Lucire: News


September 30, 2015

Kate Hudson is the Campari calendar model for 2016, photographed by Michelangelo di Battista

Alex Barrow/11.11

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Francesco Pizzo

Kate Hudson has been announced as the 2016 model for the iconic Campari calendar. The brand belongs to the namesake Italian wine company which produces the well-known apéritif. The drink itself is a palatable combination of bitter and sweet which is drawn on in the 2016 calendar theme.
   With a relevant setting of an upcoming presidential election, Hudson embodies separate roles of bitterness and seduction versus sweetness and subtlety, a play on the taste of the Campari red wine. ‘Each month embodies the different profiles Campari embodies, alongside Kate Hudson’s incredible talent and ability to switch from approachable, welcoming and sensual to audacious and seductive,’ said Bob Kunze-Concewitz, CEO of Gruppo Campari.
   Hudson, as a Hollywood actress and entrepreneur, said that she was honoured to work with the company in creating ‘two distinctive characters embodying bitter and sweet.’
   Fashion photographer Michelangelo Di Battista, who shot Hudson for the calendar, applauded both her and the company for their artistic direction in the project: ‘Campari is a brand that has always had a clear sense of æsthetic and well defined style … Kate’s enthusiasm and ability to switch between the two personalities allowed me to create images I hope are fresh, inspiring and imaginative.’
   With the images being officially unveiled on November 18, the Italian label is maintaining its reputation for their much anticipated calendar with the prominent presence of Kate Hudson. Past stars have included Eva Green, Uma Thurman, Penélope Cruz, Salma Hayek, Milla Jovovich, Olga Kurylenko and Jessica Alba.—Alex Barrow

Michelangelo Di Battista

Francesco Pizzo

September 24, 2015

Brancott Estate launches new vintages for 2015 in limited-edition World of Wearable Art bottles

Lucire staff/23.11

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Top Into the Blue and Rosebud with Patrick Materman, Brancott Estate chief winemaker. Above The two new limited-edition Brancott Estate bottles.

With the Brancott Estate World of Wearable Art (WOW) Awards’ Show back again for 2015, the famed winemaker and naming rights’ sponsor of the event has released two limited-edition bottles along with new vintages in celebration.
   The Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2015 and South Island Pinot Noir 2014 will appear in bottles featuring two former World of Wearable Art entrants by New Zealand designers. The sauvignon blanc features Into the Blue: Māori Living in a Thermoplastic World, by Marie Gant Roxburgh, and the pinot noir features Rosebud, by Kate Hellyar.
   The new Brancott Estate Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2015 is described by the company as ‘fresh, crisp and lively’, with fruit flavours, while the South Island Pinot Noir 2014 is ‘vibrant and fruity with dark fruit and lovely textural interest.’
   ‘As winemakers, we are constantly creating new expressions of wine to enjoy and WOW is much the same through their celebration of innovative design. Together we are putting New Zealand wine and design on the world map,’ said chief winemaker Patrick Materman in a release.
   Dame Suzie Moncrieff, founder of WOW, notes, ‘The new limited-edition Brancott Estate WOW bottles are the perfect way to capture and share New Zealand wine and creativity. We’re excited to be able to bring our designers’ creations to life through these beautiful bottle designs.’
   The World of Wearable Art Awards’ Show season runs till October 11 in Wellington, New Zealand. The limited-edition WOW series for 2015 will be available for a limited time at NZ$17·29. The official hashtag for the event is #brancottestatewow.
   Lucire will have the 2015 WOW winners’ names later on Friday.

September 21, 2015

Revved up for fall: Doris Bergman’s sixth annual Emmy Style Lounge & Party

Elyse Glickman/13.16

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Elyse Glickman

Doris Bergman’s sixth annual Emmy Style Lounge & Party at West Hollywood Fig & Olive offered many of her familiar hallmarks, from a freshly prepared Mediterranean-inspired lunch (Cæsar salad, penne with shrimp, chicken with couscous) to ice cold Hint water to a bevy of respected talent (Emmy nominee Khandi Alexander [Scandal], Steven Bauer [Ray Donovan], Eric Roberts, Doris Roberts, Esai Morales, Shirley Jones, Elliott Gould, Jason Ritter, Rénée Taylor, Dot Marie Jones) and some of our favourite beauty, fashion and lifestyle products from Los Angeles and beyond.
   However, there were two new A-listers invited to the party that proved to be real showstoppers: the Maserati Ghibli and a bespoke, advanced McLaren 570S Coupe (not yet available to the public), escorted by the Auto Gallery. The regal purple 570S was as curve-hugging as the sublime Sue Wong dresses inside the restaurant courtyard, with both men and women clamouring to try the car on for size. While male celebs could consult with Art Lewin Bespoke Executive Clothiers for their Emmy look, the car’s tailoring, according to Car and Driver, includes a twin-turbo 3·8-liter V8, making 562 hp and 443 lb ft, mounted behind the driver, enabling it to hit 100 km/h in 3·2 seconds and a top speed of 328 km/h. Ceramic brakes, sequential seven-speed gearbox and an adaptive suspension round out the list of essential goodies.
   Local Fox 11 news presenter Christine Divine was also back to shine a spotlight on Wednesday’s Child, focused on placing children in the LA County foster care system in need of adoptive families. True to form, Bergman once again invited two lucky teens to experience her unique brand of the VIP treatment, in one of the most welcoming venues of pre-Emmys week.
   ‘In Los Angeles County, alone, there are over 35,000 children receiving child welfare services,’ points out social worker, Professor William Wong. ‘Gifts and monetary donations to the Wednesday’s Child Pre-Holiday Gift Drive [at this event] was overwhelming. Most importantly, the event sponsors and celebrity guests have provided examples to follow, giving the public permission to embrace our kids.’
   Single Dress and Roadkill Boutique offered casual attire for pre- and post-party lounging, while Twisted Silver offered lovely new pieces with a refined and ladylike ’50s–’60s look inspired by repurposed faux pearls, crystals and findings from the era. We also liked the new hair roots touch-up make-up from ColorWow, and were thrilled to see Kelley Weaver’s latest Purse Case designs be a hit with a crowd that could be as critical as the Shark Tank judges. Tekeen, new on the scene, is a tequila spirit infused with fresh fruit flavours such as pink grapefruit and passionfruit.
   Even with all of that star power, author Lacretia Palmer was the break-out star of the event, thanks to her charming-but-powerful children’s book Billy the Bully. While a variety of authors, including young adult novelist Judy Blume, have taken on the topic of bullying, what makes Billy the Bully effective is the fact that the bully himself is the story’s protagonist and his transformation from bully to conscientious individual is told from a first-person perspective. His steps towards redemption also shine a light on other issues, such as childhood hunger. Twiistii Hair Accessories, which have built-in wires for better staying power, were adorable, especially those with sports team prints.
   Other returning sponsors included NuBra, Personal Touch, Samiah Fine Clothing, Telic Footwear, My Saint–My Hero, Radar Watches, Model in a Bottle, My Dog Nose It and Timmy Woods Handbags.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor

Elyse Glickman

September 16, 2015

Naomie Harris, as Moneypenny, retrieves Sony’s Xperia Z5 in Spectre promotional tie-in

Lucire staff/2.50

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Ever since Moneypenny was reimagined as a former field agent in the shape of Naomie Harris, one might have wondered if she would see action again in the world of James Bond. Thanks to Sony in its new spot for its Xperia cellphone, she has, in a 60-second film that sees her retrieve the Z5 model in London on Bond’s behalf, showing that she’s not fully content sitting behind the desk outside M’s office.
   Sony, whose products are often seen used by MI6 in the James Bond films–Sony’s own connection to MGM and Columbia Pictures, the studios through which the films are released, helps—has released its promotional tie-in to help fuel the buzz for Spectre, the 24th EON Productions James Bond film starring Daniel Craig, to be released on October 26 in the UK.
   Filmed in South Bank, the spot also shows off the Sony RX100 IV camera, which captures super slow-motion footage.
   Daniel Kleinman, who has created many of the James Bond titles as the successor to “gunbarrel” designer Maurice Binder, and whose own association with Bond dates back to 1989 when he designed the music video to the theme to Licence to Kill, directed the film, through Rattling Stick. In a release, Kleinman said, ‘The campaign film truly captures the excitement of the chase, being on a mission and taking the viewer on the journey, all set against an iconic London backdrop.’ Kleinman will design the titles for Spectre.
   Harris noted, ‘London provides the perfect setting for the campaign film. Ultimately, at the centre of Bond is Britishness, so it was really important that the ad was shot here. It is not your traditional commercial; it’s an action-packed mini-movie in itself.’
   Kazuo Hirai, President and CEO, Sony Corporation added, ‘Sony has been a proud partner of the iconic Bond films since Casino Royale [2006]. While both the Xperia Z5 and RX100 IV are action-packed and full of features, they are also real, everyday-life gadgets.’
   The Sony Xperia Z5 will be available globally from October.

September 10, 2015

News in brief: British GQ hosts Men of the Year Awards; Proof eyewear arrives in New Zealand

Lucire staff/14.24

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Middle photograph by David M. Benett

British GQ hosted its 18th annual Men of the Year awards, in association with Hugo Boss, with Diageo’s Cîroc Vodka providing the cocktails and prizes of magnum bottles at the Royal Opera House event on Tuesday. Cîroc also sponsored the Solo Artist award, won by singer Sam Smith, on the same day it was announced that he would perform the next James Bond theme song, ‘Writing’s on the Wall’, for Spectre. Other guests at the event included David Gandy, Jourdan Dunn, Lewis Hamilton, James Bay, Keith Richards, Lionel Richie, Samuel L. Jackson, Elton John, Will Ferrell, Charlie Casely-Hayford, Sam Claflin, Emilia Clarke, Ella Catliff, Amber Le Bon, Yasmin Le Bon, Blur, Jason Atherton, Marc Newson, Jodie Kidd, Daisy Lowe, Erin O’Connor, Naomie Harris, Henry Holland, Nicholas Hoult, Paul Rudd and Oliver Cheshire. As well as the Cîroc cocktails (Cîroc Blue Stone, Cîroc Men of the Year and Cîroc Thyme Sour), dinner consisted of pickled beets, truffle ricotta, baby gem lettuce and pine nuts, followed by bream fillet with potato cake, marinated squid and heritage potato salsa, ending with a lemon and thyme cheesecake.
   Sustainable eyewear is in vogue now, and Idaho-based Proof eyewear is launching into the New Zealand market in time for summer. The Wood collection features sustainably sourced wood, including mahogany, walnut and bamboo; the Eco collection uses cotton-based acetate and sustainably sourced wood; and the Skate collection uses recycled Canadian maple skateboards. A portion of each sale goes to Proof’s socially responsible Do Good programme, which has provided tsunami relief in Japan, child soldier rehabilitation in Africa, and reforestation in Haïti. In 2013, Proof donated funds to build two eye clinics in India, and this year, they donated over US$12,000 in El Salvador toward community projects, and another US$12,000 went to the Nature Conservancy in Idaho. Proof’s New Zealand website is at

David M. Benett; JAB Promotions; courtesy Diageo

September 5, 2015

Maison Mumm and David Guetta collaborate in advance of Melbourne Cup and Kentucky Derby

Lucire staff/1.12

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Stephane Cardinale

Maison Mumm and David Guetta have announced their second collaboration, with the musician reimagining the classic Mumm bottle, and in November, launching a music video. Mumm says there will be a ‘digital activation’ for one of its marketing campaigns, to be released through its social networks at the beginning of October.
   Guetta’s redesigned Mumm Cordon Rouge bottle, launched at the reopening of Parisian nightclub Queen, is in platinum, intending to create a mirror effect under club lighting. The limited-edition bottle will be available in 750 ml and magnum sizes in France, Australia, UK, Italy, Spain and other markets.
   Martell Mumm Perrier-Jouët chairman and CEO César Giron hosted the event on Thursday.
   The original collaboration saw Mumm and Guetta work on the music video for his number-one track, ‘Dangerous’. The next one sees the two collaborate before two major horse-racing events where Maison Mumm is an official partner: the Melbourne Cup and the Kentucky Derby.
   The new promotion is centred around the idea of an avant-garde ‘urban horse race’, with the music video, launching November 1, supporting this concept.
   To kick off Mumm’s participation in the Melbourne Cup, Guetta is performing at the Hisense Arena on November 2, the night before the famous horse race.

Stephane Cardinale

August 20, 2015

The Royal New Zealand Ballet’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream: where talent surpasses itself

Jack Yan/16.19

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Stephen A’Court

Top Dancers Tonia Looker and MacLean Hopper in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Above Tonia Looker and Harry Skinner.

If you ever wish to see the Royal New Zealand Ballet when everyone has reached beyond what you knew was their peak, then A Midsummer Night’s Dream presents that very opportunity: a ballet where the quality is jaw-droppingly magnificent, where choreographer, designer, lighting designer, and musical director have surpassed themselves, and where the dancers have revelled in bringing a production to life.
   In tonight’s (August 20) world première, Tracy Grant Lord’s designs are the first thing you notice, a galactic image of the night sky projected on to the curtain before the action is revealed, then a set that can only be described as her best work reviewed by Lucire to date. Set in a fairy dell in the wood, Lord’s imagination takes us into a world of cabanas and fungi, with electric blue shades offsetting the dark, night sky. It is the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s largest set, complete with bridges, multiple staircases, even a pole from which Puck slides down. Lord notes that her design ‘includes particular structural, decorative and technical elements that exist only for this production, and have all been developed and manufactured in the company workshops.’ This is a unique interpretation, a master-class in ballet set design, all the more impressive when one considers that Lord had a budget to work to. She envelopes us with her world even before the dancers take their first step.
   Kendall Smith’s lighting design comes into its own with Lord’s set, keeping the cabanas’ interiors dark when unused and lighting them subtly when dancers appear. His moon, in Act II, appears as a round, fluorescent ring, emerging from behind the mesh. With Lord employing a single set for the entire ballet, Smith’s lighting gave the production a sense of variety and change throughout. We noted earlier that Smith employed 4,000 LEDs and 2,000 m of fibreoptic cable, and we can certainly say they were put to excellent use. Smith, whose résumé includes lighting for Andrea Boccelli and Luciano Pavarotti, and some of the most respected companies in the US, was flown out with the support of the US Embassy, giving another world-class aspect to A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
   Lord also stretched her imagination with the costumes, giving the initial illusion that the fairies were petite; it was only when Oberon and Titania appeared that you began realizing their true scale. Oberon’s and Puck’s costumes had a more cinematic, modern bent than seen in other interpretations of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, with the former having a plunging neckline and a science-fiction feel to it. The fairies’ wings and headgear had metallic detailing, again taking us beyond the typical dell and going past the usual, traditional elements that earlier productions tend to rely on.
   Rising star Liam Scarlett did not disappoint, either, with choreography that expresses a witty yet respectful take on the Shakespeare play. Whether it was transforming Bottom into a donkey, and his subsequent comical pas de deux with Titania, having Puck swing down à la the cinematic Tarzan to commence his antics in the second act, or the strongly romantic pas de deux between Oberon and Titania, Scarlett’s interpretation brought the Mendelssohn score to life, matching movement masterfully to music.
   The music, too, saw RNZB musical director Nigel Gaynor go further than he typically has. Mendelssohn’s score was insufficient for a full-length ballet. Gaynor and Scarlett collaborated, choosing additional Mendelssohn pieces to give the characters greater depth and the story more completeness. Various opuses have been added along with incidental music, and Mendelssohn fans will recognize them and marvel at just how well they have been incorporated, not least how fittingly the choreography has been applied. It’s this characterization which marks out Scarlett’s work. The interactions between the characters—Oberon and Puck, Titania and Bottom, Hermia and Lysander, Helena and Demetrius, and the comical pursuit by both Lysander and Demetrius toward Helena—gives the RNZB’s production exceptional entertainment value. Like its The Nutcracker of 2010, the dance techniques are rich enough for the adult ballet-goer to appreciate, while the structure and comical elements give children plenty to enjoy.
   Adding incidental music from Mendelssohn is not new—Balanchine did the same in his version—but the level of dedication is apparent.
   And all this before commenting on the dancing itself, which was exquisite.
   MacLean Hopper had the commanding nature of Oberon on opening night. Tonia Looker’s Titania had a beauty and elegance that never diminished even when dancing with a donkey, thanks to her control. However, Kohei Iwamoto arguably stole the show as Puck, with an irreverence that the audience loved. Harry Skinner’s Bottom may have had a relatively minor role but his transformation, complete with tail, ensured he was remembered. Lori Gilchrist (Hermia), Joseph Skelton (Lysander), Abigail Boyle (Helena) and Demetrius (Paul Mathews) contrasted each other’s emotions through simple movements; when both men are entranced by Helena, Boyle’s movements conveyed her shock at the energetic pursuit—accompanied by an equally energetic rejection of Hermia. Scarlett was never too clever for his own good: he kept to the story and the score, and delivered through the characters in subtle ways, a sign of a choreographer who works in close collaboration with his dancers.
   It was a privilege to see A Midsummer Night’s Dream in Wellington as a world première; after its New Zealand tour (which runs till September 20), it will next be performed by the Queensland Ballet, with whom the RNZB co-produced, in 2016.
   The Vodafone season of A Midsummer Night’s Dream runs through August 23 in Wellington; Christchurch sees the ballet from August 27 to 29; it opens in Auckland on September 2, running to September 6. It reaches Rotorua for a single performance on September 10, Palmerston North on September 16, and Napier on September 19 and 20. Full details can be found at—Jack Yan, Publisher

Top Promotional image for A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Above Forget retro: the sketch for Oberon’s costume.

August 18, 2015

Fan Phenomena: James Bond gives 007 fans more; while Sugoi invites you to the world of Bill Murray

Jack Yan/12.09

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In the year of a new James Bond movie, many books emerge. Invariably, there’ll be one on the films themselves, taking readers through the 50-plus years of the Eon Productions’ series, and, if it’s very comprehensive, the 1950s CBS TV version of Casino Royale, the 1967 spoof of the same name, and Never Say Never Again will rate more than a mention. There’ll be something about Ian Fleming, and another book on one aspect of the Bond world (gadgets, stunts, music, or something else). Seasoned Bond fans will think the circus is in town again, because the new book about the films adds little to their existing knowledge.
   Claire Hines’s Fan Phenomena: James Bond, from Intellect Books (£15·50, US$22, releasing November 15), is something different altogether: Bond from an academic and completely cultural viewpoint. Intellect is famous for its titles on popular culture and creative practice, with a rigorous academic bent, and Fan Phenomena: James Bond continues the series but takes the reader into the world of Ian Fleming’s super-spy.
   Hines serves as editor, and there are 11 very distinct contributions to her volume, dealing with everything from canonicity to 007’s appearance as ‘Ladykiller Jimmy’ in Alan Moore’s comics; Bond as a cult brand and cultural phenomenon to the clothes he wears; from the James Bond films through a feminist viewpoint to analyses of his masculinity and identity. Interspersed between these are four ‘Fan Appreciation’ sections, featuring an interview with über-fan and former Bond novel continuation author Raymond Benson, artist and collector Peter Lorenz, 007 Museum owner James Bond (who had his name legally changed by deed poll) and cross-players CousinCecily and Winter.
   Even the most seasoned Bond fan might not have considered the impact of the character, books and films, and the book fulfils a very important role: it gives them something new. William Proctor’s analysis of continuity gets the book off to a healthy start after Hines’s introduction, though typographically it suffers: the type is inexplicably small, though the layout is modern and the visuals help lift things. Getting Raymond Benson in there early on also helps position Fan Phenomena: James Bond as a book for the cognoscenti as well as those who want an academic examination, and Benson reveals a little more behind the scenes of his years as the official continuation author.
   Matthew Freeman, in considering the many media in which Bond occupies, including the gaming world, shows just how the phenomenon breaks the established rules and succeeds, while Jesús Jiménez-Varea and Antonio Pineda’s chapter on Moore’s comics is bound to take many fans into uncharted territory. Joshua Wille’s chapter on fan edits does the same: while many know about ABC-TV’s cutting of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service when it aired on US TV, but there are numerous fan edits made in the digital era that had this author hunting the forums.
   Artist Peter Lorenz’s Bond film posters are stunning and present a nice visual break before Lucy Bolton’s chapter analysing the phenomenology of Bond. Bolton’s piece is perhaps closest to those Bond “collectable” books that come out with the films as she analysed the films from Dr No to Skyfall, and fans may have their own interpretations of their cultural significance through the years. Editor Hines’s own chapter looks at Bond as cult brand, and is fascinating in her study of the 1960s Eon films. Hines reconciles how cult and mainstream come together with the Bond series, successfully. Lisa Funnell gives Bond a feminist slant and the enjoyment she derives as an assistant professor teaching women’s studies.
   Stephanie Jones looks at the Bond lifestyle but primarily through the analysis of one work, The Complete James Bond Lifestyle Seminar, which she reveals is relatively light on Bond references, leading to a less satisfying chapter—though it could hardly be blamed on Jones. Llewella Burton’s chapter on Bond and fashion, and how it became a style through the rise of merchandising as the movies became blockbusters with Goldfinger is punctuated by photos from Galeries Lafayette as it opened a James Bond boutique in 1965, again gold dust for Bond fans. Karen Brooks’s and Lisa Hill’s chapter analyses the new and old masculinities through the three Daniel Craig films of 2006, 2008 and 2012.
   Crossplayers CousinCecily and Winter talk about their love of James Bond and Q, leading neatly on the final chapter by Elizabeth J. Nielsen, which deals with Bond’s homoerotic moments and subtexts. She traces them to Fleming himself in the torture scene in Casino Royale, before covering the flirting between Bond and the new Q in Skyfall, which itself has a phenomenon, attracting both women and the LGBTQ community.
   This is a volume for the intelligent Bond fan, someone who appreciates learning about the impact of Ian Fleming’s creation. Of course the films are covered more, as it was through them that Bond became a global phenomenon. The reader walks away having been better informed: this is not a Bond book for the light reader who wants reassurance of the facts they already know, but one which gives them something more satisfying to consider.

Top A scene from What About Bob?, by Jon Boam. Centre Lost in Translation, by Grace Danico. Above Lost in Translation, by Henry Kaye.

On a briefer note, but still tied with film, Sugoi Books has released an A5 book called Cook Your Own Food: a Bill Murray Scratch and Sniff, retailing at £6. There are 20 pp., with 10 smells, with some stunning illustrations, with artists reinterpreting key moments from Murray’s films, focusing on his culinary habits. ‘Scratch the smelly pads at the top right and enter the world of Bill Murray,’ the publisher asks, and you are spoiled with scenes from Lost in Translation, Caddyshack, Groundhog Day, What About Bob?, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and others. For £6, the illustrations are so good it doesn’t even matter if you have a poor sense of smell.—Jack Yan, Publisher

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