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June 22, 2016

Aston Martin reveals Vanquish Zagato, with production limited to 99

Lucire staff/22.25



As expected, the Aston Martin Vanquish Zagato concept that was shown at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este at Lake Como has become a production reality, with the company saying that it will produce 99 examples at Gaydon, Warwickshire, with deliveries commencing during the first quarter of 2017.
   Aston Martin says the car is an example of its collaboration with Zagato, though its press information does not say whether the model, based on its Vanquish flagship, was styled by the Italian coachbuilder or done in-house, as it had been for the V12 Vantage Zagato in 2011.
   The company notes that the new car has ‘Aston Martin’s acclaimed dynamic and material qualities with Zagato’s signature design language.’
   At the launch of the concept last month, Zagato CEO Andrea Zagato noted, ‘We pride ourselves on our strong partnership and the creation of the Vanquish Zagato Concept was a true shared experience. It represents the essence of an important design relationship that dates back over fifty years,’ but there was no elaboration on where the design took place.
   The first collaboration began with the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato of 1960, and it was revived under Victor Gauntlett’s leadership of the company in the 1980s with the V8 Vantage Zagato. Neither car was considered attractive on launch, though both were perceived to be future classics—which they became. The DB4 GT Zagato is now valued at over £10 million and has few critics today.
   Subsequent collaborations were the 2002 DB7 Vantage Zagato, which used a lightly modified version of the donor car’s front end so it did not have to be retested for safety; and the 2011 V12 Vantage Zagato.
   The Vanquish Zagato has an engine uprated to 600 PS, with a claimed 0–60 mph time of 3·5 s. The company says the suspension set-up will be unique to the model. It features a unique carbonfibre body that has new round rear taillights, LED technology shared with the Aston martin Vulcan supercar, a sculpted rear end that has a profile similar to that of the DB11, with a downward contour and pronounced spoiler splitting the taillights. There is a pronounced side strake, reinterpreted so it now runs more deeply down the height of the front wing aft of the wheels, and, as expected, there is the famed Zagato double-bubble roof. The Vanquish Zagato is a liftback.
   Inside, the Vanquish Zagato uses herringbone carbonfibre, and shadow and anodized bronze leather, with the option of aniline leather. The seats and doors have a Z-pattern stitch, and the Zagato Z is embossed on headrests and stitched into the centre console.















Filed under: design, history, living, London, Lucire

Kate Moss and Rimmel celebrate 15 years with new lipstick and nail polish collection launched in London

Lucire staff/17.02




David M. Benett

Kate Moss and Rimmel London have released their latest collaboration celebrating the supermodel’s 15-year relationship with the beauty brand.
   The Kate Moss Rimmel 15th Anniversary Collection comprises Moss’s favourite nude and red lip and nail shades.
   Journalists, bloggers and other guests were invited to a London house where Moss modelled two outfits, initially a black Equipment shirt with red hearts, and a green jacket over a sheer black top.
   Guests were treated to manicures using Rimmel’s new Supergel nail polish shades by manicurist Adam Slee, before a lipstick master-class by make-up artist Kirstin Piggott.
   Stylist Zoë Bedeaux and Scott Wimsett hosted a session where Moss talked of her 15-year association and how her fashion outfits inspired the Collection. Guests then could inspect those outfits and discussed how they inspired the nude and red shades.
   In a release, Moss said, ‘I’m incredibly proud of my 15-year relationship with Rimmel. It’s a brand very close to my heart; my first ever lipstick was Rimmel Heather Shimmer. The partnership has strengthened and evolved over the years, with me taking an actively creative role. The new anniversary collection echoes some of my favourite London looks from the last decade and a half. I’ve focused on reds and nudes because they’re the colours I love to wear—each shade reflects a different side of me.’
   In the collection, the Lasting Finish Lipstick by Kate comes in six shades and can last eight hours, numbered 51 through 56; and the Super Gel Nail Polish by Kate gives a shine that lasts for 14 days, and comes in four shades (nos. 15, 42, 44 and 71).











































David M. Benett

June 12, 2016

Chloë Delevingne, James Blunt, Sienna Miller, Stefanie Powers, Lavinia Brennan among VIPs at Queen’s Cup Final

Lucire staff/14.30




Tristan Fewings

Cartier has again sponsored the Queen’s Cup Final, where Dubai played La Indiana at the Guards Polo Club in Egham. Cartier has sponsored polo events for 32 years, beginning in 1984 with the International Day at Windsor Great Park at Guards Polo Club. After 28 years, the company decided to sponsor the Queen’s Cup.
   Dubai was victorious at the match, which saw VIPs including Millie Mackintosh, Stefanie Powers, Beatrix Ong and Fabrizio Zappterra, Anton Mosimann, Philipp Mosimann, Mark Mosimann, Anton Rupert Jr and Tatiana Mountbatten, Arizona Muse, Carine Feniou and Laurent Feniou, Charlie Brooks, Chloë Delevingne, Edward Grant, Clementine Nicholson, James Troughton, Carlo Carello, Natasha Rufus Isaacs, Melissa Mills, Saskia Winbergh and Gunnar Winbergh, Patricia Haimes, Dean Piper, Hugo Heathcote, Malcolm Borwick, Simon Marquis, Earl of Woolton and Countess Woolton, Count Riccardo Lanza, Lady Philippa Cadogan, Melissa Mills, Francesca Schwarzenbach-Mulhall, Urs Ernst Schwarzenbach, Sofia Blunt, Taylor Manuela Londono, Lord Rothermere, Pierre Denis and Pia Denis, Sarah Stancliffe, Melanie Vere Nicoll, Lord March and Lady March, Lorraine Candy, Lord Wrottesley and Lady Wrottesley, Olivia Hunt, Marina Fogle, Lydia Forte, Lily Donaldson, Sienna Miller, Phoebe Hitchcox, John Hitchcox, Amber Atherton, James Blunt, Jamie Richards and Lavinia Brennan, Linda Reid, Jo Miller, Phoebe Vela, Johann Rupert, Lady Kitty Spencer, Katherine Baxter, Belinda delucy McKeeve, Kelly Theo, John Rendall, Katherine Baxter, Alexandra Edwards, Sacha Forbes, Amanda Sheppard, Rupert Finch, Nicholas Foulkes, Pierre Lagrange, Nina Suess, Tamara Kalinic, Pattie Boyd, Rod Weston, Tori Cook, Amber Venz Box, Drummond Money-Coutts and Sophia Money-Coutts, Ed Taylor, Gillian de Bono, Greta Morrison, Hanneli Rupert, Heida Reed and Sam Ritzenberg, Hugo Taylor, Jake Parkinson-Smith, Amanda Sheppard, Samira Parkinson-Smith, Manuela Londono, Felix Cooper, Jilly Cooper, Geoffrey Kent, Mark Vestey, and Rosie Vestey.






























Tristan Fewings

June 7, 2016

Kerry Washington’s OPI nail lacquer collaboration launched; Kate Bosworth endorses Aczone gel

Lucire staff/2.49


OPI’s autumn–winter 2016–17 nail lacquer collection takes its inspiration from Washington, DC, and it’s the first product of the collaboration between the company and its spokeswoman and creative ambassador, Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated actress Kerry Washington.
   Washington worked alongside OPI co-founder Suzi Weiss-Fischmann to develop and name the 12 shades, available in both lacquer and GelColor formulas.
   Weiss-Fischmann noted of her collaborator, ‘She exemplifies the spirit of Washington, DC women, and her bold approach to life is evident everywhere from her acting to her activism to her red carpet style.’
   Washington said in a release, ‘It has been so inspiring to work with Suzi—the first lady of nails—on creating and naming this collection. It’s a real art and science to develop colour that will appeal to women of all types and skin tones and that mirrors and complements the runway trends for the season.
   ‘Nail colour is a simple but impactful form of individual expression. Wearing bold shades like these is empowering and uplifting, not to mention a perfect way to show some election year spirit!’
   The collection goes on sale from August 1 at John Lewis and Debanhams in the UK.
   In another celebrity endorsement, Allergan plc has announced that Kate Bosworth is its spokeswoman for Aczone gel, a prescription topical treatment for acne patients. Bosworth attended an event for Aczone in New York alongside dermatologist Dr Joshua Zeichner. The company notes that acne affects 40 million to 50 million people in the US, and 85 per cent of people between 12 and 24 struggle with it.

May 26, 2016

The Body Shop launches Bio-Bridges programme, regenerating and protecting 75,000,000 m² of forest

Lucire staff/12.44


Above: The red-shanked douc, or monkey, one of the endangered species that the Body Shop’s Bio-Bridges programme will protect.

On Tuesday, the Body Shop unveiled its Bio-Bridges programme, which aims to regenerate and protect 75,000,000 m² of forest.
   The programme will not only see forests protected from exploitation and unsustainable harvesting, the Body Shop wants to ensure that animals and plant species within them thrive.
   The first project is the Khe Nuoc Trong forest in north-central Vietnam, home of the red-shanked douc, saola (known as the Asian unicorn and one of the rarest animals on earth), Bengal slow loris and Burmese python. All of these species are threatened by hunting and illegal logging, and the Body Shop notes that nearby habitats are still suffering from the effects of Agent Orange used during the Vietnam War. The World Land Trust and Viet Nature Conservation Centre are working with the Body Shop, patrolling the forest and setting up camera traps, while working with the local community, promoting sustainable forest use and farming.
   Promoting this project to Body Shop customers is an in-store and online campaign called Help Reggie Find Love, featuring Reggie, a red-shanked douc. Each customer transaction will restore and protect 1 m² of habitat in Khe Nuoc Trong.
   Christopher Davis, director of corporate responsibility and campaigns for the Body Shop, said, ‘We want to focus on actively enriching the world’s biodiversity. These areas of forest in Vietnam are biological treasure troves that are being destroyed through poaching and illegal logging. Bio-Bridges are an innovative way to create protected corridors of biodiversity that allow the wider forest to flourish and its inhabitants to breed and thrive. In Vietnam, within five to ten years we hope to be able to see endangered species multiply. We’ll be promoting Help Reggie Find Love online and in our stores in 65 countries around the world, helping raise awareness of this serious issue in a different way and allowing our customers to make a direct and positive impact with every purchase.’
   The company has embarked on this latest corporate social responsibility programme as part of its new global Enrich Not Exploit commitment launched in February. It recognizes that protecting and promoting biodiversity is good not only for the planet, including combatting climate change, but for the natural ingredients it sources for its products.
   The second Bio-Bridge programme begins in late 2016 in the Garo Hills in India, in partnership with World Land Trust and Wildlife Trust of India.

May 1, 2016

New fashion retail locations: Swarovski in Covent Garden, and Sills & Co. in Wellington

Lucire staff/13.29

Swarovski will open on May 7 in St Martin’s Courtyard in Covent Garden.
   The new 141 m² store will be situated on Long Acre alongside Barbour, L. K. Bennett and COS, and will stock the company’s jewellery and watches.
   ‘We are delighted to be opening our Swarovski boutique in St Martin’s Courtyard. By positioning ourselves at the heart of one of London’s key shopping scenes, our unique store concept and beautiful displays will hopefully inspire and introduce a new set of fashionable customers to the Swarovski brand,’ said Hayley Quinn of Swarovski UK and Ireland.
   Meanwhile, last month, Sills & Co. opened its flagship store in Wellington’s Old Bank Arcade, with its labels Caroline Sills, Sills and Isaac & Lulu.
   The newest label of the three, Isaac & Lulu, is a more fashion-forward brand, named for head designer Ange Todd’s daughter Lulu and Caroline Sills’ grandson Isaac, and is described as being feminine and youthful.


April 21, 2016

Beyoncé partners with three charities as part of the Formation World Tour

Lucire staff/2.41

As part of her Formation World Tour, Beyoncé has announced three charitable organizations that will partner with her own initiative, BeyGood.
   The singer wants to encourage fans to give to the three organizations, and demonstrates how easy it is to “pay it forward”.
   She proposes using one of three ways: online through CrowdRise, in partnership with United Way, to support the Flint, Michigan water crisis (where fans can qualify for winning VIP tickets to her tour); through their communities with United Way, with issues specific to each tour market; or on-site, after signing up with Global Citizen and Chime for Change, with opportunities to win tickets and upgrades on the tour.
   United Way will be present at very stop beginning with the North American leg. The first venue is Marlins Park, Miami, Fla. on April 27. Gucci’s Chime for Change, which Beyoncé co-founded, and Global Citizen will have their programme in select tour locations, including Houston, Los Angeles, New York, Detroit and London. There are charity events in Houston, Compton (Calif.), and Detroit.
   Fans in Houston can give and support Rudy Rasmus and his Bread of Life initiative, combatting hunger in the city, and TurnAround Houston, to help create jobs. In Compton, the event will help Urban Education Institute, which works with youth through music and the arts. In Detroit, the event will celebrate the resourcefulness of the people of Flint and Detroit.
   Since the announcement of BeyGood, the initiative has claimed to have helped millions of people with employment, shelter and more. Tour dates are available at beyonce.com.

April 18, 2016

Fashion Cities Africa gives a snapshot of four cities on a varied, rich continent

Jack Yan/3.51

The second largest continent on the planet is, logically, home to a massive number of fashion designers and movements, although out of Africa, there hasn’t been as much recognition of them till recently. Fashion Cities Africa, the book, inspired by the exhibition of the same name at the Brighton Museum & Art Gallery that opens at the end of April, is one high-profile development which seeks to shine a light on the variety present on the continent, while on a similar note, next month’s Africa Fashion Festival in Wellington will do the same for its designers.
   Hannah Azieb Pool, who edits the new book, is a Eritrean-born, London-based journalist, who, along with Helen Jennings, has co-writing duties, resulting in a cohesive, beautifully presented book that examines contemporary fashion in Nairobi, Casablanca, Lagos and Johannesburg. It doesn’t pretend to be a fully comprehensive guide, stating from the outset it is meant to provide mere glimpses on a continent that is incredibly diverse. The foreword by Binyavanga Wainaina, a flâneur, reminds us that there are clusters scattered throughout the land that have their own tendencies, and that her favourite designer is Nigerian, Chioma Chukwulozie.
   The reader is thrown in to the colour of Nairobi, where sibling bloggers Velma Rossa and Papa Petit (a.k.a. Oliver) take one half of the first spread with their über-stylish and proudly urban Kenyan clothes, and stylists, musicians, designers, bloggers and artists profiled on following pages give slices of their lives that shake occidental sensibilities with their own palettes and ensembles. Nairobi, for the most part, emphasizes comfort, and the clothing shot on these pages by Sarah Marie Waiswa demonstrate that the city’s fashion could easily translate to other places, spanning everything from casual to luxury. Adèle Dejak has shown in Milano, for instance, and appeared in Vogue Italia with her collaboration with Salvatore Ferragamo, while John Kaveke and Nick Ondu show the sort of sartorial elegance that could easily influence menswear in other fashion capitals.
   Profiles of some of the personalities from the city follow, reminding us that Nairobi is a crossroads: Ami Doshi Shah is of Indian descent, her family brought there by the British when both countries were under Crown rule, while Ann McCreath is a Scots émigrée who fell in love with the fashion there. There’s a dose of youthful energy, too, with Anthony Mulli, a jewellery designer who started when he was 16, pointing the way forward.
   The book follows a similar structure for subsequent cities, moving on to Casablanca next.
   Lucire readers will be familiar with Morocco thanks to travel editor Stanley Moss’s writings, and Jennings’ chapter, with photographs by Deborah Benzaquen, takes us on a similar journey through the country’s largest city. It was, of course, a home for Yves Saint Laurent at one point, as well as a drawcard for many western celebrities, when a first wave of Moroccan designers became known outside of the region. A second wave, Jennings explains, emerged in the 1980s and 1990s, with Zineb Joundy a graduate of the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture. A greater sense of artistic freedom and Casablanca’s position that blends Arabic, European and indigenous cultures has resulted in some looks that may seem familiar—perhaps thanks to the likes of Saint Laurent and his influence. Again the profiles are well selected, a cross-section of the highly varied cultures in the city: Amine Bendriouich, Amina Agueznay, Yassine Morabite, Saïd Mahrouf, and Zhor, Chadia and Aida Raïs each cover a very different parts of the fashion spectrum, from T-shirts to traditional caftans.
   Once the book gets to Lagos, it’s apparent that there’s a sense of “bubbling under”, with Lakin Ogunbanwo’s photographs, paired with Jennings’ words again, showing slightly more subdued looks for men, but prouder, more flamboyant looks for women. Jennings notes that civil war and Nigeria’s military juntas stalled its fashion scene for some years, before a revival when democracy returned in 1999. Foreign labels were seen as cool till recently, with the country discovering its confidence in its own æsthetic, to the point where one of her interviewees, stylist Bolaji Anumashaun, says that fashion can be one of Nigeria’s ‘greatest exports’. Anumashaun founded thestylehq.com with a pan-African fashion focus, and Arise magazine, founded in 2008, also stepped up the promotion for Nigerian designers. With Nigeria’s GDP now greater than South Africa’s, that confidence is bound to increase, and Jennings looks at Nike Davis Okundaye, who owns the biggest gallery in West Africa in Lagos, and happy to promote young talent. Others, such as Yegwa Ukpo and Amaka Osakwe, both were schooled in the UK before returning to Lagos to found their brands, while PR consultant Zara Okpara and luxury concept store owner Reni Folawiyo complete their city’s picture.
   Johannesburg completes Fashion Cities Africa, and it’s perhaps fair that Pool chose to put it last. Many mistakenly think of South African fashion when they refer to ‘African fashion’, spurred in part by the Republic’s sporting ties to many other countries in the Commonwealth. Victor Dlamini has the photographic duties here, and Pool pens the words, and she goes through the various Jo’burg neighbourhoods, noting that its fashion is more established than Nairobi’s but less self-conscious than Lagos’s. There is a western infusion here in some parts, she notes, but on closer examination there are accessories that reference Soweto streets or Zulu culture. The city even has two fashion weeks: South Africa Fashion Week and Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Joburg, making the city spoiled for choice when it comes to giving its designers a platform. David Tlale, whom Lucire readers will have heard of, and who has shown at New York Fashion Week, hails from here, and Jo’burg designs have a greater sense of familiarity thanks to western media exposure. It oozes colour and vibrancy, much like the photos chosen for Pool’s first chapter on Nairobi, and in similar fashion (pun unintended) there are profiles from across the spectrum: designer Thula Sindi, creative collective, the Sartists, accessories’ and shoe designer Maria McCloy, and womenswear designers Marianne Fassler and Anisa Mpungwe.
   It’s our hope that we can cease talking about ‘African’ fashion and instead replace the dialogue with specific cities or countries, just as we do for smaller continents such as Europe. Just as there is no such thing to fashion observers as ‘European’ fashion, there is equally no such thing as ‘African’ fashion: it is impossible to generalize at a continental level. Both as an informative volume and a coffee-table flick-through (as it is softcover), Fashion Cities Africa succeeds, and it’s exceptionally good value with full-colour photographs (needed for its story, over 196 pp.) at £20 (available via Amazon UK here, or Book Depository here) or US$28·50, (Amazon link here). It is published this month by Intellect Books, as part of its Street Styles series.—Jack Yan, Publisher

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