Lucire


  latest news   fashion   beauty   living   volante   in print   tablet   tv
  home   community   shopping   advertise   contact

Tailor Renew: does exactly what it says on the box


NEWS  by Jack Yan/April 18, 2017/14.20

Tailor Skincare’s Renew is a probiotic serum that’s already picked up an Innovation Award for Best Formulation from the New Zealand Society of Cosmetic Chemists. For the service of our readers, we put it to the test, as we do with other products that come across our desk.
   In the case of Renew, I wanted to get a real-world sense of how it might work. Believing in “tested on humans”, my other half came to the rescue, putting the serum on one hand but not the other at night.
   Within a day there was a noticeable difference where the serum had been applied: the skin felt softer and smoother to the touch, even healthier. Things continued to improve over the week: it really works.
   It did exactly what Tailor claims: it stimulated and revitalized the skin, thanks to its probiotic lysate and grape seed extract. The lysate-based Prorenew Complex CLR ingredient is unique to Tailor, while grape-seed extract is a known antioxidant that protects the skin. These work with the body’s own processes.
   ‘Renew’ is an honest claim—here’s a product whose name is a real claim to what it does.
   Tailor recommends that it be used for the face and neck after cleansing and moisturizing, using ‘a pea-sized amount’. It works with all skin types.
   Tailor Renew, retailing for NZ$69, is made in New Zealand, and is cruelty-free.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Natural selections: the best of 2017’s Expo West


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 7, 2017/19.04



Anaheim, California is, famously, home to Disneyland, the happiest place on Earth. However, hundreds of visitors who came to Anaheim on a hot weekend in mid-March found their happy place at the city’s convention centre. For the last several years, the centre and the adjoining Marriott and Hilton hotels have been home to the Natural Products Expo West.
   Although Expo West is a trade show, it has a colourful, carnival-like setting. This year, it expanded to include numerous new products’ rooms and a festive midway area that added an extra level of family-friendliness, as many paid attendees have their kids in tow. For the 2017 edition, the planners truly infused the proceedings with a healthy dash of Coachella and other hippie-chic music and arts festivals. Retailers and hospitality professionals from around the globe descended on this four-day carnival of healthy living to scope out established and emergent producers of specialty foods (ethnic, vegan, organic, ethically sourced, and so on), beauty products, pet gear, household supplies, cooking ingredients, vitamins and health aids.
   Everything that makes the business of an environmentally conscious-driven so alluring was in place, from free early morning yoga classes, to a concert stage with a steady stream of free energy bars, Late July chips, Think Thin protein bars, Kettle Chips, Pamela’s baked goods, Siggi yoghurt, Silk milk substitutes, and GoGurt. Pie Pops—possibly the most indulgent treat handed out to passers-by—was the cream of the crop with its custardy ice-cream core bathed in crumbled pie crust and toppings.

A healthy appetite for change
Pie Pops notwithstanding, there were fewer knockout ice-cream vendors populating Expo West 2017 than in past years. Sweet Lady Jane, Hollywood bakery to the stars, picked up some of the slack by rolling out its line of supermarket cakes and pies, including layer cakes that make the brand’s VIP cache accessible to markets beyond La La Land. There were almost too many excellent Fair Trade chocolates (Wild Boar and ZazuBean could give Valrhona a run for its money), and way too many reinventions of the classic granola bar (Empact, raising money and awareness for women’s causes, was among the best).
   While coconut- and almond-based beverages continued to dominate the dairy substitute drinks, Ripple Oat Milk cut in to the competition, as did Banana Wave. Carnation released its new Natural Bliss almond- and coconut-based coffee creamers. (Correspondent Jody Miller and I were partial to the coconut.) There was also a jolt of excellent coffee and tea offerings with artsy packaging, from canned coffee from hot Los Angeles desert bar BeSweet, to sublimely boxed Pukka teas and herbal infusions, to earthy Prana Chai, Maxpresso’s tasty instant coffee packets from South Korea, and Black Medicine’s powerful brews. Kombucha also flowed in abundance, and once again, we found Kombucha Dog was top dog for its balanced flavours as well as its animal welfare charity endeavours. Speaking of balanced, we loved the true fruit flavour of the blood-orange ginger ale and other concoctions from Massachusetts-based Powell and Mahoney Drink mixers, KillCliff energy drinks (which donates proceeds to US Navy Seal veterans), and bright watermelon and ginger flavours from Dry Soda, in contrast to medicinal energy drinks that still flood the market.
   As it can get very easy to burn out on nutrition bars and chocolate, ethnic and ethnic-inspired food offerings from the main floor and new products’ installations provided excitement. We loved the multi-brand and product spaces focused on México (perfect lime popsicles), Korea and Japan. New Zealand was well represented, with a large booth featuring a mix of imports from Pacific Resources International, including manuka honey items, medicinal items, and snacks from the Proper brand.
   Tamales from Arizona and New Mexico provided welcome relief from diabetic-coma overloads of sweets, as did Hummus Pods (heartier, less “chemical” variations on Hot Pockets); Yellow Bird, Tsang and One Culture hot sauces and salsas; the latest from celebrity chef Rick Bayless’s Frontera Grill; Thai fare from Koh; and Indian foods from Deep and Tasty-Bite. Better Than Pasta, which swaps out wheat and rice noodles with konnyaku (a sweet potato-based product popular in Japan) added spicier creations to their line-up of products. Arlette Tea Seed Oil, meanwhile, may truly be the next big thing: a tea-based substitute for olive oil.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor

continued below
















The bad and the beautiful
Health and beauty are big business, even in the natural products world. While many up-and-coming brands were represented, the aforementioned carnival-like atmosphere was absent from the Health & Beauty Pavilion, in favour of a more corporate trade show vibe. In fact, some popular beauty vendors were downright surly (I’m talking to you, Beauty without Cruelty and Andalou Naturals). Others were merely aloof. Hopefully their reps will take some people skills’ training next year.
   In spite of those glaring shortcomings, there were real high points and positive vibes. Quite a few brands got it right with attitude and presentation. Alaffia (getting attention with their live drummers and vibrant tribal décor, pillows and scarves), showcased their Fair Trade hair and body care. Badger celebrated new Moms with a new line of body care and new additions to their Damascus Rose facial care. Derma-E debuted sleek new packaging, while Burt’s Bees not only showcased their new Healthy Nutrition protein powders, but rewarded patient attendees with two complimentary products. As a big sunscreen advocate, it was encouraging to see Goddess Garden and Earth Science proudly display their hottest SPF products.
   One of the most refreshing trends, and a welcome respite from singular note essential oils, was holistically sourced perfume. Sow Good’s natural eau de parfum, made with premium ingredients and alcohol from organic sugar cane, were available in four distinct scents packaged in elegant bottles. Juniper Ridge, meanwhile, distils their perfumes from such free-range ingredients as wildflowers, plants, bark and other cool stuff that grows in the woods. This results in a fragrance library that authentically reflects the great outdoors.
   Taking multiple vitamins and supplements every day is a hard pill to swallow for many of us. Fortunately, drinkable and gummy-bear supplements were everywhere to help the less diligent among us. Vegan Smart, Vega One, Vegan Slim, Almased and Rainbow Light will keep the calories down and the metabolism up with shakes in a plethora of flavours. American Health, Pure Essence Labs, Oxylent, Paradise, Mega Foods, and Genesis Today, in contrast, want you to drink your way to health.
   For the more dedicated whole-food junkie, Kulli Kulli offers a pure moringa vegetable powder, while Manitoba Harvest grew on us through samples of their tasty hemp smoothie. Gummies and chewables from Bluebonnet, Solgar and Hero Nutritionals taste just like candy, so now everybody can get their daily dose.
   In the lifestyle department, Ecos gratified the weary with a free full-size product. And a big kudos to Seventh Generation for donating their display products to a shelter. We like that!—Jody Miller, LA Correspondent

Huawei, Zambesi team up to launch P10 phones in New Zealand; Zambesi creates bespoke collection


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 5, 2017/11.47



Huawei has teamed up with leading New Zealand fashion label Zambesi to launch its P10 and P10 Plus smartphones.
   To mark the New Zealand introduction of the phones on April 12, Zambesi has created a bespoke collection inspired by the P10’s colours, namely the Graphite Black, Dazzling Blue, Dazzling Gold and Prestige Gold.
   The Zambesi collection uses 100 per cent merino wool, black satin and double silk organza gauze in tones of cobalt blue, gold and black, mirroring the P10’s colours.
   The phones will be on display alongside the collection at Zambesi’s Auckland and Wellington stores.
   The new phones promise some class-leading specs, including 5·1- or 5·5-inch screens, larger batteries, 64 Gbyte plus 4 Gbyte RAM, dual Leica cameras on the back and a Leica front-facing (selfie) camera, fingerprint-repelling Hyper Diamond-Cut metal finishing with colours created in partnership with Pantone, a Kirin 960 processor running Android 7, and support for 4·5G networks.
   They also offer Te Reo Māori as a standard language option in New Zealand.
   Huawei is so confident of the P10’s glass that it offers a complimentary three-month screen replacement guarantee. Retail price is NZ$999 for the P10, and NZ$1,199 for the P10 Plus.


Catching our eye: stand-outs at the 2017 ID Emerging Designer Awards


NEWS  by Chris Park/March 26, 2017/11.52

Thirty finalists were selected to showcase their capsule collections at the 2017 ID Emerging Designer Awards’ runway show. Hosted on a crisp autumn evening in the iconic Dunedin Railway Station, the finalists were chosen by a panel of judges from over 150 different entrants, with designers coming from all over the world.
   Head judge Tanya Carlson said that, although it might sound cliché and make her sound like a broken record, she truly believes that the standard of the submissions continues to rise and we were fortunate to see some of the talent.
   Here were some of the designers which particularly caught our attention.

Marina, Talia Jimenez, University of Technology, Sydney, NSW
Winner of the Golden Centre Prize for the Most Commercial Collection




Chris Park/The Park Brothers

   First off the runway, the collection featured playful digital prints of overlapping marine animals. Jimenez balanced the vibrant imagery by using mostly pastel colours for the prints and keeping the overall colour palette minimal.
   The collection was inspired by a trip to the Sydney Fish Markets in Piermont, where she experienced an overwhelming cacophony of marine-themed advertisements, overfilled crates of prawns, and mud crabs tied up in string everywhere.
   The prints were featured on PVC overalls faced with cotton worn with merino turtleneck knits, and oversized raincoats, referencing clothing traditionally worn by fishermen. The prints might be fun but the imposition of the prints on top of “fishermen” alludes to the over-exploitation of the marine ecosystem, and our excess indulgence in the spoils of the sea.




Chris Park/The Park Brothers

Above: Close-ups from Talia Jimenez’s Marina collection.

The Daily Show, Megan Stewart, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand
NZME and ‘Viva’ Editorial Prize for Best New Zealand Collection







Chris Park/The Park Brothers

   This collection is a sharp critique on the distortionary effect that electronic communication and mass media have on our perception of reality. The distortionary effect is expressed in a very literal sense by the use of distorted imagery from television shows and twisted knits.
   She references digital media and the pixels of a screen by incorporating 90-degree angles and rectangles in her patterns, which further add to the warping when the square clothing twists around the human form.
   The television imagery was selected and distorted by Stewart herself, before being printed onto hessian-like material. The shoulder construction hangs by the elbows, adding to the warping effect on our perception of the clothing.
   The bright playful colours and mesmerizing patterns belie the warning messages that Stewart transmits to the viewer, of how being absorbed into media will warp one’s perception of reality.

XXX, Nehma Vitols, University of Technology, Sydney, NSW
H&J First Prize








Chris Park/The Park Brothers

   Vitols’s collection was ethereal. The pieces looked like they were hovering in front and behind the models rather than being worn by them, and yet it the composite fabric used by Vitols that gave it a stiffness belying the translucency of the wraith-like materials.
   Nehma created this material by taking silk organza and bonding it with stiff cotton organdy, then applying laser-cut Tyvek detailing in white to add visual depth. As the models walked down the runway, the fabric would shimmer and float, as if it had a mind of its own.
   The pieces were cleverly constructed from scraps of fabric left over from creating archetypal garments, held together using a combination of ties made out of leftover strips of fabric, contrast top-stitching and golden zips, which provided some weight and textural contrast to the sheer fabric.
   The complexity of the construction, the innovative materials and the brilliant execution led to Vitols taking out the grand prize at ID for 2017. Congratulations!—Chris Park, Special Correspondent




Chris Park/The Park Brothers

Above: Detail from Nehma Vitols’s collection, XXX, which took first prize at the ID Emerging Designer Awards.

A grand Petit double bill: Royal New Zealand Ballet performs Carmen and L’Arlésienne


NEWS  by Jack Yan/March 22, 2017/13.15




Stephen A’Court

Above, from top: Joseph Skelton as Don José and Natalya Kusch as Carmen in Carmen. Yuri Marques, with Shaun James Kelly as Frédêric and Madeleine Graham as Vivette in L’Arlésienne. Madeleine Graham as Vivette and Shaun James Kelly as Frédêri in L’Arlésienne.

What a treat to see two of Roland Petit’s ballets—L’Arlésienne and Carmen—performed by the Royal New Zealand Ballet, faithfully executing two of the late Parisian maestro’s works, staged by the Roland Petit Trust’s Luigi Bonino.
   They are particularly close to RNZB artistic director Francesco Ventriglia’s heart, having worked with Petit himself and having danced the role of the Toreador in Carmen in Milano and New York after the maestro cast him. ‘Maestro Petit was the first to trust me as an artist, and it was a turning point,’ writes Ventriglia in the notes to the season’s performances.
   Both are passionate ballets, but perhaps more so tonight as the RNZB returned home to Wellington to perform them for the first time, dedicated to their late senior costumier, Andrew Pfeiffer, who passed away March 3 after three decades’ service to the company.
   Ventriglia, accompanied by RNZB executive director Frances Turner, made the announcement on stage before the curtain went up.
   When it did, we were taken into Provence with the first ballet, L’Arlésienne. It’s the briefer of the two ballets (and receives a lower billing in RNZB publicity: it’s Carmen with L’Arlésienne) but particularly intense, exploring themes of dreams, isolation and solitude. The ballet draws from Provençal folk music and costumes—costumier Christine Laurent gives black shawls to the women and vests with a red sash to the men—and the pas de deux between Frédéri (Shaun James Kelly) and Vivette (Madeleine Graham) is tinged with intensity and tragedy. Frédéri’s descent into madness through his obsession with the unseen Girl from Arles is well portrayed by Kelly, especially his solo at the end as he tries hard to break through his mental turmoil—for a finalé it’s particularly powerful and Kelly builds to it and carries it. Graham’s Vivette tries in vain to save him with emotions showing in her light and flowing dance and her expressions. It’s a tragic end for a man who refused to conform and who allows his obsession to dominate him.
   The ballet is characterized by the small steps from folk dance, contrasting Frédéri’s wilder, grander contemporary moves as he tries to break from the rigidness of Provençal society; while simple sets by Réné Allio keep the focus on the leads, from a canvas cloth with an abstract landscape to the final window.
   That simplicity is in contrast to the rich and somewhat sinister reds in the first two scenes in Carmen: the tobacco factory exterior that opens the second ballet sees a giant wooden frame and hanging laundry as the full cast performs; the tavern scene has a touch of surrealism with the barren frames of the wooden chairs adding to the spectacle. There’s fake cigarette smoke emanating from the stage (the scene calls for dancers to light up). Here it’s the late Antoni Clavé’s costume and set design at work, the women in bodices with zig-zag lines. Among this we first meet Carmen, played to perfection tonight by RNZB’s Ukrainian-born, Wien-trained guest artist Natalya Kusch, a powerful ballerina in total control of her craft. Her Carmen oozed defiance, with her cropped hair and short black dress. It’s the company’s ability to attract international talent that adds to its world-class performances, and Kusch’s Carmen was a veritable femme fatale, her en pointe moves emphasizing her prowess.
   After Carmen and Don José (Joseph Skelton) spend the night together, their pas de deux was particularly sensual—watch for one explicit move where Skelton arches his back and Kusch lays and rubs on top of him—and hinted at the peril ahead. Skelton’s tense portrayal as he stabs the victim drew you more deeply into the ballet, while his final confrontation with Carmen is powerful and tragic.
   Carmen is the grander of the two, and a spectacular note to finish on. With the relatively short run time, it packs a great deal in, making it more concentrated than the Rio de Janeiro-set version performed by the RNZB in 2010, a full-length ballet by Didy Veldman.
   The Two Ballets by Roland Petit, Carmen with L’Arlésienne, continue till April 1, with four more performances in Wellington (from March 23 to 25) before moving to Auckland (March 29 to April 1). Further details are available at the RNZB’s website.—Jack Yan, Publisher



Stephen A’Court

Above, from top: Massimo Margaria as Chief Bandit, Joseph Skelton as Don José and Natalya Kusch as Carmen in Carmen. RNZB dancers with Joseph Skelton as Don José in Carmen.

The Body Shop’s Drops of Youth and Drops of Light liquid peels: effective and perfect for sensitive skin


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/March 20, 2017/9.42


We’ve been sampling the Body Shop’s new Drops of Youth Youth Liquid Peel and Drops of Light Pure Resurfacing Liquid Peel, coming soon to New Zealand. These products claim to deliver a smoother, healthier, more youthful and lighter skin.
   I tried out both products, and they get Lucire’s thumbs-up. The formula between them both is similar, so you’d choose which one you want based on your preference. Drops of Light features red algæ extract from the North Atlantic and vitamin C. Drops of Youth is 100 per cent vegan, enriched with edelweiss, sea holly and criste marine plant stem cells. The liquid peels help skin appear brighter, refined and more even. At first, I wasn’t sure how they worked, because they are not like a traditional exfoliant scrub. After a bit of research, I found out that a liquid peel essentially takes off the top layer of dead cells from your face. The first thing I noticed when I opened Drops of Youth was the smell: it was nice and clean, and the texture was like a really refreshing cold jelly. I applied the product on my face, massaging for around 20 seconds, and noticed that these little balls of dead skin cells were forming. After I wiped the product off my face, my skin felt amazing, and appeared soft and bright.
   I am really careful with my skin routine and not to keen to introduce new products because I’ve had a very long battle with rosacea and sensitive skin. However, with the Body Shop’s liquid peels I didn’t experience any rosacea outbreaks or reactions, which tells me they are great for those with sensitive skin. I’ve kept using the products two to three times a week and I notice my skin feels much softer and glowing now!—Nathalia Archila

Countdown to the Oscars: more beauty secrets are out at the Secret Room Red Carpet Luxury Lounge


NEWS  by Elyse Glickman/February 23, 2017/23.02




Elyse Glickman

Even with savvy Amy Boatwright surprising us every awards’ season with her magic in putting together the Secret Room Red Carpet Luxury Lounge, finding new beauty discoveries (and being treated to an amazing array of treatments ranging from Botox to hair services) never stops being exciting. As we’ve come to expect, the pampering and products for people were nicely balanced with fundraising and awareness for the Best Friends Animal Society and No-Kill Los Angeles (NKLA) shelters, both dedicated to ensuring cats and dogs get the medical treatments, owners and fur-ever homes they deserve.
   However, as this is part of the countdown leading up to Hollywood’s biggest night, the 2017 Academy Awards, the ladies once again pulled out all the stops with sweets and 100 per cent arabica bean coffee from Wolfgang Puck and beauty treatments (including Botox!) from Pasadena-based Parfaire Medical Æsthetics who did a fantastic job of introducing prospective clients to their services and practitioners, and topped it off with a US$50 gift certificate for VIPs. Other services that transformed the suite into a spa included Cecilia Alcala’s massage services, braids and up-dos from Toni & Guy stylists, and Celebrity Gold face masks, and décolleté and hand treatments from European Skin & Massage Studio.
   However, the best beauty surprise of all was the return of Chaz Dean to the main stage at the SLS Hotel in Beverly Hills. A decade ago, he opened his house (that is, his Hollywood bungalow house-turned-salon) to Lucire and other outlets for pre-award show beauty lounges that are still the stuff of awards’ week legend. He introduced us to the wonders of all-purpose, all-in-one products under the Wen line. Although Chaz had been through a lot in recent years, including a fire at the salon and some controversy surrounding his products, he’s bounced back in a big way, with lavish new formulas for Wen, as well as pet grooming products, elegant fragrances, and body care in an ever-changing offering of seasonal aromas as well as year-round scents.
   Speaking of magic gardens (specifically, Chaz’s assortment of fragrances), guests learned about one of Los Angeles’ best hidden treasures, the Gottlieb Native Garden, in a stunning coffee-table book. Located a few minutes drive from the SLS, this inspired hideaway open to the public features California native vegetation as well as once-lost forms of wildlife returning to this new habitat. Other nice things ripe for the picking included skin care from Dermatologic Cosmetics Laboratories, Axia Medical Solutions, Dermis RX Skincare, EstheProLabo HerbZyme Elixir, Allomind’s 3-D movie viewing glasses, and luxury items and other incentives to visit Croatia from the Croatian Tourist Board. There had to be something special for pets, and Sally Snacks‘ Venison Dog Treats fit the bill.
   Repeat “nominees” returning to the lounge included Australia-based Auspect Skincare International with full travel kits filled with their all-purpose line, starring anti-ageing serums for fine lines and wrinkles and eye cream for dark circles to solutions for rosacea and acne-prone skin. Forever in My Heart Jewelry by Mira, whose founder was also devoted to animal welfare, returned with more chic silver statement pieces and pet-oriented baubles. We also enjoyed a second helping of Storm Rejuvenate Pro’s tidy box of perfect gel primer serum packet whose contents erase the appearance of wrinkles and loose skin, and a double dip of gourmet peanut butter from Julie’s Real Foods, Pasta Chips and Goodie Girl cookies.
   At many Secret Room events, media guests can pick up extra bonus products to try. However, this go-round, Amy gave the familiar “and wait … there’s more” sentiment a lift by sending press away with an L. L. Bean tote brimming with such desirables as make-up palettes from Anastasia Beverly Hills, a free year-long subscription to New Beauty, vitamins from Hero Nutritionals, a gift certificate for Sasaki Advanced Æsthetic Medical Center, a gift certificate for shoes from Hey Lady Shoes, and some hand-crafted home décor items. It was a grab bag worthy of being treated with kid gloves.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor





















Elyse Glickman

Allbirds releases limited-edition Wool Runner, teaming up with independent Wellington businesses


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/February 7, 2017/23.32

Allbirds has launched an eight-day celebration in Wellington starting today to promote artisans and creators who share its brand’s philosophy of quality and independence.
   Allbirds, a sustainable footwear brand co-founded by former All Whites skipper Tim Brown, has teamed up with craft brewery Garage Project, coffee roaster Coffee Supreme, and chocolatier Wellington Chocolate Factory. Each has created an Allbirds-inspired product that ties in with the brand’s new shoe, the Wool Runner.
   The Wool Runner features a merino wool upper and a plant-based in-sole, making the shoe particularly light and keeping the wearer’s feet fresh. Time went so far as to call it ‘the world’s most comfortable shoe’.
   The Wellington businesses have limited-edition Allbirds Wool Runners, finished in black, with details that unique to each partner.
   During the eight days, Allbirds has invited travellers passing through Wellington Airport to try the Wool Runner. They also have a pop-up store at creative video agency Wrestler, 21 Jessie Street, Te Aro, where one can try on and buy the limited-edition design.
   The limited-edition design can also be found from February 8 at www.allbirds.co.nz.
   Allbirds has also collaborated with artists Andrew J. Steel and Toby Morris, who have created a mural in the Eva Street alleyway to celebrate the programme.
   Other events will be announced via Allbirds’ Instagram page.—Nathalia Archila

Next Page »

 

Get more from Lucire

Our latest issue

Lucire 36
Check out our lavish print issue of Lucire in hard copy or for Ipad or Android.
Or download the latest issue of Lucire as a PDF from Scopalto

Lucire on Twitter

Lucire on Instagram