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Mandy Moore, Priyanka Chopra, Taylor Swift, Riley Keough among sexiest celebs on Victoria’s Secret list


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 13, 2017/17.28


Above: Riley Keough is on Victoria’s Secret’s ‘What Is Sexy?’ list, as its sexiest break-out star.

Victoria’s Secret has released its 2017 ‘What Is Sexy?’ list, with Mandy Moore, Priyanka Chopra, Taylor Swift, Margot Robbie and Riley Keough among the celebrities named.
   On social media, netizens voted for their Sexiest Social Stars, naming Tone It Up as the sexiest fitness star, Desi Perkins as the sexiest beauty star, and Rocky Barnes the sexiest fashion star.
   The full list is detailed below.

Sexiest actress: Mandy Moore
Sexiest fitspiration: Nikki Reed
Forever sexy: Margot Robbie
Sexiest red-carpet look: Priyanka Chopra
Sexiest entertainer: Taylor Swift
Sexiest festival style: Jamie Chung
Sexiest sense of humour: Billie Lourd
Sexiest smile: Victoria Justice
Sexiest cast: The Royals, E!
Sexiest author: Chrissy Teigen, Cravings: Recipes for All the Food You Want to Eat
Sexiest style risk-taker: Vanessa Hudgens
Sexiest break-out star: Riley Keough
Sexiest snapper: Catt Sadler
Sexiest songstress: Lady Gaga
Sexiest US city: Palm Springs
Sexiest DJ: Alexandra Richards
Sexiest street style: Olivia Munn
Sexiest rising songstress: Bebe Rexha
Sexiest mogul: Lauren Conrad, founder and designer of LC Lauren Conrad, PaperCrown, PaperCrown Bridesmaids and TheLittleMarket.com
Sexiest late-night host: James Corden
Sexiest athlete: Julie Johnston

   Coinciding with the announcement is Victoria’s Secret’s push of its Sexy Little Things collection, available in B to DDD and S, M and L sizes.

H&M stays positive with unisex denim line, following love-themed Paris catwalk show


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 8, 2017/20.59



Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) has announced a new denim line, Denim United. The difference this time is that it is a truly unisex collection, with identical women’s and men’s designs, with jackets, overalls, shorts, T-shirts and an oversized hoody. The materials and silhouettes are shared between the sexes.
   More sustainable materials have been used, including organic and recycled cotton.
   The collection goes on sale on March 23, online-only at hm.com.
   ‘It is very natural for us to launch a unisex collection as fashion is constantly evolving and intersecting and today we see there are no boundaries in democratic style. Fashion should always be inclusive,’ said Marybeth Schmitt of H&M in a release.
   The announcement follows H&M Studio’s showing of its spring–summer 2017 women’s and men’s collections at the Tennis Club de Paris during Paris Fashion Week, where the designs went on sale at its flagship Fifth Avenue store in New York and online immediately. They went on sale in other stores on March 2.
   Celebrities in attendance in Paris included Nicki Minaj, Olga Kurylenko, Alexa Chung, Lucky Blue Smith, Clémence Poésy and Sasha Lane, while Emily Ratajkowski led the celebrations in New York.
   Models walking in Paris included Gigi Hadid, Bella Hadid, Adwoa Aboah, Amber Valletta, Jordan Barrett, Winnie Harlow and Luis Borges. The Weeknd gave a special performance at the Paris show, performing ‘Starboy’, ‘Can’t Feel My Face’ and ‘I Feel It Coming’.
   The collection featured fine knits, loose-fitting shorts, tops, dresses, anoraks and sandals, with ruffle detailing and bold graphics proclaiming ‘Love’.
   ‘With this collection we want to send a global message of love. There are a few pieces that carry the word again and again, kind of like a ticker tape and as a constant reminder of what is important. It feels like now, more than ever, we all need positive feelings and thoughts in our lives,’ said H&M creative director and head of design Pernilla Wohlfahrt.

Paris show

Backstage

The celebrities

The show

The Weeknd

New York event

Little Golden day: TMG pens a new chapter on pre-Oscar fun


NEWS  by Elyse Glickman/March 4, 2017/2.16



Elyse Glickman

Main photo: Real housewife of Beverly Hills Eden Sassoon and Random House publicist Jillian Vandall. Above: Displays for Y2K Jewellers and Eufora.

Many movie buffs could equate the Academy Awards as a golden door that opens once a year to “classic” status for the nominated films, screenplays, actors, and technical achievement. And while invitees prepared for a golden night, TMG used their two-day event, TMG Beauty & Style Destination Pre-Oscar Luxury Lounge, to pay tribute to the 75th anniversary of another classic, Random House Little Golden Books. Just like classic movies, these little literary treasures have delighted generations of families with their enduring themes and illustrations.
   We love that TMG has continued offering their beauty-and-spa-focused suite in the fabled Beverly Hilton Hotel penthouse, especially as others have come and gone. We also appreciate kid-friendly activities that simultaneously have solid adult appeal. What could be more fun than a candy buffet, a selfie-op with the forever-young Pokey Little Puppy, and getting a first look at the 75th anniversary treasury of stories that never grow old?
   Essie nail care offered manicures with a matte gold shade specially formulated for the occasion. Guests wanting to completely let go of the Oscar week hustle relaxed with a spa session from professionals representing Nelly de Vuyst, a spa-grade line of products developed in Belgium and based in Montréal. The invigorating products, only available in spas and med-spas, contain active ingredients (e.g. vitamin C, hyaluronic acid, Dead Sea salt, and various essential oils) that leave skin feeling invigorated. Ginny Cosmetic Skincare’s team created red carpet-ready looks using their assortment of jewel-toned hues for lips, cheeks and eyes. Eufora hair care, meanwhile, topped things off with professional styling and their women’s and men’s product lines.
   Actual jewels were available for red carpet loan or sale. Y2K Jewelers featured opulent styles inspired by the old Hollywood (Elizabeth Taylor, Grace Kelly) æsthetic, while Gienia Design displayed its contemporary styles for men and women. Actress-turned-designer Kathrine Baumann continues to shine in Hollywood thanks to her intricate, whimsical-themed Swarovski crystal handbags.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor, and Leyla Messian, LA Correspondent








Above, from top: Eden Sassoon from Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. Julia Butters of ABC’s American Housewife Steve Bauer of HBO’s Ray Donovan with Jean Lalonde, VP of business development for Nelly de Vuyst Skin Care. Celebrity make-up artist Spencer Barnes with Shareen Malik of Beverly Hills Beauty Group. Chris Mulkey radiates after his Nelly de Vuyst skin care treatment. Landry Bender of Disney’s Best Friends Whenever gets glammed for the red carpet by Eufora stylist Mirza Batanović. Carly Hughes of American Housewife stops by Y2K Jewellers for some red-carpet jewellery. Edy Ganem of Devious Maids looking fabulous in Gienia Designs’ earrings. Lucire US West Coast Editor Elyse Glickman with the Poky Little Puppy.

A 2017 Academy Awards suite that’s all heart


NEWS  by Leyla Messian/March 1, 2017/9.00




Above, from top: Dancing with the Stars (the US version) Karina Smirnoff with Footmate. Title sponsor Buywine.com with Allen Maldanado (Black-ish, 2017 Golden Globe-nominated series). Jewellery from Twisted Silver.

Who says you need Valentine’s Day to show a little love? As event planner Doris Bergman sees it, every day should be Valentine’s Day—with the flair of a blockbuster movie première!
   In other hands, an event like this would be just another free-for-all. However, after nine years of helming the annual Valentine Romance Oscar Style Lounge & Party and Post-Holiday Gift Drive, Doris is one of the undisputed masters of the pre-award party. From her selection of an always-reliable venue (West Hollywood gathering place Fig & Olive) to her stable of interesting sponsors and vendors offering products that have a story to tell, she appeals to a broad audience.
   As every celebration requires a few toasts to those being honoured, it was fitting that the lead sponsor was Buywine.com, which shared an incredible array of fine wines from Napa, California boutique wineries. Bryan David Scott and LA mixologist Flairin’ Farron were back to fuel up guests with velvety iced espresso drinks brewed with his top grade, ethically sourced coffee beans. Rekorderlig Cider and Spa Girl Cocktails rounded out the refreshing afternoon with bright, refreshing blasts of fruit flavour. Spa Girl Cocktails, founded by Karen Haines in 2012, is offered in two vodka-based flavours—cucumber Martini and pear—that weigh in at 48 calories per drink.
   Art Lewin Bespoke Suits & Tuxedos and Sue Wong made sure that talent attending events and ceremonies were perfectly attired. Lewin even gave silk ties to the diligent Fig & Olive staff working the event. Wong’s latest collection of vintage-inspired gowns reflected the trend toward muted tones and subtle sparkle. Timmy Woods, meanwhile, showcased her one-of-a-kind pop culture themed handbags available for loan. Imagine walking down the red carpet with a Swarovski crystal-encrusted bag of popcorn.
   Single and Kaya di Koko were also back by popular demand, with a selection of casual and cocktail dresses in a flattering array of cuts and sizes. Be ready for jewel tones and lace overlays that go from day to dinner. Samiah, one of our favourite regulars, had more fabulous coats for purchase as well as tote bags crafted in regal fabrics. However, there’s more to the bags than what meets the eye: they hold contents in so well that they could be a portable-yet-luxurious file cabinet as nothing shuffles around in these well-designed bags.
   My Saint, My Hero returned with a few new additions to their range of faith-oriented bracelets and bangles, including grown-up friendship bracelets sold by the pair.
   Twisted Silver strutted their stuff with a dazzling display of favourite and new designs in their eco-friendly, found-object-inspired necklaces, cuffs, bracelets and statement pieces for men and women. This year, the designer is reaching out to Lucire readers with a 15 per cent off plus free shipping code, OSCARS2017. The offer excludes gift certificates, subscription club, and outlet items. The code will be good through April 30, 2017.
   While day spas and med spas have been de rigueur sponsors at pre-Academy Awards events from the early days on, Doris’s team raised the bar with an impressive display from Dr Perricone MD, topped with an appearance of Dr Nicholas Perricone himself! Guests were among the first to try his new Cold Plasma lifting and firming line for face, eyes and décolletage. They also received some of his classic skin care staples and his new Essential Multivitamin, packets of water-soluble Super Greens, and H2 Elemental Energy water. We were also impressed with Dr Sal Nadkarni, the rare cosmetic surgeon who makes calls through his Rejuvenation in Motion Mobile Med-Spa. His candour and consummate knowledge of the latest fillers and procedures for face and body were refreshing.
   There were also fun items that appealed to the kid in everybody. Fibrum Mobile Virtual Reality headsets take the smartphone gaming experience to the next level. Game players use a visual mouse (their own eyes) to kill zombies, monsters and other menaces. Illinois-based Sassy Locks Custom Baby Clothing introduced new and expectant parents to their adorable, custom-made infant apparel.
   Attendees included Oscar nominees Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (who penned the Best Song for La La Land), David Greathouse and David Permut (producers on Best Picture nominee Hacksaw Ridge), Saniyya Sidney (appearing in nominated films Fences and Hidden Figures), Oscar winner Bruce Dern, Allen Maldanado (Golden Globe nominee for Black-ish), Dale Goldboldo (The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story), Rénée Olstead (Grammy-nominated for ‘Do You Want to Know a Secret?’), Frank Stallone, Matt Walsh (Veep), Patrika Darbo (Acting Dead), Dancing with the Stars US beauties Karina Smirnoff and Edyta Sliwinska, Sam Trammell (True Blood), Steven Bauer (Ray Donovan), Lauren Makk (Fablife), Dr Nicholas Perricone, Michael Campion (Fuller House) and Tony Denison (Major Crimes). Along with the VIPs, two lucky teens in foster care benefiting from Wednesday’s Child were in attendance, as was celebrity charity spokesperson–presenter Christine Devine of KTTV FOX 11 News, Los Angeles.—Leyla Messian, LA Correspondent




Above, from top: Fuller House’s Michael Campion with Dr Perricone Hydrogen Water. Multiple Oscar nominee Bruce Dern with Hearts by Hillel. Sam Trammell with Fibrum Virtual Reality.








Gifts and services were provided by:
The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism, Dr Perricone Hydrogen Water, Vida Emanuel European Day Spa, Isdinceutics, USA, Photo Tee-Shirts, Buywine.com, True Love Skin Care, the Footmate System by Gordon Brush, Rejuvenation in Motion Mobile Med-Spa, Timmy Woods Handbags, Twisted Silver, My Saint, My Hero, Sassy Locks Custom Baby Clothing, the Coffee Chef, Samiah Hinton Designs, Fibrum Virtual Reality, Sue Wong Couture Gowns & Fragrance, Single Dress, Kaya di Koko, Single Underwear for Men, Rekorderlig Cider, Handmade Hearts By Hillel, Hint Water, Art Lewin Bespoke Suits & Tuxedos, Spa Girl Vodka, M&R Photo Gallery, Pura d’Or Hair Care, Spongelle, Zozo Bean Bakery, Zenful Water and Dr Perricone Gift Boxes (containing Cold Plasma, Cold Plasma Eye, Cold Plasma Sun-D, the Essential Multivitamin, Super Greens and H2 Elemental Energy. VIP gift bags were also provided by Dr Perricone.

Video: La La Land producer Jordan Horowitz on the 2017 Oscars Best Picture flub


NEWS  by Lucire staff/February 27, 2017/7.56

In a move echoing that of Miss Universe host Steve Harvey in 2015, actor Warren Beatty read out the wrong name for Best Picture at the 89th Academy Awards.
   La La Land was announced as the winner at the 2017 Oscars on Sunday night, but the actual winner was Moonlight.
   La La Land’s team were already on stage giving their acceptance speeches until its producer, Jordan Horowitz, said nonchalantly, ‘There’s a mistake. Moonlight, you won Best Picture.’
   Beatty said that he had been handed the wrong envelope, its contents saying ‘Emma Stone, La La Land.’ Horowitz backs up Beatty’s version of events in the video below.
   Host Jimmy Kimmel made a reference to Harvey’s gaffe, when he read out the wrong winner at the beauty pageant.
   The gaffe almost overshadowed other wins on the night being the 2017 Oscars’ most talked-about moment.
   Damien Chazelle was Best Director for his work on La La Land.
   Casey Affleck won Best Actor for Manchester by the Sea. Supporting gongs went to Viola Davis and Mahershala Ali, who became the first Muslim to win an acting Oscar.


The mishap at the 2017 Oscars, by Entertainment Tonight


La La Land Producer Jordan Horowitz relives the moment by Entertainment Tonight

Best Film
Moonlight

Best Actress
Emma Stone, La La Land

Best Actor
Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea

Best Director
Damien Chazelle, La La Land

Best Supporting Actress
Viola Davis, Fences

Best Supporting Actor
Mahershala Ali, Moonlight

Best Original Screenplay
Kenneth Lonergan, Manchester by the Sea

Best Adapted Screenplay
Barry Jenkins and Tarell Alvin McCraney, Moonlight

Best Cinematography
Linus Sandgren, La La Land

Best Original Score
Justin Hurwitz, La La Land

Best Original Song
Justin Hurwitz, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, La La Land

Best Sound Editing
Sylvain Bellemare, Arrival

Best Foreign Language Film
Asghar Farhadi, The Salesman

Best Film Editing
John Gilbert, Hacksaw Ridge

Best Visual Effects
Robert Legato, Adam Valdez, Andrew R. Jones and Dan Lemmon, The Jungle Book

Best Production Design
David Wasco and Sandy Reynolds Wasco, La La Land

Best Sound Mixing
Kevin O’Connell, Andy Wright, Robert Mackenzie and Peter Grace, Hacksaw Ridge

Best Documentary Feature
Ezra Edelman and Caroline Waterlow, O. J.: Made in America

Best Animated Film
Byron Howard, Rich Moore and Clark Spencer, Zootopia

Best Animated Short Film
Alan Barillaro and Marc Sondheimer, Piper

Best Documentary, Short Subject
Orlando von Einsiedel and Joanna Natasegara, The White Helmets

Best Live-action Short Film
Kristof Deak and Anna Udvardy, Sing

Best Make-up
Alessandro Bertolazzi, Giorgio Gregorini and Christopher Nelson, Suicide Squad

Best Costume Design
Colleen Atwood, Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them

SAG Awards: Claire Foy, Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, Emily Blunt, Viola Davis shine on red carpet, while on stage, stars get political


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/January 30, 2017/23.18


Dimitrios Kambouris, Kevin Mazur, Christopher Polk, Stefanie Keenan, John Sciulli, Emma McIntyre, Matt Winkelmeyer, Frazer Harrison

The 23rd annual Screen Actors’ Guild Awards, held at the Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center on Sunday, honoured outstanding performances from 2016 in film and television.
   From the moment the ceremony began, the stars wasted no time diving right into politics. Hollywood’s most popular actors didn’t hold back: faces like Emma Stone, Kerry Washington, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Bryan Cranston, Ashton Kutcher and Simon Helberg expressed their opposition to US president Donald Trump and his newly imposed immigration ban.
   Helberg and his wife Jocelyn Towne carried a sign ‘Refugees welcome’ and had ‘Let them in’ emblazoned across the chest respectively, Veep’s Julia Louis-Dreyfus called the Muslim ban ‘un-American’, Moonlight’s Mahershala Ali spoke out against the persecution of minorities, and Orange is the New Black’s Taylor Schilling called attention to the importance of diversity. But the most rousing speech came from Stranger Things’ David Harbour.
   ‘I would just like to say, in light of all that’s going on in the world today, it’s difficult to celebrate the already celebrated Stranger Things, but this award from you who take your craft seriously and earnestly believe, like me, that great acting can change the world is a call to arms from our fellow craftsmen and women to go deeper. And through our art to battle against fear, self-centredness and exclusivity of our predominately narcissistic culture and through our craft to cultivate a more empathetic and understanding society by revealing intimate truths that serve as a forceful reminder to folks that when they feel broken and afraid and tired, they are not alone. We are united in that we are all human beings and we are all together on this horrible, painful, joyous, exciting and mysterious ride that is being alive.
   ‘Now, as we act in the continuing narrative of Stranger Things, we 1983 Midwesterners will repel bullies. We will shelter freaks and outcasts, those who have no home. We will get past the lies. We will hunt monsters and when we are at a loss amidst the hypocrisy and the casual violence of certain individuals and institutions, we will, as per Chief Jim Hopper, punch some people in the face when they seek to destroy the weak and the disenfranchised and the marginalized. And we will do it all with soul, with heart, and with joy. We thank you for this responsibility. Thank you.’
   Denzel Washington, who had hitherto been nominated the most times but failed to win, broke the drought by scoring a SAG award for his performance in Fences.
   Netflix’s most expensive drama, The Crown, was rewarded with two wins, for lead actress Claire Foy, and supporting actor John Lithgow, whose incredible portrayal of Winston Churchill was recognized by the Guild, though it was the network’s Stranger Things that scooped the prize for best drama series. Matt Smith, who co-starred with Foy, joined her on the red carpet.
   Foy wore a brooding, floral Valentino gown, while Emma Stone stunned in Alexander McQueen. We also spotted Viola Davis in Vivienne Westwood, Natalie Portman in Christian Dior, Meryl Streep in Valentino, Naomie Harris in Lanvin, Thandie Newton in Schiaparelli, Michelle Williams in Louis Vuitton, Danielle Brooks in Christian Siriano, Michelle Dockery in Elie Saab, Kate Hudson in Christian Dior, Salma Hayek and Nicole Kidman both in Gucci, and Emily Blunt in Roberto Cavalli.
   Lily Tomlin was awarded the SAG Lifetime Achievement Award.
   The full list of winners is detailed below.—Nathalia Archila


From Taraji P. Henson to Nicole Kidman: best dressed at the SAG Awards

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
Captain Fantastic
Fences
Hidden Figures
(winner)
Manchester by the Sea
Moonlight

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role
Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea
Andrew Garfield, Hacksaw Ridge
Ryan Gosling, La La Land
Viggo Mortensen, Captain Fantastic
Denzel Washington, Fences (winner)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Amy Adams, Arrival
Emily Blunt, The Girl on the Train
Natalie Portman, Jackie
Emma Stone, La La Land (winner)
Meryl Streep, Florence Foster Jenkins

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series
The Crown
Downton Abbey
Game of Thrones
Stranger Things
(winner)
Westworld

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series
Millie Bobby Brown, Stranger Things
Claire Foy, The Crown (winner)
Thandie Newton, Westworld
Winona Ryder, Stranger Things
Robin Wright, House of Cards

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
Sterling K. Brown, This Is Us
Peter Dinklage, Game of Thrones
John Lithgow, The Crown (winner)
Rami Malek, Mr Robot
Kevin Spacey, House of Cards

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a TV Movie or Limited Series
Riz Ahmed, The Night of
Sterling K. Brown, The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story
Bryan Cranston, All the Way (winner)
John Turturro, The Night of
Courtney B. Vance, The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a TV Movie or Limited Series
Bryce Dallas Howard, Black Mirror
Felicity Huffman, American Crime
Audra McDonald, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill
Sarah Paulson, The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story (winner)
Kerry Washington, Confirmation

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role
Mahershala Ali, Moonlight (winner)
Jeff Bridges, Hell or High Water
Hugh Grant, Florence Foster Jenkins
Lucas Hedges, Manchester by the Sea
Dev Patel, Lion

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
Viola Davis, Fences (winner)
Naomie Harris, Moonlight
Nicole Kidman, Lion
Octavia Spencer, Hidden Figures
Michelle Williams, Manchester by the Sea

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series
The Big Bang Theory
Blackish
Modern Family
Orange Is the New Black
(winner)
Veep

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series
Anthony Anderson, Blackish
Tituss Burgess, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Ty Burrell, Modern Family
William H. Macy, Shameless (winner)
Jeffrey Tambor, Transparent

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series
Uzo Aduba, Orange Is the New Black
Jane Fonda, Grace and Frankie
Ellie Kemper, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep (winner)
Lily Tomlin, Grace and Frankie

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble
Captain America: Civil War
Doctor Strange
Hacksaw Ridge
(winner)
Jason Bourne
Nocturnal Animals

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble
Game of Thrones (winner)
Daredevil
Luke Cage
The Walking Dead
Westworld

Mary Tyler Moore’s most famous TV shows altered lives for the better


NEWS  by Jack Yan/January 26, 2017/12.38


Jack Yan

You’re going to make it after all When visiting Minneapolis many years ago, I photographed the now-famous statue of Mary Tyler Moore doing the “hat toss” from the credits of The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

When I asked my colleague Nathalia Archila to write an obituary for Mary Tyler Moore, it reminded me of an episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show where Mary Richards’ boss, Lou Grant, asks her to update obituaries as part of her job. It seems there are plenty of links in my life to The Mary Tyler Moore Show, a show I grew up watching.
   I have a connection with the show as a fan: I once ran the biggest email list for the series and its spinoffs. Called The Mary & Rhoda List, it was a place where other fans could discuss their favourite moments and keep up to date with the stars. It was originally run with a bunch of addresses, before I shifted it to Egroups, which later became Yahoo! Groups. For many years now, while I’m still listed as the admin, it’s been run by Sandy McLendon, a US-based fan.
   The list did catch the eye of co-star Valerie Harper, who one year sent me a nice autographed copy of her book for Christmas, along with a wee note. It was an acknowledgement of a job well done. But when Facebook and social media became the norm, the group became much less frequented.
   But why did this show have such an impact? In the 1970s, there was the backdrop of feminism, and watching The Mary Tyler Moore Show did give me the notion that women should be treated as equals to men. An underlying feminist theme existed in many of the episodes, and the absence of pay parity was directly addressed in one of them. I was too young to have noticed the references to Mary spending the night at a boyfriend’s or the fact she was on the Pill, but what I did see as a child was a Mustang-driving woman who had an independent life and a nice apartment. Why couldn’t all women do what they wanted and not be subject to what society dictated? Perhaps it appealed to my nonconformist mindset, something which I’ve had my entire life.
   I can’t be the only middle-aged man today who gained some awareness of feminism and equal rights through this show.
   I might have even gained the notion of working in the media through The Mary Tyler Moore Show—after all, plenty of people became comedy writers after seeing The Dick Van Dyke Show—and, perhaps to a similar degree, Tabitha (think The Mary Tyler Moore Show if Mary Richards was a witch living out in California).
   In reruns I discovered the snappy writing and directing of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and when you compare it to the shows that had just gone before—The Beverly Hillbillies comes to mind—it was realistic, urban and sophisticated. American films had become more gritty around that time, and television followed. While somewhat idealized, and certainly not as downbeat as All in the Family, the successful US remake of Till Death Do Us Part, you could associate with the characters. You simply couldn’t on the other show about a Texas oil millionaire living in Beverly Hills. Showing it to my other half tonight, she remarked at how little it had actually dated: there still isn’t pay parity for women, for instance, and women over 30 are still under pressure from society and, sometimes, family, on whether they will get married and have kids. I worked out that this show aired 47 years ago, and 47’s a lot nearer to 50 than it is to 40. Half a century and we’re still not giving women their due.
   It’s a show I have enjoyed regularly, including its reruns in the late 1990s, though, interestingly, its most acclaimed episode, ‘Chuckles Bites the Dust’ (1975), isn’t my favourite. I even had the 2000 TV movie, Mary & Rhoda, recorded by friends in the US and air-mailed over here, though it was such an appalling production that I wondered if it was worth the trip.
   Again in reruns, I became a fan of The Dick Van Dyke Show. I wasn’t born during that show’s original run; instead, I had seen van Dyke and Carl Reiner’s later effort, The New Dick Van Dyke Show. And Dick van Dyke, of course, was the silver-haired man giving us fire safety messages on New Zealand TV then, presumably adaptations of US PSAs.
   The Dick Van Dyke Show gave us a look at an extremely fun job—that of comedy writers—but there was also plenty of romance between van Dyke’s Rob Petrie and his screen wife, Laura, played by Moore. Maybe that, too, was idealized, but I see elements of that in my own relationship—that if you’ve got to keep it going, you need to inject some fun. I saw myself as a Rob Petrie kind of guy, and I might never have watched the earlier show if it wasn’t for Moore’s involvement.

continued below





Jack Yan

Above, from top: Sign at the Mary Tyler Moore Table at Basil’s. The Mary Tyler Moore Table at Basil’s at the Marquette Hotel. Where the exterior shots of Mary Richards’ first house were filmed, at Kenwood Parkway. The Midwest Plaza, where the fictional WJM-TV was located.

   Naturally, when I was in Minneapolis, the setting of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, I stalked the locations of the house used in the exterior shots of Mary’s original apartment, had a jog along the Lake of the Isles, snapped a photo of where the fictional WJM-TV was, as well as visited the statue of Moore on Nicollet Mall (once Nicollet Avenue) that commemorates her "hat toss" in Reza S. Badiyi’s opening credits for the sitcom.
   I headed to Basil’s at the Marquette Hotel for lunch and sat at what is now called the Mary Tyler Moore Table—Moore sat at this table with an unnamed actor in later versions of the credits—and, naturally, I got there by Ford Mustang, the same make and model of car she drove in the show.
   When Moore’s death was announced this morning here, it gave me time to reflect on just how big a part her work had played in my life. And how the messages of her ‘two Camelots’—two highly successful, much-watched TV series—resonated with me in different ways.
   The last time I saw Moore on TV, she was in a sitcom that co-starred Betty White, Hot in Cleveland. It reunited Moore with Harper, White (who was the sexually charged Sue Ann Nivens on The Mary Tyler Moore Show), Georgia Engel and Cloris Leachman (Georgette and Phyllis on The Mary Tyler Moore Show). The fact she’s now gone means we won’t get these surprise reunions any more. However, we can still wander down memory lane, and her work is widely available on DVD.
   As we wandered in this piece, what we probably should be aware of is how hard-fought the victories of the feminist movement were. We must also realize, particularly in Moore’s own country, how there are forces prepared to undo them: their presidential elections evidenced this, with men and women quite divided on whom each group chose. Some would rather see us go back to the past, to an era even before the Petries. However, progress must continue, as we’ve more to gain from diverse voices—yet another message I recall from The Mary Tyler Moore Show.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Mary Tyler Moore, ground-breaking actress and diabetes campaigner, dies aged 80


NEWS  by Jack Yan//0.38




The two Camelots: the Petries’ living room was the hippest fictional place to be in the early 1960s, with Dick van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore as Rob and Laura Petrie in The Dick Van Dyke Show. Ed Asner with Moore in the pilot episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show—not the first take. The original first-season cast of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, clockwise from top left: Valerie Harper, Ed Asner, Cloris Leachman, Ted Baxter, Mary Tyler Moore, and Gavin MacLeod.

Mary Tyler Moore, the multi-Emmy-winning star and Oscar-nominated actress, died aged 80 on Wednesday in Greenwich, Connecticut.
   Publicist Mara Buxbaum issued the following statement: ‘Today, beloved icon, Mary Tyler Moore, passed away at the age of 80 in the company of friends and her loving husband of over 33 years, Dr S. Robert Levine. A ground-breaking actress, producer, and passionate advocate for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Mary will be remembered as a fearless visionary who turned the world on with her smile.’
   Moore was born in Brooklyn, New York, on December 29, 1936. At 17, she wanted to be a dancer, with her dance training evident in one of the first roles that brought her national attention: the Happy Hotpoint elf, who danced across the screen as the mascot for Hotpoint appliances. She had a small role in Richard Diamond, Private Detective, and she guest-starred in numerous other TV shows.
   However, in 1961, Moore hit the big time when Carl Reiner cast her in The Dick Van Dyke Show. Moore saw herself as an aspiring dramatic actress, but found herself one of the most gifted comedic artists of her generation. It was Reiner’s second attempt at making the series (which he originally wrote for himself to star in), produced by Danny Thomas’s company. Thomas himself remembered Moore from an earlier role and recommended her to play opposite star Dick van Dyke as his screen wife.
   Despite an age gap between herself and van Dyke of 11 years, the two actors hit it off, and both have said since that they had crushes on each other. Her role was meant to have been a smaller one—effectively the straight man to van Dyke’s Rob Petrie character when he came home from the office—but recognizing her talents, her role began to expand.
   After a rocky first season that saw producer Sheldon Leonard approach sponsors to save the show, The Dick Van Dyke Show took off for its second season in 1962, and never looked back.
   The show was regarded as ground-breaking for showing a modern, white American couple in the suburbs, and Moore herself—as a young mother—wore capri pants as Laura Petrie, which brought her much attention, as well as complaints from less tolerant viewers. Moore’s catchphrase, ‘Ooh, Rob,’ became linked to her. She won two Emmys for her role as Laura Petrie, from three nominations.
   Van Dyke shared the clip below via Twitter on hearing of Moore’s death.

   Many of the key people on the show wanted to do other things—van Dyke had the beginnings of a movie career—and The Dick Van Dyke Show ended its run in 1966, on a high. Moore had numerous smaller roles, including one as a nun in the Elvis Presley starrer Change of Habit, but audiences still associated her with the Laura Petrie character. After appearing on a one-off van Dyke TV special, Moore and second husband Grant Tinker pitched a new sitcom to CBS.
   CBS effectively approved the sitcom based on Moore’s star power, though there were many road blocks in getting The Mary Tyler Moore Show made, as recounted in 2013 by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong in her book, Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted and All the Brilliant Minds Who Made The Mary Tyler Moore Show a Classic. The network had expected the show to be a flop, an early cut of the pilot didn’t find favour, and even co-star Ed Asner almost didn’t get his Lou Grant role, one that he is best known for. However, Moore, Tinker, and the team persisted, and The Mary Tyler Moore Show was one of the 1970s’ most acclaimed sitcoms, earning Moore four Emmy wins from eight nominations.
   The Mary Tyler Moore Show was, on the surface, an urban show that marked the dawn of the 1970s, after an era of rural-themed sitcoms such as The Beverly Hillbillies. But it was unheard of to show a young, single woman in her 30s forging a career and her own path in life. The show still stands up to scrutiny today for its writing and pace. Producers James L. Brooks and Allan Burns were committed to show a slice of reality—Moore could be seen repeating outfits during a season as a real working woman would—and to get a woman’s point of view, the show wound up hiring numerous female writers. It was implied in one episode that the fictional Mary Richards had stayed over a boyfriend’s, and another that she was on the Pill—both elicited viewer complaints at the time. The Mary Tyler Moore Show tapped into the US’s conscience, with the growing women’s movement. It also spawned imitators, including the short-lived sitcom Diana, with Diana Rigg, and the similarly short-lived Bewitched sequel, Tabitha. Behind all seven seasons were Moore and Tinker, who had formed their own production company, MTM Productions, Inc. MTM went on to produce numerous other shows, including spin-offs Rhoda, Phyllis and Lou Grant, as well as The Bob Newhart Show, WKRP in Cincinnati, Hill Street Blues, St Elsewhere, Remington Steele and The Pretender.
   Moore considered herself lucky to have been involved in ‘two Camelots’: two series that had broken ground in their respective times. While continuing to remain active on stage and screen, few projects were as well connected to Moore in the public mind. Moore did receive an Oscar nomination for her role in Ordinary People (1980) as a mother grieving the death of one of her sons—a situation that had a tragic parallel that year as Moore’s son, Richie, by her first husband Richard Meeker, accidentally shot himself in an accident.
   Moore and Tinker divorced in 1981, and she married her third husband, Dr S. Robert Levine, in 1983.
   Later projects included telemovie sequels to both The Mary Tyler Moore Show (Mary and Rhoda, released in 2000—and never had the spark of the original) and The Dick Van Dyke Show (2004, written by creator Carl Reiner and called its 159th episode). As covered in Lucire in 2012, van Dyke presented her with a SAG lifetime achievement award.
   Moore was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in her 30s and was an active campaigner for the JDRF, formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. She was also an animal rights’ activist and a vegetarian.—Jack Yan, Publisher, with Nathalia Archila


John Shearer/WireImage

Above: Mary Tyler Moore receives a lifetime achievement award from former co-star Dick van Dyke.

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