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January 27, 2016

Emanuel Ungaro celebrates 50th anniversary, launches La Diva eau de parfum at Petit Palais

Lucire staff/4.57




Pascal le Segretain

Emanuel Ungaro celebrated its 50th anniversary on Tuesday, with a party at the Petit Palais in Paris, and launched its La Diva perfume to coincide with the occasion.
   Creative director Fausto Puglisi and president Asim Abdullah played host to 600 guests, who were shown a virtual history of the house in images, choreographed and created by Ali Mahdavi and scored by Monarchy, on the wall of the venue. Salvatore Ferragamo Group CEO Michele Norsa introduced La Diva, with the façade of the Petit Palais showing a projection of the new fragrance’s press image, modelled by Charlotte Free. Ferragamo Parfums has licensed the Emanuel Ungaro brand for the fragrance.
   Guests included Suzy Menkes, Kristina Basan, Elodie Frégé, Frédérique Bel, Leila Ndabirabe, Zahia Dehar, Estelle Lefébure, Catherine Baba, Laurie Cholewa, Karole Rocher, Blanca Li, Jin Weng, Bojana Panić, Alexia Niedzielski, Elizabeth von Guthman, Axelle Lafont, Prince Wenzeslaus of Liechtenstein, Lola le Lann, César Domboy, Richard Orlanski, Frédéric Taddei, Ariel Wizman, Nicolas and Alexandre Lestrat, Kyle Eastwood, Kamel Ouali, Aure Atika, Isabelle Funaro, Amanda Sthers, Fausto Puglisi, Ali Mahdavi, Benjamin Belin, Manu Katché, Frédérique Lopez, and Sofiia Manousha.
   Musical trio LEJ (Lucie, Elisa and Juliette) performed live at the Petit Palais, while Marie-Amélie Seigner took over with her DJ set as guests danced till late into the evening.
   The fragrance goes on sale in March, as eaux de parfum in 30, 50 and 100 ml sizes, priced from €39 to €69. The fragrance has top notes of pear and raspberry, midnotes of pink peppercorn, basenotes of honey and vanilla, with a floral heart, enriched with notes of patchouli. Firmenich’s Marie Salamagne created the scent.

















Pascal le Segretain


























Victor Boyko

October 1, 2015

Ikea extends itself into fashion: you read it here first last year

Lucire staff/23.16


Ikea

September 29’s Ikea Fashion Show at Moda di Milano (hashtagged both #IKEAfashion and #IKEAtemporary) showcased work from two designers who collaborated with the Swedish-founded furniture conglomerate.
   ‘With a number of new collections that have been developed in collaboration with fashion designers, Ikea is stepping into new territory—one from which we can learn a lot,’ according to the company.
   Giltig by Katie Eary and Svärtan by Martin Bergström will see their collections retailed in 2016, but they received a boost in profile thanks to their appearance at one of the top fashion weeks in the world.
   For us, the first thing that came to mind when seeing Ikea fashion was Stefan Engeseth’s (below right) prediction, published in Lucire first last year, and later in Style.com, the Daily Mail, The Guardian and Flare, plus a number of newspapers and news websites: that fashion should be Ikea’s next industry.
   At the time, Ikea had no such plans officially, but it isn’t surprising to see another one of Engeseth’s predictions come true. He came up with the idea of Coca-Cola being served through taps at home before Coke itself actually trialled that idea, plus another, over 15 years ago, on how cellphones could connect two strangers, albeit not through an app.
   We wrote: ‘Engeseth says that Ikea’s expertise lends itself easily to the world of apparel …
   ‘He believes that fashion is in a repetitive cycle, stuck in history and needing renewal.
   ‘Ikea could offer both complete apparel items and composite parts that customers could assemble themselves, says Mr Engeseth. The parts could be “tailored” at home in inventive ways without the need for complex sewing.’
   Last year, Lucire publisher Jack Yan added, ‘This taps in to its existing fan base, and just as importantly, Ikea can make full use of its channels, outmanœuvring many existing fashion labels. Ikea has an international retail base and it has distribution down to a fine art.’
   When we asked him about the Ikea show in Milano yesterday, he had his reservations about some of the designs, but stated, ‘It’s good that Ikea takes its first step into fashion, and rewarding to see them developing the concept more now.’
   He was also buoyed by seeing that, after the show, Ikea’s official Twitter account went back to his blog post late last year about Ikea fashion, and “favourited” a Tweet about it. Engeseth even preempted the hashtag used back in 2014.
   There’s no sign that Ikea fashion will be in a composite format, ready for its customers to assemble, but Engeseth appears to have been right that the brand would extend itself into the new segment.

September 30, 2015

Bar Refaeli, Pelé and Lapo Elkann celebrate Hublot’s Big Bang watch anniversary at new production warehouse

Alex Barrow/10.17


Hublot, the luxury watch company, opened an expansive new production warehouse in Nyon, Switzerland on the 10-year anniversary of their iconic Big Bang watch on Tuesday.
   Three hundred guests from around the globe attended the opening event including ambassadors, VIP guests, friends of the company and journalists. The milestone ceremony was further endorsed by notable Hublot ambassadors Pelé, Bar Refaeli and Lapo Elkann who contributed to the handing over of keys ceremony.
   To celebrate the sweeping popularity of the large watch, the warehouse was developed to keep up with enormous production demand. With the first major production centre being built just six years ago, this feat recognizes and celebrates the vast success the company has had with their luxury watches.
   Owned by big-brand conglomerate LVMH, Hublot has consistently enhanced and cemented their reputation as high-quality, skilled watchmakers recognized the world over. Over the past decade the Big Bang watch has been celebrated at various award ceremonies internationally in Genève, Japan and the Middle East. With the rapid success of the company in such a short time, the decade anniversary celebrations of the Big Bang watch indicates that Hublot aren’t even considering slowing down their economic boom.
   Based in Switzerland, the new warehouse is destined to house over one hundred work stations which will bring Swiss employees up to over 400 people working for the company. Due to the high sales of the last decade, the company have afforded SFr 20,000,000 into the project. To further celebrate the acheivements, the company has launched a “decade of success” campaign across the 73 Hublot stores worldwide.—Alex Barrow



September 29, 2015

Huawei, Vogue China and Fornasetti collaborate on custom smart watch, released at Milan Fashion Week

Alex Barrow/23.17




Vittorio Zunino Celotto

A collaboration between big names Huawei, Vogue China and Fornasetti sparked the creation of the Fornasetti smart watch, the unveiling of which was done at Vogue China’s 10-year anniversary celebrations. Celebrated at the closure of Milan Fashion Week, the introduction of the special edition watch has allowed for it to be seen in the limelight of the fashion world.
   Huawei, a global innovation company, works towards bettering and expanding on telecom networks. With a focus on consumer product, technical innovation and research and development, the company has expanded through Asia, Europe, the US and Russia. Huawei’s crowd-sourcing specialists have opened up a platform for outside artists and designers to contribute designs for appropriate accessories to complement the watch such as customized skins, or potential ideas for future technologies such as smart phones or smart watches.
   The watch itself is a product of Huawei Business Group, but the design was customized by Fornasetti, the celebrated interior design and fashion label. The watch has all the traditional makings of a high-quality, sophisticated watch such as the scratch-resistant sapphire crystal class and stainless steel frame, as well as the traditional 42 mm diameter of the watch face itself. What makes this accessory stand out is its technical capabilities, inclusive of playing music downloads offline, Bluetooth connections and a heart rate and motion sensor. These make it the ideal companion for monitored physical activity without the bulk of other smart technologies.
   Designer Barnaba Fornasetti said his design had a multi-dimensional inspiration to it which contributed to the final product. ‘The Fornasetti brand is built upon the revival and reinvention of its classic designs and objects, giving them a new purpose and always keeping its artisan approach. The Lina face is a part of my father’s legacy and to reinforce its timeless design, I paradoxically decided to apply it on a cutting edge product that keeps time.’ The image on the watch face is a vintage-style depiction of a woman’s face, namely inspired by that of Lina Cavalieri, an Italian opera singer. This image is an established symbol of Fornasetti and has been used in a similar fashion in the label’s past designs.
   The collaboration between the three large names has allowed space for future business endeavours, opening up each other’s company networks. Glory Zhang of Huawei said, ‘This collaboration with Fornasetti is the start of an exciting journey for Huawei, delivering connections between innovative technology and art, design and culture. This is the first of many exciting cultural collaborations as we move to become an innovator within the arts’.
   Notable attendees of the event included models Karlie Kloss and Sean O’Pry, AC Milan footballer Riccardo Montolivo and model Cristina de Pin, fashion photographer Mario Testino, Giorgio Armani, Vogue China editor-in-chief Angelica Cheung. Representing Huawei was Glory Zhang, its chief marketing officer. All attendees of the event were gifted with the smart watches and modelled them for the evening.—Alex Barrow
















Vittorio Zunino Celotto

August 18, 2015

Fan Phenomena: James Bond gives 007 fans more; while Sugoi invites you to the world of Bill Murray

Jack Yan/12.09

In the year of a new James Bond movie, many books emerge. Invariably, there’ll be one on the films themselves, taking readers through the 50-plus years of the Eon Productions’ series, and, if it’s very comprehensive, the 1950s CBS TV version of Casino Royale, the 1967 spoof of the same name, and Never Say Never Again will rate more than a mention. There’ll be something about Ian Fleming, and another book on one aspect of the Bond world (gadgets, stunts, music, or something else). Seasoned Bond fans will think the circus is in town again, because the new book about the films adds little to their existing knowledge.
   Claire Hines’s Fan Phenomena: James Bond, from Intellect Books (£15·50, US$22, releasing November 15), is something different altogether: Bond from an academic and completely cultural viewpoint. Intellect is famous for its titles on popular culture and creative practice, with a rigorous academic bent, and Fan Phenomena: James Bond continues the series but takes the reader into the world of Ian Fleming’s super-spy.
   Hines serves as editor, and there are 11 very distinct contributions to her volume, dealing with everything from canonicity to 007’s appearance as ‘Ladykiller Jimmy’ in Alan Moore’s comics; Bond as a cult brand and cultural phenomenon to the clothes he wears; from the James Bond films through a feminist viewpoint to analyses of his masculinity and identity. Interspersed between these are four ‘Fan Appreciation’ sections, featuring an interview with über-fan and former Bond novel continuation author Raymond Benson, artist and collector Peter Lorenz, 007 Museum owner James Bond (who had his name legally changed by deed poll) and cross-players CousinCecily and Winter.
   Even the most seasoned Bond fan might not have considered the impact of the character, books and films, and the book fulfils a very important role: it gives them something new. William Proctor’s analysis of continuity gets the book off to a healthy start after Hines’s introduction, though typographically it suffers: the type is inexplicably small, though the layout is modern and the visuals help lift things. Getting Raymond Benson in there early on also helps position Fan Phenomena: James Bond as a book for the cognoscenti as well as those who want an academic examination, and Benson reveals a little more behind the scenes of his years as the official continuation author.
   Matthew Freeman, in considering the many media in which Bond occupies, including the gaming world, shows just how the phenomenon breaks the established rules and succeeds, while Jesús Jiménez-Varea and Antonio Pineda’s chapter on Moore’s comics is bound to take many fans into uncharted territory. Joshua Wille’s chapter on fan edits does the same: while many know about ABC-TV’s cutting of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service when it aired on US TV, but there are numerous fan edits made in the digital era that had this author hunting the forums.
   Artist Peter Lorenz’s Bond film posters are stunning and present a nice visual break before Lucy Bolton’s chapter analysing the phenomenology of Bond. Bolton’s piece is perhaps closest to those Bond “collectable” books that come out with the films as she analysed the films from Dr No to Skyfall, and fans may have their own interpretations of their cultural significance through the years. Editor Hines’s own chapter looks at Bond as cult brand, and is fascinating in her study of the 1960s Eon films. Hines reconciles how cult and mainstream come together with the Bond series, successfully. Lisa Funnell gives Bond a feminist slant and the enjoyment she derives as an assistant professor teaching women’s studies.
   Stephanie Jones looks at the Bond lifestyle but primarily through the analysis of one work, The Complete James Bond Lifestyle Seminar, which she reveals is relatively light on Bond references, leading to a less satisfying chapter—though it could hardly be blamed on Jones. Llewella Burton’s chapter on Bond and fashion, and how it became a style through the rise of merchandising as the movies became blockbusters with Goldfinger is punctuated by photos from Galeries Lafayette as it opened a James Bond boutique in 1965, again gold dust for Bond fans. Karen Brooks’s and Lisa Hill’s chapter analyses the new and old masculinities through the three Daniel Craig films of 2006, 2008 and 2012.
   Crossplayers CousinCecily and Winter talk about their love of James Bond and Q, leading neatly on the final chapter by Elizabeth J. Nielsen, which deals with Bond’s homoerotic moments and subtexts. She traces them to Fleming himself in the torture scene in Casino Royale, before covering the flirting between Bond and the new Q in Skyfall, which itself has a phenomenon, attracting both women and the LGBTQ community.
   This is a volume for the intelligent Bond fan, someone who appreciates learning about the impact of Ian Fleming’s creation. Of course the films are covered more, as it was through them that Bond became a global phenomenon. The reader walks away having been better informed: this is not a Bond book for the light reader who wants reassurance of the facts they already know, but one which gives them something more satisfying to consider.




Top A scene from What About Bob?, by Jon Boam. Centre Lost in Translation, by Grace Danico. Above Lost in Translation, by Henry Kaye.

On a briefer note, but still tied with film, Sugoi Books has released an A5 book called Cook Your Own Food: a Bill Murray Scratch and Sniff, retailing at £6. There are 20 pp., with 10 smells, with some stunning illustrations, with artists reinterpreting key moments from Murray’s films, focusing on his culinary habits. ‘Scratch the smelly pads at the top right and enter the world of Bill Murray,’ the publisher asks, and you are spoiled with scenes from Lost in Translation, Caddyshack, Groundhog Day, What About Bob?, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and others. For £6, the illustrations are so good it doesn’t even matter if you have a poor sense of smell.—Jack Yan, Publisher

March 7, 2015

Top of the world and top of the Beverly Hilton: the TMG luxury suite

Elyse Glickman/12.20


After we experienced TMG’s 11th Annual Beauty & Style Destination Pre-Oscar Lounge it was no surprise that the polite, professional but exacting young ladies standing at various hotel check points wanted to be sure guests were on the list for this primp-and-prep focused suite. This hot invitation not only promised the select group of celebs and press a variety of wonderful services, interesting new beauty products and great views of Los Angeles, but also fantastic company. The people administering brow services, manicures, massages and hair styling were absolutely delightful.
   Skinny Girl provided the snacks and libations (loved the Thai-spiced tortilla chips!), while Shapes, a Southern California brown threading salon chain had the main stage. Their artistry with brow shaping and make-up touch ups were fantastic (we are regular paying customers at their Sherman Oaks branch and can attest to their consistently excellent work), but the roll-out of their new Reema make-up line really got our attention, not only with their lovely colours but easy-on-just-threaded-skin formulas. The collection includes eye shadows and liners (naturally!) along with lipsticks, blushes, glosses and other necessities. IT Hair Care’s rep, meanwhile, was distributing the multi-tasking twelve-in-one styling solution, while we had our tresses tamed with other products in the line.
   On the new age-y end of things, guests could try a mini-stress reduction treatment with Miracle Wands. On the practical (and just plain cool) end, we were impressed with ExoFab, a protective case for Iphone 6 and Samsung smartphones that also sticks to mirrors and other surfaces, making selfies a breeze and more discreet to boot. Children lucky enough to attend with their A-list parents could be the first among their friends to receive the new 35th aAnniversary edition of Strawberry Shortcake and her friends, their cutesy ’80s rag doll æsthetic replaced with a more glamorous (but age-appropriate) face and fashion sense. Celebrity babies, meanwhile, could luxuriate in a crib bedecked with Horse & Dragon organic baby linens (as the founder’s son did in his compelling test drive of the products).
   If you had the patience to keep moving from one suite to another, you would be treated to a marvellous display of Onirikka’s striking and stunning silver, gold and semi-precious stone laden fine jewellery crafted in New York with influences from El Salvador artists and a wonderfully fragrant spa offering treatments and takeaways from Matis Paris and Academie Paris Skin Care along with very conscientious practitioners providing thorough instructions on how to use those products correctly.
   Celebrities on hand for this very “suite” afternoon of beauty and friendly faces included Grace Gealey and Katie Doubleday from the Fox series Empire, Sherry Saum (The Fosters), Neil Jackson (Sleepy Hollow), Oscar nominee Dennis Liddiards (best hair and make-up, Foxcatcher), Steven Bauer (Scarface), Naomi Grossman (American Horror Story), Rosi Blasi, and Frances Hannon (Oscar nominee and winner for best hair and make-up in The Grand Budapest Hotel).—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor, and Leyla Messian, Correspondent









January 12, 2015

Paris shows solidarity in Sunday’s March for Unity

Lola Cristall/5.08



Lola Cristall

The March for Unity that took place today in Paris was announced as the largest demonstration in the history of France, with an estimated 1·5 million to 2 million on the capital’s streets. The interior ministry believes that there had not been so many since the liberation of Paris in August 1944. A number of people from around the world, politicians and celebrities walked the streets throughout the afternoon.
   Lucire’s Paris editor Lola Cristall took these photographs as she joined others to commemorate and celebrate the victims of Paris’s terror attacks last week.
   The deaths included staff at the satirical Charlie Hebdo, where cartoonists Charb, Cabu, Tignous et Wolinski (the pen names for Stéphane Charbonnier, who was also editor, Jean Cabut, Bernard Verlhac and Georges Wolinski) and police officers Franck Brinsolaro and Ahmed Merabat were slain in a massacre on Wednesday. Police officer Clarissa Jean-Philippe was killed the following day in a related attack, and four civilians were killed in a siege on Friday.
   ‘While my domain is predominantly the luxury and entertainment sector, the pictures might be of interest to some people to see how so many came together in the city to support the innocent journalists, artists and victims,’ said Cristall.
   ‘The city is coming together as one. They were phenomenal artists,’ she added.
   Those in the march chanted, ‘On est tous Charlie’ (‘We are all Charlie’) and ‘Charlie Charlie Charlie,’ holding up banners and placards, reading everything from ‘Je suis Charlie’ (‘I am Charlie’), which began trending on the day of the massacre on Tumblr and other social media, and ‘Nous sommes Charlie’ (‘We are Charlie’) to ‘Je suis Muslim’ (‘I am Muslim’). French flags, hearts and Charlie Hebdo covers were also seen in the march.
   World leaders also participated in the march, including French president François Hollande, HM Queen Rania of Jordan, German chancellor Angela Merkel, Spanish prime minister Mariano Rajoy, Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas, Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu, British prime minister David Cameron, Malian president Ibrahim Boubacar Këita, Polish prime minister Ewa Kopacz, Turkish prime minister Ahmet Davutoglu, and Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko. Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov, Egyptian foreign minister Sameh Shoukry, US attorney-general Eric Holder, European Council president Donald Tusk, and UK opposition leader Ed Miliband were also present.
   Reporters sans frontières were critical of the presence of Davutoglu and Shoukry, as their countries had restricted press freedoms.
   Public transport was free in Paris to discourage private car use for the march.
   Earlier in the week, Jean Paul Gaultier and his staff posed for a photograph where they held up ‘Je suis Charlie’ print-outs, showing unity with the fallen journalists.


Jean Paul Gaultier

Above Jean Paul Gaultier and his staff with ‘Je suis Charlie’ banners, showing solidarity with the fallen at the massacre at Charlie Hebdo. Below More scenes from Paris on Friday and during the March for Unity on Sunday.












Lola Cristall

November 26, 2014

Edward Enninful to be honoured at 2014 British Fashion Awards

Lucire staff/11.35

Edward Enninful will receive the Isabella Blow Award for Fashion Creator at this year’s British Fashion Awards, the British Fashion Council announced today.
   Ghanese-born Enninful is a stylist and the current fashion and style director of W.
   In 1991, he became fashion director of I-D, at the age of 18, making him the youngest editor at a major international title. Seven years later, he became contributing fashion editor of Vogue Italia, and he held the same post at Vogue in 2006. In 2011, he took on his role at W.
   Enninful has also worked on campaigns for Gucci, Comme des Garçons, Christian Dior, Dolce and Gabbana, Celine, Lanvin, Mulberry, Giorgio Armani, Valentino, Jil Sander, Calvin Klein, Fendi, Alessandro Dell’Acqua, Hugo Boss, and Missoni.
   I-D founders, Terry and Tricia Jones, said, ‘When the wonderful Simon Foxton first introduced Edward into the I-D family, we had no idea that he would become one of the most outstanding stylists of his generation. He not only brought his own talent to the magazine, but started working with hundreds of other individual youngsters at the beginning of their careers. His fashion corner in the I-D office was always a mecca for ideas and supermodel diversity became one of his many contributions to the international fashion industry.
   ‘We are thrilled and super proud that I-D’s youngest-ever son has travelled so far in his career and feel very privileged to have known him as a teenager. Edward’s own individual talent, his absolute loyalty, his encouragement and promotion of other peoples’ careers, as well as his love and belief in diversity within the industry, is rare and quite unprecedented. We truly believe that Edward’s creative voice, experience and original inspiration fully justify this very prestigious award!’
   Supermodel Naomi Campbell said, ‘Edward is not only one of my dearest friends and brother, but he is also one of the most outstanding people I have ever had the pleasure of working with. His unique talent, drive and imagination are poured into his work, making him responsible for some of the most heart quickening imagery in the history of fashion.’
   Fashion photographer Stephen Klein added, ‘Edward has exquisite taste and precision and is both sensitive to the aim of the photographer and venue without compromising either.’
   Speaking for the British Fashion Council, Natalie Massenet, its chairman, said, ‘Edward’s creative energy and level of vision captures the mood of our times: his work is original, energetic, sincere and unforgettable. His creative journey may have started in London, but today his influence spans the entire globe intersecting the worlds of fashion, art and business.’
   The British Fashion Awards 2014 is sponsored by Swarovski, Canon, MAC, Toni & Guy, Vodafone, American Express, Marks & Spencer, Mercedes Benz, Penhaligon’s, and Rightster.

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