Lucire: News


November 11, 2015

TAG Heuer launches Connected Watch with Intel and Google, based on classic Carrera design

Lucire staff/5.30

Rob Kim

While it might not be surprising to see Apple and Huawei introduce smart watches, Swiss watchmaker TAG Heuer has created its entry, revealed at the weekend at LVMH Tower in Manhattan at an event hosted by Jean-Claude Biver, CEO of TAG Heuer, Brian Krzanich, CEO of Intel, and David Singleton, VP of engineering for Android at Google.
   The TAG Heuer Connected Watch with Intel Inside blends Android Wear technology with the quality and pedigree of the Swiss brand. TAG Heuer worked with Intel and Google to pack its watch with apps—including exclusive ones on lifestyle, golf, motor racing and trailing—as well as voice control, an Intel Atom Z34XX processor, 4 Gbyte of memory, all-day battery life, wifi, Bluetooth and audio streaming, all in a water-resistant 46 mm diameter grade 2 titanium case with a textured rubber strap. Of course there are also timer, alarm and stopwatch functions.
   There is a sapphire crystal touch-screen, and by default the watch retains its classic appearance, with the most pertinent information appearing inside the three chronograph counters at the 12, 6 and 9 o’clock positions. One can choose from one of three digital watch faces, inspired by the TAG Heuer Carrera range. When you want more, you touch the counter, and the app goes into full-screen mode. It will remain connected to the cloud as long as there is wifi. Its base applications remain running regardless of connectivity. The retail price is US$1,500, €1.350 or £1,100.
   For those who fall out of love with the digital world, TAG Heuer says customers can exchange it for a mechanical watch at the end of its two-year warranty period.

Rob Kim

November 6, 2015

Huawei Watch hits UK market, with classic design, and Android and IOS pairing

Lucire staff/11.51

The Huawei Watch has now hit the UK market, available from Vmall, Selfridges and Google Store at prices ranging between £289 and £369. The revolutionary watch, running Android Wear, with the added ability to pair with IOS, is offered with a choice of 40 classic faces on its 400- by 400-pixel 286 ppi screen, which gives way to displays from its many apps, including fitness tracking, a phone-finding function, and other features. Buyers have a choice of stainless steel or black frames, and black leather, stainless steel mesh, stainless steel link or black-plated stainless steel link straps.
   A launch event was held on November 4 at the Mondrian Hotel in London, with a discussion on the future of wearables in UK fashion led by vlogger Jim Chapman, LS:N Global co-founder Chris Sanderson and Huawei global brand director Amy Lou, and hosted by presenter and columnist Darren Kennedy; and three catwalk shows. The Hackney Colliery Band performed live at the function.
   The watch measures 42 mm in diameter, with a circular AMOLED display coated in scratch-proof sapphire crystal.

October 20, 2015

Tommy Hilfiger unveils virtual-reality shopping experience, launching first at Fifth Avenue Store

Lucire staff/21.25

How fitting that October 20—Lucire’s anniversary—is the date of another technological landmark, with Tommy Hilfiger announcing its virtual reality shopping experience, launching today at its Fifth Avenue store in New York City.
   Wearing a Samsung Gear VR device, customers can find themselves immersed in a 360-degree presentation of Tommy Hilfiger’s fall–winter 2015–16 runway collection, as though they were sitting in the front row at the Park Avenue Armory on February 16, 2015. There is also an exclusive backstage view not traditionally open to audiences.
   Hilfiger said in a release, ‘Through virtual reality, we’re now able to bring our one-of-a-kind fashion show to the retail setting. From the incredible set and music to exclusive backstage moments, consumers will be able to watch the clothes move and see the collection in the original show environment—it’s a compelling and interesting elevation of the traditional shopping experience.’
   Tommy Hilfiger CEO Daniel Grieder added, ‘Through cutting-edge virtual reality technology, we can invite shoppers to experience the Hilfiger Collection fashion show from a front row seat. We’re using virtual reality to open the doors to a unique part of our world, directly connecting the consumers in our retail space with one of our largest brand events each season.’
   The company’s aim is to increase social engagement. The virtual reality set-up was created in collaboration with WeMakeVR, and captured with the proprietary WeMakeVR-Falcon camera.
   The virtual reality programme will roll out in London (Brompton Road and Regent Street, and at wholesale with Selfridges), Paris (Boulevard des Capucines and Champs-Élysées), Milano (Piazza Guglielmo Oberdan), Amsterdam (P. C. Hooftstraat), Düsseldorf (Schadowstraße), Firenze (Piazza degli Antinori), Zürich (Bahnhofstraße) and Moskva (Kuznetsky Most) afterwards.

September 29, 2015

Huawei, Vogue China and Fornasetti collaborate on custom smart watch, released at Milan Fashion Week

Alex Barrow/23.17

Vittorio Zunino Celotto

A collaboration between big names Huawei, Vogue China and Fornasetti sparked the creation of the Fornasetti smart watch, the unveiling of which was done at Vogue China’s 10-year anniversary celebrations. Celebrated at the closure of Milan Fashion Week, the introduction of the special edition watch has allowed for it to be seen in the limelight of the fashion world.
   Huawei, a global innovation company, works towards bettering and expanding on telecom networks. With a focus on consumer product, technical innovation and research and development, the company has expanded through Asia, Europe, the US and Russia. Huawei’s crowd-sourcing specialists have opened up a platform for outside artists and designers to contribute designs for appropriate accessories to complement the watch such as customized skins, or potential ideas for future technologies such as smart phones or smart watches.
   The watch itself is a product of Huawei Business Group, but the design was customized by Fornasetti, the celebrated interior design and fashion label. The watch has all the traditional makings of a high-quality, sophisticated watch such as the scratch-resistant sapphire crystal class and stainless steel frame, as well as the traditional 42 mm diameter of the watch face itself. What makes this accessory stand out is its technical capabilities, inclusive of playing music downloads offline, Bluetooth connections and a heart rate and motion sensor. These make it the ideal companion for monitored physical activity without the bulk of other smart technologies.
   Designer Barnaba Fornasetti said his design had a multi-dimensional inspiration to it which contributed to the final product. ‘The Fornasetti brand is built upon the revival and reinvention of its classic designs and objects, giving them a new purpose and always keeping its artisan approach. The Lina face is a part of my father’s legacy and to reinforce its timeless design, I paradoxically decided to apply it on a cutting edge product that keeps time.’ The image on the watch face is a vintage-style depiction of a woman’s face, namely inspired by that of Lina Cavalieri, an Italian opera singer. This image is an established symbol of Fornasetti and has been used in a similar fashion in the label’s past designs.
   The collaboration between the three large names has allowed space for future business endeavours, opening up each other’s company networks. Glory Zhang of Huawei said, ‘This collaboration with Fornasetti is the start of an exciting journey for Huawei, delivering connections between innovative technology and art, design and culture. This is the first of many exciting cultural collaborations as we move to become an innovator within the arts’.
   Notable attendees of the event included models Karlie Kloss and Sean O’Pry, AC Milan footballer Riccardo Montolivo and model Cristina de Pin, fashion photographer Mario Testino, Giorgio Armani, Vogue China editor-in-chief Angelica Cheung. Representing Huawei was Glory Zhang, its chief marketing officer. All attendees of the event were gifted with the smart watches and modelled them for the evening.—Alex Barrow

Vittorio Zunino Celotto

September 7, 2015

Huawei and futurist Sabine Seymour predict technology’s impact on fashion

Lucire staff/22.44

We know that fashion and technology will continue coming together, and we’ve seen some innovative ideas where technology impacts on what we wear—including clothing that senses a person’s mood and alters itself accordingly. If Dr Sabine Seymour, futurist, author of Fashionable Technology, and professor of fashion and technology at Parsons is right, these ideas will become mainstream, including several others that would have been science fiction a generation ago.
   Huawei, the Chinese mobile device manufacturer, has teamed up with Seymour, as it launched a new smartwatch, which it called ‘premium … with a classic design, which is also technologically innovative.’
   Huawei’s new watch, measuring 42 mm in diameter, features a touch-sensitive AMOLED display coated in scratch-proof sapphire crystal and a stainless steel frame.
   Seymour says our underwear will begin having sensors that track personal data, such as heart rate and body temperature—an evolution of some of the exercise accessories that are commonplace today.
   We will be able to change the pattern, colour, shape and style of our garments in the future, forecasts Seymour, with technology more seamlessly integrated into clothing. Clothes will become gesture- and touch-sensitive. Length and shape can change as required, and users will be able to download new designs. Newly downloaded prints can display on to the garment.
   Garments that adjust to body temperature are on the horizon, too, while 3-D printing and on-demand manufacturing will see shoes produced in the home to a perfect fit. They will also connect to cars, which will adjust the seat accordingly.
   These fashions will be sustainable and their power will come possibly from kinetic energy, rather than batteries.

May 30, 2015

News in brief: Chi launches Touch 2; Electra bicycles’ 1970s’ inspiration; Hair La Vie’s new video campaign

Lucire staff/7.29

Farouk Systems’ Chi has launched a new touch-screen hair-drier, the Touch 2 (MSRP US$199·99), with more customization options. It features a 2·24-inch touch-screen control and that control the temperature, ions and speed, and allows users to tailor their blow-outs based on one’s hair texture. The drier can emit more ions for thick, coarse hair, and fewer for normal and fine hair. Chi’s ceramic technology generates moist heat and a consistent temperature.
   Electra reminds us that for summer 2015, its range of retro-styled bicycles are ideal for getting to the fun events of the season. The 1970s-inspired designs and bright colours of orange, pink and yellow, along with flower prints that some will remember were staples in period interiors, mark out the line. There are also interchangeable tassles for the handlebars, and other customization features. However, Electra’s Robin Vallaire, creative director, notes that the bicycles have the latest technology beneath all the 1970s styling.
   Hair La Vie, the natural hair-growth vitamin, has launched a video campaign which features testimonials, including celebrity hairstylist Stephanie Hobgood, who works with the likes of Kendall Jenner, Kylie Jenner, and Rosario Dawson. Hair La Vie includes 20 natural, clinically proven ingredients, and no synthetic fillers, binders or additives. It says there are visible results after two to three weeks, priced at US$39. ‘When clients ask me for a product to help them repair and regrow their hair, I recommend Hair La Vie, because honestly, it’s the first vitamin I’ve seen that actually works. And I’ll tell you right now not a lot of them do,’ says Hobgood. Some of Hair La Vie’s profits are donated to worthy causes and to a scholarship for women.

May 12, 2015

Full Harper’s Bazaar archive joins those of Vogue and WWD, digitalized by ProQuest

Lucire staff/15.10

With the entire Vogue US archive already available to researchers, it was a matter of time before its rival, Harper’s Bazaar, followed.
   ProQuest has announced that it is creating the first digital archive of the magazine, from 1867 to the latest issue. It joins ProQuest’s earlier digitalizations of Vogue and Women’s Wear Daily. The archives are known for their ease of search as well as their high-resolution imagery.
   ‘We know scholars and students are using more than journals and books to conduct their research,’ said ProQuest’s senior director of product management for humanities, Stephen Brooks. ‘Digitization programmes such as this one with Harper’s Bazaar unlock valuable, historical primary sources from the confines of print, making them easy to access, text mine and use within researchers’ workflows.’
   Harper’s Bazaar, originally Harper’s Bazar, was the US’s first fashion magazine. Carmel Snow, Diana Vreeland, Elizabeth Tilberis, Alexey Brodovitch, Man Ray, Richard Avedon, Patrick Demarchelier, Andy Warhol, Daisy Fellowes, Gloria Guinness, and Eleanor Hoyt Brainerd have all featured prominently in the magazine since its inception.

May 1, 2015

It’s full circle for back to its origins in fashion retail

Jack Yan/14.17

Top Earlier today, attempting to get into meant a virus warning—the only trace of this curiosity is in the web history. Above is back, with a note that it will be transforming into an e-tail site.

If there’s one constant in fashion, it’s change. The other one, which we notice thanks to a number of our team being well schooled on fashion history, is that trends always return, albeit in modified form. Both have come into play with, which announced earlier this week that it would become an ecommerce site.
   When Lucire started, we linked to, but it wasn’t in our fashion magazines’ directory. It was, instead, in our shopping guide.
   In 2000, that all changed, and it began appearing under our fashion magazine links, where it was until today. An attempt to log in to the home page was met by a virus warning, preventing us from going further. We figured that this was part of the transformation of the website as it readied itself for the next era, discouraging people from peering. However, having had these warnings splashed across our own pages two years ago courtesy of Google’s faulty bot, when our site was in fact clean, there was a part of us taking it with a grain of salt. In either case, given the impending change, it was probably the right time to remove the link.
   This evening, is back and virus-free, with an overlay graphic announcing that the website will be changing. Plenty of our media colleagues have analysed the closure over the past week: the Murdoch Press has gossiped about how the layoffs were announced, WWD suggests editor-in-chief Dirk Standen didn’t know it was coming, based on rumours, while Fashionista puts it all into context by analysing just where ecommerce is within the fashion sector, and that content should be the answer over clothing sales.
   What is interesting is no one that we’ve spotted has mentioned how the domain name (we’ve carefully noted it in lowercase there) has effectively come full circle. Perhaps we really are in the age of Wikipedia-based research, as this fact is not mentioned there at all.
   When Lucire launched in 1997, was the website for Express Style, later more prominently, and simply, branded Express, a US fashion retailer. It’s not hard to imagine that had Express remained at the URL, it would have become an e-tailer; it has, after all, made the move into ecommerce at its present home, Like a fashion trend that comes back two decades later, has gone back to its roots: by the autumn it’ll be e-tailing.
   The omission from the above paragraph is the sale of the domain name by Express to Condé Nast in the late 1990s. We never completely understood the need to start a new brand to be the US home of Vogue and W; for many  years, typing into the browser in the US would take one automatically to Then, somewhere along the line, Condé Nast decided that should be the online home of Vogue after all.
   But having made the decision to forge ahead with, Condé Nast did it with a lot of resources, and took its site to number one among print fashion magazine web presences in a remarkably short space of time. It devoted plenty of resources to it, and it’s thanks to that certain things that were once frowned upon—e.g. showing off catwalk collections after the show—became acceptable. Designers used to enjoy the fact that we and Elle US delayed online coverage, the belief being that the delay ensured that pirates could not copy their designs and beat them to the high street.
   To get itself known, Condé Nast bought advertising at fashion websites that were better known, including this one (yes, in 2000 that really was the case), at a time when online advertising cost considerably more than it does today.
   The muscle from the best known name in fashion publishing changed the way the media interacted with readers. Designers figured that if they wanted coverage, they would have to accept that their work would be shown nearly instantly. We became used to that idea, so much so that we now have to show the catwalk videos live in the 2010s.
   In some ways, the change makes sense: we’re talking about an Alexa rank in the 4,000s, which translates to plenty of traffic. The name is known, and most shoppers will make some association with Vogue. The official word is that Franck Zayan, formerly head of ecommerce for Galeries Lafayette, will helm the revised website, and he’s reporting that brands are coming on board rapidly.
   One shouldn’t mourn the loss of as a fashion news portal, since the content we’re all used to is bound to appear at Vogue. And in all the years we had it in our magazines’ directory, it was listed under our Vogue entry anyway. We await the new site to see what Condé Nast will do with it, and it may yet return to the spot where it once was in the 20th century, in the shopping guide.—Jack Yan, Publisher

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