Lucire

Lucire: News

Share 


May 21, 2016

AmFAR Cannes gala raises $25 million: Katy Perry, Sonam Kapoor, Bella Hadid, Doutzen Kroes, Paris Hilton among VIPs

Lucire staff/13.33




Pascal Le Segretain; Gareth Cattermole; Kevin Tachman/AmFAR

The swankiest do during the Festival de Cannes is the AmFAR gala, held at the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc, and presented by Harry Winston and Bold Films. The event, Cinema Against Aids, raised over US$25 million supporting AmFAR, the Foundation for Aids Research, and its pursuit of a cure for HIV–Aids. Sponsors included the Weinstein Company, Renault, and Moët Hennessy.
   Kevin Spacey MCed the event, with his impressive mimicry, playing Johnny Carson, Bill Clinton, Jack Lemmon, Al Pacino, and his Frank Underwood from the US House of Cards remake. Adrien Brody, among others, furnished artwork that was auctioned to raise funds for AmFAR; other items included a Damien Hirst sculpture and a week-long stay at Leonardo DiCaprio’s home in Palm Springs. Swiss art auctioneer Simon de Pury presided over the auction.
   Katy Perry (in Marchesa), the Village People, Sister Sledge and the Bluebell Girls performed live, and Carine Roitfeld curated a fashion collection with a disco theme featuring Karlie Kloss (who arrived in Marchesa), Jourdan Dunn, Bella Hadid, and Doutzen Kroes (who arrived wearing Tom Ford), among others. The collection raised over US$1 million.
   Celebrities attending included Brody and DiCaprio, Harvey Weinstein, Dame Helen Mirren (who, like so many of her L’Oréal Paris spokespeople attending, wore make-up from the brand), Milla Jovovich, Paris Hilton (with jewellery by Avakian), Barron Hilton, Uma Thurman, Sonam Kapoor (in Ralph & Russo), Heidi Klum, Irina Shayk (in Miu Miu), Faye Dunaway, Alessandra Ambrosio (in Redemption, with Jimmy Choo shoes and jewellery by Boucheron), Toni Garrn, Jasmine Tookes, Karolína Kurková (in Armani Privé and Harry Winston jewellery) and Archie Drury, Ana Beatriz Barros (in Ralph & Russo), Petra NÄ›mcová (in Georges Chakra with jewellery by Chopard), Barbara Palvin (in Armani Privé), Hailey Clauson, Sasha Luss, Sharam Diniz, Valery Kaufman, Izabel Goulart, Sophie Taylor, Chanel Iman, Liu Wen, Elle Fanning, Joel Edgerton, Orlando Bloom, Chris Tucker, Kirsten Dunst, Vanessa Paradis, Diego Luna, Mads Mikkelsen, Joel Edgerton, Juliette Binoche, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Eva Herzigova, Chloë Sevigny, Julian Lennon, Lewis Hamilton, Matt Bellamy, Adriana Lima, Nicolas Winding Refn, Nina Agdal, Elif Aksu, Mert Alas, Alina Baikova, Natasha Poly (in Roberto Cavalli), Mischa Barton, Boris Becker, Dean Caten, Dan Caten, Eva Cavalli, Anna Cleveland, Mina Cvetković, Heidi de la Rosa, Lily Donaldson, Isabeli Fontana, Georgia Fowler, Luma Grothe, Jessica Hart, Jacquelyn Jablonski, Xiao Wen Ju, Liya Kebede, Lara Leito, Maryna Linchuk, Angela Lindvall, Sasha Luss, Catrinel Marlon, Angela Martini, Stella Maxwell, Margot Moe, Mia Moretti, Hanne Gaby Odiele, Soo Joo Park, Marcus Piggott, Julia Restoin Roitfeld, Vladimir Roitfeld, Olivier Rousteing, Remo Ruffini, Dragos Savulescu, Lucky Blue Smith, Lara Stone, Daria Strokous, Kasia Struss, Jasmine Tookes, Dasha Zhukova, and AmFAR board chairman Kenneth Cole.









































































May 20, 2016

Bella Hadid, Irina Shayk, Ming Xi, Jourdan Dunn, Isabeli Fontana glam up Festival de Cannes’ day 8

Lucire staff/14.15



Venturelli

Bella Hadid grabbed plenty of attention on day eight of the Festival de Cannes, wearing a red Alexandre Vauthier custom silk wrap gown that left few of the 19-year-old’s curves to the imagination. With a deep neckline and a thigh-high slit, the gown ensured plenty of paparazzi snapped her at the première of La fille inconnue (The Unknown Girl). She narrowly avoided a revealing “wardrobe malfunction” thanks to a red thong—a moment captured by some paparazzi and camera operators. She complemented her Vauthier gown with Giuseppe Zanotti sandals and jewellery by de Grisogono.
   Also choosing to go with de Grisogono for jewellery on day eight were Shanghai-born model Ming Xi (奚夢瑤) in a sparkling silver Zuhair Murad holiday 2016 gown and Jourdan Dunn in a Ralph & Russo haute couture spring–summer 2016 white silk gazar ball gown with a hand-painted floral design and crystal and glass beading. Ana Beatriz Barros also chose Ralph & Russo, wearing an asymmetric teal chiffon gown with draped train, as did Chanel Iman that same evening at the Planet Finance Foundation Gala Dinner.
   Irina Shayk, walking the red carpet for L’Oréal Paris, went for a more subtle look up front with her black Miu Miu gown—but round the back were diamante chains and extravagant feather detail on the hems—the perfect contrast. Make-up was again very natural, with L’Oréal Paris’s make-up artists opting for lighter to medium shades in the Brow Artist Genius Kit and the Rosé shade in the Color Riche La Palette. To suit Shayk’s complexion, they chose Cushion Nude Magique foundation in Rosy Beige, and the Glam Bronze Cushion de Soleil. For the eyes, L’Oréal Paris’s False Lash Sculpt in black and Super Liner Black ‘n’ Sculpt gave her movie-star looks. Dame Helen Mirren, Soo-Joo Park and Isabeli Fontana also wowed as L’Oréal Paris ambassadors, and racing driver Lewis Hamilton joined them as the sole male for the brand.
   Rosie Huntingdon-Whiteley, like Shayk and Hadid, went for a backless gown, and chose a pleated, draped red design from Alexandre Vauthier. Liya Kebede chose an emerald green design from Haider Ackermann, while Alessandra Ambrosio wore Michael Kors.




























An extensive Scope: NZ School of Dance blends Choreographic Season pieces into thoughtful, cohesive work

Jack Yan/14.13





Stephen A’Court

Above, from top: Connor Masseurs. A scene from Scope. Kent Giebel-Date and Christina Guieb. Christina Guieb.

The New Zealand School of Dance’s Choreographic Season for 2016, Scope, blended its 10 performance so seamlessly, and with related themes, that it worked well as a single, larger piece, despite the many talents and styles involved in choreography, music and dance.
   Each time we attend an NZSD performance, we’re always impressed by how they mix things up. Sometimes, it’s in the style of dancing or the changes to the venue. This time, they’ve surprised us yet again by not having breaks between each work, allowing them to flow naturally. Other than at the beginning, when half-dressed dancers emerged on stage in a row, only to have their neatly folded outfits fall from the sky, there were also no costume changes.
   Scope’s notes hint at the related themes, all centring on the energies that drive life on Earth, and how humanity can be destructive, but also how it can unite and bring people together. The flow did mean it was sometimes difficult to see when one performance finished and another started—this is not meant as a negative criticism, because the effect is that the audience became particularly engrossed.
   The performances flowed so seamlessly thanks largely, we believe, to the collaborative processes by the 10 graduating students of the New Zealand School of Dance, who created and performed their own works, cooperating with lighting and sound designers as well as fellow students in following years. It was particularly immersive, more so than the 2015 season that Lucire thought very highly of.
   In a release, the show’s coordinator, Victoria Colombus, herself an alumna, noted, ‘This year the New Zealand School of Dance students and Toi Whakaari students are cultivating a very collaborative working process. They have been working together to investigate overriding themes and how they can utilize different elements of stagecraft and performance to sew together these common threads.’ It worked.
   â€˜Trophics’, choreographed by Tristan Carter with music by Te Aihe Butler, involved the entire cast, essentially evolving. The first scene showed them essentially running on to the stage but as they progressed, their moves became more complex, as though they discovered they had more limbs and abilities. This evolved into the next performance, printed in the programme with a blank box and the cubed sign as its title, with the introduction of white boxes as props but signifying that we can find peace among our busy lives. Christopher Mills’s ‘Box Cubed’ (for ease of typesetting here) concluded with female dancers calling out to others scattered among the audience, the matriarchy evolved into the patriarchy with ‘Obelus’, a male-exclusive performance that mixed martial arts with the flow of dance, examining themes of rivalry, the toppling of leadership, and the resulting power vacuum. There was thoroughly enjoyable choreography by Jag Popham.
   From here the performances became more otherworldly—and one can see the evolutionary theme continue into a more technical arena. ‘The Private Sphere’ introduced themes of contrast: ‘Plastic fruit and tending flowers. Air freshener and painted landscapes,’ read the programme, but we saw it as humanity’s attempt to introduce technology, but not always in a pleasant way. Dancers mimicked robotic movements as they portrayed artificial materials; could the theme have been the draining of humanity from our everyday lives? From Isaac di Natale’s ‘The Private Sphere’, we moved into Breanna Timms’s ‘Atlas of Intangible’, where the movements became fluid again, almost to show that advancements can see us claw back our humanity. Timms’s idea was to show the connections between all life through energy, how the actions of one influence another, and this was done with great beauty and more tradition in the choreography, helped with music such as Estonian composer Arvo Pärt’s ‘Summa for Strings’.
   Samuel Hall’s ‘Come along and Feel the Kairos’, a reference to that perfect moment, involved audience members in the front row (Lucire’s second-row seat meant the note-taking continued), who became part of a mass performance. Dancers in the centre connected while one remained outside the lines formed by the audience and their guides; and despite the presence of amateurs on stage there was a flow that held our attention.
   â€˜Blight’, choreographed by Tiana Lung, had many layers that tied back to earlier themes of technology and humankind’s attempts to quell nature as a result; a dancer representing new life is controlled and quashed by existing life forms. ‘Shaving a Cactus’, choreographed by Holly Newsome, again introduced a technological theme (helped by Crooked Colours’ ‘Step (Woolymammoth × Tsuruda Remix)’ as the soundtrack) and synthesized voices which dancers. Te Aihe Butler’s music editing for Jessica Newman’s ‘XXX’ took us back to the start thematically, with sound effects that were basic and raw. The whole cast returned for an energetic finalé in Isabel Estrella’s ‘Temenos’.
   Scope, the New Zealand School of Dance’s Choreographic Season for 2016, runs from May 20 to 28 at Te Whaea, the National Dance and Drama Centre, in Newtown, Wellington. Tickets are priced from NZ$12 to NZ$23; bookings and further information can be found at the NZSD’s website at www.nzschoolofdance.ac.nz.—Jack Yan, Publisher


Stephen A’Court

Above: The third-year contemporary students at the New Zealand School of Dance for 2016.

May 19, 2016

Kim Kardashian, Toni Garrn, Paris Hilton, Chanel Iman, Milla Jovovich at de Grisogono party at Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc

Lucire staff/16.04


Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com


Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com

De Grisogono and its founder and creative director Fawaz Gruosi played host to one of the Festival de Cannes’ most anticipated soirées at the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc. A high-fashion jewellery show, with dresses by Elie Saab, followed by an extravaganza by Ekdokimov, the launch of Euronews’s new identity, a dinner for 650 guests, and a private performance by the Earth, Wind & Fire Experience featuring the Al McKay Allstars, DJ Jack E and DJ Willy.
   Given the Zeitgeist, it was Kim Kardashian West (in Lan Yu) who grabbed paparazzi attention on the evening of day 7, but there were plenty of other top stars there, too: Robert de Niro and Grace Hightower, Paris Hilton looking more radiant than ever, Chanel Iman, Ana Beatriz Barros, Milla Jovovich, Toni Garrn and Chandler Parsons, Harvey Weinstein and Georgina Chapman, Bella Hadid (in Givenchy), Siran Manoukian, Hofit Golan, Valeria Golino, Hailey Clauson, Chris Tucker, Denise Rich, Victoria Lopyreva, Mischa Barton, Mohammed al Turki, David Wertheimer and Toghzan Izbassarova, Lara Lieto, Stephen Hung, Amaury Nolasco, Godeliv van den Brandt, Natasha Poly, Maryna Linchuk, Doina Ciobanu, Rose Bertram, Kenneth Cole, Alina Baikova, Gala Gonzalez, Eva Cavalli, Carolina Parsons, Jean-Roch, Édgar Ramírez and Ana de Armas from Hands of Stone, Violetta Gruosi, Amy Jackson, Gregory van der Weil, Ivana Trump and Massimo Gargia.
   And since you can never get by without your Mum, Kardashian West’s mother Kris Jenner was also a VIP at the extravagant soirée held during the Festival de Cannes.
   Gruosi took the opportunity to showcase a flawless, colourless rough diamond weighing 404 ct with flawless clarity, one of the 30 largest top-quality ones ever found, and the largest found in Angola.










































































Barbara Palvin, Izabel Goulart, Lucky Blue Smith, Natasha Poly shine at Festival de Cannes for day 7

Lucire staff/9.47


Pascal Le Segretain


The Festival de Cannes’ seventh day saw the premières of Julieta, directed by Pedro Almodovar, and Personal Shopper, starring Kristen Stewart. But all eyes were on the fashion again at the Palais des Festivals: Natasha Poly and Lara Stone represented L’Oréal Paris, with the Russian model wearing a Prada pink, black and gold strapless gown with bow detail and jewellery by de Grisogono, and the Dutch model also choosing Prada, with a cream gown accessorized with Repossi jewels.
   Barbara Palvin returned for her second year representing L’Oréal Paris, wearing a Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini spring–summer 2016 V-neck gown with ruffled sleeves, Izabel Goulart wore a Ralph & Russo spring–summer 2016 haute couture nude silk satin chiffon robe with pleated godets over a beaded blush pink bustier, with jewellery by de Grisogono and shoes by Giuseppe Zanotti; Karlie Kloss donned a Louis Vuitton long-sleeve sequinned gown; and Luma Grothe wore a sheer Patricia Bonaldi gown with Montblanc jewellery. Lucky Blue Smith, completing the ensemble of L’Oréal Paris spokeswomen on day seven, wore Yves Saint Laurent.
   Also spotted at the Cannes Film Festival were Adriana Lima wore a Prada gown with Chopard earrings from the company’s haute joaillerie collection, Petra NÄ›mcová wore a Saffiya spring–summer 2016 gown with Giuseppe Zanotti sandals and Chopard jewels; and Cindy Bruna wore Zac Posen with jewels by Chopard.



































May 18, 2016

Sonam Kapoor outshines celebs on Cannes’ day 6; Xiao Wen Ju, Lena Meyer-Landrut, Grażyna Torbicka show global style

Lucire staff/14.59




Stephane Cardinale/Corbis; Venturelli; Andreas Rentz

Sonam Kapoor chose a Ralph & Russo column gown with a feathered cape and train for day 6 on the red carpet at the Festival de Cannes, for the première of Loving. Once again, L’Oréal Paris make-up artists went for a natural look for Kapoor, with the Superstar mascara (in Red Carpet), the Super Liner (in So Couture) and the Cushion Nude Magique foundation in Porcelaine: if you look good in it, why change it? They varied her L’Oréal Paris Color Riche eye-shadow to a Lilas Chéri shade, while the lipstick was another natural Color Riche shade, no. 231. Her jewellery was from Bulgari Haute Joaillerie, with a necklace comprising 16 diamonds.
   Fellow ambassador Xiao Wen Ju (appearing for the French cosmetics’ giant for the first time) wore a cobalt blue Azzedine Alaïa dress with transparent effects, and excitedly told her 200,000 Instagram followers about the experience; German singer Lena Meyer-Landrut wore Yves Saint Laurent to the première and showed a lot of thigh; and actress Grażyna Torbicka wore a stylish gown by Tomasza OssoliÅ„ski. La La Anthony wore a Gauri & Nainika gown with a de Grisogono Melody of Colours ring.









May 6, 2016

In brief: Paula Sweet releases new book; Kardashians and Jenners mobbed by paparazzi; Cannes controversies

Lucire staff/10.25


Many of you have enjoyed Paula Sweet’s photography in Lucire, and now you can have an entire volume of her work with her new book, Do Not.
   Paula has caught signs all over our planet during her travels, and asks in the synopsis, ‘In a world of limitation and regulation, how aware are you of the restrictions placed on your own existence?’
   The premise is an excellent one that encourages us to think: ‘In this collection of signs discovered all over Planet Earth, the artist and photographer Paula Sweet documents the shrinking area of personal freedom and encourages us to rethink the contrary: if a sign is to be placed, should it not encourage us to some productive or positive action?’
   Lucire readers can enjoy a 40 per cent discount for a limited time (US$39·56, marked down from US$65·94), commencing early May 2016, if you use this link here.
   Meanwhile, in the celebrity world, this latest compilation from Celebrity Wire shows how manic things are—and we don’t think there’s much personal freedom for some of these 2016 “names”. Except it isn’t signs restricting their freedom, but a gauntlet of paparazzi. Kanye West and Kim Kardashian, Kendall Jenner and Kris Jenner are seen and photographed leaving homes and heading into clubs and restaurants; “it” couple Katy Perry and Orlando Bloom head into a waiting cab; new Calvin Klein fragrance face and rising actress Margot Robbie left her apartment; and Emma Roberts had lunch, and a dozen followed her home. Surprisingly, Justin Bieber kept a low profile as he walked through LAX, while Christina Applegate gave a thumbs-up but obscured the lower part of her face as she left the terminal. It’s definitely not the life, thank you!
   In our second video, Jane Fonda speaks about the second season of Grace and Frankie at the Netflix première. She notes that during the course of the new season, Grace realizes Frankie is good for her, and they become friends.
   Finally, with the Festival de Cannes about to kick off, Cover looks at five recent controversies to hit the event.


Celebritywire


Celebritywire


Cover

May 4, 2016

Royal New Zealand Ballet’s The Wizard of Oz: a family-friendly feast

Jack Yan/14.29



Ross Brown

I truly hope Francesco Ventriglia’s The Wizard of Oz will be performed all over the world, because this family-friendly ballet has all the ingredients for first-time and seasoned watchers alike. What we saw at the world première tonight in Wellington were skilful dancing, moments of contemplation, beautiful staging and design, and a masterful matching to the music of Francis Poulenc.
   Based on the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, rather than the 1939 MGM film, The Wizard of Oz, audiences are helped by the familiar storyline, which is common to both. Ventriglia keeps the basic idea but takes some different parts from the book compared to the well known film, and in the adaptation to a ballet enhances certain scenes. The structure is of a classical ballet, as are many of the dance moves, including some neatly executed lifts and catches in two pas de deux in Act II, between the Prince and Princess of Porcelain (William Fitzgerald and Laura Jones on opening night), and the Wizard (Fitzgerald again) and Dorothy (Lucy Green).
   Ventriglia forgoes the cyclone in favour of a simpler Dorothy in hospital with a coma, watched over by her Uncle Henry (Sir Jon Trimmer), but once she is deposited in the land of the Munchkins, you know that the action has started. The use of this device is very personal to Ventriglia, and can be traced back to when he was five years old in Genova, when he noticed that a girl in isolation in a children’s hospital had gone from her bed one day. His mother told him that she had gone to the Emerald City in the Land of Oz.
   A blue sky backdrop links each scene with Dorothy, and on its first appearance in Act I, lights up one’s mood. Gianluca Falaschi, The Wizard of Oz’s designer, approaches the set with both creativity and sensibility. Doors open up revealing different scenes behind the sky set, depending on the context, but it works well, giving the stage additional depth. Watch out for both the Emerald City, which borders on a bright discothèque—and no, there are no shades of 1974’s film The Wiz here—and the Kingdom of Porcelain, which is revealed in the second act. There is one beautiful touch near the close of the second act where the Wizard offers to take Dorothy away, but the fear of revealing spoilers prevent me from telling you just what Falaschi has created.
   The costumes deserve extra mention. Glinda, the Witch of the North, danced by Abigail Boyle with plenty of movements en pointe, sparkled with a bright white costume that featured 1,000 sequinned butterflies, giving her an other-worldliness; this contrasted Dorothy’s simpler farm dress that Falaschi says took its cue from the film. Dorothy’s multiple costume changes—her "saucer tutu" for the Porcelain scene, for instance—hint at the chequered pattern of her original dress, so audiences are clear that Green is dancing in the same role. The Witch of the West (Mayu Tanigaito) only has the Flying Monkeys for her allies in this version, but she enters the stage looking sinister, her outfit having connections to more adult themes but considerably toned down for a family audience. The Flying Monkeys, meanwhile, are bare-chested but masked while they are under her spell, wearing large, black skirts. Elaborate, dominating movements convey their evil intent, while the chandeliers and prison cage on the set contrast with the simplicity of the blue sky of Dorothy’s world.
   Scarecrow (Loughlan Prior) deserves additional mention since he is the first character to follow Dorothy and, therefore, has a greater role on stage; Prior’s floppy, soft movements convey his character’s construction neatly. Tin Man (Massimo Margaria)’s metallic detailing on his outfit wasn’t as easily seen and almost looked as though he was wearing a body colour, but thankfully this newer interpretation allowed the ballerino much freer movement. Jacob Chown got into his Lion character from his first moment on stage, right through to when he took a bow.
   Felipe Domingos, as the Guardian of the Emerald City cut a distinctive figure with his flowing movements, and shone in his first scene; Harry Skinner’s Yellow Cat, chasing after the mice played by Linda Messina and Tonia Looker, was a particularly likeable comedic performance (though one wonders why the cat is bigger than the dog: Toto is a stuffed toy in this version). Watch out, too, for a tap-dancing scene as Green dons red shoes instead of the Silver Shoes from the book.
   Falaschi is inspired by 1930s bathing costumes, flapper dresses and cloches, and a bellhop’s uniform for the Guardian, all of which he works in to give The Wizard of Oz, a visual feel that is its own. In all, 37 new costumes were created for the production.
   Jason Morphett’s lighting was particularly clever, as Falaschi’s box set forced him to use lights in the corner. He based his concepts on Poulenc’s music, which lent itself well to visuals thanks to its lyrical nature. I tend to find lyrical scores can paint a scene better than those founded on sound effects, and the compilation of various Poulenc compositions, compiled by RNZB pianist Michael Pansters from two dozen recordings, worked well as a complete ballet. Ventriglia calls the score ‘very cinematic,’ and that seems a very apt description.
   As detailed in our preview, the ballet began life as an unperformed, single-act ballet, which Ventriglia first conceived when artistic director of Maggio Danze in Firenze. There is an additional meaning here, as Ventriglia, who hails from Italy, has had to ask himself just what ‘home’ means, as Dorothy had to discover: ‘My conclusion is that home is where you feel grounded and comfortable within yourself,’ he writes in the programme. ‘For me that place is the dance studio.’
   The work, he writes, has been adapted to the dancing style of the company and the new inspirations he has found in New Zealand since his arrival a year and a half ago.
   The Wizard of Oz achieves its aim of being a big-story ballet that appeals to everyone, and audiences will be delighted at this latest production.
   The Ryman Healthcare Season of The Wizard of Oz kicks off in Wellington on May 4, and will visit nine centres around New Zealand: Christchurch, Invercargill, Dunedin, Blenheim, Rotorua, Auckland, Palmerston North, and Napier. Further information can be found at the Royal New Zealand Ballet website, www.rnzb.org.nz.—Jack Yan, Publisher


Next Page »

 

Get more from Lucire

Our latest issue

Lucire 35
Check out our lavish print issue of Lucire in hard copy or for Ipad or Android.
Or download the latest issue of Lucire as a PDF from Scopalto

Lucire on Twitter
Lucire on Instagram