environmental harm—into action, ahead of COP26.
   Tickets are £150, and speakers include Virgil Abloh, Kering chief sustainability officer Marie-Claure Daveu, British Fashion Council CEO Caroline Rush, Baroness Lola Young of Hornsey, Burberry CEO Marco Gobbetti, Priyanka Chopra Jonas, British Fashion Council chair Stephanie Phair, Parley for the Oceans founder Cyrill Gutsch, Centre for Sustainable Fashion director Dilys Williams, Alexander McQueen CEO Emmanuel Gintzburger, and other luminaries. A more complete list of speakers and the day’s programme are available here.
   Sessions include ‘Positioning Around COP 26: the Role of UK Fashion to Help Fight Climate Change’; ‘Future of Fashion: Innovation for Climate Action’; ‘Fashion and Nature: How Biodiversity Is Moving up the Corporate Agenda’; and ‘Social Justice: Eliminating Exploitation in the Supply Chain’.
   ‘Fashion and Nature’ will feature journalist Bandana Tewari, Dilys Williams, Dr Helen Crowley of Kering, and Michael Wessely of Sheep, Inc.
   The intent is to provide real tools to effect change and ticket-holders are encouraged to make serious commitments to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, the Race to Net Zero, and others.
   Tickets are available here.

 


Are these the trends we’ll remember the 2020s by?

Filed by Jack Yan/May 12, 2021/23.35

A fashion magazine seems to have a few roles. The first is to create a record of trends, not just reporting on them but preempting them, as a snapshot of where society is at any given moment. The second is arguably to chart culture itself, and just what the Zeitgeist is.
   If the articles in this May 2021 number of Lucire KSA is any indication, there is a complexity in design right now. Perfume bottles, jewellery and watches in our ‘Luxury Line’ pages at the back of the magazine are an indication: we seem to marvel at the intricacies of complex jewellery right now, and the “in” watch is the skeleton type, where the inner workings are exposed for all to see.
   But it’s not just in these accessories and beauty products; Meg Hamilton’s Paris Fashion Week report reveals layered clothing, tweed coats with knitted patterns, Norwegian sweaters, floral prints and padding. Even Stella McCartney, who delivered punchier colours without as much complexity in the patterns, told of volume with bell-bottom trousers.
   Volume is in, and a fashion historian might point to other times when that has been the case. I won’t explore that in this editorial, but I am intrigued about the reasons. Are they reflections of how we view our lives as being complex? Is the volume something we demand because we need protection from such an uncertain world? Meg’s thesis is quite the opposite: we are emerging from our cocoons, and it’s end of the hibernation forced upon us by COVID-19.
   The reality is that we won’t know for sure till some time has passed and we reflect on the times we live in, and each decade falls into a caricature of its one outstanding trend. It’s why westerners think of miniskirts for the 1960s and Laura Ashley for the 1970s, and the 1980s were the decade of power dressing. The 1990s might be summarized by grunge, and logomania might well dominate the 2000s. These are not accurate constructs: they are shortcuts that we give periods of time to convey a sense of nostalgia or, when it comes to film, to purposely set something in a certain era that audiences can collectively reminisce about. And in so many cases, they are ex post facto justifications of those eras, allied with social and political trends.
   If we were to take a punt on how this era will be remembered, we need to keep those non-fashion trends in mind. And maybe these times will be remembered for their complexity, even if every generation thinks they are living through the most complex period in history. The items you see in this issue might well come to represent this decade, more than the necklines of dresses that revealed instead of concealed that we saw out the 2010s on. Ultimately, however, only time will tell.—Jack Yan, Founder and Publisher


Above: From the Stella McCartney autumn–winter 2021–2 collection.

 


How ethical are the clothes we buy today?

Filed by Lucire staff/May 7, 2021/12.23

Top photograph: Amanda Vick/Unsplash

Our garments speak volumes of our values and set the stage for the image we want to build of ourselves. We wear red to portray power. Black is our surefire way to exude sophistication. Silk is luxurious while denim is urban and rebellious. The clothes we put on every morning tell a story—but they also build our intricate relationship with the world.
   What might feel good on your skin might not lie so comfortably on your conscience. With sweatshops, underaged workers, toxic dyes, and seasonal collections rushing to the shelves, the restless beat of fast fashion has stirred many to take a different approach. We now have access to a wide selection of brands that are paving the road toward a better, cleaner, safer future.

Ethical stamps and labels
Fortunately for us, fashion aficionados, it’s relatively easy to come across labels that can be trusted today. However, you can also go beyond what you find online and research what your locally present brands are all about. Perhaps they can offer ethical certification to show just how committed they are to the cause, and what they are doing to make a difference.

Local shops for a greater impact

Becca McHaffie/Unsplash

Large-scale fashion brands often lack the transparency we need to know if they don’t have any sweatshops handling the manufacturing, or similarly unethical processes behind their public image. Small, local businesses are the ones that offer all that information openly—you can easily find their manufacturing facilities or design shops around the corner and talk to their employees.
   In eco-conscious regions like Australia, everything from casualwear to formalwear can be purchased in the same spirit. The selection of ethical women’s workwear in Australia is also on the rise, and many professional women are choosing the kind of attire that lasts for years on end. This philosophy combines the idea of timelessness and the spirit of local brands to support the development of ethical fashion.

Long-lasting, not seasonal
As alluring as it is to switch our wardrobes at the turn of every season, that is precisely what keeps the wheels of fast fashion turning. We can do better. Opting for timeless instead of trendy, and choosing durable pieces made of materials that can last for more than a couple of months should be one of the pillars of ethical shopping.
   Go for garments made of sustainable and durable fabrics like linen, hemp, and bamboo. Look for other alternatives that will keep your items wearable for a good, long while.

Brand transparency and reports

Mr Lee/Unsplash

Brands that turn to vague terminology and zero access to real data are the ones we should steer clear of. Fashion labels that are transparent in the kind of efforts they are making are the ones we can turn to for truly ethical dressing. Be it accessories the likes of Elvis & Kresse, or athleisure, you can easily find brands that share their impact with the public.

The fabrics and dyes in use
Sustainable processing and manufacturing are two major aspects of ethical brands. Microplastics in synthetic fibres tend to cause irreparable damage to the marine world and the entire planet. As for the toxic dyes so frequently used, they also cause immense damage to water even in urban areas where that same water should be safe for drink and the local ecosystems.
   Some brands are looking for ways to recycle and repurpose for the sake of ethics. Like Coco Veve from Britain and Horizon Athletic from Australia, many are making way for smarter choices in fabric selection, for us to make better choices in how we dress.
   Ethical brands don’t hide behind vague terminology such as ‘responsible’ or ‘clean’. They showcase the impact of their work in data, reports, and employee reviews, and they make sure you can access it all in a matter of clicks.
   The idea that ethical clothing is costly should be dismantled right away—it all depends on the price you’re willing to pay for the health of your family, yourself, the people participating in the making of your clothing, and the natural world. Is the extra couple of dollars really going to offset your budget as much as toxic dyes and unfair labour can devastate our economies and the planet for the long haul? The choice is, ultimately, yours to make.—Peter Minkoff

Peter Minkoff is a fashion and lifestyle editor at Trend Privé magazine. Follow Peter on Twitter for more tips.

 


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