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Venezia day 3: Mădălina Ghenea, Francesca Sofia Novello, Karina Nigay, Eleonora Bernardi Zizola

Filed by Lucire staff/September 4, 2020/22.50




Iosip Mihail

On day 3 of the 77ª Mostra internazionale d’arte cinematografica di Venezia, Academy Award winner Jim Broadbent and Notting Hill director Roger Michell were present at both the Corradi Cinema Lounge and the red carpet for the film The Duke, which tells the story of a man who sneaks into London’s National Gallery to steal a portrait of the Duke of Wellington by Goya.
   Est director Antonio Pisu and cast members Matteo Gatta, Jacopo Costantini and Italian X Factor judge, Lo Stato Sociale singer Lodo Guenzi were also present at the Lounge, as was Padrenostro actor Francesco Gheghi and Romanian model and actress Mădălina Ghenea. They were also on the red carpet, joined by Arisa, Francesca Sofia Novello, Pierfrancesco Favino, Karina Nigay, Angelo Quarti, Eleonora Bernardi Zizola, and the cast of Padrenostro.












Iosip Mihail

 


Venezia kicks off festival with Cate Blanchett, Tilda Swinton, Ester Expósito, Élodie Yung, Taylor Hill

Filed by Lucire staff/September 3, 2020/0.18




Mihail Iosip

With COVID-19 still infecting people around the world, there was no Festival de Cannes to report on in May, but Venezia has managed to kick off a restricted version of the 77th Mostra internazionale d’arte cinematografica, or the Venice Film Festival, for 2020.
   September 1 saw the start of the Corradi Cinema Lounge at the Ausonia Hungaria hotel, which hosted the cast of Daniele Luchetti’s Lacci, this year’s opening film at the Mostra. The Lounge also hosted directors Andrea Segre (Molecole) and Carlo Hintermann (The Book of Vision).
   September 2, the day of the opening ceremony, saw the Lounge host director Christos Nikou and actress Sofia Georgovassili from Apples, Giona A. Nazzaro, and Jacopo Chessa. Sky Cinema 1 also filmed an episode there for broadcast on September 4 for its 100 × 100 Cinema programme with host Piera Detassis.
   On the red carpet for the opening were president of the jury Cate Blanchett, Adriano Giannini and Gaia Trussardi, Anna Foglietta, Daniele Luchetti, Diodato, Elena Bouryka, Élodie Yung, Ester Expósito, Giulia Rosmarini and Alberto Barbera, Giulia Valentina, Laura Morante, Linda Caridi, Luigi Lo Cascio, Marracash, Paola Turani, and Taylor Hill.
   Tilda Swinton was awarded the Golden Lion award and wore a Chanel white cotton blouse with smocking motifs and a long black crêpe layered skirt from the spring–summer 2020 haute couture collection, accompanied by the Chanel haute joaillerie Tweed frangé earrings in 18 ct white gold and diamonds, and the Plume de Chanel ring in 18 ct white and yellow gold and diamonds. Chanel also created her make-up.
   The Lounge showcases the exterior designs from Corradi, and is now in its sixth year at the festival. It has partnered with Hotcorn.com, a cinema website.























Mihail Iosip

 


Chanel releases Coco Mademoiselle l’Eau Privée, a night scent; Keira Knightley fronts campaign

Filed by Lucire staff/August 28, 2020/0.52



Keira Knightley is the face of Chanel’s Coco Mademoiselle l’Eau Privée, the house’s latest take on the Coco Mademoiselle range first launched in 2001.
   Overseen by Olivier Polge, Chanel’s in-house parfumier, l’Eau Privée has been described as ‘a watercolour scent’, dialling down the wooden notes in favour of orange, jasmine, rose and musk. Chanel says it remains true to the original oriental fragrance but is more ‘confidential’ and delicate. It is seen as a “night scent”.
   The bottle (50 and 100 ml) is in translucent frosted glass, with the words l’Eau Privée in gold lettering, looking more subtle against the contents.
   With the new addition, Coco Mademoiselle comes in five varieties: eau de toilette, eau de parfum, eau de parfum intense, parfum, and the new l’Eau Privée.





 


As predicted in Lucire six years ago: Ikea moves into fashion

Filed by Lucire staff/August 20, 2020/13.08


It took six years for the prediction to come true: author and management consultant Stefan Engeseth forecast in 2014, as first published in Lucire, that Ikea would extend its brand into fashion next.
   The story, which ran here first, was eventually picked up by the international media.
   Last month, Ikea announced it was releasing its first clothing line through its Harajuku store in Tokyo, with pre-sales beginning on July 31. The collection, dubbed Efterträda, features streetwear staples, as well as a tote bag, bath towels, an umbrella and water bottles.
   The clothing and bags are made from eco-friendly cotton and the water bottles are reusable.
   Helping launch the line’s look book are Bunta Shimizu, Moeka Shiotsuka, Kyohei Hattori, and Nene.
   Engeseth says, ‘It’s amazing, fun, and cool to see how Ikea is moving. Since fashion brands such as Zara and H&M are moving into furniture, it is necessary to stay modern and relevant.
   ‘The potential of dressing up over 100 million Ikea family members has the potential to be bigger than many fashion brands today.’

 


Net-à-Porter offers limited-edition luxury items for Qixi Festival

Filed by Lucire staff//6.13

In time for the Qixi Festival, often branded in the occident as the Chinese Valentine’s Day, Net-à-Porter has unveiled its social media campaign featuring five short romantic videos, of people meeting their loved ones at different ages. In addition, celebrity couple model Emma Pei (裴蓓) and Rojamtic Wang (王朱筱寅), who had appeared together promoting Princess Cruises in 2016, have appeared in the new Net-à-Porter campaign.
   The retailer will also launch an art exhibition centred around the festival, in association with Leica, featuring the works of photographers Tan Sibo (覃斯波), Vincent Keyue Zhang (章轲越), and Laurent Bu. Bloggers and illustrators will also publish their works.
   Participating brands in the promotion include: Buccellati, which is offering an exclusive, limited-edition series of necklaces and bracelets; Ahkah, with a little red heart necklace and bracelet; and Baume & Mercier, with an exclusive Net-à-Porter Classima ladies’ mechanical watch.
   The promotion began on the 19th in the lead-up to the Qixi Festival on the seventh day of the seventh lunar month, or August 25 on the Gregorian calendar this year. There are limited-edition greeting cards with love poems and special packaging. More information can be found via Tmall or Taobao, using the keyword NAP, or visit the Net-à-Porter Tmall store.


 


Putting the brakes on fast fashion

Filed by Jack Yan/August 15, 2020/9.10

Lucire is UN Environment’s first fashion industry partner.

Abigail Beall’s statistics in a recent BBC report about clothing recycling make sobering reading. She writes, ‘Around 85% of all textiles thrown away in the US—roughly 13 million tonnes in 2017—are either dumped into landfill or burned. The average American has been estimated to throw away around 37kg of clothes every year. And globally, an estimated 92 million tonnes of textiles waste is created each year and the equivalent to a rubbish truck full of clothes ends up on landfill sites every second.’ Her other statistics show that only 12 per cent of the material for clothing gets recycled, and that the fashion industry is responsible for 10 per cent of all greenhouse gas emissions and 20 per cent of global waste water.
   Meanwhile, on the consumer end, our need for gratification (at least in the UK) has seen us buy 60 per cent more clothing than we did 15 years ago, and no one wants to wait six months after seeing something on the catwalk.
   Beall says that recycling is difficult because while there may be one dominant material, such as cotton, threads and labels are made from other materials. Jeans are usually made of cotton yarn blended with elastane. This makes them all difficult to recycle, and sorting textiles into different fibres is still usually done manually. Techniques to chemically separate blends without losing either natural or synthetic fibres are not yet scalable.
   And what’s donated to charity shops is now of poor quality, with most reaching Oxfam’s Wastesaver plant unsellable, and six tonnes a week are torn up to be used as cloths or stuffing.
   Many fashion labels are recognizing these difficulties, especially as consumers realize the harm the industry is causing the environment. Some have been choosing recycled materials, including ocean plastics that have been turned into new materials in clothes and shoes—over the years Lucire has devoted plenty of space to these. Others are inventing new, sustainable materials.
   There is some hope that the lockdowns that various countries have had to endure during the COVID-19 crisis might wake populations up to the preciousness of the environment. Many enjoyed watching nature return, something covered in an earlier issue of Lucire KSA. And, with many now opting to work from home—and companies adjusting to the new reality of allowing staff to work remotely—the need to dress up for the office has diminished. Casual clothes are very much the norm in many societies now. In such cases, people might not be quite as willing to push for the latest in attire if it isn’t going to be seen in public, and only in the virtual world. Might we embrace quality over novelty once more?
   Beall shows that the rise in consumption is a relatively recent phenomenon, something within living memory for most consumers. It can only be a good thing for the planet if we reduced our clothing consumption to the levels they were at 15 years ago, and even then labels were making money in the clothing business.
   We weren’t so obsessed with fast fashion, and while retailers like H&M and Zara were making headway around the world with cheaply made garments, there were still enough consumers happy to pay more for quality. Until 2004 there was a difference, too: high-end designer style hadn’t been democratized, not until Karl Lagerfeld began the first of many designer collaborations with H&M, giving rise to what this magazine called ‘accessible luxury’.
   We also weren’t as obsessed with the new. When Lucire was first established, some fashion labels were deeply wary of allowing online media to cover their catwalk shows. They were scared of counterfeiters: the sooner they could see something, the sooner the knock-offs would appear. The designers were used to having the advantage, and old media were willing to comply. Lucire, for its part, never ran the catwalk stories live: internet connections weren’t that great then, and neither was digital photography. By the time the film and prints got to New Zealand, and everything was manually laid out, there was a delay. But as coverage democratized, and as designers themselves delighted in showing every­thing live, often to “influencers” who beamed the shows instantaneously via social media, consumer demands also shifted. In an Instagramming generation, being seen with the latest is more vital than before—yet, again, one hopes that the perspective we’ve gained with the pandemic will put the brakes on that.
   We’re not exactly in Luddite position or pining for a return to the past. We’re excited about the innovations, such as Bionic, a polyester made from recycled shoreline waste that H&M, recognizing the shift, has promoted [Natalia Vodianova modelled one such dress three years ago, shown at top]; and the new sustainable materials that our clothes could be made from. But we would like to see the end of the race to the bottom which fast fashion and the insistence on novelty have driven, where garment workers are paid less and less to satisfy the profits of some brands and the appetites of some consumers.
   If we value good design, ethical sourcing and quality over novelty and low prices, then we may be able to reverse some of these frightening statistics. It might even be unfashionable, as the pandemic affects certain countries worse than others, to flaunt the fact you’ve been able to head out shopping (real or virtual) to get the newest. Influencers will need to find something else to promote.
   Even filmmakers are sensing it. The Michael Winterbottom-directed Steve Coogan–Isla Fisher comedy, Greed [covered earlier in Lucire], is a satirical tale about a thinly disguised version of Sir Philip Green, the head of Arcadia Group, who stood accused by British government committees of plundering British Home Stores while under his company’s control. Sir Philip also did not escape criticism in this magazine.
   Coogan plays Sir Richard ‘Greedy’ McCreadie, who spends his adult life pushing suppliers in Sri Lanka (with India standing in for the country in the film) into a race to the bottom. The last act wraps up the film neatly: namely that for all the lessons that we might have learned, the fictional McGready family ticks on, little changed. No, the outcome isn’t funny, but it is a call to action—it’s Winterbottom exercising pathos. Showing statistics about fast fashion, the income gap, and the single-digit earnings of Asian garment workers takes that one step further. Are we choosing to fund these lifestyles and the fast-fashion machine, or should we opt for the sort of designers often championed by this magazine, who work with Fair Trade, eschew seasons, and emphasize quality?
   With such a film part of our 2019–20 Zeitgeist, then it appears that we should call time on the excesses the industry has created, opening the door to those independent designers, many of whom have appeared in this magazine, who invest heart, creativity, and time to make quality fare.—Jack Yan, Publisher

 


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