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Catching our eye: stand-outs at the 2017 ID Emerging Designer Awards


NEWS  by Chris Park/March 26, 2017/11.52

Thirty finalists were selected to showcase their capsule collections at the 2017 ID Emerging Designer Awards’ runway show. Hosted on a crisp autumn evening in the iconic Dunedin Railway Station, the finalists were chosen by a panel of judges from over 150 different entrants, with designers coming from all over the world.
   Head judge Tanya Carlson said that, although it might sound cliché and make her sound like a broken record, she truly believes that the standard of the submissions continues to rise and we were fortunate to see some of the talent.
   Here were some of the designers which particularly caught our attention.

Marina, Talia Jimenez, University of Technology, Sydney, NSW
Winner of the Golden Centre Prize for the Most Commercial Collection




Chris Park/The Park Brothers

   First off the runway, the collection featured playful digital prints of overlapping marine animals. Jimenez balanced the vibrant imagery by using mostly pastel colours for the prints and keeping the overall colour palette minimal.
   The collection was inspired by a trip to the Sydney Fish Markets in Piermont, where she experienced an overwhelming cacophony of marine-themed advertisements, overfilled crates of prawns, and mud crabs tied up in string everywhere.
   The prints were featured on PVC overalls faced with cotton worn with merino turtleneck knits, and oversized raincoats, referencing clothing traditionally worn by fishermen. The prints might be fun but the imposition of the prints on top of “fishermen” alludes to the over-exploitation of the marine ecosystem, and our excess indulgence in the spoils of the sea.




Chris Park/The Park Brothers

Above: Close-ups from Talia Jimenez’s Marina collection.

The Daily Show, Megan Stewart, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand
NZME and ‘Viva’ Editorial Prize for Best New Zealand Collection







Chris Park/The Park Brothers

   This collection is a sharp critique on the distortionary effect that electronic communication and mass media have on our perception of reality. The distortionary effect is expressed in a very literal sense by the use of distorted imagery from television shows and twisted knits.
   She references digital media and the pixels of a screen by incorporating 90-degree angles and rectangles in her patterns, which further add to the warping when the square clothing twists around the human form.
   The television imagery was selected and distorted by Stewart herself, before being printed onto hessian-like material. The shoulder construction hangs by the elbows, adding to the warping effect on our perception of the clothing.
   The bright playful colours and mesmerizing patterns belie the warning messages that Stewart transmits to the viewer, of how being absorbed into media will warp one’s perception of reality.

XXX, Nehma Vitols, University of Technology, Sydney, NSW
H&J First Prize








Chris Park/The Park Brothers

   Vitols’s collection was ethereal. The pieces looked like they were hovering in front and behind the models rather than being worn by them, and yet it the composite fabric used by Vitols that gave it a stiffness belying the translucency of the wraith-like materials.
   Nehma created this material by taking silk organza and bonding it with stiff cotton organdy, then applying laser-cut Tyvek detailing in white to add visual depth. As the models walked down the runway, the fabric would shimmer and float, as if it had a mind of its own.
   The pieces were cleverly constructed from scraps of fabric left over from creating archetypal garments, held together using a combination of ties made out of leftover strips of fabric, contrast top-stitching and golden zips, which provided some weight and textural contrast to the sheer fabric.
   The complexity of the construction, the innovative materials and the brilliant execution led to Vitols taking out the grand prize at ID for 2017. Congratulations!—Chris Park, Special Correspondent




Chris Park/The Park Brothers

Above: Detail from Nehma Vitols’s collection, XXX, which took first prize at the ID Emerging Designer Awards.

The Modist launches retail site for modest fashion, while Getty Images and MuslimGirl.com announce photo library


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 9, 2017/10.01

The Modist, an online store for modest fashion, opened yesterday, shipping to over 100 countries. The store has a selection of over 75 designers, including Marni, Alberta Ferretti, Christopher Kane and Mary Katrantzou, ensuring a contemporary, fashionable selection. The store is accompanied by an online magazine called The Mod, which includes styling tips and interviews. Says founder Ghizlan Guenez, ‘Our mission is to build a strong sense of purpose to empower a woman’s freedom of choice and to acknowledge how similar women across the world are, despite our diverse backgrounds, cultures and lifestyles—a relevant conversation at this time. We aim to break down preconceived notions while building a community and dialogue that invigorates, informs and celebrates the fashionable, modern, modest woman.’
   The Modist’s COO, Lisa Bridgett, notes that the market potential in the modest fashion segment is projected to reach US$484,000 million by 2019.
   Also in recognition of a more global, inclusive society, MuslimGirl.com and Getty Images announced yesterday a content partnership that aims to convey a more authentic representation of Muslim women. The imagery is far more realistic and positive, battling stereotypes and misconceptions. The photographs feature girls with and without hijabs, and Muslim women in everyday situations at home, with friends and at work.
   ‘One of the ways I open up my talks is by asking the audience to search Muslim women images on their phone browsers, which is always met with their awe at the unsettling results,’ said Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, founder and editor-in-chief of MuslimGirl.com. ‘I don’t want to be able to use that example anymore, and I could not be prouder to partner with Getty Images on finally taking on such an important and influential task.’

Lucy Lawless, Veronica Webb, Peyton List, Jazz Jennings among celebs modelling AHA’s Red Dress Collection


NEWS  by Lucire staff/February 10, 2017/2.55


Nicholas Hunt; Fernanda Calfat; Astrid Stawiarz; Jamie McCarthy

While Lucire’s Paris editor Lola Cristall is covering New York Fashion Week and will give her best-of report after the event, there’s one show that always brightens up the runways, and for a good cause: the American Heart Association’s Red Dress Collection.
   Back in the early 2000s when we first covered it, it was called the Heart Truth—now it’s a more positive Go Red for Women, presented by Macy’s.
   This year’s show, held on Thursday at the Hammerstein Ballroom, was hosted by Katie Holmes. There were some particularly high profile models wearing red gowns to promote awareness of cardiovascular disease among women: Lucy Lawless (Xena: Warrior Princess, Parks & Recreation), Jazz Jennings (I Am Jazz), Jeannie Mai (The Real), C. C. H. Pounder (NCIS: New Orleans; Sons of Anarchy), Peyton List (Jessie), Veronica Webb, Bonnie Somerville (Code Black), Lauren Holly (Motive), Juliette Lewis (Secrets and Lies), Maureen McCormick (Dancing with the Stars US, but perhaps best known for the original Brady Bunch), Jessie James Decker, Lorraine Toussaint (Orange Is the New Black), Diane Guerrero (Orange Is the New Black, Jane the Virgin), Bridget Moynahan (Lord of War; I, Robot; Blue Bloods), Adrienne Bailon (The Real), US Olympic gymnast Laurie Hernández, and Rachel Platten (who also sang live on stage). On the red carpet were Star Jones and her dog Pinky, Macy’s chairman and CEO Terry J. Lundgren, American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown, and designers Amanda Casarez, Bethany Meuleners, and Masha Titievsky, who created the gowns as part of a non-profit incubator programme hosted at Macy’s.
   Heart disease survivors joined celebrities this year, including Macy’s senior manager Odilia Cristabel Flores and AHA’s Nicole Hardy.
   The AHA notes that 80 per cent of cardiac and stroke events can be prevented with education and action. To date, Macy’s has raised more than US$60 million to heart health research and education.

Video: British Fashion Awards 2016: Gigi Hadid is model of the year, Simone Rocha and Craig Green scoop top designer honours


NEWS  by Cecilia Xu/December 5, 2016/23.51




British Fashion Council

In a room of 4,000 outstanding individuals, designers, supermodels and stars, the 2016 British Fashion Awards took place in London tonight. With many renowned and iconic designers such as Ralph Lauren, Tom Ford and Donatella Versace present, as well as the new and upcoming, the show sure was a varietal and multifarious mix.
   Of the top awards of the night, Craig Green won the British Menswear Designer Award, while Simone Rocha won the British Womenswear Designer Award, and Alexander McQueen won the dominant British Brand of the Year award.
   David Beckham presented the Outstanding Achievement Award to Ralph Lauren, a celebratory award to the individual for their significant contribution to the global fashion industry. Gigi Hadid scooped her sister Bella and best friend Kendall Jenner in the International Model of the Year Award, a defining and prestigious award so it was no surprise to see emotions on stage as she accepted the honour.
   Jaden and Willow Smith were surprised with the New Fashion Icon award; with no nomination prior, the award comes as a revelation on the night.
   My personal adoration this year was for Gucci, so it came as no surprise to see Alessandro Michele take home the Accessories’ Designer of the Year award. With such a rich and flamboyant collection for Gucci in 2016, this prestige was well deserved, don’t we all agree? Gucci, all in all, has done extremely well this year as a wrap, as the brand sweeps away two awards, with Marco Bizzarri taking the International Business Leader award.
   Vêtements, an urban and streetwear brand that has been taking Instagram by storm, and the likes of the youth especially in Asia this year, won the award for International Urban Luxury Brand.
   Britain’s Emerging Talent Award was taken by Molly Goddard, Franca Sozzani won the Swarovski Award for Positive Change, Bruce Weber, as announced earlier, was honoured with the Isabella Blow Award for Fashion Creator, and the International Ready-to-Wear Designer was taken by Demna Gvasalia for Balenciaga. And last but not least, 100 Years of British Vogue took the Special Recognition Award of 2016.
   VIPs attending included David Gandy, Molly Goddard, Erdem Moralioglu, Christopher Bailey, MBE, Nicole Scherzinger, Derek Blasberg, Adwoa Aboah, David and Victoria Beckham, Jack Whitehall, Karlie Kloss, Lily Donaldson, Vivienne Westwood, Nadja Swarovski, Abbey Clancy, Jourdan Dunn, Olivia Palermo, Eva Herzigová, Winnie Harlow, Anya Hindmarch, Giovanna Engelbert, Laura Bailey, Julien Macdonald, Jordan Kale Barrett, Hamish Bowles, and Lady Gaga. The British Fashion Council’s Dame Natalie Massenet and Caroline Rush looked like stars as they walked the red carpet.—Cecilia Xu








British Fashion Council

Red carpet

Molly Goddard, Erdem Moralioglu, Christopher Bailey, MBE

Dame Natalie Massenet, Nadia Swarovski, Caroline Rush, CBE

Lady Gaga

Simone Rocha, Derek Blasberg, Adwoa Aboah

Eva Herzigová, Jack Whitehall, Amber Valletta, Winnie Harlow

Anya Hindmarch, Giovanna Engelbert, Laura Bailey

Julien Macdonald, Nicole Scherzinger, Jordan Kale Barrett, Hamish Bowles

Craig Green

100 Years of British Vogue

Simone Rocha

Franca Sozzani

Ralph Lauren

Molly Goddard

Bruce Weber

Vêtements

Marco Bizzarri

Alessandro Michele

Alexander McQueen

Demna Gvasalia

Jean Paul Gaultier reports for Swarovski

Lupita Nyong’o, Iman, Charli XCX, Elizabeth Olsen attend Kenzo × H&M launch, directed by Jean-Paul Goude


NEWS  by Lucire staff/October 20, 2016/7.08




Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com

Hennes & Mauritz launched its collaboration with Kenzo at Pier 36 in New York on Wednesday, with a fashion show directed by the legendary Jean-Paul Goude.
   Attending celebrities included Rosario Dawson, Iman, Lupita Nyong’o, Chloë Sevigny, Elizabeth Olsen, Charli XCX, and Chance the Rapper.
   The new collection, dubbed Kenzo × H&M, is the latest in a long line of designer collaborations that began with Karl Lagerfeld in 2004.
   H&M’s idea of accessible luxury takes the classic, iconic styles from leading designers, making them available for a mass-market audience. Kenzo × H&M has been designed by Kenzo’s own Carol Lim and Humberto Leon.
   The all-dancing and playful spectacular featured a remix of ‘Express Yourself’ by Sam Spiegel, choreography by Ryan Heffington, and a performance by rapper Ice Cube to top the night off.
   In a release, Lim and Leon stated, ‘Tonight was a celebration of everything we love about Kenzo × H&M—it was a fun, vibrant and unexpected celebratory mix of different worlds coming together. It was a show we will never forget.’
   ‘The launch of Kenzo × H&M was truly spectacular. It was amazing to see the collection come to life with all its incredible print, colour and energy. It was such an honour to have Jean-Paul Goude direct the show and he captured the mood perfectly,’ said Ann-Sofie Johansson, H&M’s creative adviser.
   The new collection hits 250 H&M stores globally and online on November 3.








Neilson Barnard; Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com

H&M’s New Zealand store will be the first to see the Kenzo × H&M collection


NEWS  by Bhavana Bhim/August 23, 2016/1.45




Oliver Hadlee Pearch

H&M will retail the Kenzo × H&M collaboration announced last month, with the line joining its Sylvia Park store on November 3. With the time difference, this means the New Zealand store is the first to carry the line.
   Since joining Kenzo in 2011, Carol Lim and Humberto Leon have set their own fashion agenda with collections full of bold colours and vivid prints, revealed through high-impact shows, artist collaborations and creative digital campaigns. Global influences and traditions are remixed and fused with the energy of the street, resulting in collections that are both inspirational and accessible to their fans around the world. At Kenzo, fashion expresses freedom, joy and individuality for all.
   ‘We can’t wait to share with everyone the world of Kenzo × H&M, with all of its creativity, fun and love of fashion,’ said Ann-Sofie Johansson, creative adviser at H&M.
   Last month, the brand revealed the four first looks from the collaboration which combine vivid personalities and bright prints of the clothing for a fun atmosphere.
   Amy Sall, a student activist based in New York and founder of SUNU: Journal of African Affairs, Critical Thought & Æsthetics is photographed beside Juliana Huxtable, a 28 year old artist, poet and DJ also based in New York, wearing tiger-print jerseys, roll-neck tops and matching high-waisted leggings. They also wear black leather gloves containing a pink logo print and jacquard knitted tiger-sock shaft boots.
   The second look shows the 19-year-old musician and performance artist based in Paris, Oko Ebombo. He wears a parka with a removable printed collar, block colour tiger-print jeans, plus padded flip-flops with tabi socks. Ebombo also wears a tiger-printed cap with an attached scarf, a printed woven scarf and the tiger-printed cross-body bag.
   The third look shows Isamaya French, a make-up artist based in London, part of the London-based collective, Theo Adams Company. She wears an oversized leather jacket with pink faux shearling lining, with a matching tiger print jersey roll-neck top, and high-waisted leggings.
   The final look is revealed on Anna of the North, a 25-year-old Norwegian musician who gained global attention earlier during the year with her track ‘The Dreamers’. She wears a fresh interpretation by Kenzo’s creative directors, of an iconic design by founder Kenzo Takada: a short folkloric ribbon dress featuring various prints from the collection.
   ‘With this collaboration with H&M we want to think big, push the boundaries and bring the new energy of Kenzo to everyone around the world,’ say Lim and Leon.—Bhavana Bhim


Oliver Hadlee Pearch

Fashion Cities Africa gives a snapshot of four cities on a varied, rich continent


NEWS  by Jack Yan/April 18, 2016/3.51

The second largest continent on the planet is, logically, home to a massive number of fashion designers and movements, although out of Africa, there hasn’t been as much recognition of them till recently. Fashion Cities Africa, the book, inspired by the exhibition of the same name at the Brighton Museum & Art Gallery that opens at the end of April, is one high-profile development which seeks to shine a light on the variety present on the continent, while on a similar note, next month’s Africa Fashion Festival in Wellington will do the same for its designers.
   Hannah Azieb Pool, who edits the new book, is a Eritrean-born, London-based journalist, who, along with Helen Jennings, has co-writing duties, resulting in a cohesive, beautifully presented book that examines contemporary fashion in Nairobi, Casablanca, Lagos and Johannesburg. It doesn’t pretend to be a fully comprehensive guide, stating from the outset it is meant to provide mere glimpses on a continent that is incredibly diverse. The foreword by Binyavanga Wainaina, a flâneur, reminds us that there are clusters scattered throughout the land that have their own tendencies, and that her favourite designer is Nigerian, Chioma Chukwulozie.
   The reader is thrown in to the colour of Nairobi, where sibling bloggers Velma Rossa and Papa Petit (a.k.a. Oliver) take one half of the first spread with their über-stylish and proudly urban Kenyan clothes, and stylists, musicians, designers, bloggers and artists profiled on following pages give slices of their lives that shake occidental sensibilities with their own palettes and ensembles. Nairobi, for the most part, emphasizes comfort, and the clothing shot on these pages by Sarah Marie Waiswa demonstrate that the city’s fashion could easily translate to other places, spanning everything from casual to luxury. Adèle Dejak has shown in Milano, for instance, and appeared in Vogue Italia with her collaboration with Salvatore Ferragamo, while John Kaveke and Nick Ondu show the sort of sartorial elegance that could easily influence menswear in other fashion capitals.
   Profiles of some of the personalities from the city follow, reminding us that Nairobi is a crossroads: Ami Doshi Shah is of Indian descent, her family brought there by the British when both countries were under Crown rule, while Ann McCreath is a Scots émigrée who fell in love with the fashion there. There’s a dose of youthful energy, too, with Anthony Mulli, a jewellery designer who started when he was 16, pointing the way forward.
   The book follows a similar structure for subsequent cities, moving on to Casablanca next.
   Lucire readers will be familiar with Morocco thanks to travel editor Stanley Moss’s writings, and Jennings’ chapter, with photographs by Deborah Benzaquen, takes us on a similar journey through the country’s largest city. It was, of course, a home for Yves Saint Laurent at one point, as well as a drawcard for many western celebrities, when a first wave of Moroccan designers became known outside of the region. A second wave, Jennings explains, emerged in the 1980s and 1990s, with Zineb Joundy a graduate of the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture. A greater sense of artistic freedom and Casablanca’s position that blends Arabic, European and indigenous cultures has resulted in some looks that may seem familiar—perhaps thanks to the likes of Saint Laurent and his influence. Again the profiles are well selected, a cross-section of the highly varied cultures in the city: Amine Bendriouich, Amina Agueznay, Yassine Morabite, Saïd Mahrouf, and Zhor, Chadia and Aida Raïs each cover a very different parts of the fashion spectrum, from T-shirts to traditional caftans.
   Once the book gets to Lagos, it’s apparent that there’s a sense of “bubbling under”, with Lakin Ogunbanwo’s photographs, paired with Jennings’ words again, showing slightly more subdued looks for men, but prouder, more flamboyant looks for women. Jennings notes that civil war and Nigeria’s military juntas stalled its fashion scene for some years, before a revival when democracy returned in 1999. Foreign labels were seen as cool till recently, with the country discovering its confidence in its own æsthetic, to the point where one of her interviewees, stylist Bolaji Anumashaun, says that fashion can be one of Nigeria’s ‘greatest exports’. Anumashaun founded thestylehq.com with a pan-African fashion focus, and Arise magazine, founded in 2008, also stepped up the promotion for Nigerian designers. With Nigeria’s GDP now greater than South Africa’s, that confidence is bound to increase, and Jennings looks at Nike Davis Okundaye, who owns the biggest gallery in West Africa in Lagos, and happy to promote young talent. Others, such as Yegwa Ukpo and Amaka Osakwe, both were schooled in the UK before returning to Lagos to found their brands, while PR consultant Zara Okpara and luxury concept store owner Reni Folawiyo complete their city’s picture.
   Johannesburg completes Fashion Cities Africa, and it’s perhaps fair that Pool chose to put it last. Many mistakenly think of South African fashion when they refer to ‘African fashion’, spurred in part by the Republic’s sporting ties to many other countries in the Commonwealth. Victor Dlamini has the photographic duties here, and Pool pens the words, and she goes through the various Jo’burg neighbourhoods, noting that its fashion is more established than Nairobi’s but less self-conscious than Lagos’s. There is a western infusion here in some parts, she notes, but on closer examination there are accessories that reference Soweto streets or Zulu culture. The city even has two fashion weeks: South Africa Fashion Week and Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Joburg, making the city spoiled for choice when it comes to giving its designers a platform. David Tlale, whom Lucire readers will have heard of, and who has shown at New York Fashion Week, hails from here, and Jo’burg designs have a greater sense of familiarity thanks to western media exposure. It oozes colour and vibrancy, much like the photos chosen for Pool’s first chapter on Nairobi, and in similar fashion (pun unintended) there are profiles from across the spectrum: designer Thula Sindi, creative collective, the Sartists, accessories’ and shoe designer Maria McCloy, and womenswear designers Marianne Fassler and Anisa Mpungwe.
   It’s our hope that we can cease talking about ‘African’ fashion and instead replace the dialogue with specific cities or countries, just as we do for smaller continents such as Europe. Just as there is no such thing to fashion observers as ‘European’ fashion, there is equally no such thing as ‘African’ fashion: it is impossible to generalize at a continental level. Both as an informative volume and a coffee-table flick-through (as it is softcover), Fashion Cities Africa succeeds, and it’s exceptionally good value with full-colour photographs (needed for its story, over 196 pp.) at £20 (available via Amazon UK here, or Book Depository here) or US$28·50, (Amazon link here). It is published this month by Intellect Books, as part of its Street Styles series.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Video and photos: double win for J. W. Anderson at British Fashion Awards 2015; Gwendoline Christie wins Style Award


NEWS  by Lucire staff/November 24, 2015/3.01




Mike Marsland/British Fashion Council

Jonathan Anderson, the man behind the label J. W. Anderson, has scooped both the men’s and women’s Designer of the Year awards at the British Fashion Awards last night, held at the Coliseum in London.
   Anderson has previously won the men’s prize, in 2014, the New Establishment Designer award in 2013, and the Emerging Womenswear Designer award in 2012.
   As detailed earlier by the British Fashion Council, Karl Lagerfeld won the Outstanding Achievement Award for his contribution to the fashion industry.
   Other heavyweight names on the night included Tom Ford, who was recognized with the Red Carpet award, for creating global awareness of one’s designs in the media (Lady Gaga collected on his behalf); Burberry, with the Creative Campaign award for its editorial and advertising; and Alessandro Michele for Gucci as the International Designer.
   The much-acclaimed Isabella Blow Award for Fashion Creator was given to Nick Knight, for his contribution to the global fashion industry.
   Charlotte Olympia won the Accessory Designer award, and Stella McCartney was recognized as the best brand. Erdem won the Establishment Designer award for its retail and ecommerce presences, while Mary Katrantzou won the New Establishment Designer award.
   Jourdan Dunn won the award for Model of the Year. Game of Thrones actress Gwendoline Christie was named the winner of the British Style Award, which was voted on by 6,000 people.
   Of the three emerging designer awards, the winners were Thomas Tait for womenswear, Grace Wales Bonner for menswear, and Jordan Askill for accessories.
   VIPs attending or presenting included British Fashion Council chair Natalie Massenet, Victoria and David Beckham, Tinie Tempah, Cheryl Fernandez-Versini, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Sarah Burton, Naomi Campbell, Anna Wintour, Angela Scanlon, Liv Tyler, Nick Grimshaw, Lily Allen, Poppy Delevingne, Rita Ora, Robert Konjic, Mollie King, Alexa Chung, Yasmin Le Bon, Laura Bailey, Pierre Denis, Imran Amed, Markus Lupfer, Gareth Pugh, Elisa Sednaoui, Michael Polish, Sandra Choi, Alexandra Shulman, FKA Twigs, Sophie Dahl, Sam Rollinson, Jack Whitehall, Jim Chapman, Immy Waterhouse, Elisa Sednaoui, Georgia May Jagger, Olga Kurylenko, Olivier Rousteing, Faustine Steinmetz, Harold Tillman, Jefferson Hack, Marc Hare, Christopher Raeburn, Stephen Jones, Molly Goddard, Susanna Lau, Kate Beckinsale, Mario Testino, Malaika Firth, Jamie Bochert, Charlotte Simone, Edie Campbell, Lulu Kennedy, Salma Hayek and François-Henri Pinault, Roksanda Ilincić, Lilah Parsons, Katie Grand, Carson McColl, Giles Deacon, Lewis Hamilton, Nadja Swarovski, Daisy Lowe, David Burton, David Koma, Lara Stone, Lucky Blue Smith, Fernando Jorge, Sid Bryan, Jack Guinness, Sarah-Jane Crawford, Pixie Lott and Oliver Cheshire, Helen Wright, Emilia Wickstead, Erin O’Connor, Anya Hindmarch, Henry Holland, Noomi Rapace, Craig Green, Adrian Joffe, Astrid Andersen Mollie King, Jo Elvin, Patrick Grant, Peter Pilotto, Sophia Sanchez de Betak, Christopher de Vos, Christopher Kane, Sophia Neophitou-Apostolou, Joseph Altazurra, Richard Nicoll, Tanya Burr, Kate Bosworth, Karlie Kloss, Joanna Lumley and Jennifer Saunders (as Patsy Stone and Eddy Monsoon), Orlando Bloom, Suzy Menkes, Alasdhair Willis, Alice Dellal, Chloë Green, Arizona Muse and Amy Cole.
   Sponsors for the evening included principal partner Swarovski, presenting partners MAC and Toni & Guy, and official sponsors Ciroc, Marks & Spencer, Mercedes-Benz and St Martins Lane. Other supporters included Diptyque Paris, Fashion & Beauty Monitor, Fiji Water, Nikki Tibbles, Warsteiner and Wild at Heart.

Red carpet

Gwendoline Christie interview

Lucky Blue Smith

Suzy Menkes

Jack Whitehall

Alessandro Michele

Rita Ora

Erdem

Jourdan Dunn

Lady Gaga
















































































Mike Marsland/British Fashion Council

Winners’ enclosure
Lady Gaga accepts on behalf of Tom Ford

Jourdan Dunn

Karl Lagerfeld

Burberry

Alessandro Michele for Gucci

Stella McCartney

J. W. Anderson, Menswear Designer of the Year

J. W. Anderson, Womenswear Designer of the Year














Mike Marsland/British Fashion Council

Highlight reel

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