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In brief: Deadly Ponies Man’s 2017 latest; Vivienne Westwood previews Berlin festival; Patricia Barker is new RNZB artistic director


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 13, 2017/21.01




Andrei; modelled by Henry Humphreys, hair by Lauren Gunn/Colleen, make-up by Lochie Stonehouse/MAC Cosmetics

Deadly Ponies Man has launched its latest collection for 2017, inspired by the ocean, using Ink bovine leather and shearling, and brass highlights. It’s meant to convey the idea of a ‘moody seascape’ and an ‘intrepid voyager’, which the promotional images suggest. That’s interpreted with classic items such as the Phantom duffle (now a weekender with zips going right down the side) and a range of travel accessories; and if the seascape idea isn’t evident enough, a notebook inside Deadly Ponies Man’s compendium has pastel blue and white hues resembling water washing up on beaches.




   Bread & Butter by Zalando previewed its second festival of style and culture in Berlin, with the theme of Bold. Jefferson Hack moderated the evening, with Dame Vivienne Westwood the VIP of the evening. Others who spoke included Zalando brand marketing VP Carsten Hendrich; and a panel featuring Aitor Throup, Adwoa Aboah, Erika Bowes, Fergus Purcell and MikeQ. A light show, an interactive mirror installation, and a real-time face-projection mapping photo booth followed, with a live performance by Abra and DJs Zora Jones, Bambii and Why Be concluding the night. Other guests included Marie Nasemann and Peaches. The main event takes place September 1 to 3 at Arena Berlin, with more updates via Bread & Butter’s Instagram and Facebook.
   Patricia Barker is the new artistic director of the Royal New Zealand Ballet, and takes up her post this month, succeeding Francesco Ventriglia. Barker is a former prima ballerina and, most recently, artistic director of Grand Rapids Ballet in Michigan. Ventriglia has programmed the RNZB’s 2018 national tours and Barker will realize these. Ventriglia is the guest choreographer for the company’s major commission, Romeo and Juliet, for which rehearsals begin now—the company says this will ensure a smooth transition with the outgoing and incoming directors working side by side for two months. RNZB board chair Steven Fyfe noted, ‘From a large number of excellent applications from New Zealand and all over the world, the board was greatly impressed by Patricia’s vision for all aspects of the RNZB’s activities, together with her experience as an artistic leader. Her knowledge of both contemporary and classical repertoire, as a dancer, coach and director also makes her an outstanding fit for the RNZB.’
   Barker is the RNZB’s 12th artistic director and the second woman to hold the position (after Una Kai in 1973–5).










Isa Foltin; Alexander Körner

The Body Shop, Cruelty Free International call for global ban on animal testing for cosmetics


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 2, 2017/2.08

The Body Shop and Cruelty Free International have called for the end of animal testing for cosmetics, and wants the United Nations to create an international convention supporting a ban. Customers are encouraged to lend their voices online to the campaign, as well as in any of the Body Shop’s 3,000 stores, where they can sign a petition.
   It’s a call that’s in line with growing consumer demands, as detailed in Nathalia Archila’s ‘A Guide to Cruelty-Free Cosmetics’ in the latest issue of Lucire.
   Eighty per cent of countries still have no laws banning animal testing for cosmetics, says the Body Shop, while Cruelty Free International estimates 500,000 animals continue to suffer for the cosmetics’ industry annually. A global ban, they believe, is the most effective way to stop the practice.
   Animal testing has never been that reliable, says the Body Shop, and a more accurate modern alternative is the use of artificially grown human skin, which has been validated by authorities.
   The Body Shop’s CSR manager Jessie Macneil-Brown said, ‘The Body Shop passionately believes that no animal should be harmed in the name of cosmetics and that animal testing on products and ingredients is outdated, cruel and unnecessary. This is why the Body Shop and Cruelty Free International have partnered to deliver the largest and most ambitious campaign ever to seek a global ban on the use of animals to test cosmetic products and ingredients.
   ‘This campaign will finish what we both started back in the 1980s. We are calling on at least 8 million people from every corner of the globe who care about animal welfare to join our cause and sign our petition. We will take this petition to the United Nations to call on them to support a global ban on animal testing in cosmetic products and ingredients. With an international convention enforced, consumers would finally be confident that any cosmetics they buy are cruelty-free. It’s time to end animal testing for cosmetics’ purposes once and for all. Join us to make it happen.’
   As well as signing the petition, consumers can use the hashtag #ForeverAgainstAnimalTesting to raise awareness.

Why nixing sugar in your system is not a diet


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 8, 2017/10.58


Above: Summer Rayne Oakes’s SugarDetoxMe: 100+ Recipes to Curb Cravings and Take Back Your Health, the result of a “sugar cleanse” she went on from 2014. To get people off sugar, Summer Rayne’s even created a programme to help others do the same. Below left: Summer Rayne Oakes.

I never thought I could nix my sweet tooth. I just figured it’s something that you’re born with. To a large extent, that’s actually true. Not only are humans programmed to prefer sweet over bitter, (which is no doubt an evolutionary advantage, as many bitter tastes are actually poisonous), but by the time we’re born and as we’re growing, our taste is already fairly developed.
   The latter part is courtesy of a number of factors, including what our mother chose to eat while we were in utero, whether we were breast-fed or formula fed, and even now—what evidence suggests—what our Dads and even grandparents ate. The last point I made is not one to gloss over. If the evidence, which has presented itself today, is correct, then the food choices we put into our bodies today—will affect several unborn generations after us. In sum, we’re making direct health decisions for people who are yet to be born!
   With all of our “advances” in medical care, we must ask ourselves why is life expectancy dropping for the first time since 1993? When I was born in the mid-’80s, type 2 diabetes—a disease that is inextricably linked to our excessive sugar intake—was known as ‘adult-onset diabetes’. Now in just three decades, it’s common among children, affects 1 in 11 adults worldwide, 37 per cent of whom live in the western Pacific region; and one in seven births is impacted by gestational diabetes. In New Zealand alone, nearly 286,000 people were diagnosed with diabetes in 2015—a doubling over the last decade. If the rate continues at this pace, diabetes is projected to cost Kiwis more than $1,000 million in annual health care costs in five years’ time.
   The statistics seem startling enough, but perhaps not as startling as something closer to home, like the amount of free sugars—or sugars not bound by fibre—that we’re consuming on a daily basis. The upper limit of free sugars for the day—and I emphasize the word upper—is 6 teaspoons for a woman, 9 for a man. However, New Zealanders, in particular, are consuming around 27 teaspoons per day per person, according to the Sugar Research Advisory Service. That’s well over three to four times the upper limit for the day!
   About three years ago now, I began working in the world of “good” food. We were experimenting with an idea as to whether we could get farm-fresh food into people’s fridges more efficiently. When working so closely with farmers and food makers, you inevitably home in on what you’re eating—and how it makes you feel. I always considered myself a healthy eater in general. My parents have always been health-conscious and we largely grew our own food. Unlike my parents, however, I struggled with a sugar tooth; one that has left me with many memories of hoarding sweet things. I finally had the time to ask, ‘Why?’ and to begin to probe how this one ingredient has seemingly snuck its way into three out of four products on our supermarket shelves.
   This curiosity and the need to know how to overcome my seemingly innate sugar habit led me on a Nancy Drew-like investigation; I began researching all I could about our relationship to the sweet stuff, and started documenting my “sugar cleanse” via sugardetox.me, which later led to an easy-to-follow, empowering programme to help others do the same and most recently, a cookbook and guide on the very topic.
   Free sugars have become so prevalent in our food that the average person might not even realize that he or she is tipping the sugar scale even before heading out the door in the morning. This particular ingredient has a way of changing our brain chemistry, too—acting as a hyper-stimulus to trigger our brains and bodies to release dopamine, serotonin, and other neurotransmitters. In sum, it keeps us hooked and trapped in a vicious cycle of ups and downs throughout the day.
   It’s part of the reason why reducing or eliminating free sugars from your diet is not a diet. It’s simply removing a potentially deleterious substance from one’s body—much in the same way an alcoholic needs to remove alcohol from his or her system. This may, at first, seem a little counter-intuitive, but the ingredient is heavily taxing our bodies to the point that some scientists are now calling it a ‘chronic [versus acute] liver toxin’. Over time, it affects our body’s own natural abilities to detoxify themselves. This in turn can cause inflammation, energy slumps, skin problems, obesity, and disease. Though some medical practitioners would be hard pressed to call excessive sugar intake an “addiction”, more signs point to the fact that it is—from brain-imaging scans to the rise of sugar-addiction clinics.
   As those of us who have begun to eradicate free sugars from their diets know, you begin to taste real ingredients again. Our taste buds have plasticity, renewing themselves, and adjusting taste preferences to the food we feed our bodies and our cells. A freshly picked summer tomato is sumptuously sweet; but to those of us who are used to overdosing on a hyper-stimulating cola, the best sun-ripened tomato from the farm might seem fairly bland.
   Our appreciation for real food is within our reach—if we give our taste buds time to acclimate from that which is hyper-stimulating. It’s not impossible to curb your sweet tooth, as I have found out. We are, after all, masters of our own destiny. Some of us have to contend with more challenging, uphill battles—but when we have the curiosity and will to understand our body’s needs and wants, then we’re already primed towards a path to better health. I encourage and invite everyone to take the time to explore their own personal cravings and relationship to food, as none of us have the same story or experience. I assure you that when you’re able to put your own puzzle pieces together to see the whole picture, you begin to feel empowered to discover the path towards health that is right for you!—Summer Rayne Oakes, Editor-at-large

Doutzen Kroes and Hunkemöller launch wanderlust-themed bikini collection at Berlin party


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 1, 2017/1.47



Hunkemöller.co.uk

Hunkemöller and spokeswoman Doutzen Kroes launched Doutzen’s Summer Stories, a bikini range in which the celebrity model has had a hand in designing, at Fabrik 23 in Berlin on April 18.
   Doutzen’s Summer Stories’ collection captures the Zeitgeist perfectly: it’s inspired by the wanderlust theme, or ‘backpacker chic’, as the company calls it. It’s very fitting in an age of international travel and exploration, and their social media documentation. What often appears on social media isn’t a coordinated, styled look, but something thrown together, based on the wearer’s comfort. What if a collection actually offered that look? It’d save hunting around—and that’s likely what Hunkemöller’s banking on for spring–summer 2017. Officially: ‘From beach to festival, the entire collection has been designed so that you can create complete looks whatever your plans are.’
   The Fabrik 23 party was along the same lines, with guests dressed as though they were taking a faraway island holiday, and a Cuban band performed live along with Latin dancers. Kroes joined in with the dancing.
   The collection has details such as fringes, tassles, coins (we love this detail) and shells, with colours in tints of red, blue and pink (entitled Arabian Spice, Deep Lagoon, and Coral Wash respectively), black (Nero) and off-white (Snow White). The collection also includes crochet dresses, tunics and a one-suit. It goes on sale online at hunkemoller.co.uk on May 2, and in stores on May 5.


Doutzen’s Summer Stories launches in Berlin by Lucire






Hunkemöller.co.uk

Hooking up: Blu and Ministry of Sound; Kathy Ireland Worldwide and Larson-Juhl


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 22, 2017/12.14




John Phillips

With vaping gaining greater acceptance, Blu, a leading e-cigarette brand, has teamed up with the Ministry of Sound in London. Celebrities attending the celebration of the partnership included Pixie Geldof, Nicola Roberts, Vanessa White, Louise Thompson and Ryan Libbey, with DJs Hernan Catteneo and Nick Warren performing.
   Another partnership this week saw Kathy Ireland Worldwide joining forces with Larson-Juhl and the Buffalo Works to create branded art and wall décor. Larson-Juhl specializes in picture frame design, manufacturing and distribution, while the Buffalo Works manages brands and licenses art. Ireland said of the agreement, ‘To finally join forces with Larson-Juhl and the Buffalo Works is a dream come true for many reasons. Larson-Juhl is a member of the Berkshire Hathaway business family. We began our Kathy Ireland Home collection with a Berkshire Hathaway flooring company. Our first retail client was Irv Blumkin and Nebraska Furniture Mart, still clients and dear friends, all these years later.’







John Phillips

Five ideas reshaping the fashion industry: H&M Foundation invites public to vote on the best


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 28, 2017/10.51

H&M Foundation invites the public to vote on the best ideas that can help revolutionize the fashion industry toward a sustainable, waste-free future.
   Initiated in 2015, the competition is now on to its second round, with €1 million up for grabs between five winners. The vote, at globalchangeaward.com, closes on April 2. The public will determine how the €1 million will be split, with the top innovation receiving €300,000. All winners receive an innovation accelerator to help realize their ideas and get industry access.
   The first of the 2016 five is a digital content thread that facilitates the recycling of clothes. By weaving an RFID thread with a digitalized ingredients’ list into the garment, recyclers will know what the garment is composed of.
   There’s a carbon-binding nylon made from water, biomass and solar energy instead of oil. The nylon also binds greenouse gases into the material, to help with a zero-emissions world.
   Third, a vegetal leather made from wine production waste helps with animal welfare, and eliminates the use of oil in making synthetic leather.
   Fourth, old denim is broken down into particles, which are turned into a colouring powder to dye new denim, saving water and energy in production.
   Finally, ‘manure couture’ takes the cellulose in cow manure and turns it into a biodegradable textile, reducing the release of methane gas and harmful substances.
   The result will be announced at a ceremony at the Stockholm city hall on April 5.
   ‘The second round of Global Change Award received 2,883 innovative ideas from 130 countries, which is even more than last year. Cross-border challenges call for a cross-border approach. I am convinced that by bringing people from different industries, with different backgrounds and perspectives together we can make a fundamental shift, speeding up the transition to a circular waste-free fashion industry,’ said Karl-Johan Persson, CEO of Hennes & Mauritz. Fifty-six per cent of the innovations came from women.
   The top five were chosen by an expert panel, comprising: Vikram Widge, had of climate and carbon finance at the World Bank Group; Rebecca Earley, professor in sustainable textile and fashion design at University of the Arts London; Amber Valletta, model, actress, entrepreneur and sustainability influencer; Ellis Rubinstein, president and CEO, New York Academy of Sciences; David Roberts, distinguished faculty, Singularity University; Lewis Perkins, president, Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute; Johan L. Kuylenstierna, executive director for Stockholm Environment Institute; and Dame Ellen MacArthur, founder, Ellen MacArthur Foundation. The late Franca Sozzani, editor-in-chief, Vogue Italia, was an expert panel member in 2015 and 2016, but passed away before helping to select this year’s winners. All members participate pro bono.

H&M: more Conscious Exclusive details and images featuring Natalia Vodianova, plus first peek at childrenswear


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 24, 2017/17.33

Hennes & Mauritz has released further images from the H&M Conscious Exclusive collections, previewed in Lucire in February.
   A plissé dress made of Bionic, a sustainable polyester made from recycled shoreline waste, was part of the preview, but H&M has revealed more about other designs made from the fabric.
   The company has screen-printed distorted peonies and mimosa on to the fabric for ‘dream-like prints’, while an image of a dreaming woman has been quilted into its jacket.
   Designers have also added sequins to a recycled polyester cocktail dress, while a tuxedo comes in organic silk and Tencel twill. There’s a fishnet bag made from shoreline waste, and earrings from recycled glass and plastic.
   Children’s designs also feature for the first time, with tulle dresses and structured blazers and trousers.
   H&M head of design and creative director Pernilla Wohlfahrt said in a release, ‘For this year’s Conscious Exclusive collection at H&M, we thought not only about the look of the pieces, but also how they feel and sound. It’s a collection to please all our senses, and also our desire to be sustainable in everything we do.’
   ‘H&M’s Conscious Exclusive collection shows how the best style can be mindful of the planet, to help protect it for the future. It’s such a desirable collection, with pieces made in sustainable materials that you want to wear for seasons to come,’ added model Natalia Vodianova, who fronts the campaign.
   Vodianova also founded Elbi, a digital philanthropy platform connecting users with a charities worldwide. H&M says it will continue to partner with the platform.
   The collections will go on sale in c. 160 stores worldwide, from April 20.







The Modist launches retail site for modest fashion, while Getty Images and MuslimGirl.com announce photo library


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 9, 2017/10.01

The Modist, an online store for modest fashion, opened yesterday, shipping to over 100 countries. The store has a selection of over 75 designers, including Marni, Alberta Ferretti, Christopher Kane and Mary Katrantzou, ensuring a contemporary, fashionable selection. The store is accompanied by an online magazine called The Mod, which includes styling tips and interviews. Says founder Ghizlan Guenez, ‘Our mission is to build a strong sense of purpose to empower a woman’s freedom of choice and to acknowledge how similar women across the world are, despite our diverse backgrounds, cultures and lifestyles—a relevant conversation at this time. We aim to break down preconceived notions while building a community and dialogue that invigorates, informs and celebrates the fashionable, modern, modest woman.’
   The Modist’s COO, Lisa Bridgett, notes that the market potential in the modest fashion segment is projected to reach US$484,000 million by 2019.
   Also in recognition of a more global, inclusive society, MuslimGirl.com and Getty Images announced yesterday a content partnership that aims to convey a more authentic representation of Muslim women. The imagery is far more realistic and positive, battling stereotypes and misconceptions. The photographs feature girls with and without hijabs, and Muslim women in everyday situations at home, with friends and at work.
   ‘One of the ways I open up my talks is by asking the audience to search Muslim women images on their phone browsers, which is always met with their awe at the unsettling results,’ said Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, founder and editor-in-chief of MuslimGirl.com. ‘I don’t want to be able to use that example anymore, and I could not be prouder to partner with Getty Images on finally taking on such an important and influential task.’

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