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Automobili Pininfarina completes first high-speed tests for Battista electric hypercar at Nardò

Filed by Lucire staff/December 2, 2020/0.29


Mahindra & Mahindra, presently looking to offload loss-making Ssangyong, has much more glamorous cars in its sights, as the Pininfarina Battista electric hypercar nears production.
   The new car, testing at the Nardò track, aims to be the most powerful Italian sports’ car ever produced—quite a claim in a country where Maserati, Ferrari and Lamborghini were founded—with a 120 kWh battery powering four electric motors, one at each wheel, for a total of 1,900 PS and torque of 2,300 Nm. Range is expected to be 500 km.
   A fully developed prototype has completed its first high-speed test programme at Nardò under chief product and engineering officer Paolo Dellacha and test driver and vehicle dynamics’ engineer Georgios Syropoulos. This car has a complete luxury interior, and wears a disguise over its carbonfibre shell.
   The tests, on public roads and private facilities, will fine-tune and homologate the Battista.
   Syropoulos completed tests including sprints on the circular banking at Nardò’s 12·6 km ring and laps on the 6·2 km handling track.
   Dellacha said, ‘This test is an exciting moment for our clients and the team at Automobili Pininfarina as we complete another phase In the development of the most powerful Italian sports car ever made. We have undertaken extensive development using advanced simulation technology, and we can now fine-tune the calibration of Battista’s bespoke chassis and pioneering four-motor torque vectoring system on road and track.’
   Syropoulos added, ‘The phenomenal performance potential of the Battista is clear. Our clients will never have experienced acceleration like this before, yet giving them the opportunity to tailor their experience using a range of drive modes means this hypercar offers much more than just speed thrills. With a zero-emissions range of 500 km and sophisticated all-wheel-drive technology, every drive in Battista will be a pleasure.’
   The Battista features Brembo CCMR carbon–ceramic brakes, four-motor torque vectoring, an ultra-stiff carbonfibre monocoque, seamless global roaming, and over-the-air updates. Top speed will be in excess of 350 km/h with an expected 0–100 km/h time of under 2 s, faster than a current Formula 1 racing car. Automobili Pininfarina expects it will reach 300 km/h in less than 12 s. The company has also partnered with Chargepoint, giving customers complimentary charging with the firm.
   Mahindra & Mahindra licensed the Pininfarina brand name from the famed styling house, Pininfarina SpA, which will retain an ‘influential’ role over design and production. The Battista is named after Pininfarina’s founder, Battista ‘Pinin’ Farina.
   Dellacha is a veteran of Ferrari, Maserati and Alfa Romeo, while Syropoulos has focused on EVs at Lotus, Tesla and Faraday Future.
   Production at Cambiano, Italy is expected to be fewer than 150, with first deliveries in 2021.

 


Monin introduces three new flavours and recipes for summer

Filed by Lucire staff/December 1, 2020/9.42


Monin, the famous cocktail syrup brand, is introducing three new flavours for summer: its Watermelon Syrup (NZ$20·99, 700 ml), Margarita Mix (NZ$20·99, 700 ml), and Yuzu Purée (NZ$25·99, 1 ℓ). And to make them especially enticing, they’ve also created recipes for each one of them: the Watermelon Summer Cup, the Margarita Meringue cocktail, and the Yuzu Tea Ceremony, conceived by award-winning bartender Jeremy Nivern and Monin’s own mixologist, James Millar.
   The Watermelon Summer Cup brings together the new syrup with Pimm’s and limoncello; the Margarita Meringue is a fresh concoction blending the Mix with limes, orange and agave; while the Yuzu Tea Ceremony makes the best use of the Japanese citrus fruit that’s described as a cross between a lemon and a mandarin.
   Monin is available via www.grabmonin.com, and readers can use the code SUMMER10 to save 10 per cent. They can also be found on Facebook and Instagram.

Watermelon Summer Cup

Glassware
Highball

Ingredients
20 ml Monin Watermelon Syrup
30 ml Pimm’s No. 1
10 ml Domaine de Canton
10 ml Pallini Limoncello
20 ml lemon juice
2 fresh strawberries, stems removed
Splash of lemonade

Garnish
Fresh fruit: strawberry, mint, orange and watermelon

Method
   In your cocktail shaker muddle fresh strawberries, add all ingredients (except lemonade) to your cocktail shaker and shake vigorously with ice. Strain into an ice-filled highball glass, top with lemonade and garnish with mint and fresh fruit. Serve and enjoy.

Margarita Meringue

Glassware
Cocktail coupe

Ingredients
Cocktail
45 ml Jose Cuervo 1800 Coconut
30 ml lime juice
20 ml apricot brandy
Top with Monin Margarita Mix foam
300 ml Monin Margarita Mix
300 ml egg whites
   Add Monin Margarita Mix and egg white to your cream whipper (ISI or similar) and charge with a NO2 canister then shake vigorously, let rest for one minute. Charge with a second NO2 canister and again, shake vigorously. Let rest and refrigerate for one hour before use.

Garnish
Toasted Monin Margarita Mix foam
Desiccated coconut

Method
   Prepare foam. Add all ingredients to your cocktail shaker and shake vigorously with ice. Fine strain into your chilled coupe and top with chilled Monin Margarita Mix Foam. Garnish with a sprinkle of desiccated coconut before toasting to finish. Serve and enjoy.

Yuzu Tea Ceremony

Glassware
Teapot and rocks glass

Ingredients
60 ml Monin Yuzu Purée
60 ml Roku gin
20 ml mandarin Napoléon liqueur
100 ml jasmine tea
60 ml pink grapefruit juice
30 ml lemon juice

Garnish
Sakura (cherry blossom) wood smoke (optional)
Mandarin leaf

Method
   Add all ingredients to your ice-filled teapot and stir briefly. If using, smoke the teapot with cherry blossom wood smoke (optional). Pour from your teapot into your rocks glass over large-format ice. Garnish with a mandarin leaf. Serve and enjoy.

 


Two ends of the spectrum: Citroën’s facelifted C3; GMSV releases Chevrolet Silverado in RHD

Filed by Jack Yan/November 11, 2020/11.41


Two motoring releases are taking place in New Zealand this week: the first was the facelifted Citroën C3, a B-segment car that we really rate. The C3, which was first released in 2016, gets a slightly more aggressive nose, tying it in with larger models in the Citroën range. We suspect it’ll drive largely the same, which means light steering, easy manœuvrability, and reasonably good visibility (especially given today’s trend of silo-like cabins). We enjoyed the 1·2-litre triple, which the C3 retains in petrol guise here. However, Citroën tells us that there are new Advanced Comfort seats with lumbar support padding and driver’s arm reset, and more safety gear.
   It’s a sensible car in uncertain times, especially with petrol continuing to hover around the NZ$2 per litre mark—for our US readers I recently converted it to over US$5 a gallon. Lucire had the pre-facelift C3 around Auckland not too long ago and it especially made sense in urban areas. Will it do well? That’s the catch: it should, but you have to wonder about buyers as yet another crossover, with all the fuel it will consume over a comparably sized car, leaves a dealer’s forecourt.
   I must be missing something as I don’t think five bucks a gallon is cheap, unlike those who have made the Ford Ranger the nation’s top selling vehicle. Or those who have made the Toyota Hilux our number two.
   In such an environment—and I used that noun intentionally—maybe GM Special Vehicles’ Chevrolet Silverado 1500 will make perfect sense to Kiwi buyers who believe trucks are the in thing, and size is king. If everyone else is finding petrol cheap, then who am I to argue?
   The biggest pick-up truck to be sold in the country, by what’s left of General Motors down here, will be just the ticket for those who like the sound of a 6·2-litre V8 hauling around 5,000 lb (2,268 kg). Sure, I know some of you will need the 4·5-tonne towing capacity, but I’m betting more will be swayed by all the chrome and a cabin that boasts the best-in-class front head- and legroom. GMSV points out there are 31 inches of displays: digital dash, infotainment, and head-up.
   A plus for Kiwis is the fact the Silverado is here with right-hand drive, converted in Australia by Walkinshaw Automotive Group.
   What’s the bet that a lot of these Silverados are going to be sparkling clean, barely going near a payload?
   We admit we enjoyed the Holden Trailblazer when it was on test with us, for being an honest workhorse, and maybe the Silverado falls into that category. Holden’s top model last year was the Colorado, the country’s sixth best seller, in a country where pick-ups are the second-biggest segment (after 4×4 mid-sized SUVs).
   However, it’s hard not to be a little cynical in the wake of GM’s withdrawal from our market despite having the most competitive range in years—only to tell us that they pin their future on a truck more than twice the weight of the C3. Maybe the Ranger posers will have something to aspire to, no matter how often this magazine leans toward sustainability. Find your dealer at www.gmspecialtyvehicles.com.—Jack Yan, Publisher

 


Elle commemorates 75th anniversary at Chinese edition’s Style Awards

Filed by Lucire staff/October 29, 2020/21.16


Elle might not have been in China for 75 years, but as one of the few countries that has put COVID-19 largely behind it, the French magazine’s landmark anniversary was commemorated in Chengdu, along with Elle China’s Style Awards.
   The Elle China Style Awards took place at Chengdu’s New Century Global Centre, the world’s largest building as measured by floor area (1,700,000 m²), rather than in Shanghai, where it had hitherto been held. The Awards had the theme ‘Traversing the boundaries of influences’.
   The awards went to Liu Song for Photographer of the Year; Wang Ziqian for New Photographer of the Year; Zhao Jiali for Supermodel of the Year; Mao Geping for Beauty Master of the Year; and Yang Guidong and Chen Xuzhi for Designers of the Year.
   Elle China editorial director Nicole Xue also launched the magazine’s ‘Wonder Women’ project with actresses Ma Yili and Tao Hong, Olympic champion Ding Ning, lawyer Guo Jianmei, artist Xiang Jing, and ‘Beidou Goddess’ Xu Ying.
   The magazine also unveiled its 75th anniversary cover at the event.

 


A welcome return to the ballet, with RNZB’s The Sleeping Beauty

Filed by Jack Yan//12.34





Stephen a’Court

Top: Kate Kadow as Princess Aurora in The Sleeping Beauty. Above: Kate Kadow and Laurynas Vejalis as Prince Désiré. Kirby Selchow as Carabosse and Sara Garbowski as the Lilac Fairy. Kirby Selchow. Kirby Selchow and Clytie Campbell as the Queen.

How fortunate we are in Aotearoa New Zealand to be able to attend events while the world battles a pandemic, and judging by the opening night of The Sleeping Beauty at the Opera House in Wellington, audiences were more than ready to be entertained by the Royal New Zealand Ballet.
   It was a wise decision to put on a classical ballet for the end of the year, with choreography after Marius Petipa and staged by the RNZB’s artistic director Patricia Barker, with the Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky score performed by Orchestra Wellington, conducted by Hamish McKeich. This was a safe bet that would bring audiences in, and what better in 2020 than a sense of the familiar, performed by some new faces in prominent roles, and an energetic company that has been all too ready to show the country—and the world—what it has to offer.
   This was the first time Lucire has seen Kate Kadow in a lead role, that of Princess Aurora. Kadow had plenty of difficult manÅ“uvres to perform, and had to be present from Act I (or Chapter Two, as listed in the programme) through to the end. A challenging pas d’action at the end of Act I—the Rose Adagio—saw Kadow en pointe for a particularly lengthy period. This is a famous pas d’action, which Kadow carried out well, and deservedly earned a round of applause. She had similar, if not as lengthy, en pointe balances in other parts of the ballet. One hopes we will see more of this experienced American-born dancer in prominent roles with this company.
   Kirby Selchow relished the role of Carabosse, and reminded us just why so many actors—and dancers, for that matter—like the role of the villain. Audiences do take to them, and without spoiling it with specifics, her entrance was one of the grander and more entertaining ones for any baddie of late.
   Sara Garbowski, as the Lilac Fairy, might be the one to watch—though it should be mentioned that the role has been a prominent one for some time, in some cases more so than Aurora’s. It’s the Lilac Fairy that has to countermand Carabosse’s spell, and she is present from the prologue through to the end.
   Prince Désiré, performed by Lithuanian-born Laurynas Véjalis, had a wonderful grand pas de deux with Kadow in the final wedding scene, with some technically tricky steps. He made holding Kadow in his arms look effortless despite the technical difficulty and strength required.
   This was a family ballet, with any scenes that might disturb children completely toned down: Désiré’s battles with Carabosse’s minions in the forest are done with plenty of dry ice on stage, and the villains are dispatched quickly; and we must also say that the awakening of Aurora was innocently done.
   Humorous moments for the children, bearing in mind this is a two-hour, 45-minute production, include the pas de deux between Puss in Boots and the White Cat (Joshua Guillemot-Rodgerson and Leonora Voigtländer respectively). And it’s always a good lesson to not go for the bad boy, as Aurora does with the Rose Adage.
   Ballet masters Clytie Campbell, Laura McQueen Schultz and Nick Schultz assisted Barker in staging the ballet, and Michael Auer served as dramaturge.
   Donna Jeffris’s costumes were a stand-out, particularly the Queen’s sparkling gown and the use of tulle; meanwhile her work for Carabosse had a dose of drama and darkness, while Morfran’s epaulettes hinted at a certain army that terrorized Europe in the 1930s and 1940s.
   As usual, the scenic design, by Howard C. Jones, is of a particularly high standard, including the use of digital elements on a screen, such as growing vines around trees during the 100 years Aurora is asleep. Jones worked on the RNZB’s much acclaimed Giselle.
   Jones’s design also saw the use of Bodoni display type at the beginning of each chapter, explaining, in poem form, what lay ahead, making the ballet accessible to younger audience members.
   A technical glitch on opening night did see the type fail to display for the prologue, necessitating a restart with the overture performed again—the sort of minor thing that is easily forgivable after nearly a year without a ballet to attend. In fact, the audience applauded to show their understanding and appreciation.
   The child performers in the ballet added to the family touch, and their role in the garland dance was particularly well choreographed and danced.
   The Ryman Healthcare Season of The Sleeping Beauty runs from October 29 through December 12, touring nationally. Further details can be found at the RNZB website.—Jack Yan, Publisher


Ross Brown

Above: Kate Kadow as Princess Aurora in The Sleeping Beauty.

 


Campari aligns itself with cutting-edge creators in latest digital campaign

Filed by Lucire staff/October 6, 2020/11.12



Campari has launched a digital campaign, with video content, aligning itself with pioneering artists, rather than models or celebrities. The concept is ‘Red Passion’, Campari’s latest brand concept, described as ‘the urge inside us that is impossible to ignore.’
   As a brand that sees itself as visionary—it has played its part in the creation of the Negroni and the Americano—Campari has teamed up with ground-breaking artists in a series directed by Matt Lambert. The campaign was devised by Wunderman Thompson, with the films produced by Movie Magic, and digital strategy led by We Are Social.
   Participants include bartender Monica Berg, named the most influential person in her industry in 2020, who describes ‘Red Passion’ as ‘It’s a feeling, it’s a vibe, it’s not necessarily something you can force, but when you see it, you know it and you simply can’t ignore it!’
   Jamaican-born choreographer MJ Harper also features, and says of the campaign, ‘What’s interesting about it is, that depending on how it’s pushed or not pushed, you will find people who are actually active in their creativity and people who are very much passive.’
   Saxophonist Bendik Giske performs on his instrument for the campaign, while avant-garde director Margot Bowman features in the clips and worked behind-the-scenes.
   Francesco Cruciani, managing director, Italian Icons, Campari Group said, ‘With a rich legacy and history in fuelling passion and creativity, Campari constantly inspires and challenges people, encouraging them to keep their Red Passions alive in the path to creation. This was true in the time of Gaspare and Davide Campari and still is to this day, where we constantly aim to go beyond the expected. Working with director Matt Lambert to deliver his unique style and artists such as Monica, Bendik, MJ and Margot was truly eye opening as we saw Red Passion in action, front row. We want to invite everyone to follow their lead!’
   The videos hit YouTube, Campari’s website and Instagram on the 5th. More information can be found at campari.com/red-passion.

 


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