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May 12, 2016

A Billion Lives has world première in New Zealand, revealing powerful forces aiding the tobacco industry

Jack Yan/11.16


Jack Yan

Above: The team behind A Billion Lives, and Doc Edge organizers Dan Shannon and Alex Lee.

Those of us outside the vaping world have probably looked at e-cigarettes, wondering why on earth these could be better for your health. Or we may have thought they were a fad, since the only people I knew who vaped were tech hipsters, who enjoyed vaping as though it was a matter of course, and nothing to be curious about—thereby keeping their habit a closed shop. But then, perhaps they were tired of repeating themselves, and had settled into being comfortable with their e-cigs.
   A Billion Lives is a documentary that takes a look into this world, but it does so much more. The title refers to the number of people who can be saved if they give up smoking, but there are powerful forces at play to ensure that people don’t. And those forces have ensured that there is misinformation about vaping and the potential for the technology to save lives.
   Filmmaker Aaron Biebert, who directed and narrated the film which had its world première in Wellington as part of the Doc Edge Festival, journeyed to 13 countries on four continents to find similar patterns worldwide: here is a life-saving technology of e-cigarettes, but governments were banning them or fining citizens over their use, ignoring the science and deciding to be complicit with the tobacco industry in keeping people addicted to a harmful product. Instead, governments spend money spreading lies about e-cigarettes, calling them a gateway to cigarettes, or that one could get formaldehyde poisoning, claims that the film demonstrably refutes. E-cigarettes are not completely safe, and the film acknowledges that, but they have proven to be a successful tool to help those giving up smoking, especially where mainstream solutions have failed.
   In his own country, the US, Biebert points out that governments collect far more revenue from cigarette taxation than from several industries combined, and have no real incentive to cut off the flow of dollars. E-cigarettes, which were invented by pharmacist Hon Lik in China, were conceived as a way to give up smoking, and have been successful for 30 million people around the world. A Billion Lives points out that nicotine is not what causes lung cancer, and that the US Surgeon-General has said as much. What are harmful are the tar and 4,000 chemicals in modern cigarettes. It equates nicotine with coffee in terms of addictiveness, and the figure of 95 per cent less harmful than a typical cigarette featured prominently in the film. Vaping essentially allows one to get the pleasure of nicotine without the harm of the tar and toxins.
   Yet as a society, we have come to equate nicotine as being the evil, addictive substance, and that’s no accident.
   This point is made halfway into the film, with a good part of the first section looking into the history of cigarettes (Flintstones sponsor announcements for Winston cigarettes elicited laughs from the audience), and David Goerlitz, the Winston male model from the 1980s, being a particularly effective interviewee, discussing how he went from a smoking advocate earning millions to having a crisis of conscience when his brother developed lung cancer and died. Goerlitz went to the other side, and became a high-profile spokesman who was able to talk in plain language just what governments, Big Tobacco, and Big Pharma (which sells patches and gum, and would like to continue doing so) were doing. Health professionals were being marketed to far more than the public, permitting Big Pharma to continue to sell its products, the film notes.
   Biebert was able to get other interviewees at a very high level, including Dr Derek Yach, the former executive director of the World Health Organization, and Dr Delon Human, former president of the World Medical Association, among others, speaking plainly about how lives could be saved through vaping e-cigarettes, a tool which could get smokers to kick their habit.
   Meanwhile, the pro-smoking side was represented through historical clips—you get the feeling that we had only touched the surface of what was out there, with corporations spending thousands of millions to fund biased studies and get on to our airwaves.
   Beautifully shot and scored, this independently funded feature tells a story about our times and just why so many citizens today are wary of their governments and multinational corporations. Those who oppose global trade agreements, for instance, do not do so in isolation—and while A Billion Lives takes no political side, it does tap into the Zeitgeist of our modern suspicion about what is on our airwaves and what are the motives behind it. Like Adam Curtis, whose documentaries seek to explain the complex in simple terms, Biebert has done the same, narrating and directing, although he appears on camera as well when narrative gaps need to be plugged. He is an honest, frank speaker, and gives the film a personal touch.
   Young smokers who tried e-cigarettes were often people who already smoked and saw them as a way to give up their addiction, and most, Biebert pointed out in a post-screening Q&A, were not even using nicotine in their e-cigarettes.
   Yet the state of California, where Biebert is based, spent $75 million telling us about the evils of e-cigarettes, said the director in his Q&A; while in the film, he points out that US federal funds were being illegally used for lobbying activities. The American Lung Association had deceived the public, too, notes Biebert, who told the audience, ‘If you get powerful charities on side, you can do anything.’ The increasing restrictions on e-cigarettes in the US, the subject of federal lawsuits, was equated to ‘Prohibition II’.
   Dr Marewa Glover of End Smoking NZ, who introduced the film at its première, said that young people were using e-cigarettes as a way round peer pressure, when people in their circle smoked.
   However, Australia has already banned e-cigarettes, with one interviewee, Vince, who sold them, telling a story about being raided by authorities and now faces losing his home as he fought the government on principle. He believed firmly he was saving lives. There are massive fines for vaping in Brunei and Hong Kong. There were restrictions in New Zealand, too, noted Glover, although those who sought to misinform were technically in breach of the country’s health legislation.
   Biebert says he is neither a smoker nor a vaper; but all good documentary-makers, he had a commitment to get the right information out there. He acknowledges that vapers have not given themselves the best image, either, and that A Billion Lives can only be one small part of getting the truth out.
   ‘We need to cut the head off the monster,’ said Biebert, ‘and the monster is being funded by big business. We need more than the movie. People need to get the right information.’
   He added, ‘The truth ends up winning. Even condoms were illegal in the US at one time.’
   A Billion Lives will begin making its way to other countries. The website is at abillionlives.com, while the movie’s Instagram is at abillionlivesfilm.—Jack Yan, Publisher


Above: The author (centre) joins Aaron Biebert, director (left) and Jesse Hieb, producer, for a photo.

May 5, 2016

Margot Robbie to model in Deep Euphoria Calvin Klein fragrance campaign

Lucire staff/14.03


Neil Rasmus/BFA

Australian actress Margot Robbie is the new face of Calvin Klein’s latest women’s fragrance, Deep Euphoria Calvin Klein.
   The Coty fragrance will début in August, with Robbie appearing in print and on TV. It builds on the goodwill of the existing Calvin Klein Euphoria fragrance.
   ‘Ms Robbie perfectly embodies the modern femininity of the empowered deep euphoria woman that we believe will resonate with women around the world,’ said Vincent Brun, senior vice-president of global marketing for Calvin Klein Fragrances at Coty Inc.
   ‘We are thrilled to work with Ms Robbie on this exciting addition to the Calvin Klein Fragrances portfolio,’ said Melisa Goldie, chief marketing officer for Calvin Klein, Inc. ‘Her beauty and talent is an expression of the incredible legacy of women who have been captured in Calvin Klein campaigns over the years.’
   Robbie first came to prominence with her role in Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street, opposite Leonardo DiCaprio, and had the female lead in Focus, opposite Will Smith. She also appeared briefly in The Big Short, based on the Michael J. Lewis book. She will appear this summer as Jane Porter in The Legend of Tarzan opposite Alexander Skarsgård, and as Harley Quinn in Suicide Squad, which reunites her with Smith, and which also stars Jared Leto.
   She follows in the footsteps of Kate Moss, Scarlett Johansson, Christy Turlington, Natalia Vodianova, Rooney Mara, Diane Krüger and Doutzen Kroes.

February 29, 2016

The Secret Room 2016 Oscar suite: the suite where everybody matters

Leyla Messian/5.06



There is something about W Hollywood Hotel that makes every VIP feel special, from the sweeping entrance to the red carpets that lead the way to the ballrooms and other public areas. How everybody else feels once they get to their destination is another matter, especially when it comes to pre-Oscar events. I am happy to report that the vendors appearing at the Secret Room’s Oscar “show” brightened my busy week with their unique and useful products.
   Fake Bake presented their new facial self-tan lotion that imparts anti-ageing properties, along with a golden glow. Fruit stem cells plus other botanicals preserve and repair skin cells that have been abused by the bright lights of flash photography. Cailyn Cosmetics introduced Pure Lust Matte Tint for lips in a variety of waterproof reds, fuchsias and natural hues that enable women to sip cocktails without leaving embarrassing lip marks on the glass.
   It would take damn good soap to wash off this long-wearing lip tint. Dam Good Soap, a hand-made Canadian skin-care-in-a-bar collection, is made from organic olive oil enhanced with raw cocoa butter, honey and pure essential plant essences. Each bar of soap can last up to three months. Wouldn’t you prefer to wash your face with Thai lemongrass, Breakfast in Paris, or pomegranate instead of the aroma of sodium laurel sulphate or petroleum? I know I would!
   Two medical-grade skin care lines shared the stage with another research-based anti-wrinkle fighting system. Dermesse introduced celebrities to their Facelift in a Bottle, a 99 per cent natural collagen serum. Those desiring to stimulate collagen production can try L-ascorbic acid serum, while others concerned with acne or sun damage can strengthen their skin with hyaluronic acid cream. Dermesse also complements their scientific product line with a simple, natural sugar scrub.
   Airelle showcased a hydrating masque made with pure New Zealand manuka honey, as well as a facial serum that delivers more hyaluronic acid to prevent fine lines. Ageoff 90 Second Facelift recommended a two-step fight against wrinkles. Ageoff Glow caplets deliver a 65 per cent increase in collagen levels after 60 days, while Ageoff Instant Serum hides wrinkles immediately for those of us desiring to look our best in a matter of seconds.
   Label M, a professional hair and skin care line, brought their official London Fashion Week hair care products to Hollywood. Gents can prep their hair for the big night with Label Men, which contains New Zealand tea tree oil and Indian sandalwood. Its clean, masculine scent would appeal to ladies as well! Curly girls can enhance their tresses with Label M’s Curl Cream, which contains jojoba extract and an Enviroshield complex that protects sensitive hair against heat and sun. For the finishing touch, Label.M also offers a Diamond Dust Body Lotion that allows you to shimmer in the lights, thanks to black and white diamond and pearl dust in a rose petal oil base.
   Chicago jewellery designer Jan Payser gifted celebrities and press with mixed-metal Crystal Glow necklaces. Her higher-end pieces are inspired by elements of nature—tropical birds and exotic orchids forged in sterling silver and embellished with pastel-coloured pearls. These works of wearable art have a one-of-a-kind feel.
   Amy James, from Grand Prairie, Texas, showed off her Amy’s Social Butterfly greeting cards. Each intricate card is hand made by the company’s owner. She uses tiny scissors and swivel blades to create peacocks, Oscar statues and the Hollywood sign. From a distance, her three-dimensional cards looked like whimsical cake toppers and party favours.
   Representatives from two Australian companies were on hand to introduce taste-makers and trendsetters to something comfortable for everybody. Rashoodz Swimwear keeps babies and toddlers safe from the sun’s harmful rays. They even have a line of sunnies for image-conscious tykes. Kathy Sheeran of Island Trading Co. showed off her set of cotton pillow cases and sheets that assure a good night’s sleep after a night of revelry.
   No Secret Room Style Lounge would be complete without something special for the four-legged fans of Young Hollywood. The Petzi Treat Cam allows pet parents to interact with their furry child from anywhere at any time. By downloading the Petzi app, you can summon your cat or dog in a language they understand (baby talk), dispense a treat, and watch them go wild with delight from the comfort of your own computer or smart phone. The Petzi even lets you photograph your salivating, excited pet and share it on your favourite social media site. Pavlov would be proud.
   During a season when it seems as if only the lives of the rich and famous matter, the Pocket People were there to remind all of us that everyone matters. The Pocket People’s ultimate goal is to spread their message of love, comfort and empathy through their doll collection. Each hand-crafted doll is just a little bit different; their World of Pocketopia “community” is one that truly values diversity.—Leyla Messian, LA Correspondent






















December 3, 2015

Miss Universe New Zealand represented on inaugural Philippine Airlines flight from Auckland

Lucire staff/11.29




Jack Yan

Top Miss Universe New Zealand 2015 second runner-up Gabrielle Manaloto, who was born in the Philippines, at Auckland Airport before boarding her flight on Philippine Airlines to Manila. Centre Gabrielle Manaloto with the captains of the Airbus A320. Above Gabrielle Manaloto and Miss Universe New Zealand CEO Nigel Godfrey.

Miss Universe New Zealand 2015 second runner-up Gabrielle Manaloto, who was born in the Philippines, winged her way back to her birthplace tonight on Philippine Airlines’ inaugural flight from Auckland to Manila.
   Accompanying her on the journey was Miss Universe New Zealand CEO Nigel Godfrey.
   The service sees the 156-seat Airbus A320 stop off in Cairns en route, flies every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday.
   At Auckland Airport earlier tonight, Miss Manaloto had her photograph taken with the captain of the aircraft, who will pilot the A320 on its first leg to Cairns.
   A native Tagalog speaker, Miss Manaloto found herself easily conversing with the crew of the A320 prior to their flight out of Auckland.
   Flying Philippine Airlines’ very comfortable business class, Miss Manaloto and Mr Godfrey were treated to the friendly welcome that the Philippines are known for, giving them a taste of the hospitality that awaits them when they touch down in Manila.
   Philippine Airlines cites the large number of Filipino expatriates as a reason for entering the market-place. It is the most convenient route to the Philippines for the 44,000-plus Filipinos residing in New Zealand.
   It is the second time Miss Universe New Zealand has experienced the hospitality and service of Philippine Airlines. During the Miss Universe New Zealand finalists’ retreat in September, Philippine Airlines flew the Top 20 to and from Manila, as they visited Cebu and Bohol.
   Miss Manaloto is the second Miss Universe New Zealand 2015 finalist to depart from Auckland Airport this week. On December 2, the winner of this year’s competition. Samantha McClung (below), flew to Las Vegas, Nevada, to compete in Miss Universe 2015. The finals for Miss Universe take place on December 20.
   Entries for Miss Universe New Zealand 2016 are now open at www.nextmissnz.com.


Jack Yan

Above Miss Universe New Zealand 2015 Samantha McClung on Wednesday morning as she prepared to depart from Auckland to Las Vegas, Nevada to compete in Miss Universe.

November 27, 2015

Op–ed: Kiribati’s waking nightmare

Lucire staff/11.22

November 27, 2015

Rt Hon John Key, MP, Prime Minister
Hon Bill English, MP, Deputy Prime Minister
Parliament Buildings
Wellington
New Zealand

Dear John and Bill,

I’m having a nightmare. I want to tell you guys about it—to tell you to wake me up; shake me if you have to. Scream me awake, and when I am, I want you to tell me it’s not as bad as it seems.
   I’ve landed in Tarawa, Kiribati, where news from New Zealand awaited me that John has declared his faith that climate change can be addressed with technology—scientists have told him the technology isn’t far off.
   At an official dinner, people look at me as though I have some glorious technology news to pass on. I don’t. I went to bed that evening feeling hollow; figures screaming through my head, the voice of that pesky Jim Salinger uttering the most terrifying words I’ve heard in many years: ‘The world has now entered abrupt climate change.’ You know Jim right, the guy with the Nobel Peace Prize? Gosh, I wish he would shut up with all that sense he talks.
   In the same nightmare I wake the next day to be told that 90 per cent of drinking water wells have been contaminated with E. coli, that the crops at vital plantations are no longer growing due to saltwater poisoning the ground. That lagoons which once fed villages have become infested with E. coli, killing a large bounty of marine life. That the ocean-warming and acidification has killed a majority of the coral atoll that forms the very ground I’m stood on. It’s like a really bad apocalypse video game—I’m anxious that zombies are going to duck out from behind the door. I look around at homes whose front doors the ocean now laps, at dead fruit trees once laden with produce killed by the salt seeping into the soil. I’m failing to see what Tony Abbott found so comical about this situation.
   In this nightmare I wonder what kind of technology could possibly solve this. I then remind myself of John’s track record of absolute reliability, and I feel comforted. The law can’t solve this. I mean, even if it could and there were laws to protect these people, there are no lawyers, and they’d be unaffordable for these people if there were. So, technology must be the saving grace.
   I visited the hospital to witness first-hand what an infant mortality rate 10 times that of New Zealand’s looks like. Have you ever seen such a thing? It’s completely shocking; it hit me with a force a hundred times that of any image of a child lying washed up on a shore a world away. I tried to fight back the tears, and the numbing coldness that consumed my body. I tried not to vomit—but later in the privacy of my room I did find solace in a Fiji Airways sick bag. I sat there and waited for the moment I’d be shaken awake. I desperately wanted John to ride in and tell me that the threat of climate migration is many years off and not something to be worried about. I wanted Bill to sit down and tell me that none of it was real, and the sea levels were not rising.
   John, could you go tell that mate of yours Obama to stop being a bloody alarmist; that according to Bill, there’s no proof Alaskan villages are vanishing into the ocean. That entire nations are not facing forced-extinction from the ocean swallowing them alive. You go tell that puffed-up American know-it-all that he’s alarming the masses, causing me nightmares and unwanted anxiety.
   Bill, could you go tell all those apparently credible scientists who’ve won those fancy awards, that 2015 is not the hottest year in history and they’re just plain wrong. Round them up with Malcolm across the ditch (because they give him a hard time as well) and be done with them. Bully them into submission a bit harder. Just shut them up.

Thanks in advance,

Pearl

§

I imagined the response coming back something a little like this.

Dear Pearl,

You are far too much of a pretty wee thing to be travelling to such far-flung and irrelevant places like Kiribati in your nightmares; to spend time worrying about such things. Why don’t you pay heed to the advice I gave Keisha Castle-Hughes: try visiting the salon for a bad blow-dry instead?
   Don’t worry about other people. By the time New Zealand starts feeling the full effect of climate change we’ll have the technology available to deal with it.
   I’ve also got Malcolm under control—he’s going to share Nauru so we’ve got somewhere to put all those helpless fellow human beings in the Pacific fleeing the rising sea-levels and food shortages. The ones who think they’re right to turn to us for help. I’m going to stop the boats.
   Meanwhile, the Kardashians have a new season, vote for the fern, and use our new buzz word: technology.
   In the meantime, here’s a Live Lokai bracelet. Hold on to it, because before long the Dead Sea and Everest will be things for the history books.

Merry Christmas,

John

§

That’s kind of how this piece came about. I thought I’d write a wee letter. The problem is, the more I wrote and decried the blind buying-in of the latest spin to come out of the ninth floor, the more ridiculous it felt, and the more scared I became in turn. If I’m completely honest, the realization that many—possibly even some reading this piece—didn’t know how absurd the spin had become, worried me to the point of physical sickness. Thanks again Fiji Airways, your sick bags are truly first-class.
   I’m writing this from Kiribati. I’m fully awake. I’m awake in a nightmare. I went to the hospital. I waded through water at high-tide to cross the road infested with human fæces to get there before what they call the ‘morgue’ closed. In a bag at the other end of the room was a pile of clothes and a pair of trainers I never want to see again. I was going to turf them out, but a young woman tasked with showing me around asked if she could have them, since for her wading through the stench of death and fæces was an everyday reality.
   Don’t get me wrong, Kiribati is absolutely beautiful and if it weren’t for the damage wreaked by rising sea levels and climate change, I would focus only on its beauty, but the reality is these threats make the situation people face here far from idyllic. It’s a dire situation, it’s a nightmare.
   A real-life nightmare, there is no amount of shaking that can wake me; though shaking I am, believe me. Shaking from incredulity at the sheer scale of the situation. The problem is I’m not the who needs to be screamed awake. That’s right: if you have ever for one moment entertained the illusion that sea-levels are not rising; that climate change is not the single biggest threat facing humanity; that you can carry on shirking the responsibility to aid in the fight for human survival and dignity, you need to be screamed awake. Will the humanity in you please wake up?
   I’m not saying this with any political leaning. I believe that most of our politicians are drastically failing us all. Who knows what will happen if we leave this to them. I mean, half of those reading this may freak out at the thought of the Green Party controlling the economy, but don’t blink an eyelid at them leading on the issue defined as ‘the single greatest threat to mankind’ by every serious world leader. Why is that? How will the economy exist without our planet?
   Climate change is no longer some far-off theory or problem. It is happening right here and widely through our Pacific backyard. Right now. As you read this climate change is already disrupting our agriculture and ecosystems, our food and water security, our energy, our infrastructure, our health, our safety. Today. Tomorrow. Some more than others but make no mistake it is happening to all of us. It is the issue. An issue that affects all issues, economic included. Everything is and will be impacted. And it becomes more damning with each passing year.
   This matter is far too important to be surrendered to the political domain. This is about humanity. If you think the devastation wreaked by ISIS is as bad as it gets, then please contemplate Mother Nature.
   If the images of parents putting their children into boats because the water was safer than the land left you reeling, then please consider that in the not-too-distant future this will become a reality for many small island states; that many nations in the Pacific will not survive the two-degree cap that Paris is gearing up to gain commitment for in the coming week. They will have to put their children into boats because the water is safer than the land. We have already signed them up for that, and every moment that each of us stands by maintaining the status quo we sign them up for worse—exponentially.
   They will have to flee their homes, forced to migrate due to the lack of food security. Rising sea-levels, along with drastic weather disturbances will make a boat safer than their homes, and these boats will head for our shores.
   Despite this cold hard reality our leaders head into Paris in support of watering a climate agreement down. There’s talk of steps to make the agreement not legally binding. Not many would agree to a marriage or business deal on such terms, I wonder why we are willing to let them negotiate humankind’s survival on such flippant terms.
   During the explosion of the refugee crisis into mainstream media we witnessed both the most hopeful and depraved responses to others’ suffering. I couldn’t help but wonder about the rationale for stopping the boats, for refusing the asylum and migration of those most in need—those least at fault in the destruction of our ecologies, but who will continue to pay the highest price. What possible excuse will we give to keep them out? Do we convince ourselves they’re all terrorists, rapists and murderers to render them exempt from the right to our sympathies, to human dignity? It’s a sad state of affairs that anyone would have to wonder such a thing.
   Leading into the sustainable development goals, New Zealand took a step towards supporting the Pacific, coming out strong and vocal on Sustainable Development Goal 14 (SDG14), which focuses on the conservation and sustainable use of ocean, sea and marine resources. This focus was well warranted, and an open acknowledgement of our responsibility within the region, and our understanding of how many lives depend on the ocean ecologies. I was proud to stand in the General Assembly and hear John Key announce the Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary. It was an important step, but we must be clear that it was but one step in the marathon of steps we need to build a better world.
   In the words of Jim Salinger and virtually every other expert of climate science in the world, the world has entered abrupt climate change. We have already reached tipping-points we cannot mitigate. We are already signed up for things that are going to drastically change life as we know it, this is a cold hard fact. The question that remains now is whether we can summon the courage to turn around and fight for survival. Life is already going to change; but whether we tumble over yet more tipping-points points and the scale of the consequences we face from them is up to us. Sometimes we have little option but to wake ourselves up.
   We have a choice. We can surrender that choice to those who hold offices of power, or we can take that choice into our own consideration. Some say the whole endeavour to pull back from this is hopeless. I’m not willing to accept that. I simply refuse to stand by and let life go without a fight.
   John Key used very interesting rhetoric this week. He used the word ‘faith’. He is placing his faith in technology. Instead I am going to place my faith in humankind—the creators of technology. I am going to place my faith in our ability to comprehend the magnitude of what we face, and choose survival. I ask you to join not just myself, but others around the world in doing so. We still have a fighting chance to make things better. They won’t get better unless we take action and inspire others to do the same. No one is without power: everybody has the capacity to take a few steps.
   I’ve written this for those who know how to challenge the status quo intelligently. The doers, the thinkers, the problem-solvers. I’m not asking anyone to climb something or break laws, just that each person reading this ponders for a minute about how they can contribute, what steps they can take.
   So as we lead into the COP21 talks, billed as a defining moment in human history, at a time when recent events have given us ample reason to desert our faith in our own kind, I encourage every single person reading this to ask themselves what they can do to take action. This weekend millions of citizens around the world are exercising their rights, their freedoms, using their voices and taking to the streets to send world leaders an imperative to act and take meaningful action.
   Mark my words: a decade or possibly two from now it won’t be the Rugby World Cup final you remember with pride. What will be etched in your memory is whether you answered humanity’s call for survival, whether you were one of those who actually did something. Sometimes that something is simply the act of showing up to show solidarity with humankind. In Paris where world leaders have gathered there can be no march, because the worst of humanity put on a display that has left millions of innocent people terrorized. So in the coming week I will be keeping my eyes firmly on Paris, I am marching, I am lending my effort to reinforce the very best in humanity, because if there’s one thing the world needs right now, it’s more of the good.
   It’s only so big, it goes around and we are all on it—Earth. I believe it’s worth saving, do you?—Pearl Going


Disruption, excerpt: ‘Tipping Points’ from Disruption on Vimeo


Above Kiribati President Anote Tong with his TED discussion, ‘My country will be underwater soon—unless we work together’. Click above to watch.

Guest contributor Pearl Going is a global communications’ strategist who has worked broadly across entertainment, human rights and environmental issues. Her most recent work includes the Mercy Campaign, Rohingya Slavery and SIDS. She is an avid climber and has climbed five of the seven summits.

November 11, 2015

Sponsored video: TheTrendSpotter.net and Chandon get spontaneous

Lucire staff/5.41

A Lucire special promotion


We’ve often believed in being spontaneous ourselves, so it’s great to see Chandon express this very notion in its latest campaign, starring Dasha and Colin Gold of TheTrendSpotter.net. It’s a wonderful three-minute slice of life into the couple’s journeys around the world as they cover fashion event after fashion event, filmed in Melbourne, London and Paris.
   There’s no better way to traverse the world than with doing those unplanned things—and for the Golds, they’re accompanied by Chandon at all the important moments, whether they’re sharing it with each other, or entertaining friends. ‘It’s a mindset, it’s how we can all live,’ says Dasha, and the sparkling wine, co-started by the Moët Hennessy brand, is as international as they come.
   While champagne can only come from Champagne, Chandon is made with the same care and spirit as its more famous sister brand, from wineries around the world.
   And unlike The September Issue, a wonderful film to all except those of us in the industry because it came across too much like our own diaries and what we had to do this week, the spot is entertaining in reminding us that the best stories, in this fashion media business, also come from those spontaneous moments. At fashion weeks, where we decide on a whim to catch something outside the catwalk grind, or exploring a little alleyway in a big metropolis away from the tourist traps.
   #LiveLifeUnplanned, then, is a reminder and a call for us to embody those unexpected moments, because only then do you live life to the full. Pop over to Chandon’s Instagram with your #LiveLifeUnplanned moments, and let’s create some great memories!






Post sponsored by Chandon

Filed under: fashion, London, Paris
October 31, 2015

Schwarzkopf releases four new products in its Bonacure BC Oil Miracle range

Alex Barrow/5.53

Schwarzkopf Professional has added four new products to its BC Bonacure Oil Miracle range: Oil Mists for either thick or fine hair, a light oil shampoo, and a warming treatment, exclusive to hair salons.
   This collection uses nourishing oils to bring life back into dull hair. While other oil-based treatments can leave hair feeling heavy and damp, the Oil Miracle range revives hair and gives it an instantly dry feeling with a lighter, livelier texture.
   The Oil Mists feature marula oil for light hair and argan oil for normal to thick hair, and with their micro-dispersion technology, the hair dries faster.
   Some treatments strip hair of their natural oils to remove the greasy shine it can sometimes have. Schwarzkopf, on the other hand, uses healthy oils to revitalize damaged hair and to give it the natural shine it needs. Give yourself and your hair the love it needs with this luxurious new range.
   The Oil Mists (A$34·90) and shampoo (A$34·90) are in stores now. For stockist information in Australia, call 1 800 251-887.—Alex Barrow

Filed under: beauty, hair, Lucire, New Zealand
October 23, 2015

News in brief: Kendall & Kylie launch; Plakinger makes sure daughters look stylish; Blue Can water packaged to last

Lucire staff/21.44




Top Kendall and Kylie Jenner with their new collection. Centre and above By using the same fabrics, mothers and daughters can have matching designs thanks to Plakinger.

The Kendall & Kylie Collection, designed by sisters Kendall and Kylie Jenner, will hit Forever New stores in Australia on November 17. With 19 pieces, the limited-edition collection consists of ‘directional party looks’, with playsuits, skirts, crop tops and dresses featuring black, white and blush tones as well as an animal print. Details include lace work, exposed zips and sheer panelling. Prices range from A$79·99 to A$249·99 and the range is available from forevernew.com.au and selected stores nationally and internationally.
   Plakinger, the luxury label started by Russian mother–daughter duo Svetlana Ziggel and her mother Galina Plakinger, has released 10 looks for mothers and their little girls, so that they can have outfits with the same fabrics. Made in their atelier in Germany, the label is available through Maison Bo-M in Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia and in the concept stores owned by the Chaumont luxury group in China.
   One might think that bottled water lasts forever, but it only has a six- to twelve-month shelf life, and less if stored in extreme temperatures. Los Angeles-based Blue Can (right) provides premium emergency drinking water for homes, businesses and vehicles, thanks to a filtration system and the use of pressurized aluminium cans. The company says the water can be stored for decades—50 years is regularly cited. It supports the Emergency Water Foundation, a California non-profit corporation, which assists public institutions, business organizations, and schools with their Disaster Awareness Plans.

Below Some of the looks from the limited-edition Kendall & Kylie Collection.





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