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November 25, 2016

Smooth operator: hair removal with Veet’s Sensitive Precision Beauty Styler

Cecilia Xu/22.49

Women are often concerned about hair removal on sensitive areas of their body such as their face, which needs more gentle treatment, thus subtracting the option to treat these areas the same way as they would with other parts of their body. Research has shown that ‘Many women feel a stigma about shaving their face, and believed that shaving hair makes it grow back faster and thicker,’ Veet’s senior consumer marketing manager Emma Smith says.
   Veet’s Sensitive Precision Beauty Styler provides the solution to this, as it is super-gentle on the skin, making hair removal on any sensitive areas easy and safe. Gone are the days of needing multiple tools to stay hair and fuzz-free. Veet’s Beauty Styler is an all-in-one portable, handbag-friendly tool developed to provide women with a quick, effective and pain-free hair removal option, handy and easy to use for touch-ups, and effortlessly trimming and shaping facial, underarm and bikini hair.
   To facilitate precise shaping and styling, the Beauty Styler comes with multiple interchangeable heads: these include a two-headed trimmer for optimum eyebrow shaping and miscellaneous facial hair trimming, and a 20 mm trimmer head for underarms and bikini line.
   Veet takes smooth skin to a whole new level with the introduction of the Precision Beauty Styler and is now available from leading supermarkets and pharmacies, RRP NZ$49·99. Veet also invites users to share their successful use of the Precision Beauty Styler on social media, hashtagging #smoothoperator.—Cecilia Xu

November 20, 2016

Celebrity Connected: a platform for the “green party”

Elyse Glickman/6.20




Elyse Glickman

After an intense, divisive US presidential season, and its controversial aftermath, Californians were ready to kick off award show season. Celebrity Connected not only got the party started, but provided some much needed pre-Christmas comfort and joy to greet the Hollywood creative community. The W Hollywood became a Garden of Eden, filled with a bumper crop of organic vegan goodies, non-dairy frozen treats, comfy weekend wear, interesting vaping inventions, yoga goods, and plants that could be planted in yards to further green up one’s neighboUrhood.

The Children’s Hour
Bears for Humanity founder Vijay Prathap spread a little early Yuletide cheer, distributing US-made Santa Bears to get his point across about the company’s multi-tiered charitable efforts. The 100 per cent certified organic, global Fair Trade elements of the bear are brought together by at-risk women looking to expand their career opportunities through the welfare-to-work programme. With every bear purchased, another bear is given to a child in need in communities throughout the country.
   There were also all-ages fashion and skin care (with lots of mother-and-daughter teamwork) served up by Royal & Reese, Swag-Eez and Sistah Buttah, as well as yoga hear from Karma and Soul. Pre-teen entrepreneurs Angels & Tomboys showed off their Shark Tank-winning, rock-inspired body sprays (including Purple Rain, a tribute to Prince reminding one of the grape soda we all loved as kids).

Green days
Although the overall progressive agenda now hangs in the balance with a conservative government coming to power in 2017, the fight to make cannabis legal in several states—including California—has moved in the right direction. Adults over 18 could sign up with MediCann doctors on the spot for paperwork that provided three months of access to dispensaries. In the immediate, they could sample several innovative products incorporating medical marijuana, cannabis, and hemp.
   Hemp Kitchen offered a Medicine Chest package through their delivery service with a variety of foods and treatment products addressing pain relief, headaches and other ailments. Chef Mike was on hand to explain how enjoy the products and the nutritional components of the goods. The Art of Edibles Cannabis Collective and To Whom It May provided chocolate aficionados with gorgeously wrapped gourmet truffles, and generous gifts from VQase and Hawaiian Vape provided extra flavour and fun for those partaking in the popular cigarette alternative.
   Souly Vegan of Oakland served substantial sustenance, while Justin’s nutty goodies added sweet relief to mid-day hunger pangs and Cocorilla had coconut water as nature intended—in its original shell. Pure indulgence was doled out by Street Churos (a food truck with a charitable element), Kokolato gelato and Yoga-urt.

Other things that rocked
Stand-out items included hand-crafted natural stone statement jewellery and minaudière handbags from Ann Ong, Rocking the Clock’s repurposed musical instrument home décor clocks and accents, and Cordcruncher, which promises to eliminate tangled earbuds once and for all. A great travel essential I look forward to trying is MAI Couture’s passport case, which can be filled with easy to use, unbreakable, and mess-proof papers with blush, bronzer, and foundation.

Finds beyond the suite
Around the same time as this suite, we found some other good products worth noting. Eufora Curl ’N is one of the best curl-defining sprays for finer hair texture going. All the definition and spring without sticky stuff weighing down hair.
   EC/BC recently rolled out its TSA-friendly backpacks and briefcases. Though the designs are unisex, these carry-on items make a statement in terms of fuss-free travel that help sort out (literally) anything that may stop a law-abiding citizen in the security line. The Barceló Hotel Group (known for its Caribbean and Mexican resorts) is also expanding its reach into Cuba, Costa Rica and other hot destinations, figuratively and literally.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor
















Elyse Glickman

November 16, 2016

Skilful execution by tomorrow’s stars at New Zealand School of Dance’s 2016 Graduation Season

Jack Yan/11.39




Stephen A’Court

Above, from top: Meistens Mozart. An excerpt from Political Mother. Pas de deux from The Sleeping Beauty.

The New Zealand School of Dance’s Graduation Season once again brings an expertly executed programme, mixing genres from classical to modern to experimental. Among the programme tonight were three premières: Helgi Tomasson’s Meistens Mozart was performed for the first time in New Zealand, while Amber Haines’s Incant and Jiři Bubeniček’s Dance Gallantries received their world premières on opening night of the season at Te Whaea.
   Meistens Mozart started the evening and showed that, with the right arrangement and choreography, the German language could be made cheerful. Songs by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf, Bernhard Flies and Jakob Haibel, sung by the Tölzer Boys’ Choir, accompanied the six dancers, the standout of whom was George Liang. Liang had previously been at Canada’s National Ballet School, and we had seen him perform last month at the Republic of China’s National Day celebration. There were no opening-night jitters from any of the six, who instantly transported us to an alpine society, celebrating springtime love, courtship and playfulness.
   The all-male He Taonga—a Gift was an energetic and intense performance where drumbeats from Whirimako Black’s ‘Torete te Kiore’ soundtrack sparked sudden moves, a demonstration of control and strength from the 14 dancers. Choreographed by Taiaroa Royal and Taane Mete, He Taonga was created for the School in 2009 and reprised tonight.
   Opening the second section, Laura Crawford and Yuri Marques were like delicate dolls in their pas de deux from The Sleeping Beauty, Act III, with the choreography after Marius Petipa. Marilyn Rowe, OBE staged and coached, while Qi Huan was répétiteur. This was a tough ballet piece to get right and the pair got stronger as they performed, gaining confidence and drawing us into their romance.
   Taking a complete tangent into modern dance was the solo performance of Glitch, a new work from NZSD tutor Victoria Columbus, whose talents we most recently saw at the World of Wearable Art, where she serves as director of choreography. The movements themselves were created by graduate Connor Masseurs, who performed the dance, playing the part of a “glitching” robotic man short-circuiting on stage with skilful, shuddering movements. Masseurs completely absorbed us with his solo: it wasn’t just his limbs that Masseurs controlled, he extended the idea to facial movements, inventively finding new ways to glitch. Masseurs first performed the dance at the Grand Théâtre at the Maison de la Culture de Tahiti as part of a gala at the Académie de Danse Annie Fayn.
   Incant was mysterious, brooding, and ethereal: this all-female work saw dancers come together to generate new shapes, conveying to us notions of clouds, trees in a forest, or tunnels, at times passing a lit sphere between them. Haines’s choreography was meant to question traditional notions of beauty and got us successfully focusing on the collective moves of the dancers. ‘This world,’ she notes in the programme, ‘invokes a mesmerizing state of collective consciousness and celebrates the power and luminous beauty of shared intention.’ A captivating work, it ended the second set of dances.
   Dance Gallantries was another more traditional work, with 10 dancers telling more playful stories of romance, complemented by Otto Bubeniček’s colourful costume design and solo violin music by J. S. Bach.
   A group of 12 performed an extract from Political Mother, the evening’s one political work with jarring music and clever choreography by Hofesh Shechter. A couple merrily folk-dances in a town square, happy to be part of their society, but are they genuinely happy or manipulated by the state? Their expressions seem to suggest the latter, fooled into believing that all is well and happy in their naïveté. The action moves on to a prison, where the music is muffled and dancers ape being restrained by either arms or ankles. The final scene, with a large group of dancers back in the town, show that the entire society has succumbed to the illusion, raising their arms in acceptance. It makes you question about the times we live in, and whether intellectual discourse is suppressed in favour of simpler ideas, a population told to be happy without really knowing why.
   Finally, Tchaikovsky’s music from The Nutcracker was excerpted for the upbeat Tempo di Valse, with the NZSD returning to a ballet to finish the evening. The ‘Waltz of the Flowers’ was instantly recognizable, the 15 dancers showing classical movements. Nadine Tyson choreographed, while the colourful traditional costumes were designed by Donna Jefferis.
   Depending on the show, the pas de deux from The Sleeping Beauty may be replaced by Jack Carter’s Pas de deux romantique, with music by Rossini; while Glitch may give way to The Wanderer, choreographed by Columbus and perforned by Liang.
   The season runs from November 16 to 26 at Te Whaea in Wellington, New Zealand, with prices ranging from NZ$18 to NZ$33. Tickets can be booked at the New Zealand School of Dance, or online at nzschoolofdance.ac.nz/book-tickets. We’d rate it another must-see, especially to catch some rising stars—we understand that some are off overseas, already snatched up by dance companies.—Jack Yan, Publisher

November 8, 2016

A golfing summer: Lydia Ko and well known Kiwis team up as golf ambassadors

Cecilia Xu/15.15


New Zealand is once again promoting women’s golf this November, as Kiwi Lydia Ko herself returns as one of seven high-profile She Loves Golf ambassadors. Also back are Toni Street, Laura McGoldrick and Jamie Curry, this year joined by She Loves Golf newbies Matilda Rice and Daisy Dagg. With a month of activities, Lucire readers can again be part of a giveaway, with a total value of over NZ$800, as part of the She Loves Golf campaign (hashtagged #shelovesgolf).
   The spokeswomen will be documenting their personal golf experiences via their own blogs and social media channels, inspiring other budding young Lydia Kos to grab a friend and go play some golf!
   There are pop-up events to take place in Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington during November. The website at www.lovegolf.co.nz shows what activities women can participate in nationally, as well as gear they can buy and prizes they can win. Clubs are running their own events and offers, all of which can be found on the website.
   All you need to do to be in to win the following prize pack is to like our Facebook page and the post where we mention #shelovesgolf: on top of the golf introductory lessons, there are plenty of goodies. We’re only shipping to New Zealand addresses, and we’ll take entries till the end of November. We’ll draw one name from the likers. Enter now—and enjoy your next round of golf on us!—Cecilia Xu

Prize pack contents
• Caffe L’Affarè: two bags of L’Affare’s Gusto Fair Trade organic coffee, a copy of How to Make Really Good Coffee, and a KeepCup Brew
• Maybelline New York: Falsies Push-Up mascara, Master Precise curvy eyeliner, Master Fix setting spray, Vivid Matte Liquid Lip in Possessed Plum, Vivid Matte Liquid Lip in Fuchsia Ecstasy, Master Contour palette (medium)
• OSM: four six-pack boxes, four twin packs, a bag of each of cranberry and apricot bites, an OSM postcard pack and two bonus Cookie Time Original Chocolate Chip Cookies
• OVI Hydration: four bottles (watermelon, citrus, berry and peach) and a dual compact speaker
• Essano: “treat your skin” pack with rosehip cleanser, moisturizer, body lotion, rosehip oil and night cream
• Aloe Up: Pro Ultra Sport SPF 30 sunscreen stick, Pro Ultra Sport SPF 30 sunscreen lotion, Pro Ultra Sport SPF 50 sunscreen lotion, White Collection for the face (SPF 25), Pro Ultra Sport SPF 15 lip ice and Aloe Kote SPF 25
• Anti-Flamme: pack of 90 g bottles of five essential sports rubs and K6·0 tape
• Institute of Golf voucher for a one-on-one 30-minute golf lesson
The Cut and World magazines: magazine and 12-month subscription to both titles
• Srixon: a dozen golf balls
• Hertz upgrade voucher
• LoveGolf bucket hat
• She Loves Golf golf tees

November 6, 2016

Olga Lomaka’s Artefacts: west meets east at Saatchi Gallery

Lucire staff/22.07




ValmonS Photography

For a short period, the Saatchi Gallery has been transformed into a temple with not just one, but a series of Buddhas. Each one of them has been “dressed up” into somewhat inappropriate attire, symbolizing the obsessive consumerist society we live in. From recognizable brands to modern-day icons to symbols instantly recognized by the millennials, the Buddhas silently, without judgement, point out how engrossed we all are into disconnecting from our spiritual selves and consuming more and more physical and digital content.
   Renowned London-based artist Olga Lomaka is presenting her latest exhibition, Artefacts. The leitmotif of the Artefacts is the clash of contemporary western and ancient eastern civilizations. It contrasts the principles of consumer society, its cultural and technological obsession, with the peacefulness and profoundness of Buddhism, the major religion of the east.
   ‘The project is ambiguous: I do not expect the viewer to make a choice, or to draw any dichotomies between cultures and notions,’ says Lomaka. Artefacts is a collision of tradition and spiritualism with what most of us see as being important here and now—the latest gadget, the latest trend. ‘I believe that only a harmonious balancing of these two attitudes can propel us out of the current “confrontation” between them. The wisdom of traditional past will help us advance on the path of our spiritual evolution,’ adds the artist.
   The concept of Artefacts may have surprised many but it certainly didn’t make the guests of Saatchi Gallery leave without questioning their values. Some of the Buddhas have travelled with Olga Lomaka to the prestigious Art Monaco fair where the she has been granted the Best Artist award. Some of the other Buddhas, including Fashion Guru, Miss Universe and Super Buddha were chosen to represent the artist at the Biennale of Contemporary Art in Firenze in 2017, where you could view them and ponder what is important to you. After all, there is never a wrong time to question your beliefs, right?—Elina Lukas, Correspondent



















ValmonS Photography, Erik Erxon, Deivydas Lekavicius

October 20, 2016

Lupita Nyong’o, Iman, Charli XCX, Elizabeth Olsen attend Kenzo × H&M launch, directed by Jean-Paul Goude

Lucire staff/7.08




Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com

Hennes & Mauritz launched its collaboration with Kenzo at Pier 36 in New York on Wednesday, with a fashion show directed by the legendary Jean-Paul Goude.
   Attending celebrities included Rosario Dawson, Iman, Lupita Nyong’o, Chloë Sevigny, Elizabeth Olsen, Charli XCX, and Chance the Rapper.
   The new collection, dubbed Kenzo × H&M, is the latest in a long line of designer collaborations that began with Karl Lagerfeld in 2004.
   H&M’s idea of accessible luxury takes the classic, iconic styles from leading designers, making them available for a mass-market audience. Kenzo × H&M has been designed by Kenzo’s own Carol Lim and Humberto Leon.
   The all-dancing and playful spectacular featured a remix of ‘Express Yourself’ by Sam Spiegel, choreography by Ryan Heffington, and a performance by rapper Ice Cube to top the night off.
   In a release, Lim and Leon stated, ‘Tonight was a celebration of everything we love about Kenzo × H&M—it was a fun, vibrant and unexpected celebratory mix of different worlds coming together. It was a show we will never forget.’
   ‘The launch of Kenzo × H&M was truly spectacular. It was amazing to see the collection come to life with all its incredible print, colour and energy. It was such an honour to have Jean-Paul Goude direct the show and he captured the mood perfectly,’ said Ann-Sofie Johansson, H&M’s creative adviser.
   The new collection hits 250 H&M stores globally and online on November 3.








Neilson Barnard; Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com

October 17, 2016

Royal New Zealand Ballet’s ’17 line-up: triple Academy Award winner James Acheson designs for Romeo and Juliet

Lucire staff/0.01



Ross Brown

Top: The Royal New Zealand Ballet’s Carmen, premièring on February 16, 2017. Above: A new version of Romeo and Juliet, premièring on August 16.

Royal New Zealand Ballet artistic director Francesco Ventriglia has announced his second full season for the company, kicking off 2017 with Two Ballets by Roland Petit: Carmen with L’Arlésienne, premièring in Christchurch. Both have scores by Georges Bizet: Carmen was composed for the opéra comique in 1875 before Petit adapted it into a ballet in 1949; Petit created the ballet for L’Arlésienne in 1974, using the score originally composed for the play. They have been performed internationally, though not in New Zealand till the RNZB performances running from February 16 to April 1 in eight centres.
   The RNZB will perform three of Alexander Ekman’s works—Cacti, Tuplet and Episode 31—in a full programme from May 17 to June 15, in Wellington, Auckland, Napier, Christchurch, and Dunedin. For Cacti, the RNZB will be joined by the New Zealand String Quartet.
   The pièce de résistance for 2017 will be the Ryman Healthcare Season of Romeo and Juliet, in a new version by Ventriglia. Using the score by Sergei Prokofiev from 1935, the new work features set and costume design by three-time Academy Award winner James Acheson (The Last Emperor, Dangerous Liaisons, Restoration) working on his first ballet. Working with Auckland Live, the RNZB will offer a live audio description of this ballet for blind and visually impaired patrons on September 3. The season kicks off August 16 and runs till September 24, reaching nine centres.
   Ventriglia said in a release, ‘Not only does this bold programme celebrate international talents like France’s greatest-ever choreographer Roland Petit and the contemporary genius of Alexander Ekman, it’s also about creating great art here in New Zealand with a new version of Romeo and Juliet. The talented dancers of the RNZB and I look forward to bringing you another year of world class productions. See you at the theatre.’
   Executive director Frances Turner added, ‘It’s a big and beautiful year which will take the incredible artists of the RNZB around New Zealand for 70 performances in 16 cities and towns. We are proud to be taking the highest quality art to the widest possible audience.’
   The RNZB will help the New Zealand School of Dance, its official school, celebrate its 50th anniversary with a season in Wellington on November 24–5, while Tutus on Tour with Ballet in a Box return to the regions through the year.
   More information can be found at the RNZB website.

October 16, 2016

New York celebrates with Wine and Food Festival and GBK’s Thank-You Lounge

Lola Cristall/23.41





Above: Celebrities at the GBK NYCWFF Thank-You Lounge, including Emeril Lagasse, Whoopi Goldberg, and Ayesha Curry.

The New York City Wine and Food Festival (NYCWFF) earlier this week embraced haute cuisine and easy cooking techniques. While celebrating good food and delectable drinks, the complete net proceeds benefited Food Bank for New York City and No Kid Hungry. The whole city transforms into an absolute food escapade throughout the week. Celebrity chefs hosted major culinary events: Lucky Chopsticks, hosted by James Beard Award-winning culinary personality Andrew Zimmerman, was filled with two floors worth of delectable Asian foods. The venue took guests to an elegant, Asian-like atmosphere. For French flair, Midnight in Paris, hosted by James Beard Award-winning pastry chef Dominique Ansel, also known for his creative cronut creation, presented guests an exclusive dessert-tasting event.
   GBK’s NYCWFF Thank-You Lounge is another hot-spot. The Guittard Chocolate Company offers a delectable array of chocolates, whether dark with a fruity aftertaste or milky with a more subtle texture. Warther Cutlery is a perfect fit for any kitchen, with an easy-to-hold grip and a perfectly sharp blade. Lipper International has a wide range of functional wood-made designs to choose from. Wood is a recurring theme for kitchen décor: Boos Block beautifully brings the look back to the home with their flawless range of counter-tops and cutting-boards. The more than a century-old brand continues to present textured wood pieces that easily fit into any culinary environment. TriDerma MD presented guests with naturally made skin products that include organic alœ vera as the star ingredient to ensure healing and rejuvenating.—Lola Cristall, Paris Editor

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