Lucire: News


October 10, 2015

Classic and Sports Car—the London Show to celebrate Aston Martin with seven landmark models

Lucire staff/10.28

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Aston Martin might not have the freshest range out there as it readies its next generation of supercars, but its marketing machine is at the top of its game this quarter, with a celebration at Classic & Sports Car—the London Show from October 30 to November 1 at Alexandra Palace—days after its bespoke DB10 gets its screen début in the 24th EON James Bond feature, Spectre.
   The show will feature the oldest surviving Aston Martin, the 1921 A3, joined by the DB Mk III, DB5, V8, DB7, V12 Vanquish and DB9 GT in a display sponsored by EFG International. The cars have been supplied by the Aston Martin Heritage Trust, Desmond J. Smail, Aston Service London, Aston Sales Kensington and Aston Martin.
   Complementing the Aston Martins will be 300 of the world’s most prestigious classic cars from collectors and retailers, including a collection of Sir Stirling Moss’s British single-seat racing cars.
   The A3 was the fourth prototype by Aston Martin founders Robert Bamford and Lionel Martin, and the only survivor.
   The DB Mk III, which appeared in the Ian Fleming James Bond novel Goldfinger, is one of 500 built between 1957 and 1959. The DB5, perhaps the most famed Aston Martin of them all thanks to its appearance in the film adaptation of Goldfinger, appears in the show in silver birch, matching the colour of the cars from the Bond films.
   The William Towns-styled V8, derived from the DBS V8, had a very long-running production, from 1972 to 1989. The DB7 marked Aston Martin’s renaissance, with its beautiful Ian Callum styling over a Jaguar XJS base: 7,000 were built between 1994 and 2004.
   The V12 Vanquish, which also made a James Bond appearance (in the film Die Another Day), was a more muscular grand tourer, débuting in 2001 and ran till 2007. The DB9 GT, the ultimate DB9, is the one current Aston Martin on display.
   James Elliott, Classic & Sports Car magazine group editor, said in a release, ‘We’re thrilled that the inaugural Classic & Sports Car—the London Show is able to celebrate Aston Martin’s position as one of the greatest British manufacturers with seven important cars from its glorious production history. From the 1921 A3, kindly loaned to us by Aston Martin Heritage Trust, to the latest DB9 GT, these seven automotive icons are sure to represent a star attraction for visitors to our inaugural Alexandra Palace event.’
   The show will also announce the results of a worldwide poll to find the Best British Car Ever, and feature a Live Stage in partnership with Smooth Radio. Tickets are available via or 44 844 581-1275.

Filed under: Lucire

Mellerio creates high jewellery for Lancôme’s exclusive 80th anniversary La vie est belle extrait de parfum

Lucire staff/5.01

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The Lancôme brand started in perfumes before branching out into the wide range of skin care and cosmetics, but now Mellerio dits Meller has taken it as an inspiration to create high jewellery.
   The famed jeweller, founded in 1613, has created a design to adorn 80 flasks of the limited-edition La vie est belle extrait de parfum that celebrate Lancôme’s 80th anniversary.
   After designing the first, it now has to replicate it another 79 times, a task that it believes it is unlikely to have undertaken before.
   Mellerio explains that it paid special tribute to Lancôme founder Armand Petitjean, who personally created numerous beauty accessories between the 1920s and 1940s, including beauty boxes, lipsticks and powder cases. In the Lancôme archives are drawings featuring a rock crystal cream jar inlaid with precious stones, dating back to the 1850s.
   ‘Mellerio reinterpreted the wings of liberty, the organza bow draped around the neck of the bottle “La vie est belle”, to create a pink gold coated silver piece (vermeil). Several wings are pierced, others are chiselled, inspired from a motif found in Lancôme’s archives, and the final ones are polished with the “mirror” technique, one of the three traditional metal treatment processes, used in jewellery. This ornament highlights the sublime glass smile dreamt up by Armand Petitjean and created in 2012 for “La Vie est belle”, using the latest glass-making techniques,’ it noted in a release.
   The 80 flasks will be sold worldwide, with six bottles in France at the Printemps Haussmann from November 5.

September 23, 2015

Tommy Hilfiger and Jeffrey Deitch host Rock Style exhibition launch in London

Alex Barrow/3.42

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Darren Gerrish

On Monday, the Rock Style exhibition’s official opening was celebrated at Sotheby’s S2 gallery in London. Hosted and curated by famous fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger and art dealer Jeffrey Deitch, the exhibition celebrates the innovative connection between music and fashion, as examined in Tommy Hilfiger and Anthony De Curtis’ book, Rock Style, written in 2000.
   Hilfiger himself has been a notable figure of fashion for 30 years and has dressed celebrities such as Lily Aldridge, Zooey Deschanel, Snoop Dogg and Naomi Campbell. Although he no longer runs the company, Hilfiger is still heavily involved in the fashion industry. De Curtis complements him perfectly with his music-critic background, writing for publications such as Rolling Stone, The New York Times and Relix, making them the perfect duo to have written the book Rock Style.
   The show exhibits numerous photographs of rockers over the years, as well as paintings of idols such as Deborah Harry, Joey Ramone, Sid Vicious and George Harrison done by street artist and graphic designer Shepard Fairey. The exhibition emphasizes the nature of fashion, music and identity, and how the three collaborate to create the worlds that these stars lived in. The very essence of nostalgia and fashion experimentation is captured in the large images, ones that depict the unique identity of each performer. The iconic leathers and studs of Sid Vicious, the radical prints and colours of Jimi Hendrix, and the very photogenic nature of David Bowie, is captured in these prints. In creating a visual exhibition, the show brings the book to life and provides a sentiment and fond memory of the rock star idols of the ’50s through to today.
   Notable attendees of the Rock Style exhibition launch included Tommy and Dee Hilfiger, Melissa Odabash, Harrods fashion director Helen David, editor of British GQ Dylan Jones, Sir Philip Green, Bob Gruen, Gered Mankowitz, Tim Jeffries, Fru Tholstrup, Justine Picardie, Katie Martin, Tamara Beckwith, Melissa Odabash, Don Letts, Caroline Rush, Stephen Webster, Mark Quinn, Henry Hudson, Philip Colbert, Steve Varsano, Lisa Tchenguiz, and Jaye Kamel, as well as other artists and socialites.—Alex Barrow

Darren Gerrish

September 8, 2015

Rolls-Royce launches Dawn convertible, a car for the ‘most exclusive social hotspots’

Lucire staff/17.06

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Rolls-Royce has unveiled the Dawn convertible, which the company says is the sexiest car it has built.
   While some Rolls-Royce cognoscenti might be able to think of some classic models that deserve that title, the Dawn is a well balanced, well designed convertible in the modern range.
   Rolls-Royce CEO Torsten Müller-Ötvös​ tells model and TV host Jodie Kidd in the launch video below that the Dawn will appeal to a younger, more social customer than the Phantom Drophead, which it sees as the last word in glamorous, open-top motoring. Like the Phantom, it seats four properly.
   In a release, he said, ‘Our new Rolls-Royce Dawn promises a striking, seductive encounter like no other Rolls-Royce to date, and begins a new age of open-top, super-luxury motoring. Dawn is a beautiful new motor car that offers the most uncompromised open-top motoring experience in the world. It will be the most social of super-luxury drophead motor cars for those who wish to bathe in the sunlight of the world’s most exclusive social hotspots.’
   Rolls-Royce design director Giles Taylor says the chrome line that rises from the A-pillar is meant to convey a sense of protection and a convivial atmosphere for its occupants.
   Rolls-Royce engineering director Philip Köhn insists that it is not simply a convertible version of the Wraith, but a model line in its own right, with its own character, with 80 per cent of the exterior body panels unique to it.
   However, mechanically, it shares a great deal with the Wraith, which itself is a highly engineered sports car, including the twin-turbo 6·6-litre V12. Where the Dawn differs under the skin is with its suspension and active roll bars, while the tyres are also not shared.
   The roof, which Köhn says is the engineering highlight of the Dawn, rises in 22 s and can be operated while the car is travelling up to 50 km/h.
   The new car takes its name from the Silver Dawn, a range which included a very rare convertible that the company made from 1949 to 1955. The earlier convertible served as inspiration.
   Rolls-Royce says the Dawn is the most torsionally rigid four-seater convertible available, and that it is the quietest one ever made.
   Retail price is expected to be over £250,000.

Filed under: design, living, London, Lucire, TV
August 18, 2015

Fan Phenomena: James Bond gives 007 fans more; while Sugoi invites you to the world of Bill Murray

Jack Yan/12.09

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In the year of a new James Bond movie, many books emerge. Invariably, there’ll be one on the films themselves, taking readers through the 50-plus years of the Eon Productions’ series, and, if it’s very comprehensive, the 1950s CBS TV version of Casino Royale, the 1967 spoof of the same name, and Never Say Never Again will rate more than a mention. There’ll be something about Ian Fleming, and another book on one aspect of the Bond world (gadgets, stunts, music, or something else). Seasoned Bond fans will think the circus is in town again, because the new book about the films adds little to their existing knowledge.
   Claire Hines’s Fan Phenomena: James Bond, from Intellect Books (£15·50, US$22, releasing November 15), is something different altogether: Bond from an academic and completely cultural viewpoint. Intellect is famous for its titles on popular culture and creative practice, with a rigorous academic bent, and Fan Phenomena: James Bond continues the series but takes the reader into the world of Ian Fleming’s super-spy.
   Hines serves as editor, and there are 11 very distinct contributions to her volume, dealing with everything from canonicity to 007’s appearance as ‘Ladykiller Jimmy’ in Alan Moore’s comics; Bond as a cult brand and cultural phenomenon to the clothes he wears; from the James Bond films through a feminist viewpoint to analyses of his masculinity and identity. Interspersed between these are four ‘Fan Appreciation’ sections, featuring an interview with über-fan and former Bond novel continuation author Raymond Benson, artist and collector Peter Lorenz, 007 Museum owner James Bond (who had his name legally changed by deed poll) and cross-players CousinCecily and Winter.
   Even the most seasoned Bond fan might not have considered the impact of the character, books and films, and the book fulfils a very important role: it gives them something new. William Proctor’s analysis of continuity gets the book off to a healthy start after Hines’s introduction, though typographically it suffers: the type is inexplicably small, though the layout is modern and the visuals help lift things. Getting Raymond Benson in there early on also helps position Fan Phenomena: James Bond as a book for the cognoscenti as well as those who want an academic examination, and Benson reveals a little more behind the scenes of his years as the official continuation author.
   Matthew Freeman, in considering the many media in which Bond occupies, including the gaming world, shows just how the phenomenon breaks the established rules and succeeds, while Jesús Jiménez-Varea and Antonio Pineda’s chapter on Moore’s comics is bound to take many fans into uncharted territory. Joshua Wille’s chapter on fan edits does the same: while many know about ABC-TV’s cutting of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service when it aired on US TV, but there are numerous fan edits made in the digital era that had this author hunting the forums.
   Artist Peter Lorenz’s Bond film posters are stunning and present a nice visual break before Lucy Bolton’s chapter analysing the phenomenology of Bond. Bolton’s piece is perhaps closest to those Bond “collectable” books that come out with the films as she analysed the films from Dr No to Skyfall, and fans may have their own interpretations of their cultural significance through the years. Editor Hines’s own chapter looks at Bond as cult brand, and is fascinating in her study of the 1960s Eon films. Hines reconciles how cult and mainstream come together with the Bond series, successfully. Lisa Funnell gives Bond a feminist slant and the enjoyment she derives as an assistant professor teaching women’s studies.
   Stephanie Jones looks at the Bond lifestyle but primarily through the analysis of one work, The Complete James Bond Lifestyle Seminar, which she reveals is relatively light on Bond references, leading to a less satisfying chapter—though it could hardly be blamed on Jones. Llewella Burton’s chapter on Bond and fashion, and how it became a style through the rise of merchandising as the movies became blockbusters with Goldfinger is punctuated by photos from Galeries Lafayette as it opened a James Bond boutique in 1965, again gold dust for Bond fans. Karen Brooks’s and Lisa Hill’s chapter analyses the new and old masculinities through the three Daniel Craig films of 2006, 2008 and 2012.
   Crossplayers CousinCecily and Winter talk about their love of James Bond and Q, leading neatly on the final chapter by Elizabeth J. Nielsen, which deals with Bond’s homoerotic moments and subtexts. She traces them to Fleming himself in the torture scene in Casino Royale, before covering the flirting between Bond and the new Q in Skyfall, which itself has a phenomenon, attracting both women and the LGBTQ community.
   This is a volume for the intelligent Bond fan, someone who appreciates learning about the impact of Ian Fleming’s creation. Of course the films are covered more, as it was through them that Bond became a global phenomenon. The reader walks away having been better informed: this is not a Bond book for the light reader who wants reassurance of the facts they already know, but one which gives them something more satisfying to consider.

Top A scene from What About Bob?, by Jon Boam. Centre Lost in Translation, by Grace Danico. Above Lost in Translation, by Henry Kaye.

On a briefer note, but still tied with film, Sugoi Books has released an A5 book called Cook Your Own Food: a Bill Murray Scratch and Sniff, retailing at £6. There are 20 pp., with 10 smells, with some stunning illustrations, with artists reinterpreting key moments from Murray’s films, focusing on his culinary habits. ‘Scratch the smelly pads at the top right and enter the world of Bill Murray,’ the publisher asks, and you are spoiled with scenes from Lost in Translation, Caddyshack, Groundhog Day, What About Bob?, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and others. For £6, the illustrations are so good it doesn’t even matter if you have a poor sense of smell.—Jack Yan, Publisher

August 9, 2015

Footnote New Zealand Dance celebrates its 30th anniversary this August with première and events

Lucire staff/14.02

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Above Footnote at its home at 125 Cuba Street.

Footnote New Zealand Dance celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, and on August 28–9, it will première 30Forward at the Wellington Opera House to mark the anniversary.
   The première will take place in Wellington, before heading to the Christchurch Arts Festival, Auckland’s Tempo Dance Festival, then to Gisborne, the Kokomai Creative Festival in Carterton, and the Tauranga Arts Festival.
   The production features highlights from past works, as curated by founding director Deirdre Tarrant, and a new commission from choreographer Malia Johnston.
   Footnote will begin its celebrations on August 21 with The Art of Footnote, at a venue on Cuba Street to be announced during August. This exhibition shows posters, programmes and concept designs from Footnote over the last three decades, and runs till August 30.
   A Pecha Kucha event at the Wellington City Gallery, focusing on the culture of movement (covering dance, music, visual art and performance) takes place on August 27. The Tarrant Dance Studios at 125 Cuba Street, Wellington welcomes visitors on August 29 to an open house, while the August 29 performance of 30Forward will be followed by a function.
   The Christchurch dates are August 31–September 1; Auckland on October 15 and 17; Gisborne on October 21; Carterton on October 24; and Tauranga on October 30.
   Tickets are on sale now—visit for ticketing information.

Above Rehearsing in 2012.

August 6, 2015

Sponsored video: Appleton Estate’s Jamaican tradition is assured

Lucire staff/15.07

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The Caribbean is most closely associated with rum when it comes to alcohol, and Appleton Estate is arguably the brand that rum lovers will think of when Jamaica comes up. Now part of Campari, Appleton Estate’s history goes back to the dawn of rum itself, to 1655 when the British captured the islands from the Spanish.
   This 4,614 ha estate is the oldest sugar estate and distillery in the country that has been in continuous production, and the brand readily plays on its Jamaican heritage, especially in its latest spot that connects the island’s culture and spirit with the rum itself.
   In the Nassau Valley, from where Jamaica’s fruits and vegetables predominantly come, Appleton Estate began creating rum in 1749, and now has a range of three core types: the Signature Blend Jamaica Rum, the Reserve Blend Jamaica Rum and the Extra 12 Year Old Jamaica Rum. Two limited-edition luxury rums form the remainder of the range: the 21 Year Old Jamaica Rum and 50 Year Old Jamaica Rum—Jamaica Independence Reserve.
   They are known for their bold aromas and fruity notes, with the Reserve having an added complexity. The Independence Reserve, launched in 2012 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the country’s independence, saw 800 bottles released worldwide, with an even more complex bouquet and intensity.
   The process is environmentally friendly today, with an emission-free boiler, a process to turn the filter press mud into fertilizer, and an extensive recycling programme in the Nassau Valley. Under the eye of Joy Spence, the first woman to hold the position of Master Blender in the spirits’ industry, Appleton Estate continues its Jamaican tradition, one which its current owner is keen to uphold, as can be seen in its latest spot.

Post sponsored by Appleton Estate

Filed under: environment, history, living, TV
June 5, 2015

Aston Martin Works’ customer track day sees One-77, V12 Zagato, DBRS9 at Silverstone

Lucire staff/23.26

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On June 3, Aston Martin Works hosted a customer track day at the Silverstone race track, featuring rare, exotic models (even by Aston Martin standards) such as the One-77, V12 Zagato and DBRS9.
   Aston Martin Works is celebrating its 60th year in 2015, and this anniversary event, where some customers brought their own cars, allowed fans to unleash their cars.
   Other models at the event included V8 and V12 Vantages, DB9s, one Virage, and a V12 Vanquish. More than 20 cars were present, with drivers coached by Aston Martin Performance driving instructors.
   Aston Martin Works’ commercial director Paul Spires said, ‘It’s great to see so many of our sports cars being driven so skilfully by such an enthusiastic group of owners.
   ‘When we proposed this idea at the beginning of the year we weren’t sure how many people would want to bring along their cars, but the response today has been superb.’

Filed under: history, living, Lucire
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