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Anna Cleveland models Paule Ka autumn–winter 2017–18, photographed by Miles Aldridge


NEWS  by Lucire staff/July 14, 2017/2.31





Miles Aldridge

Paule Ka has announced that Anna Cleveland will model its autumn–winter 2017–18 collection. The collection, overseen by creative director Alithia Spuri-Zampetti, has been photographed by the famed Miles Aldridge.
   The campaign is an homage to Parisian architecture, with Cleveland appearing suspended in a Haussmannian-era turquoise lounge with gold trim.
   Cleveland’s mother is Pat Cleveland, one of the first black models in the US to achieve prominence, working with some of the top photographers and designers of the 1960s and 1970s.
   Anna Cleveland became a model in her own right, signing with Next Management in the mid-2010s.
   Paule Ka called Spuri-Zampetti and Cleveland ‘kindred spirits’, with the creative director an Italian raised in the US and the model an American raised in Italy. Both now reside in Paris.

Modelled by Anna Cleveland/Next Paris
Photographed and art-directed by Miles Aldridge
Art direction by Grafic Thought Facility, London
Set designed by Vincent Olivieri/the Magnet Agency
Hair by Sébastien Bascle/Calliste
Make-up by Stéphane Marais/Studi57
Behind-the-scenes by Jean Christophe Moine/Ethnomedia

Kristen Stewart is the new face of the Gabrielle Chanel fragrance


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 11, 2017/12.34

Chanel has announced that actress Kristen Stewart is the face of the new Gabrielle Chanel fragrance, in a film campaign shot by British director Ringan Ledwidge, and a print campaign photographed by Karim Sadli.
   The fragrance has been created by Olivier Polge, in cooperation with the Chanel Fragrance Creation and Development Laboratory.
   Stewart is already representing Chanel with the Gabrielle bag campaign, and had previously featured in eyes and make-up campaigns in 2016 and 2017 respectively, and the autumn 2016 Le Rouge Collection No. 1 campaign. She has been a Chanel spokeswoman since 2013. Prior to her Chanel deal, Stewart modelled for the Balenciaga fragrance in 2012.
   Her next movie is Lizzie, directed by Craig William Macneill, but Stewart’s next major film date is at the Festival de Cannes, where Come Swim, her directorial début, will show.

Kérastase enters natural hair care market with Aura Botanica range; Toni Garrn spokesmodel


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/April 20, 2017/3.49

Kérastase has introduced its Aura Botanica line in New Zealand, featuring a shampoo (Bain Micellaire), retailing at NZ$48, a conditioner (Soin Fondamental), NZ$52, a treatment (Concentre Essentiel), NZ$79, and an oil mist (Essence d’Éclat), NZ$70. The collection is, on average, 98 per cent natural in origin—a first for this L’Oréal brand—and includes pure hand-pressed Samoan coconut and Moroccan argan oils.
   Kérastase says the Aura Botanica coconut oil has proven to penetrate deeply into the hair, leaving it soft, hydrated and strong. The argan oil, meanwhile, lasts longest on the hair’s surface, nourishing it and keeping hair soft and shiny. Development of the range began in 2013.
   The products have a fragrance with top notes of grapefruit and crushed mint leaves, mid-notes of black pepper, coriander and jasmine, and base notes of rich vanilla and warm amber.
   The products are (again on average) 97 per cent biodegradable, and its packaging is similarly friendly to the environment, with the Bain Micellaire in a 100 per cent recycled polyethylene terephthalate (RPET) bottle, and the Concentre Essentiel bottle is made with 25 per cent recycled glass.
   With interest in natural hair care growing, Kérastase expects a sizeable number of customers will chose Aura Botanica.
   As revealed in January, model Toni Garrn is the face of the Kérastase Aura Botanica range. Twenty-four-year-old Garrn, with 581,000 Instagram followers and a fresh, healthy face, is involved in humanitarian work, her image working well with the natural angle of Aura Botanica.—Nathalia Archila

A grand Petit double bill: Royal New Zealand Ballet performs Carmen and L’Arlésienne


NEWS  by Jack Yan/March 22, 2017/13.15




Stephen A’Court

Above, from top: Joseph Skelton as Don José and Natalya Kusch as Carmen in Carmen. Yuri Marques, with Shaun James Kelly as Frédêric and Madeleine Graham as Vivette in L’Arlésienne. Madeleine Graham as Vivette and Shaun James Kelly as Frédêri in L’Arlésienne.

What a treat to see two of Roland Petit’s ballets—L’Arlésienne and Carmen—performed by the Royal New Zealand Ballet, faithfully executing two of the late Parisian maestro’s works, staged by the Roland Petit Trust’s Luigi Bonino.
   They are particularly close to RNZB artistic director Francesco Ventriglia’s heart, having worked with Petit himself and having danced the role of the Toreador in Carmen in Milano and New York after the maestro cast him. ‘Maestro Petit was the first to trust me as an artist, and it was a turning point,’ writes Ventriglia in the notes to the season’s performances.
   Both are passionate ballets, but perhaps more so tonight as the RNZB returned home to Wellington to perform them for the first time, dedicated to their late senior costumier, Andrew Pfeiffer, who passed away March 3 after three decades’ service to the company.
   Ventriglia, accompanied by RNZB executive director Frances Turner, made the announcement on stage before the curtain went up.
   When it did, we were taken into Provence with the first ballet, L’Arlésienne. It’s the briefer of the two ballets (and receives a lower billing in RNZB publicity: it’s Carmen with L’Arlésienne) but particularly intense, exploring themes of dreams, isolation and solitude. The ballet draws from Provençal folk music and costumes—costumier Christine Laurent gives black shawls to the women and vests with a red sash to the men—and the pas de deux between Frédéri (Shaun James Kelly) and Vivette (Madeleine Graham) is tinged with intensity and tragedy. Frédéri’s descent into madness through his obsession with the unseen Girl from Arles is well portrayed by Kelly, especially his solo at the end as he tries hard to break through his mental turmoil—for a finalé it’s particularly powerful and Kelly builds to it and carries it. Graham’s Vivette tries in vain to save him with emotions showing in her light and flowing dance and her expressions. It’s a tragic end for a man who refused to conform and who allows his obsession to dominate him.
   The ballet is characterized by the small steps from folk dance, contrasting Frédéri’s wilder, grander contemporary moves as he tries to break from the rigidness of Provençal society; while simple sets by Réné Allio keep the focus on the leads, from a canvas cloth with an abstract landscape to the final window.
   That simplicity is in contrast to the rich and somewhat sinister reds in the first two scenes in Carmen: the tobacco factory exterior that opens the second ballet sees a giant wooden frame and hanging laundry as the full cast performs; the tavern scene has a touch of surrealism with the barren frames of the wooden chairs adding to the spectacle. There’s fake cigarette smoke emanating from the stage (the scene calls for dancers to light up). Here it’s the late Antoni Clavé’s costume and set design at work, the women in bodices with zig-zag lines. Among this we first meet Carmen, played to perfection tonight by RNZB’s Ukrainian-born, Wien-trained guest artist Natalya Kusch, a powerful ballerina in total control of her craft. Her Carmen oozed defiance, with her cropped hair and short black dress. It’s the company’s ability to attract international talent that adds to its world-class performances, and Kusch’s Carmen was a veritable femme fatale, her en pointe moves emphasizing her prowess.
   After Carmen and Don José (Joseph Skelton) spend the night together, their pas de deux was particularly sensual—watch for one explicit move where Skelton arches his back and Kusch lays and rubs on top of him—and hinted at the peril ahead. Skelton’s tense portrayal as he stabs the victim drew you more deeply into the ballet, while his final confrontation with Carmen is powerful and tragic.
   Carmen is the grander of the two, and a spectacular note to finish on. With the relatively short run time, it packs a great deal in, making it more concentrated than the Rio de Janeiro-set version performed by the RNZB in 2010, a full-length ballet by Didy Veldman.
   The Two Ballets by Roland Petit, Carmen with L’Arlésienne, continue till April 1, with four more performances in Wellington (from March 23 to 25) before moving to Auckland (March 29 to April 1). Further details are available at the RNZB’s website.—Jack Yan, Publisher



Stephen A’Court

Above, from top: Massimo Margaria as Chief Bandit, Joseph Skelton as Don José and Natalya Kusch as Carmen in Carmen. RNZB dancers with Joseph Skelton as Don José in Carmen.

Fragrance du Bois launches sustainably sourced Oud Intense


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 11, 2017/9.11

Here’s an ideal fragrance to go along with Lola Cristall’s favourites in Lucire issue 36. Fragrance du Bois’s latest Oud Intense complements its earlier Nature’s Treasures collection, except this time the parfumerie has gone the opposite direction with a full, undiluted oud experience.
   The spray is far bolder and designed to be a layer on top of other perfumes and scents, though it can be worn on its own.
   Fragrance du Bois’s Oud Intense features oud oil that is sourced ethically and sustainably from its own plantations.
   In keeping with the house’s exclusivity, Oud Intense is available only at its boutique in Genève, and at Jovoy, Paris and Doha, priced at €395, with a 15 ml spray version at €125.

Filed under: beauty, environment, Lucire, Paris

H&M stays positive with unisex denim line, following love-themed Paris catwalk show


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 8, 2017/20.59



Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) has announced a new denim line, Denim United. The difference this time is that it is a truly unisex collection, with identical women’s and men’s designs, with jackets, overalls, shorts, T-shirts and an oversized hoody. The materials and silhouettes are shared between the sexes.
   More sustainable materials have been used, including organic and recycled cotton.
   The collection goes on sale on March 23, online-only at hm.com.
   â€˜It is very natural for us to launch a unisex collection as fashion is constantly evolving and intersecting and today we see there are no boundaries in democratic style. Fashion should always be inclusive,’ said Marybeth Schmitt of H&M in a release.
   The announcement follows H&M Studio’s showing of its spring–summer 2017 women’s and men’s collections at the Tennis Club de Paris during Paris Fashion Week, where the designs went on sale at its flagship Fifth Avenue store in New York and online immediately. They went on sale in other stores on March 2.
   Celebrities in attendance in Paris included Nicki Minaj, Olga Kurylenko, Alexa Chung, Lucky Blue Smith, Clémence Poésy and Sasha Lane, while Emily Ratajkowski led the celebrations in New York.
   Models walking in Paris included Gigi Hadid, Bella Hadid, Adwoa Aboah, Amber Valletta, Jordan Barrett, Winnie Harlow and Luis Borges. The Weeknd gave a special performance at the Paris show, performing ‘Starboy’, ‘Can’t Feel My Face’ and ‘I Feel It Coming’.
   The collection featured fine knits, loose-fitting shorts, tops, dresses, anoraks and sandals, with ruffle detailing and bold graphics proclaiming ‘Love’.
   â€˜With this collection we want to send a global message of love. There are a few pieces that carry the word again and again, kind of like a ticker tape and as a constant reminder of what is important. It feels like now, more than ever, we all need positive feelings and thoughts in our lives,’ said H&M creative director and head of design Pernilla Wohlfahrt.

Paris show

Backstage

The celebrities

The show

The Weeknd

New York event

Barbara Palvin, Soo Joo Park, Julianne Moore, Kiersey Clemons star in L’Oréal Paris’s Voluminous Original Mascara campaign


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 7, 2017/23.25

L’Oréal Paris’s latest campaign for its Voluminous Original Mascara, dubbed The Original, brings together a group of celebrities, including models Barbara Palvin, Soo Joo Park, Dominique Babineaux, Hari Nef, Katerina Tannenbaum, and Juana Burga, actresses Julianne Moore, Diane Keaton and Kiersey Clemons, Blondie’s Debbie Harry, and TV host Lauren Ezersky.
   The first spot, shown below, sees quotations from customers around the US, where Voluminious Original Mascara is the country’s number-one entrant in the category. Babineaux and Palvin are the main models, though the whole cast appears at the end.
   L’Oréal Paris says it made its choice of the models based on their originality, rule-breaking, and truth.
   â€˜We are excited to bring together trail-blazing individuals in celebration of the mascara that women have loved for over 25 years. They each embody the essence of Voluminous Mascara—originals who continue to be fresh, creative and confident,’ said Tim Coolican, president, L’Oréal Paris USA, in a release.
   The spot promotes the original black shade as well as new blue ones. The mascara, says L’Oréal Paris, can build up to five times the natural eyelashes’ thickness.

Riccardo Tisci leaves Givenchy; autumn–winter 2017–18 prêt-à-porter format unknown


NEWS  by Lucire staff/February 2, 2017/6.31


Max von Gumppenberg and Patrick Biener

Above: From Givenchy’s spring–summer 2017 haute couture collection, which, along with its menswear shown in January, was Riccardo Tisci’s last for the brand.

Women’s Wear Daily has broken the news that Riccardo Tisci has left Givenchy.
   Tisci’s last collections for the brand were his menswear and haute couture ones, shown in Paris in January. He departed at the end of the month amicably, according to the trade newspaper.
   His final designs for Givenchy will be red-carpet ones for the Grammy Awards and the Oscars.
   WWD speculates that Tisci could be heading to Versace.
   As a result of his departure, Givenchy will not have a runway show at Paris Fashion Week, and the autumn–winter 2017–18 collection will be designed by the studio.
   No successor has been named.
   Bernard Arnault, CEO of Givenchy parent company LVMH, stated, ‘The chapter Riccardo Tisci has written with the house of Givenchy over the last 12 years represents an incredible vision to sustain its continuous success, and I would like to warmly thank him for his core contribution to the house’s development.’
   Tisci said, ‘I want to thank the LVMH group and M. Bernard Arnault for giving me the platform to express my creativity over the years. I now wish to focus on my personal interests and passions.’

Filed under: fashion, Lucire, Paris
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