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SAG Awards: Claire Foy, Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, Emily Blunt, Viola Davis shine on red carpet, while on stage, stars get political


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/January 30, 2017/23.18


Dimitrios Kambouris, Kevin Mazur, Christopher Polk, Stefanie Keenan, John Sciulli, Emma McIntyre, Matt Winkelmeyer, Frazer Harrison

The 23rd annual Screen Actors’ Guild Awards, held at the Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center on Sunday, honoured outstanding performances from 2016 in film and television.
   From the moment the ceremony began, the stars wasted no time diving right into politics. Hollywood’s most popular actors didn’t hold back: faces like Emma Stone, Kerry Washington, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Bryan Cranston, Ashton Kutcher and Simon Helberg expressed their opposition to US president Donald Trump and his newly imposed immigration ban.
   Helberg and his wife Jocelyn Towne carried a sign ‘Refugees welcome’ and had ‘Let them in’ emblazoned across the chest respectively, Veep’s Julia Louis-Dreyfus called the Muslim ban ‘un-American’, Moonlight’s Mahershala Ali spoke out against the persecution of minorities, and Orange is the New Black’s Taylor Schilling called attention to the importance of diversity. But the most rousing speech came from Stranger Things’ David Harbour.
   ‘I would just like to say, in light of all that’s going on in the world today, it’s difficult to celebrate the already celebrated Stranger Things, but this award from you who take your craft seriously and earnestly believe, like me, that great acting can change the world is a call to arms from our fellow craftsmen and women to go deeper. And through our art to battle against fear, self-centredness and exclusivity of our predominately narcissistic culture and through our craft to cultivate a more empathetic and understanding society by revealing intimate truths that serve as a forceful reminder to folks that when they feel broken and afraid and tired, they are not alone. We are united in that we are all human beings and we are all together on this horrible, painful, joyous, exciting and mysterious ride that is being alive.
   ‘Now, as we act in the continuing narrative of Stranger Things, we 1983 Midwesterners will repel bullies. We will shelter freaks and outcasts, those who have no home. We will get past the lies. We will hunt monsters and when we are at a loss amidst the hypocrisy and the casual violence of certain individuals and institutions, we will, as per Chief Jim Hopper, punch some people in the face when they seek to destroy the weak and the disenfranchised and the marginalized. And we will do it all with soul, with heart, and with joy. We thank you for this responsibility. Thank you.’
   Denzel Washington, who had hitherto been nominated the most times but failed to win, broke the drought by scoring a SAG award for his performance in Fences.
   Netflix’s most expensive drama, The Crown, was rewarded with two wins, for lead actress Claire Foy, and supporting actor John Lithgow, whose incredible portrayal of Winston Churchill was recognized by the Guild, though it was the network’s Stranger Things that scooped the prize for best drama series. Matt Smith, who co-starred with Foy, joined her on the red carpet.
   Foy wore a brooding, floral Valentino gown, while Emma Stone stunned in Alexander McQueen. We also spotted Viola Davis in Vivienne Westwood, Natalie Portman in Christian Dior, Meryl Streep in Valentino, Naomie Harris in Lanvin, Thandie Newton in Schiaparelli, Michelle Williams in Louis Vuitton, Danielle Brooks in Christian Siriano, Michelle Dockery in Elie Saab, Kate Hudson in Christian Dior, Salma Hayek and Nicole Kidman both in Gucci, and Emily Blunt in Roberto Cavalli.
   Lily Tomlin was awarded the SAG Lifetime Achievement Award.
   The full list of winners is detailed below.—Nathalia Archila


From Taraji P. Henson to Nicole Kidman: best dressed at the SAG Awards

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
Captain Fantastic
Fences
Hidden Figures
(winner)
Manchester by the Sea
Moonlight

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role
Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea
Andrew Garfield, Hacksaw Ridge
Ryan Gosling, La La Land
Viggo Mortensen, Captain Fantastic
Denzel Washington, Fences (winner)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Amy Adams, Arrival
Emily Blunt, The Girl on the Train
Natalie Portman, Jackie
Emma Stone, La La Land (winner)
Meryl Streep, Florence Foster Jenkins

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series
The Crown
Downton Abbey
Game of Thrones
Stranger Things
(winner)
Westworld

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series
Millie Bobby Brown, Stranger Things
Claire Foy, The Crown (winner)
Thandie Newton, Westworld
Winona Ryder, Stranger Things
Robin Wright, House of Cards

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
Sterling K. Brown, This Is Us
Peter Dinklage, Game of Thrones
John Lithgow, The Crown (winner)
Rami Malek, Mr Robot
Kevin Spacey, House of Cards

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a TV Movie or Limited Series
Riz Ahmed, The Night of
Sterling K. Brown, The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story
Bryan Cranston, All the Way (winner)
John Turturro, The Night of
Courtney B. Vance, The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a TV Movie or Limited Series
Bryce Dallas Howard, Black Mirror
Felicity Huffman, American Crime
Audra McDonald, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill
Sarah Paulson, The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story (winner)
Kerry Washington, Confirmation

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role
Mahershala Ali, Moonlight (winner)
Jeff Bridges, Hell or High Water
Hugh Grant, Florence Foster Jenkins
Lucas Hedges, Manchester by the Sea
Dev Patel, Lion

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
Viola Davis, Fences (winner)
Naomie Harris, Moonlight
Nicole Kidman, Lion
Octavia Spencer, Hidden Figures
Michelle Williams, Manchester by the Sea

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series
The Big Bang Theory
Blackish
Modern Family
Orange Is the New Black
(winner)
Veep

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series
Anthony Anderson, Blackish
Tituss Burgess, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Ty Burrell, Modern Family
William H. Macy, Shameless (winner)
Jeffrey Tambor, Transparent

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series
Uzo Aduba, Orange Is the New Black
Jane Fonda, Grace and Frankie
Ellie Kemper, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep (winner)
Lily Tomlin, Grace and Frankie

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble
Captain America: Civil War
Doctor Strange
Hacksaw Ridge
(winner)
Jason Bourne
Nocturnal Animals

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble
Game of Thrones (winner)
Daredevil
Luke Cage
The Walking Dead
Westworld

Mary Tyler Moore’s most famous TV shows altered lives for the better


NEWS  by Jack Yan/January 26, 2017/12.38


Jack Yan

You’re going to make it after all When visiting Minneapolis many years ago, I photographed the now-famous statue of Mary Tyler Moore doing the “hat toss” from the credits of The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

When I asked my colleague Nathalia Archila to write an obituary for Mary Tyler Moore, it reminded me of an episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show where Mary Richards’ boss, Lou Grant, asks her to update obituaries as part of her job. It seems there are plenty of links in my life to The Mary Tyler Moore Show, a show I grew up watching.
   I have a connection with the show as a fan: I once ran the biggest email list for the series and its spinoffs. Called The Mary & Rhoda List, it was a place where other fans could discuss their favourite moments and keep up to date with the stars. It was originally run with a bunch of addresses, before I shifted it to Egroups, which later became Yahoo! Groups. For many years now, while I’m still listed as the admin, it’s been run by Sandy McLendon, a US-based fan.
   The list did catch the eye of co-star Valerie Harper, who one year sent me a nice autographed copy of her book for Christmas, along with a wee note. It was an acknowledgement of a job well done. But when Facebook and social media became the norm, the group became much less frequented.
   But why did this show have such an impact? In the 1970s, there was the backdrop of feminism, and watching The Mary Tyler Moore Show did give me the notion that women should be treated as equals to men. An underlying feminist theme existed in many of the episodes, and the absence of pay parity was directly addressed in one of them. I was too young to have noticed the references to Mary spending the night at a boyfriend’s or the fact she was on the Pill, but what I did see as a child was a Mustang-driving woman who had an independent life and a nice apartment. Why couldn’t all women do what they wanted and not be subject to what society dictated? Perhaps it appealed to my nonconformist mindset, something which I’ve had my entire life.
   I can’t be the only middle-aged man today who gained some awareness of feminism and equal rights through this show.
   I might have even gained the notion of working in the media through The Mary Tyler Moore Show—after all, plenty of people became comedy writers after seeing The Dick Van Dyke Show—and, perhaps to a similar degree, Tabitha (think The Mary Tyler Moore Show if Mary Richards was a witch living out in California).
   In reruns I discovered the snappy writing and directing of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and when you compare it to the shows that had just gone before—The Beverly Hillbillies comes to mind—it was realistic, urban and sophisticated. American films had become more gritty around that time, and television followed. While somewhat idealized, and certainly not as downbeat as All in the Family, the successful US remake of Till Death Do Us Part, you could associate with the characters. You simply couldn’t on the other show about a Texas oil millionaire living in Beverly Hills. Showing it to my other half tonight, she remarked at how little it had actually dated: there still isn’t pay parity for women, for instance, and women over 30 are still under pressure from society and, sometimes, family, on whether they will get married and have kids. I worked out that this show aired 47 years ago, and 47’s a lot nearer to 50 than it is to 40. Half a century and we’re still not giving women their due.
   It’s a show I have enjoyed regularly, including its reruns in the late 1990s, though, interestingly, its most acclaimed episode, ‘Chuckles Bites the Dust’ (1975), isn’t my favourite. I even had the 2000 TV movie, Mary & Rhoda, recorded by friends in the US and air-mailed over here, though it was such an appalling production that I wondered if it was worth the trip.
   Again in reruns, I became a fan of The Dick Van Dyke Show. I wasn’t born during that show’s original run; instead, I had seen van Dyke and Carl Reiner’s later effort, The New Dick Van Dyke Show. And Dick van Dyke, of course, was the silver-haired man giving us fire safety messages on New Zealand TV then, presumably adaptations of US PSAs.
   The Dick Van Dyke Show gave us a look at an extremely fun job—that of comedy writers—but there was also plenty of romance between van Dyke’s Rob Petrie and his screen wife, Laura, played by Moore. Maybe that, too, was idealized, but I see elements of that in my own relationship—that if you’ve got to keep it going, you need to inject some fun. I saw myself as a Rob Petrie kind of guy, and I might never have watched the earlier show if it wasn’t for Moore’s involvement.

continued below





Jack Yan

Above, from top: Sign at the Mary Tyler Moore Table at Basil’s. The Mary Tyler Moore Table at Basil’s at the Marquette Hotel. Where the exterior shots of Mary Richards’ first house were filmed, at Kenwood Parkway. The Midwest Plaza, where the fictional WJM-TV was located.

   Naturally, when I was in Minneapolis, the setting of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, I stalked the locations of the house used in the exterior shots of Mary’s original apartment, had a jog along the Lake of the Isles, snapped a photo of where the fictional WJM-TV was, as well as visited the statue of Moore on Nicollet Mall (once Nicollet Avenue) that commemorates her "hat toss" in Reza S. Badiyi’s opening credits for the sitcom.
   I headed to Basil’s at the Marquette Hotel for lunch and sat at what is now called the Mary Tyler Moore Table—Moore sat at this table with an unnamed actor in later versions of the credits—and, naturally, I got there by Ford Mustang, the same make and model of car she drove in the show.
   When Moore’s death was announced this morning here, it gave me time to reflect on just how big a part her work had played in my life. And how the messages of her ‘two Camelots’—two highly successful, much-watched TV series—resonated with me in different ways.
   The last time I saw Moore on TV, she was in a sitcom that co-starred Betty White, Hot in Cleveland. It reunited Moore with Harper, White (who was the sexually charged Sue Ann Nivens on The Mary Tyler Moore Show), Georgia Engel and Cloris Leachman (Georgette and Phyllis on The Mary Tyler Moore Show). The fact she’s now gone means we won’t get these surprise reunions any more. However, we can still wander down memory lane, and her work is widely available on DVD.
   As we wandered in this piece, what we probably should be aware of is how hard-fought the victories of the feminist movement were. We must also realize, particularly in Moore’s own country, how there are forces prepared to undo them: their presidential elections evidenced this, with men and women quite divided on whom each group chose. Some would rather see us go back to the past, to an era even before the Petries. However, progress must continue, as we’ve more to gain from diverse voices—yet another message I recall from The Mary Tyler Moore Show.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Mary Tyler Moore, ground-breaking actress and diabetes campaigner, dies aged 80


NEWS  by Jack Yan//0.38




The two Camelots: the Petries’ living room was the hippest fictional place to be in the early 1960s, with Dick van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore as Rob and Laura Petrie in The Dick Van Dyke Show. Ed Asner with Moore in the pilot episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show—not the first take. The original first-season cast of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, clockwise from top left: Valerie Harper, Ed Asner, Cloris Leachman, Ted Baxter, Mary Tyler Moore, and Gavin MacLeod.

Mary Tyler Moore, the multi-Emmy-winning star and Oscar-nominated actress, died aged 80 on Wednesday in Greenwich, Connecticut.
   Publicist Mara Buxbaum issued the following statement: ‘Today, beloved icon, Mary Tyler Moore, passed away at the age of 80 in the company of friends and her loving husband of over 33 years, Dr S. Robert Levine. A ground-breaking actress, producer, and passionate advocate for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Mary will be remembered as a fearless visionary who turned the world on with her smile.’
   Moore was born in Brooklyn, New York, on December 29, 1936. At 17, she wanted to be a dancer, with her dance training evident in one of the first roles that brought her national attention: the Happy Hotpoint elf, who danced across the screen as the mascot for Hotpoint appliances. She had a small role in Richard Diamond, Private Detective, and she guest-starred in numerous other TV shows.
   However, in 1961, Moore hit the big time when Carl Reiner cast her in The Dick Van Dyke Show. Moore saw herself as an aspiring dramatic actress, but found herself one of the most gifted comedic artists of her generation. It was Reiner’s second attempt at making the series (which he originally wrote for himself to star in), produced by Danny Thomas’s company. Thomas himself remembered Moore from an earlier role and recommended her to play opposite star Dick van Dyke as his screen wife.
   Despite an age gap between herself and van Dyke of 11 years, the two actors hit it off, and both have said since that they had crushes on each other. Her role was meant to have been a smaller one—effectively the straight man to van Dyke’s Rob Petrie character when he came home from the office—but recognizing her talents, her role began to expand.
   After a rocky first season that saw producer Sheldon Leonard approach sponsors to save the show, The Dick Van Dyke Show took off for its second season in 1962, and never looked back.
   The show was regarded as ground-breaking for showing a modern, white American couple in the suburbs, and Moore herself—as a young mother—wore capri pants as Laura Petrie, which brought her much attention, as well as complaints from less tolerant viewers. Moore’s catchphrase, ‘Ooh, Rob,’ became linked to her. She won two Emmys for her role as Laura Petrie, from three nominations.
   Van Dyke shared the clip below via Twitter on hearing of Moore’s death.

   Many of the key people on the show wanted to do other things—van Dyke had the beginnings of a movie career—and The Dick Van Dyke Show ended its run in 1966, on a high. Moore had numerous smaller roles, including one as a nun in the Elvis Presley starrer Change of Habit, but audiences still associated her with the Laura Petrie character. After appearing on a one-off van Dyke TV special, Moore and second husband Grant Tinker pitched a new sitcom to CBS.
   CBS effectively approved the sitcom based on Moore’s star power, though there were many road blocks in getting The Mary Tyler Moore Show made, as recounted in 2013 by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong in her book, Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted and All the Brilliant Minds Who Made The Mary Tyler Moore Show a Classic. The network had expected the show to be a flop, an early cut of the pilot didn’t find favour, and even co-star Ed Asner almost didn’t get his Lou Grant role, one that he is best known for. However, Moore, Tinker, and the team persisted, and The Mary Tyler Moore Show was one of the 1970s’ most acclaimed sitcoms, earning Moore four Emmy wins from eight nominations.
   The Mary Tyler Moore Show was, on the surface, an urban show that marked the dawn of the 1970s, after an era of rural-themed sitcoms such as The Beverly Hillbillies. But it was unheard of to show a young, single woman in her 30s forging a career and her own path in life. The show still stands up to scrutiny today for its writing and pace. Producers James L. Brooks and Allan Burns were committed to show a slice of reality—Moore could be seen repeating outfits during a season as a real working woman would—and to get a woman’s point of view, the show wound up hiring numerous female writers. It was implied in one episode that the fictional Mary Richards had stayed over a boyfriend’s, and another that she was on the Pill—both elicited viewer complaints at the time. The Mary Tyler Moore Show tapped into the US’s conscience, with the growing women’s movement. It also spawned imitators, including the short-lived sitcom Diana, with Diana Rigg, and the similarly short-lived Bewitched sequel, Tabitha. Behind all seven seasons were Moore and Tinker, who had formed their own production company, MTM Productions, Inc. MTM went on to produce numerous other shows, including spin-offs Rhoda, Phyllis and Lou Grant, as well as The Bob Newhart Show, WKRP in Cincinnati, Hill Street Blues, St Elsewhere, Remington Steele and The Pretender.
   Moore considered herself lucky to have been involved in ‘two Camelots’: two series that had broken ground in their respective times. While continuing to remain active on stage and screen, few projects were as well connected to Moore in the public mind. Moore did receive an Oscar nomination for her role in Ordinary People (1980) as a mother grieving the death of one of her sons—a situation that had a tragic parallel that year as Moore’s son, Richie, by her first husband Richard Meeker, accidentally shot himself in an accident.
   Moore and Tinker divorced in 1981, and she married her third husband, Dr S. Robert Levine, in 1983.
   Later projects included telemovie sequels to both The Mary Tyler Moore Show (Mary and Rhoda, released in 2000—and never had the spark of the original) and The Dick Van Dyke Show (2004, written by creator Carl Reiner and called its 159th episode). As covered in Lucire in 2012, van Dyke presented her with a SAG lifetime achievement award.
   Moore was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in her 30s and was an active campaigner for the JDRF, formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. She was also an animal rights’ activist and a vegetarian.—Jack Yan, Publisher, with Nathalia Archila


John Shearer/WireImage

Above: Mary Tyler Moore receives a lifetime achievement award from former co-star Dick van Dyke.

Chanel shows off spring–summer 2017 haute couture, with Lily-Rose Depp as the bride


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/January 25, 2017/0.37

On January 24, Chanel released its spring–summer 2017 haute couture collection. House ambassadors Vanessa Paradis, Anna Mouglalis, Caroline de Maigret, Alma Jodorowsky, G-Dragon and Shin Hye Park, singer Cécile Cassel, English actresses Lucy Boynton and Ellie Bamber, Chinese model Liu Wen, as well as French actresses Diane Rouxel, Laura Smet, Olga Kurylenko, Sigrid Bouaziz, Anamaria Vartolomei, Céline Sallette, Anne Berest and Karidja Touré were all present at the Grand Palais.
   The collection’s look was all about a crazy femininity: structured shoulders, straight or tubular lines, defined and slightly raised waists. Alongside major hues of white, silver and grey, the palette moved from beige, pink, yellow, blue and pastel green through to black and navy.
   The show began with crisp tweed suits with clean couture lines, pleated and belted in toned-down but vibrant colours. Some of the suits had elegant tied bows around the neck in bold. From there, the show continued with a scene of silver silhouettes, adorned with feathers, sequins and glitter.
   The last segment of the show continued with slimmer dresses and skirts, many of which were polished by light pink and silver ostrich feathers on their linings. Karl Lagerfeld’s spring 2017 couture show grand finalé was Lily-Rose Depp, the face of Chanel No. 5, in a pink bridal gown with ruffled sleeves and skirt that left everyone in awe.—Nathalia Archila

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Sonam Kapoor, Naomie Harris, Zhang Zi Lin, Rosamund Pike among celebs at IWC Schaffhausen launch


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/January 19, 2017/23.13

On the night of January 17 at a private gala event, IWC Schaffhausen and a thousand VIP guests visited Genève to celebrate the arrival of the new Da Vinci collection.
   ‘The new collection is a modern interpretation of the iconic Da Vinci design from the 1980s. Along with its haute horlogerie innovations, the collection once more includes references that have been designed deliberately with women in mind—as is indicated by various features such as smaller case diameters, moving strap horns, diamond-set bezels and leather straps by Santoni in various colours,’ explained Georges Kern, CEO of IWC Schaffhausen.
   Numerous IWC brand ambassadors and international stars such as actors Rosamund Pike, Vanessa Redgrave, James Marsden, Sonam Kapoor, Olga Kurylenko, Jean Reno (with Zofia Reno), Game of Thrones’ Joseph Mawle, Naomie Harris, Zhang Zi Lin, Chen Bolin, Isabelle Huppert, Taylor Schilling, Moritz Bleibtreu, Barbara Becker, Franziska Weisz, Elyas M’Barek, Palina Rojinski, Hend Sabri, Murilo Benício, Pierfrancesco Favino, Ralf Möller, Anna Ferzetti, Anna Drijver, Rob Brydon, and Sir Patrick Stewart; singers and musicians Ronan Keating (with Storm Keating), Sunny Ozell, John Helliwell, and Sebastian Bürgin; TV presenters Raya Abirached and Alessia Marcuzzi; photographers Mika Ninagawa and Murad Osmann; producer Juan López Salaberry; sporting and racing legends Nico Rosberg (with Vivian Rosberg) Lewis Hamilton, Niki Lauda (with Birgit Lauda), Fabian Cancellara, Jan Frodeno, Arsène Wenger, Jochen Mass, Carmen Jordá, Oliver Bierhoff (with Klara Bierhoff), Alexei Nemov (with Galina Nemov), Günter Netzer (with Elvira Netzer), and Ion Țiriac; models Karolína Kurková, Adriana Lima, Vanessa Lorenzo, Monika Radulović (with husband, artist Alessandro Ljubičić), Andrés Velencoso, and Natalia Zakharova; chefs Andrea Berton (with Sandra Berton) and Diego Guerrero; and influencers such as Alexandra Lapp, Tiany Kiriloff, Kristina Bazan, Xenia Tchoumi, Elias El-Indari, Nadya Hassan, Lana El Sahely, Nicole Warne, Germina Preses, stylist Ana Antic, Sandra Bauknecht, Chiara Maci, and Negin Mirsalehi stepped onto the red carpet. Danish singer MØ performed live on stage at the event. Kern’s successor, Christoph Grainger-Herr, made his first appearance at a major celebrity event, as did Monika Kern, who accompanied her husband. IWC’s CMO Franziska Gsell also attended, as did IWC VIP customer, man-about-town Tim Jeffries.
   IWC Schaffhausen has been producing watches since 1868, and has gained an international reputation, creating masterpieces of haute horlogerie at their finest, combining supreme precision and exclusive design.—Nathalia Archila

A Golden mine of beauty finds, as the Secret Room honours 74th Globes nominees


NEWS  by Elyse Glickman/January 6, 2017/22.42




J. C. Olivera

Among the celebrities attending: Rénée Oldstead, Amara Karan, Katie Leclerc.

Anyone attending a Secret Room event during an award show weekend can count on discovering cutting-edge, kind-to-the-environment beauty products. However, the Secret Room Events honouring 74th Golden Globe Awards nominees and presenters focused almost entirely of skin care and wellness products made with medically or environmentally sound ingredients.
   Thanks to the product displays and the æsthetic finesse and artistic skills of platinum sponsor Anne Neilson of Charlotte, NC’s Anne Neilson Home, the SLS Hotel main ballroom in Beverly Hills felt like the ultimate hotel spa reception area. Neilson’s candles, coffee table books and spa beverage dispenser greeted guests after having their red carpet photos taken. However, not many hotel spas admit pets. Here, pets were not only welcomed with open paws, but also Paw Works, the event’s official charity. The non-profit animal rescue organization is dedicated to partnering with county and city businesses to provide abandoned animals through rescues, adoption services and other services.
   Like a good spa, there was a world of skin care products at one’s fingertips with tempting displays and open testers. First, the Pacific Ocean side of the world: South Korea was represented with UrbanHeal’s soon-to-launch line of home facial masks, while Japan’s McCoy Ltd. returned with a new post-workout body care marvel called Non F Expert designed to further advance a sleeker appearance with stem cell extracts and rice-based components. Australia-based Auspect Skincare International introduced its all-purpose line with some products made in the US that includes everything from anti-ageing serums for fine lines and wrinkles and eye cream for dark circles to solutions for rosacea and acne-prone skin. Aromababy touted its Australian-made ranges of pure and gentle aroma-free or therapeutic grade (essential oil) aromatic products for babies and young children.
   There was much to discover in the world of European beauty. Crossing over the Atlantic, guests encountered Storm Rejuvenate Pro, which proved powerful do indeed come in small packages. A tiny box with 50 little packets contains a few drops of a gel serum that instantly diminishes the appearance of wrinkles and loose skin, creating the perfect canvas for one’s make-up. Russia’s Splat encouraged smiles with its prolific line of ultra-premium dental care as well as Heya balsam shampoos. Bioderma was not only back with its popular Sensibio H2O micelle solution but also representative products from its Sebium (acne remedy) and moisturizing Hydrabio lines. European Skin and Massage Studio introduced Woda European Natural Skin Care products from Poland.
   It is no surprise that there were also several made-in-California remedies on hand, from spa equipment supplier Martinni Beauty’s cooling at-home masques to Beverly Hills-based Serumtologie, featured on CNBC’s business programme, showcasing Cserum 22 and Pure Whipped Chiffon moisturizer. The ultra-luxurious CelleCle Skincare, based in Orange County, builds its niche on products tackling skin problems brought on by urbanization, environmental stress, technology and pollution with ‘unique plant flavonoids’ and other ingredients that penetrate several dermal layers. Cote Hair Care, hailing from Las Vegas, rolled out its professional vegan hair care products replacing such nasty stuff as parabens, GMOs and gluten with quinoa oil and plant-based complexes.
   Speaking of plant-based, there were some edible and nutritious treats offered by Barlean’s and Julie’s Real. The real Julie (Fox) behind Julie’s Real was handing out samples of her grain-free granola and almond butters while reps from Barlean’s got us excited about their superfoods with omega-3 fish oil, flax oil and vegan greens powders that make everything from salads to smoothies more nutritious and delicious. All one tastes in the key lime fish oil, straight or mixed with a smoothie, is creamy tropical goodness.
   Many celebrities were on hand to sample and compare, but the most interesting spotting was comedy legend Elayne Boosler, who spent her day behind the tables promoting her Tails of Joy and supporting the inventor of Mighty No Bitey, Inc. insect repellant. I had the privilege of interviewing Boosler when she performed in Chicago back in my college newspaper days, and was delighted to see that face to face, many years on, she’s as passionate, politically astute, progressive and feisty as ever. Here’s hoping she continues to speak out, whether it’s for animal rescue or human rights in America as a new presidency approaches.
   The lone fashion-oriented sponsor was Forever in My Heart Jewelry by Mira, whose founder was also devoted to animal welfare. Her eclectic collection contained mix of special lockets (holding ashes from departed pets), statement pieces and everyday jewellery. The Happiness Box, meanwhile, was something that would be inside a spa reception area. The cylindrical can contains 365 statements of affirmation one can select to ensure every day of the year starts with a positive thought.
   There was also a handy gadget of note, the Dripo Japanese-style ice drip coffee maker, which brews potent and flavourful iced coffee without any electricity. If you have access to ice and 25 g of your favorite coffee on hand, follow the directions, go and do something else for 90 minutes, and return for a warm weather pick-me-up. The packaging for the gadget, a large cardboard carton that would normally contain prefabricated stuff, is also genius.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor







J. C. Olivera

Above, from top: Peter Mackenzie and Graham Beckel. Sara Rue. Kevin Dillon. Priyanka Bose. Annie Funke. Saniyya Sidney.















Elyse Glickman

Video: British Fashion Awards 2016: Gigi Hadid is model of the year, Simone Rocha and Craig Green scoop top designer honours


NEWS  by Cecilia Xu/December 5, 2016/23.51




British Fashion Council

In a room of 4,000 outstanding individuals, designers, supermodels and stars, the 2016 British Fashion Awards took place in London tonight. With many renowned and iconic designers such as Ralph Lauren, Tom Ford and Donatella Versace present, as well as the new and upcoming, the show sure was a varietal and multifarious mix.
   Of the top awards of the night, Craig Green won the British Menswear Designer Award, while Simone Rocha won the British Womenswear Designer Award, and Alexander McQueen won the dominant British Brand of the Year award.
   David Beckham presented the Outstanding Achievement Award to Ralph Lauren, a celebratory award to the individual for their significant contribution to the global fashion industry. Gigi Hadid scooped her sister Bella and best friend Kendall Jenner in the International Model of the Year Award, a defining and prestigious award so it was no surprise to see emotions on stage as she accepted the honour.
   Jaden and Willow Smith were surprised with the New Fashion Icon award; with no nomination prior, the award comes as a revelation on the night.
   My personal adoration this year was for Gucci, so it came as no surprise to see Alessandro Michele take home the Accessories’ Designer of the Year award. With such a rich and flamboyant collection for Gucci in 2016, this prestige was well deserved, don’t we all agree? Gucci, all in all, has done extremely well this year as a wrap, as the brand sweeps away two awards, with Marco Bizzarri taking the International Business Leader award.
   Vêtements, an urban and streetwear brand that has been taking Instagram by storm, and the likes of the youth especially in Asia this year, won the award for International Urban Luxury Brand.
   Britain’s Emerging Talent Award was taken by Molly Goddard, Franca Sozzani won the Swarovski Award for Positive Change, Bruce Weber, as announced earlier, was honoured with the Isabella Blow Award for Fashion Creator, and the International Ready-to-Wear Designer was taken by Demna Gvasalia for Balenciaga. And last but not least, 100 Years of British Vogue took the Special Recognition Award of 2016.
   VIPs attending included David Gandy, Molly Goddard, Erdem Moralioglu, Christopher Bailey, MBE, Nicole Scherzinger, Derek Blasberg, Adwoa Aboah, David and Victoria Beckham, Jack Whitehall, Karlie Kloss, Lily Donaldson, Vivienne Westwood, Nadja Swarovski, Abbey Clancy, Jourdan Dunn, Olivia Palermo, Eva Herzigová, Winnie Harlow, Anya Hindmarch, Giovanna Engelbert, Laura Bailey, Julien Macdonald, Jordan Kale Barrett, Hamish Bowles, and Lady Gaga. The British Fashion Council’s Dame Natalie Massenet and Caroline Rush looked like stars as they walked the red carpet.—Cecilia Xu








British Fashion Council

Red carpet

Molly Goddard, Erdem Moralioglu, Christopher Bailey, MBE

Dame Natalie Massenet, Nadia Swarovski, Caroline Rush, CBE

Lady Gaga

Simone Rocha, Derek Blasberg, Adwoa Aboah

Eva Herzigová, Jack Whitehall, Amber Valletta, Winnie Harlow

Anya Hindmarch, Giovanna Engelbert, Laura Bailey

Julien Macdonald, Nicole Scherzinger, Jordan Kale Barrett, Hamish Bowles

Craig Green

100 Years of British Vogue

Simone Rocha

Franca Sozzani

Ralph Lauren

Molly Goddard

Bruce Weber

Vêtements

Marco Bizzarri

Alessandro Michele

Alexander McQueen

Demna Gvasalia

Jean Paul Gaultier reports for Swarovski

Art Lewin Bespoke: when crowd suits the occasion


NEWS  by Elyse Glickman/November 24, 2016/20.30






Above, from top: Art Lewin with Daniel Simons. Interior at Art Lewin’s Santa Monica store. Eugenia Kuzmina. With Kelsey Scott. Patrika Darbo.

Whether you’re going for an audition or a job interview, the first impression is critical. With a guest list that included actors, attorneys, and LA power-brokers, nobody understands this better than Art Lewin. In mid-November, he opened his sixth store in Santa Monica, which like the other locales, is outfitted with everything needed for the perfect custom suit: an extensive library of world-class quality fabrics from internationally renowned mills in England, Italy, France, Switzerland, and Germany; and canvas that is hand-padded and artisan-stitched (as opposed to machine stitching).
   Lewin has long been a go-to tailor for Hollywood celebrities, including Jon Voight, Ernie Hudson, Jason Ritter, William Shatner, Lou Ferrigno, Esai Morales and Robert Wagner, to name a few. Art Lewin Bespoke is also preferred by a cadre of stylists. He also offers sleek suiting for women with the same attention to detail, and Sofia Milos is counted among the roster of loyal clients.
   The invitation-only red carpet opening was a mix of 100 loyal fans and new converts, including 2016 Primetime Emmy winner Patrika Darbo, Kelsey Scott (12 Years a Slave), and model–actress Eugenia Kuzmina. All guests parted with a Mario Masotti hand-made silk neck-tie to start the process of making a statement at their next court date, boardroom meeting, or audition.
   Co-sponsors BuyWine.com offered guests the best of the best including gourmet cuisine, scrumptious desserts with other treats including Napa Valley wines from Sparrow Hawk and Highway 12 vineyards, Hint Water and Rekorderlig Cider from Sweden.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor






























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