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June 2, 2016

Karen Walker Eyewear releases campaign for limited-edition 2016 Superstars range, including Parris Goebel video

Lucire staff/15.00



Mikhail Gherman

Above: Karen Walker Eyewear’s Cosmonaut style (NZ$409), part of its limited-edition Superstars releases for 2016.

Karen Walker Eyewear has just released its campaign imagery for its limited-edition Superstars range.
   The campaign has been photographed and art-directed by Walker’s husband, Mikhail Gherman.
   An additional video, called Karen Walker Dancing Heads, featuring choreographer–rapper Parris Goebel, has also been released, a collaboration between Goebel, Walker and videographer Barnaby Roper.
   The brand releases a limited-edition Superstars line each year, which takes its most famous styles and re-releases them with new colours.
   The Superstars line for 2016 comprise favourites Harvest and Super Duper, with new shapes dubbed One Orbit, Moon Disco, Cosmonaut and Star Sailor.
   The company says this year’s range has ‘astronaut-inspired colourways’, with classic black, Crazy Tort (Karen Walker Eyewear’s popular tortoiseshell style), and yellow and rose-gold mirror with metal detail.
   Superstars is available from Liberty in the UK (from May 5), Barney’s (from May 16), Karen Walker stores (from May 23) and other global partners (from June 1).








Mikhail Gherman

Above, from top: Super Duper, in gold (NZ$349). Harvest (NZ$349). Moon Disco (NZ$349). One Orbit (NZ$369). The remaining three photographs are of the Star Sailor style (NZ$409).

May 27, 2016

Brooklyn Decker stars in new video for Chrysler Pacifica minivan, alongside the ‘PacifiKids’

Lucire staff/21.51

Former Lucire model Brooklyn Decker, now better known for her role in Netflix’s Grace and Frankie, stars in Chrysler’s new campaign for its 2017 Pacifica minivan.
   The campaign sees Decker along with the ‘PacifiKids’, Miles (aged 11), Izzy (10) and Harper (8), explain the new model to her, which is Fiat Chrysler’s replacement for both the Chrysler Town & Country and Dodge Grand Caravan (the latter remains in production for the time being).
   A series of videos will début in advance of the US Memorial Day weekend on Facebook, according to the company. The first video can be found here.
   The PacifiKids understand technology in the way modern children can, and take the viewer through features such as the Pacifica’s tri-pane panoramic sunroof and voice-activated infotainment system.
   Decker is a new mother, having given birth to a boy on September 30, 2015.
   The Pacifica is reputed to be the best in class, keeping Fiat Chrysler ahead in the large MPV segment which it created back in the 1980s.
   Fiat Chrysler says there are two additional videos featuring the PacifiKids. The campaign was created with Chrysler’s social media agency, Society.

May 26, 2016

The Body Shop launches Bio-Bridges programme, regenerating and protecting 75,000,000 m² of forest

Lucire staff/12.44


Above: The red-shanked douc, or monkey, one of the endangered species that the Body Shop’s Bio-Bridges programme will protect.

On Tuesday, the Body Shop unveiled its Bio-Bridges programme, which aims to regenerate and protect 75,000,000 m² of forest.
   The programme will not only see forests protected from exploitation and unsustainable harvesting, the Body Shop wants to ensure that animals and plant species within them thrive.
   The first project is the Khe Nuoc Trong forest in north-central Vietnam, home of the red-shanked douc, saola (known as the Asian unicorn and one of the rarest animals on earth), Bengal slow loris and Burmese python. All of these species are threatened by hunting and illegal logging, and the Body Shop notes that nearby habitats are still suffering from the effects of Agent Orange used during the Vietnam War. The World Land Trust and Viet Nature Conservation Centre are working with the Body Shop, patrolling the forest and setting up camera traps, while working with the local community, promoting sustainable forest use and farming.
   Promoting this project to Body Shop customers is an in-store and online campaign called Help Reggie Find Love, featuring Reggie, a red-shanked douc. Each customer transaction will restore and protect 1 m² of habitat in Khe Nuoc Trong.
   Christopher Davis, director of corporate responsibility and campaigns for the Body Shop, said, ‘We want to focus on actively enriching the world’s biodiversity. These areas of forest in Vietnam are biological treasure troves that are being destroyed through poaching and illegal logging. Bio-Bridges are an innovative way to create protected corridors of biodiversity that allow the wider forest to flourish and its inhabitants to breed and thrive. In Vietnam, within five to ten years we hope to be able to see endangered species multiply. We’ll be promoting Help Reggie Find Love online and in our stores in 65 countries around the world, helping raise awareness of this serious issue in a different way and allowing our customers to make a direct and positive impact with every purchase.’
   The company has embarked on this latest corporate social responsibility programme as part of its new global Enrich Not Exploit commitment launched in February. It recognizes that protecting and promoting biodiversity is good not only for the planet, including combatting climate change, but for the natural ingredients it sources for its products.
   The second Bio-Bridge programme begins in late 2016 in the Garo Hills in India, in partnership with World Land Trust and Wildlife Trust of India.

May 25, 2016

Haute parfumerie: Lalique and Thierry Mugler release exquisite, luxury scents for ’16

Lola Cristall/8.10



Above: Lalique’s Bacchantes Limited Edition 2017.


Above: Thierry Mugler Angel Muse, with its cosmic theme.

Lalique’s renowned name was established by French glass designer René Jules Lalique over a century ago and currently represents flawless ingenuity in jewellery, vases and clocks. Lalique’s array of perfumes feature beautiful scents in sophisticated, fragile, luminous and extravagant glassworks. Year after year, the brand releases a collectible limited-edition flaçon with intricate, delicate designs on the bottle, marrying a stunning fragrance with a masterpiece. Its most recent release is the Bacchantes Limited Edition 2017 bottle, with a poetic vision of the beauty of voluptuous, feminine curves as exquisitely expressed in glass.
   In addition, Lalique’s Rêve d’Infini is a precious creation reviving Lalique’s trademark, the infinity symbol. Perfumer Richard Ibanez assembles hints of floral aromas, leaving behind traces of rose absolute, cedarwood, peach, bergamot, lychee, freesia, vanilla musk and sandalwood, permitting the top notes and bottom notes to intertwine.
   Encre Noire à l’Extrême is a masculine fragrance that radiates with grandiose, dominating essences. The dark wood cap on the bottle is captivating and elegant. Bergamot, cypress, incense, Java and Haïti vetiver, iris, sandalwood, patchouli and Siam benzoin contribute to the masculinity of the scent.
   Les Compositions Parfumées comprises of five unisex fragrances, each containing highly concentrated scents of luxury contained in an ornate bottle. Gold, Silver, Bronze, Electrum and Zamak each have their own sweet and succulent scent that can be worn for any occasion.
   Meanwhile, Thierry Mugler’s divine eau de parfum Angel Muse was launched under the expression ‘the new addiction you will #HateToLove.’ The intergalactic theme extends from the bottle to the scent itself: the bottle is described as a ‘cosmic pebble’, with a silver lining around the edges and a transparent centre. The electrifying scent is enticing and powerful with lavish hints of grapefruit, pink pepper, patchouli, vetiver, rose and hazelnut.—Lola Cristall, Paris Editor



Above: Lalique Rêve d’Infini.


Above: Lalique Encre Noire à l’Extrême for men.



Above: The Gold and Silver editions of Lalique’s Les Compositions Parfumées.







Above: Lalique’s limited-edition bottles, from 2011 to 2016.

Filed under: beauty, Lucire, Paris, trend
May 23, 2016

Lily-Rose Depp announced as face of Chanel No. 5 l’Eau

Lucire staff/11.14



Chanel/Getty Images

Of all the celebs that Chanel could have talked up during the Festival de Cannes, only two appeared on our radar: Gaspard Ulliel and Lily-Rose Depp. It wasn’t that big a surprise that the teenager has been announced as the new face of Chanel No. 5 l’Eau, a new fragrance created by Olivier Polge.
   Depp, 16, is the daughter of Johnny Depp and Vanessa Paradis, and is already the face of the Chanel Pearl eyewear collection launched last September.
   She had already been spotted at Cannes on the 13th for the release of La danseuse (The Dancer), in which she appears, kitted out in Chanel, wearing a black silk bustier dress from its autumn–winter 2016–17 prêt-à-porter collection and shoes from the brand; her make-up was exclusively Chanel as well.
   The announcement from Chanel came at the same time Depp released it on her Instagram, telling the world, ‘I’m so excited to announce that I am the face of the new Chanel Number 5 L’EAU!’
   The new campaign will break in the autumn and will be directed by Johan Renck.
   Other than La danseuse, directed by Stéphanie Di Giusto, Depp will star in two other films: Yoga Hosers, directed by Kevin Smith; and Planetarium directed by Rebecca Zlotowski.
   Paradis has helmed her share of advertising campaigns, including for H&M’s Conscious Collection, and Chanel itself.

May 21, 2016

AmFAR Cannes gala raises $25 million: Katy Perry, Sonam Kapoor, Bella Hadid, Doutzen Kroes, Paris Hilton among VIPs

Lucire staff/13.33




Pascal Le Segretain; Gareth Cattermole; Kevin Tachman/AmFAR

The swankiest do during the Festival de Cannes is the AmFAR gala, held at the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc, and presented by Harry Winston and Bold Films. The event, Cinema Against Aids, raised over US$25 million supporting AmFAR, the Foundation for Aids Research, and its pursuit of a cure for HIV–Aids. Sponsors included the Weinstein Company, Renault, and Moët Hennessy.
   Kevin Spacey MCed the event, with his impressive mimicry, playing Johnny Carson, Bill Clinton, Jack Lemmon, Al Pacino, and his Frank Underwood from the US House of Cards remake. Adrien Brody, among others, furnished artwork that was auctioned to raise funds for AmFAR; other items included a Damien Hirst sculpture and a week-long stay at Leonardo DiCaprio’s home in Palm Springs. Swiss art auctioneer Simon de Pury presided over the auction.
   Katy Perry (in Marchesa), the Village People, Sister Sledge and the Bluebell Girls performed live, and Carine Roitfeld curated a fashion collection with a disco theme featuring Karlie Kloss (who arrived in Marchesa), Jourdan Dunn, Bella Hadid, and Doutzen Kroes (who arrived wearing Tom Ford), among others. The collection raised over US$1 million.
   Celebrities attending included Brody and DiCaprio, Harvey Weinstein, Dame Helen Mirren (who, like so many of her L’Oréal Paris spokespeople attending, wore make-up from the brand), Milla Jovovich, Paris Hilton (with jewellery by Avakian), Barron Hilton, Uma Thurman, Sonam Kapoor (in Ralph & Russo), Heidi Klum, Irina Shayk (in Miu Miu), Faye Dunaway, Alessandra Ambrosio (in Redemption, with Jimmy Choo shoes and jewellery by Boucheron), Toni Garrn, Jasmine Tookes, Karolína Kurková (in Armani Privé and Harry Winston jewellery) and Archie Drury, Ana Beatriz Barros (in Ralph & Russo), Petra NÄ›mcová (in Georges Chakra with jewellery by Chopard), Barbara Palvin (in Armani Privé), Hailey Clauson, Sasha Luss, Sharam Diniz, Valery Kaufman, Izabel Goulart, Sophie Taylor, Chanel Iman, Liu Wen, Elle Fanning, Joel Edgerton, Orlando Bloom, Chris Tucker, Kirsten Dunst, Vanessa Paradis, Diego Luna, Mads Mikkelsen, Joel Edgerton, Juliette Binoche, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Eva Herzigova, Chloë Sevigny, Julian Lennon, Lewis Hamilton, Matt Bellamy, Adriana Lima, Nicolas Winding Refn, Nina Agdal, Elif Aksu, Mert Alas, Alina Baikova, Natasha Poly (in Roberto Cavalli), Mischa Barton, Boris Becker, Dean Caten, Dan Caten, Eva Cavalli, Anna Cleveland, Mina Cvetković, Heidi de la Rosa, Lily Donaldson, Isabeli Fontana, Georgia Fowler, Luma Grothe, Jessica Hart, Jacquelyn Jablonski, Xiao Wen Ju, Liya Kebede, Lara Leito, Maryna Linchuk, Angela Lindvall, Sasha Luss, Catrinel Marlon, Angela Martini, Stella Maxwell, Margot Moe, Mia Moretti, Hanne Gaby Odiele, Soo Joo Park, Marcus Piggott, Julia Restoin Roitfeld, Vladimir Roitfeld, Olivier Rousteing, Remo Ruffini, Dragos Savulescu, Lucky Blue Smith, Lara Stone, Daria Strokous, Kasia Struss, Jasmine Tookes, Dasha Zhukova, and AmFAR board chairman Kenneth Cole.









































































May 20, 2016

Bella Hadid, Irina Shayk, Ming Xi, Jourdan Dunn, Isabeli Fontana glam up Festival de Cannes’ day 8

Lucire staff/14.15



Venturelli

Bella Hadid grabbed plenty of attention on day eight of the Festival de Cannes, wearing a red Alexandre Vauthier custom silk wrap gown that left few of the 19-year-old’s curves to the imagination. With a deep neckline and a thigh-high slit, the gown ensured plenty of paparazzi snapped her at the première of La fille inconnue (The Unknown Girl). She narrowly avoided a revealing “wardrobe malfunction” thanks to a red thong—a moment captured by some paparazzi and camera operators. She complemented her Vauthier gown with Giuseppe Zanotti sandals and jewellery by de Grisogono.
   Also choosing to go with de Grisogono for jewellery on day eight were Shanghai-born model Ming Xi (奚夢瑤) in a sparkling silver Zuhair Murad holiday 2016 gown and Jourdan Dunn in a Ralph & Russo haute couture spring–summer 2016 white silk gazar ball gown with a hand-painted floral design and crystal and glass beading. Ana Beatriz Barros also chose Ralph & Russo, wearing an asymmetric teal chiffon gown with draped train, as did Chanel Iman that same evening at the Planet Finance Foundation Gala Dinner.
   Irina Shayk, walking the red carpet for L’Oréal Paris, went for a more subtle look up front with her black Miu Miu gown—but round the back were diamante chains and extravagant feather detail on the hems—the perfect contrast. Make-up was again very natural, with L’Oréal Paris’s make-up artists opting for lighter to medium shades in the Brow Artist Genius Kit and the Rosé shade in the Color Riche La Palette. To suit Shayk’s complexion, they chose Cushion Nude Magique foundation in Rosy Beige, and the Glam Bronze Cushion de Soleil. For the eyes, L’Oréal Paris’s False Lash Sculpt in black and Super Liner Black ‘n’ Sculpt gave her movie-star looks. Dame Helen Mirren, Soo-Joo Park and Isabeli Fontana also wowed as L’Oréal Paris ambassadors, and racing driver Lewis Hamilton joined them as the sole male for the brand.
   Rosie Huntingdon-Whiteley, like Shayk and Hadid, went for a backless gown, and chose a pleated, draped red design from Alexandre Vauthier. Liya Kebede chose an emerald green design from Haider Ackermann, while Alessandra Ambrosio wore Michael Kors.




























An extensive Scope: NZ School of Dance blends Choreographic Season pieces into thoughtful, cohesive work

Jack Yan/14.13





Stephen A’Court

Above, from top: Connor Masseurs. A scene from Scope. Kent Giebel-Date and Christina Guieb. Christina Guieb.

The New Zealand School of Dance’s Choreographic Season for 2016, Scope, blended its 10 performance so seamlessly, and with related themes, that it worked well as a single, larger piece, despite the many talents and styles involved in choreography, music and dance.
   Each time we attend an NZSD performance, we’re always impressed by how they mix things up. Sometimes, it’s in the style of dancing or the changes to the venue. This time, they’ve surprised us yet again by not having breaks between each work, allowing them to flow naturally. Other than at the beginning, when half-dressed dancers emerged on stage in a row, only to have their neatly folded outfits fall from the sky, there were also no costume changes.
   Scope’s notes hint at the related themes, all centring on the energies that drive life on Earth, and how humanity can be destructive, but also how it can unite and bring people together. The flow did mean it was sometimes difficult to see when one performance finished and another started—this is not meant as a negative criticism, because the effect is that the audience became particularly engrossed.
   The performances flowed so seamlessly thanks largely, we believe, to the collaborative processes by the 10 graduating students of the New Zealand School of Dance, who created and performed their own works, cooperating with lighting and sound designers as well as fellow students in following years. It was particularly immersive, more so than the 2015 season that Lucire thought very highly of.
   In a release, the show’s coordinator, Victoria Colombus, herself an alumna, noted, ‘This year the New Zealand School of Dance students and Toi Whakaari students are cultivating a very collaborative working process. They have been working together to investigate overriding themes and how they can utilize different elements of stagecraft and performance to sew together these common threads.’ It worked.
   â€˜Trophics’, choreographed by Tristan Carter with music by Te Aihe Butler, involved the entire cast, essentially evolving. The first scene showed them essentially running on to the stage but as they progressed, their moves became more complex, as though they discovered they had more limbs and abilities. This evolved into the next performance, printed in the programme with a blank box and the cubed sign as its title, with the introduction of white boxes as props but signifying that we can find peace among our busy lives. Christopher Mills’s ‘Box Cubed’ (for ease of typesetting here) concluded with female dancers calling out to others scattered among the audience, the matriarchy evolved into the patriarchy with ‘Obelus’, a male-exclusive performance that mixed martial arts with the flow of dance, examining themes of rivalry, the toppling of leadership, and the resulting power vacuum. There was thoroughly enjoyable choreography by Jag Popham.
   From here the performances became more otherworldly—and one can see the evolutionary theme continue into a more technical arena. ‘The Private Sphere’ introduced themes of contrast: ‘Plastic fruit and tending flowers. Air freshener and painted landscapes,’ read the programme, but we saw it as humanity’s attempt to introduce technology, but not always in a pleasant way. Dancers mimicked robotic movements as they portrayed artificial materials; could the theme have been the draining of humanity from our everyday lives? From Isaac di Natale’s ‘The Private Sphere’, we moved into Breanna Timms’s ‘Atlas of Intangible’, where the movements became fluid again, almost to show that advancements can see us claw back our humanity. Timms’s idea was to show the connections between all life through energy, how the actions of one influence another, and this was done with great beauty and more tradition in the choreography, helped with music such as Estonian composer Arvo Pärt’s ‘Summa for Strings’.
   Samuel Hall’s ‘Come along and Feel the Kairos’, a reference to that perfect moment, involved audience members in the front row (Lucire’s second-row seat meant the note-taking continued), who became part of a mass performance. Dancers in the centre connected while one remained outside the lines formed by the audience and their guides; and despite the presence of amateurs on stage there was a flow that held our attention.
   â€˜Blight’, choreographed by Tiana Lung, had many layers that tied back to earlier themes of technology and humankind’s attempts to quell nature as a result; a dancer representing new life is controlled and quashed by existing life forms. ‘Shaving a Cactus’, choreographed by Holly Newsome, again introduced a technological theme (helped by Crooked Colours’ ‘Step (Woolymammoth × Tsuruda Remix)’ as the soundtrack) and synthesized voices which dancers. Te Aihe Butler’s music editing for Jessica Newman’s ‘XXX’ took us back to the start thematically, with sound effects that were basic and raw. The whole cast returned for an energetic finalé in Isabel Estrella’s ‘Temenos’.
   Scope, the New Zealand School of Dance’s Choreographic Season for 2016, runs from May 20 to 28 at Te Whaea, the National Dance and Drama Centre, in Newtown, Wellington. Tickets are priced from NZ$12 to NZ$23; bookings and further information can be found at the NZSD’s website at www.nzschoolofdance.ac.nz.—Jack Yan, Publisher


Stephen A’Court

Above: The third-year contemporary students at the New Zealand School of Dance for 2016.

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