Lucire: News


November 26, 2015

Absolut releases dazzling limited-edition Electrik bottles to close 2015

Lucire staff/2.58

The world’s most famous vodka brand, Absolut, has released its limited-edition, celebratory end-of-year bottles, dubbed Absolut Electrik.
   The blue and silver bottles feature semi-transparent coating, representing ‘Absolut’s signature cobalt blue and the electrical conductivity of silver,’ according to the company.
   In a release, Kathryn Love, Absolut’s marketing manager for New Zealand, said, ‘Over the years, we have presented some highly appreciated limited editions, including Absolut Warhol and Absolut Originality. We aim to raise the bar for our limited editions and continue to push creative boundaries. Absolut Electrik follows that tradition.’
   In the New Zealand market, Absolut has even collaborated with local design label Huffer in 2011.
   To make things more interactive this year, Absolut has created an Electrik Mixology platform on, where users can collaborate with an on-screen robot to create a personalized drink. The robot even mixes the drink on the site. Absolut has also released two cocktail recipes for end-of-year parties.
   Absolut Electrik is priced at NZ$55·99 for each one-litre bottle, available from leading liquor retailers throughout New Zealand.

Absolut Electrik Blue Mule cocktail
1 part Absolut Vodka
2 parts ginger beer
Garnish with lime wedge. Built and served in the Mule cup over crushed ice.

Absolut Electrik Neon Lights
2 parts Absolut Vodka
1⅕ parts lemon juice
1⅕ parts pink grapefruit juice
⅘ part simple syrup
⅕ part ginger syrup (1 part freshly squeezed ginger juice with 3 parts simple syrup)
4 raspberries
Top up with soda water. Garnish with raspberries and grapefruit zest. Shake all ingredients except soda, serve in a highball glass with ice.

November 23, 2015

Stolen Girlfriends’ Club creates limited-edition straps for Samsung Gear S2 Classic smartwatch

Lucire staff/10.50

Stolen Girlfriends’ Club has created a collection of four customized leather watch straps for the Samsung Gear S2 smartwatch, in an official collaboration with the Korean electronics’ giant.
   The limited-edition straps, in black and brown crocodile, and green and blue snake, will be made available as a gift to some Samsung customers. They are made in New Zealand.
   The retro styling is intentional. As Marc Moore, Stolen Girlfriends’ Club’s creative director, noted, ‘I was really inspired by vintage watch straps for this collaboration with Samsung on the new Gear S2 Classic. I’ll be honest, I haven’t been a huge fan of some of the smartwatches being launched by brands lately—just because they look so “techy”, it doesn’t leave much option for people that are into fashion. So I was pretty excited when I first saw the Gear S2 Classic, I knew instantly that a vintage-styled strap would work great. We had a bit of fun with the colours and textures of the leather we sourced whilst keeping it really wearable and quite classic.’
   By rotating the face bezel, the Gear S2 goes to different screens, or skips to another track or zooms in on a map, making navigation particularly simple. The watch features health and fitness apps, a two- to three-day battery life, Android Bluetooth pairing, and push notifications via mobile phones. The straps can be changed further and the watch face can be customized via the Samsung Gear app. Retail price in New Zealand for the basic S2 is NZ$549, and the S2 Classic is NZ$649, available both online and at offline retailers.

November 18, 2015

A masterful Graduation Season at the New Zealand School of Dance, with two world premières

Jack Yan/14.14

Stephen A’Court

Top Concerto, part of the New Zealand School of Dance Graduation Season 2015. Above Sarah-Foster Sproull’s Forgotten Things, with the unfamiliar sight of a string of fists, waving in the space.

The New Zealand School of Dance Graduation Season performances, which began tonight (Wednesday), are always a highlight. It’s the culmination of a lot of hard work from second- and third-year students, and the six performances this year offer a very entertaining mix, especially for lovers of classical ballet.
   In previous years, the NZSD has put more contemporary dance on the menu, but the mixture in tonight’s programme was equally welcome. Paquita, the grand-pas, kicked off the evening, choreographed by Anna-Marie Holmes after Marius Petipa. The students showed immense promise, and we wouldn’t be surprised to see many of them dance professionally in ballet before long. Yayoi Matches, in the title role, and Yuri Marques da Silva, who hails from Brazil, danced the role of Lucien, increasingly captivated us during the performance. The costumes were hand-made by Donna Jefferis, assisted by the students of the Diploma of Costume Construction at Toi Whakaari: New Zealand Drama School, according to the NZSD.
   Forgotten Things took us to the other end of the spectrum with an incredibly inventive contemporary performance. With bare arms and hands, contrasting the black outfits worn by every dancer, we were exposed to unusual shapes: what does a string of fists look like as they wave in mid-air like the legs of a squid in the sea, or the hands of two dozen dancers opened out in antler formation? The idea behind the dance was to show cell division, phagocytosis and metamorphosis, translating the microscopic to human size. The beauty came from the fluid movement unusual shapes that we form with our arms, legs and hands when they are put together en masse, and we’d go so far as to say this was the cleverest dance of the evening. Sarah Foster-Sproull, a graduate herself, choreographed in her fourth commission, collaborating with the students: although trained in classical dance while at NZSD, she now choreographs contemporary dance, and, based on what we saw, very successfully. The second- and third-year students here gelled, and this dance showcased their coordination. The level of rehearsal in Forgotten Things, a world première, was evident.
   Cnoditions of Entry (the misspelling is intentional) was another contemporary première, and hugely enjoyable. NZSD alumnus Thomas Bradley (class of 2012), choreographed and provided the score made up of electronica and bass noises, and even designed the costumes along with Jefferis. Bradley’s notes indicate that the dance was in two parts: the first created a mutual understanding between them; the second conveying ‘exhaustion suspension apology and defeat’. It began in darkness, with orange-hooded, androgynous dancers huddled in a group. Abrupt movements, angular, backwards steps conveyed a confusion, as though the society that had been formed was suddenly devoid of structure or rules, feeling like the aftermath of war. Rectangular lights shone on the two sides of the stage as dancers struggled to move toward it, escaping their personal prisons; the term ‘techno-dystopia’ came to mind.
   Tarantella, a George Balanchine ballet with the masterful (and new father, with a one-month-old baby) Qi Huan as the répétiteur, saw us say at the conclusion of the pas de deux: ‘Hire these two now.’ Danced by Megan Wright and Jeremie Gan, this light-hearted yet passionate ballet needed the pair to master some very quick steps and changes of directions, and while inspired by Neapolitan street dance, the foundation is classical. It is not an easy ballet but we couldn’t fault either Wright or Gan.
   Playing the game of contrasts in the programme, the contemporary As It Fades, originally commissioned by T.H.E Dance Company of Singapore and created by Kuik Swee Boon in 2011, was an energetic performance, and showed what the dancers were capable of, with strong, purposeful movements, accompanied by the strings in Max Richter’s ‘Jan’s Notebook’ and ‘November’, which painted a world struggling to understand itself. The tension sharply vanished at the end where a dancer was surrounded by the others, caught in a chair, exhausted, breathing heavily, conveying that notion of defeat and solitude. As the performance ended, the Richter score did not feel out of place in a bleak science-fiction film from the turn of the 1970s, with credits rolling as a dancer walked off-stage into the darkness, making us wonder what lay beyond the abyss. It was very clever, and got us ready for the final performance.
   That final performance was Concerto, an abstract ballet choreographed by Kenneth MacMillan after he joined the Deutsche Oper in Berlin, with a musical score by Dmitri Shostakovich (many audiences will know his work not from ballet but from the theme tune of Reilly: Ace of Spies; this was his ‘Piano Concerto No. 2 in F’), that premièred in 1966, staged here by Lynn Wallis and coached by Stephen Beagley. Two pianists provided the Shostakovich score, while the 29 NZSD dancers were resplendent in yellow, orange and red, in costumes courtesy of the Australian Ballet. How could one not feel upbeat? The three movements began with the allegro, the corps de ballet doing a well coordinated en pointe, with Yeo Chan Yee and George Liang as the central couple performing some very skilful, quick turns. By this point the classical dancers were all in the swing of things, and there was not a single hesitation as Concerto moved to the andante and a romantic pas de deux from Lola Howard and Jerry Wan, before the final movement that opened with a beautiful solo from Georgia Powley before the ensemble brought the performance to a spirited, optimistic close.
   The Graduation Season runs till November 28 at the New Zealand School of Dance at at Te Whaea: National Dance & Drama Centre, 11 Hutchison Road, Newtown, Wellington, New Zealand. Each performance is at 7.30 p.m. except for Sunday and Monday; matinees are at 2 p.m. on Sunday, November 22 and Saturday, November 28. Tickets are NZ$33 for adults, NZ$25 for students, seniors and groups of 10 or more, and NZ$18 for children under 13. Bookings are available online.Jack Yan, Publisher

Stephen A’Court

Top New Zealand School of Dance student Yuri Marques da Silva. Above Georgia Rudd and Christopher Mills.

Amber Griffin

November 17, 2015

MAC Cosmetics’ three December launches: Rebel lipstick, Fluidline eyeliner, and more Huggable lip shades

Lucire staff/13.47

MAC Cosmetics has three débutants for the New Zealand market in December, beginning with MAC Rebel Eyes, hitting counters on the 17th. MAC Rebel lipstick has already been a hit in beauty circles, so this line of gel liners, liners, and an eye pencil is particularly welcome, with prices ranging from NZ$36 to NZ$50 for the Pro Longwear eyeliner.

MAC Cosmetics

   Right after Christmas, on December 26, MAC Fluidline eyeliner, part of its Fluidity range, launches. It combines a pigmented liner with a pen, and MAC describes it as ‘calligraphy for your eyes’. We haven’t tested it yet, but the promotional image suggests that it is a very precise tool and dries very rapidly, and at NZ$40 it hardly breaks the bank. Four shades are on offer: Retro Black, Vintage Brown (a deep, dark shade), Indelibly Blue (navy) and Privet (sea green).

   Finally, on December 31, MAC’s Huggable Lipcolour will be released with even more shades. There are 15 shades that will remain luminous for up to six hours. Plus MAC is releasing Huggable Glass, featuring 12 funkier, long-lasting creamy colours. Retail price is NZ$50.

November 13, 2015

Footwear shopping: Kendall Jenner, Kylie Jenner choose Uggs; Snkr launches in New Zealand for sneaker aficionados

Lucire staff/9.13

Michael Simon

Kendall Jenner and her sister Kylie shopped for Classic Slim styles at the Ugg Australia flagship store at 600 Madison Avenue, New York. The sisters are Ugg fans, Kylie choosing the black Bethany design and Kendall the chestnut-coloured Amie. The Classic Slim line has a slimmer silhouette, as the name implies, and has improved arch support and traction, says the company. Kendall also chose the Ugg Shearling Trapper hat, Alena slippers and the Ugg Classic boots, while Kylie bought the Scuff slipper and Classic boots.
   The Banks Group has launched Snkr, a footwear retailer that focuses exclusively on sneakers, recognizing that they are fashion statements unto themselves. In the words of the company, ‘It’s a celebration of the art of sneaker design and the undying love of sneaker collectors. It’s a place where sneaker addicts feel understood.’ Brands include Nike, Adidas, and New Balance, among others. Like all new retailers, you have the option of ordering online at—though Snkr also has physical branches in Wellington (Lambton Quay store shown), Lower Hutt and Riccarton, New Zealand.

Michael Simon

Nike Air Max Thea Premium, NZ$179·99.

New Balance 530 Athleisure in white, NZ$199·99.

Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lux Missoni Mid, NZ$159·99.

November 9, 2015

Be in to win with She Loves Golf: Lydia Ko, Toni Street, Laura McGoldrick, Jamie Curry, Amber Peebles promote the sport

Lucire staff/23.17

New Zealand is promoting women’s golf during November, in the wake of Kiwi Lydia Ko regaining her world number-one position after winning the Fubon LPGA Taiwan Championship, with a month of activities—while Lucire readers can get a fantastic giveaway as part of the She Loves Golf campaign (hashtagged #shelovesgolf).
   The campaign, with Ko, Toni Street, Laura McGoldrick, Jamie Curry, and former Lucire contributor Amber Peebles as the five spokeswomen, will be showcasing their golf experiences around the country. Each woman will document them through their social media channels.
   There are pop-up events to take place in Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington on November 13, 22 and 26 respectively. The website at shows what activities women can participate in nationally, as well as gear they can buy and prizes they can win. Clubs are running their own events and offers, all of which can be found on the website.
   All you need to do to be in to win the following prize pack is to like our Facebook page and the post where we mention #shelovesgolf: on top of the golf introductory lessons, there are plenty of goodies. We’re only shipping to New Zealand addresses, and we’ll take entries till the end of November. We’ll draw one name from the likers. Enter now—and enjoy your next round of golf on us!

2 × Whittaker’s chocolate
2 × L’Affarè coffee packs and keep cup
Neutrogena sunscreen
Vita Coco, 1 litre
Faby nail varnish
5 × Schwarzkopf products
IOG 30-minute intro to golf voucher x 2 (value NZ$180)

November 4, 2015

News in brief: Deadly Ponies’ Len Lye tribute collection; Net-a-Porter group launches All for You campaign

Lucire staff/12.04

Deadly Ponies will launch a capsule collection in honour of New Zealand-born artist Len Lye (1901–80) in November. Lye’s experimental films saw him scratch, paint and stencil directly on to film; he was also a gifted and well known sculptor. Working with the Len Lye Foundation and the New Zealand Film Archive, Deadly Ponies has re-created the energy from Lye’s work on to a series of bags, wallets and scarves. The launch commemorates the recent opening in July of the Len Lye Centre in New Plymouth, an initiative between the Foundation and the Govett–Brewster Gallery, which houses much of Lye’s work.
   Net-a-Porter and Mr Porter have launched a joint campaign for the holidays, showing how a package gets from origin to recipient, but with a fanciful twist, where models in chiffon gowns get garments from rails, paper butterflies become pocket squares, and each package gets a spritz of perfume. Released on November 3 and directed by Us, the British creative directors Christopher Barrett and Luke Taylor, the campaign emphasizes the two brands’ personalized service, hashtagged #AllforYou.
   Alison Loehnis, president of the Net-a-Porter Group said, ‘Our first joint campaign, All for You, highlights the year-round mission of our businesses: to deliver exceptional service and style to our customers around the globe, making Net-a-Porter and Mr Porter the ultimate online destinations for luxury gifting this holiday season.’

November 3, 2015

Samala Cosmetics: part of the magic behind the scenes at Miss Universe New Zealand 2015

Lucire staff/1.09

Alan Raga

The Miss Universe New Zealand Grand Final at Skycity Theatre, Auckland, on October 24 saw the return of two winning teams behind the scenes: Samala Robinson Academy and Premier Hairdressing Academy, both of which went all out to make sure the 20 finalists, as well as some of the VIPs, looked as stunning as they could be on stage. There was the added bonus this year of Samala Cosmetics, Robinson’s own line of make-up that meant organizers didn’t have the additional burden of organizing a range from another cosmetics’ company. The SRA team was familiar with what was on offer, and worked their magic accordingly.
   Robinson herself is an international make-up artist who worked around the world before returning to New Zealand and setting up her academy in 2000. Like Premier, SRA is very well known for its professionalism and high standards of training. She established her cosmetics’ line more recently and her current focus is steering her new brand’s direction.
   On the night, Samantha McClung took the title of Miss Universe New Zealand 2015. McClung coincidentally is a trained make-up artist, which should serve her well when she competes for the Miss Universe title alongside other national delegates in Las Vegas, Nevada, at the end of the year.

Alan Raga

Bhikhu Bhula

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