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April 13, 2016

The Body Shop’s British Rose body care and make-up an ideal line for Mothers’ Day

Lucire staff/14.57


The rose is often associated with England, and the Body Shop’s new range plays on that—though to be inclusive, it’s dubbed the British Rose range, with a full line of body care and cosmetics that plays on the love of a rosy scent.
   The roses are grown in Herefordshire, without the use of chemicals. The whole process respects the biodiversity of the area and the balance of nature, providing a home for the mammals and insects, especially bees, there.
   We’ve sampled the Instant Glow body butter (NZ$36·95), which is silky smooth to apply, and quickly absorbed to start doing its job. There’s no stickiness, and has promises 24 hours’ moisturizing. We love the scent, which is more noticeable in the container, and subtler after application.
   The second Instant Glow product we’ve tested, the Body Essence (NZ$45), is a body lotion that’s light, also quickly absorbed, feels nice on the skin, and gives it a subtle shimmer. The shower gel (NZ$16·50) is soap-free and the scent is more noticeable—which makes the showering experience quite a delight!
   There’s also an eau de toilette (NZ$39·95), bath foam (NZ$29·95), hand cream (NZ$23·95) and exfoliating soap (NZ$15) which we didn’t test.
   In the make-up range, the Body Shop offers nine shades for the British Rose Lip & Cheek Stains. We checked out Pink Hibiscus and Deep Berry, both of which give 12 hours of hydration with a blend of Community Trade honey and organic alœ vera, retailing at NZ$35·50 each. They are gorgeous shades that suit different skin tones, and are right on trend. There’s only a single shade for the British Rose nail colour—a mid-pink—giving a nice finish for only NZ$12·95.
   The remaining item in the range which we didn’t check out is the eye and cheek palette, retailing for NZ$59·50, with a variety of shades suiting casual and formal looks.
   For Mothers’ Day, the Body Shop has three gift packs: the British Rose Treats at NZ$30, with the shower gel, body butter and a Mini Bath, in Lily in Pink; the Essential Gift Collection (NZ$82), with the shower gel, vitamin E moisture cream, body butter and hand cream; and the Deluxe Gift Collection (NZ$152), with shower gel, vitamin E moisture cream, body butter, Body Essence and eau de toilette.
   The British Rose range hits stores in New Zealand on April 18.





March 3, 2016

H&M Studio shows its autumn–winter 2016–17 collection at Paris Fashion Week

Lucire staff/9.23




H&M

Swedish retailer H&M showed its Studio collection for autumn–winter 2016–17 at Paris Fashion Week, at the Bourse de Commerce, last night, on a catwalk patterned after a frozen lake.
   The company says the collection was inspired by ‘strong women and the beauty of independent minds.’
   The collection had a sense of glamour mixed with Bohemian chic and Swedish folklore, with oversized coats, soft forms, ruffles, sheer fabrics, gaucho hats and cowboy boots.
   Amber Valletta, Jourdan Dunn, Freja Beha Erichsen, Ashley Graham, Soo Joo Park and Hari Nef walked the catwalk, while Emma Roberts, Ciara, Atlanta de Cadenet, Olivia Palermo, Pat Cleveland, Ashley Graham, Pernilla Tiesbaek, Suki Waterhouse, Gabriel Day Lewis, Hari Nef, Andreja Pejić and Kate Mara were among the 600 guests attending the show.
   Hennes & Mauritz’s Ann-Sofie Johansson and Margareta van den Bosch were also present for the big night.
   Music was composed by Nicolas Godin of Air, with his track, ‘Mystery Lake’, created especially for the show. A choir performed its track live at the venue.
   The collection goes on sale in 200 stores and online from September 8, 2016.















H&M

Liselore Frowijn shows autumn–winter 2016–17 at Paris Fashion Week, inspired by Niki de St Phalle

Lucire staff/1.05


Peter Stigter, via Liselore Frowijn

Paris editor Lola Cristall is currently back in France to cover fashion week there, and a full recap will come later.
   Meanwhile, Dutch designer Liselore Frowijn has shown on day one, with an autumn–winter 2016–17 collection inspired by late French sculptor, painter and filmmaker Niki de St Phalle.
   The collection, dubbed Let’s Hear It for the Lions, is targeted at creative, strong women, and has a brightly coloured palette using primary colours, with the intent of making a bold statement.
   Frowijn showed blazers, dresses and skirts, with layering, and the inventive use of punched-out polka-dot holes. Accessories included wooden necklaces, chokers and knotted foam earrings.
   ‘They’re very naïvely done in a bold way with primary colours, bold shapes, round volumes, polka dots. It’s a very optimistic way of creating and I wanted to catch this energy that I got from her work in the collection,’ says Frowijn.
   The cheerful, fun collection uses both new and recycled material, sometimes in the same outfit.

March 1, 2016

Atelier Cologne launches Bergamote Soleil Cologne Absolue at intimate event in New York

Lola Cristall/2.04

Atelier Cologne launched its latest scent, Bergamote Soleil Cologne Absolue. The new scent honours three principal elements: ‘friendship, excursions and sharing values’.
   Founded in 2009, the brand is the epitome of luxury. Sylvie Ganter and Christophe Cervasel are true masters of perfume creativity, inducing exclusive scents, uplifting ingredients and high-end quality to their array of fragrances. They are motivated and highly enthusiastic about their creations, ensuring that each client finds their coup de cœur.
   Guests were invited to step into a luxurious, colourful ambiance with a fruit and floral décor within a quaint restaurant, Maman Tribeca, tucked away in the heart of New York. The refreshingly sunny and bright features of the cologne comprises lavish and stunning ingredients, with highly concentrated citrus elements: Calabrian bergamot, bitter orange from the Ivory Coast, hints of white amber, lavender from Provence, cardamom from Guatemala, Ecuadorian ambrette, Haïtian vetiver, Egyptian jasmine and Slovenian oak moss come together. A mélange of notes fortifies the long-lasting, elegant and sophisticated scent, all in a luminous yellow bottle invoking what Atelier Cologne calls an ‘Italian summer, a sense of freedom and adventure.’—Lola Cristall, Paris editor




Filed under: beauty, Lucire, New York, Paris
February 28, 2016

News in brief: discovering Aztech Mountain; Chanel’s Coco Case; Louis Vuitton to open in Queenstown

Lola Cristall/20.44



Top: A close-up from an Aztech Mountain design. Above: An artist’s impression of how the new Marine Parade–Church Street, Queenstown building will look.

Aztech Mountain, founded in 2013 in Aspen, Colorado by David Roth and Heifara Rutgers, made its début at Project Las Vegas, a fashion event that exhibits menswear and womenswear twice a year at the Mandalay Convention Centre. The label focuses on designs and creations for ‘active men’. Their high-quality materials and simple designs are easy to wear; their well constructed insulated jackets have different patterns and designs to choose from.
   Louis Vuitton has announced it will open in Queenstown, New Zealand, at Skyline Investments’ Marine Parade building. It will join World, which will reside on the Church Street side of the building, while Eichardt’s Private Hotel restaurant–café is the third tenant on the ground floor.
   Chanel has shown off its Coco Case again, since its original showing at the spring–summer 2016 collections. Presented by Karl Lagerfeld and Carine Roitfeld, the new cabin case has appeared briefly on the French company’s Instagram, with the video below.—Lola Cristall, Paris editor, and Lucire staff





February 26, 2016

The Royal New Zealand Ballet’s Speed of Light: sophisticated, modern classics lead New Zealand Festival

Jack Yan/14.13



Bill Cooper


Maarten Holl

Above, from top: Selon désir, with dancers Abigail Boyle and Loughlan Prior. In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated, with Mayu Tanigaito. With tiles and cacti in Cacti.

The Royal New Zealand Ballet’s Speed of Light, kicking off the New Zealand Festival in Wellington on Friday night, comprised an enjoyable contemporary programme that showed the strength of this world-class company. The first programme put together by Francesco Ventriglia in his role as the RNZB’s artistic director, it showed how prepared the dancers were to embrace a series of challenging and inspirational modern classics just as readily as they have taken on more traditional fare. The three are united, notes Ventriglia, by the idea of light and its precision and power; to us, it’s the relevance of each of the three ballets’ themes: all different, all giving us food for thought. Ventriglia has shown a sophistication and an understanding of the deeper meanings of ballet in choosing these particular three, which we heartily recommend.
   Selon désir kicked off the evening, choreographed by Andonis Foniadakis. The RNZB had already performed this work in the UK and Italy, but tonight saw its New Zealand première. First performed by the Ballet du Grand Théâtre de Genève in 2004, this is a particularly powerful work set to Bach, with an introduction with an electronic score composed by Julien Tarride. Alayna Ng started alone, moving energetically on to the stage, loose hair flying and her body dropping to the floor, before fifteen other dancers join her in quick succession, marching on and danced with assertiveness, but carried so gracefully. The two Bach choruses—the St Matthew and St John Passions—add to the atmosphere, with the strings adding to the beauty of the movements; a pas de deux in the middle of the performance showed just how free the movements were, and how Foniadakis’s ideas of agony and martyrdom could still be danced with such grace and fluidity. The colours of the costumes—men and women in tops and skirts—are earthy, inspired by Renaissance paintings, and they were equally loose, adding to the sense of flight across the stage.
   This was in contrast to In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated, which had been commissioned by Rudolf Nureyev for the Paris Opéra Ballet, choreographed by William Forsythe, who also designed the lighting, stage and costumes. Premièring in 1987, the second ballet is very much a product of its time, with electric performances from the RNZB: turquoise leotards that showed off the muscular frames; indulgent, abrupt movements; dancers posing while others pulsed; and an electronic score by Thom Willems that shocked from its very first note. In 1987, Forsythe was fêted for In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated, with how charged it was to audiences; it still has the capacity to do that today. The theme remains classical, but it’s in the power and the challenge to classical ideas that makes In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated fresh. Every decade, certainly since this ballet’s creation, has had its disrupters; so much so that that term is now embedded as a desirable trait in entrepreneurial activity. That’s the best way to think of In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated: a ballet that inspires us to shake the establishment in our own lives.
   After such heady themes, Cacti brought a dose of humour. Swedish choreographer Alexander Ekman used his national culture’s appreciation of irony: this is a country that quietly celebrates fame, for instance. Ventriglia says that this was the work he wanted to stage with the RNZB, even before he was appointed. This postmodern work, first performed in the Netherlands in 2010, parodies the reviews of contemporary dance and the affectations therein. A spoken introduction read by Spenser Theberge samples such pretentious words, as 16 dancers arrive atop their tiles, dancing, clapping and shouting within their very restricted spaces, before a surreal scene where they each bring a cactus plant on to the stage. It’s not meant to "mean" anything—even if Theberge’s reading in artsy-luvvie terms suggests cacti truly know what comes from standing the Earth’s soil, unlike dancers who merely perform on the ground. But the meaninglessness of over-analysis is part of the beauty of it, just as the lighting rig comes down to restrict the dancers from above; or a dot-matrix sign flashes the ballet’s name from the wings. It’s designed to poke fun at clichés and of the modern media and marketing landscape. This is the wit of the ballet, made even more obvious by the pas de deux which lets us hear the dancers’ thoughts, deconstructing the complexity and beauty of ballet into almost banal statements, before a stuffed black cat is thrown from above the stage on to the floor, a shrieking meow accompanying its fall.
   The New Zealand String Quartet accompanies this final performance, with recorded music forming most of the central part. The work is more familiar here, with compositions from Haydn, Beethoven, and Schubert. Cheekily, the RNZB has reproduced the spoken-word text in the programme (a must, incidentally), as well as the stream-of-consciousness thoughts of the duet from the characters Aram and Riley. Humour aside, this was beautifully performed: the 16 dancers on their tiles kept the audience entertained despite lacking the freedom of movement of Selon désir, while the duet was cleverly executed, with the deconstruction actually enhancing one’s appreciation of the fluid movements.
   It always helps to end things on a fun note, especially as Speed of Light starts the New Zealand Festival, and the levity is bound to get audiences talking. And rightly so. This was a highly entertaining contemporary programme, and it’s heartening to note that the Royal New Zealand Ballet will take this to the Auckland Arts’ Festival as well as to the South Island next.
   Dates for Speed of Light are: Wellington, February 26 to 28 inclusive; Auckland, March 2–6; Christchurch, March 10–12; Dunedin, March 16. For booking information, visit www.rnzb.org.nz.—Jack Yan, Publisher

February 11, 2016

Messika launches book charting its rise, with Alice Dellal, Sai Bennett, Lady Mary Charteris, Sophie Kennedy Clark

Lucire staff/23.34



David M. Benett

Messika, the Parisian diamond jeweller founded in 2005, launched its book published by Assouline at Maison Assouline in Piccadilly, joined by guests Alice Dellal, Hikari Yokoyama, Sai Bennett, Sarah-Jane Crawford, Sophie Kennedy Clark, Lady Mary Charteris, Jo Wood, Cora Corré, Portia Freeman, Max Cocking and Alice Naylor-Leyland.
   Representing Messika were founder and creative director Valérie Messika, and Messika author Vivienne Becker was also present. Both were on hand to sign copies of the new book, which becomes officially available at the end of the month through retailers and Assouline’s website. It hits Amazon in April, but can be pre-ordered now.
   Valérie Messika is the daughter of diamond dealer André Messika, who also attended the event. Her house has charted a course that has seen it become celebrated in a decade, creating a youthful, strong, and edgy look for diamond jewellery, infusing it with tribal and punk influences.
   Messika-themed cocktails and canapés were served at the event, including ‘The Move’, champagne mixed with crushed strawberry, Moroccan rose, lychee and lemon. Messika jewellery was also on display.
   The book retails at official prices of £16, US$25 and €22, and is available in English and French.







David M. Benett

February 10, 2016

The Body Shop renews its ethical commitment with measurable CSR goals as it celebrates its 40th birthday

Lucire staff/0.00



The Body Shop, well known for a generation for its commitment to corporate social responsibility (CSR), is unveiling a new global strategy as it celebrates its 40th birthday.
   Its new commitment, dubbed Enrich Not Exploit, aims to ‘reaffirm the Body Shop position as a leader in ethical business,’ according to the company.
   Unlike many organizations that claim to have CSR goals, the Body Shop aims to make theirs measurable, with a target date for completion by 2020.
   The ambitious goals are also designed to renew the Body Shop’s position with a younger audience, including millennials.
   There is an increase in the use of community trade and transparency, demanded by modern consumers.
   Chairman and CEO Jeremy Schwartz said, ‘The Body Shop courageously pioneered new ways of thinking, acting and speaking out as a company. Our ground-breaking campaigns were ahead of their time and changed laws on animal testing, domestic violence and human trafficking. We were the first in beauty to use community trade and we still have the strongest programme in the industry. We are small, but we lead.
   ‘Today for all of us, the greatest challenges lie ahead and the Body Shop’s 40th anniversary is the perfect time to reassert our aim for leadership in ethical business. For us, being truly sustainable means shaping our business to work in line with the planet’s natural systems so they can replenish and restore themselves. With our commitment we’re challenging ourselves to go further than we’ve ever gone before to make a real, sustainable and positive difference. We have set ourselves a significant goal to be the world’s most ethical and truly sustainable global business.
   ‘Reestablishing the Body Shop as a leader will come from delivering our ambitious aim to be the world’s most ethical and truly sustainable global business.’
   The 14 targets the company has set itself, to enrich people, products, and the planet, follow.
   ‘1. Double our Community Trade programme from 19 to 40 ingredients and help enrich communities that produce them.
   ‘2. Help 40,000 economically vulnerable people access work around the world.
   ‘3. Engage 8 million people in our Enrich Not Exploit commitment mission, creating our biggest campaign ever.
   ‘4. Invest 250,000 hours of our skills and know-how to enrich the biodiversity of our local communities.
   ‘5. Ensure 100% of our natural ingredients are traceable and sustainably sourced, protecting 10,000 hectares of forest and other habitat.
   ‘6. Reduce year on year the environmental footprint of all our product categories.
   ‘7. Publish our use of ingredients of natural origin, ingredients from green chemistry, and the biodegradability and water footprint of our products.
   ‘8. Develop an innovation pipeline that delivers pioneering cosmetic ingredients from biodiversity hotspots and which helps to enrich these areas.
   ‘9. Build bio-bridges, protecting and regenerating 75 million square metres of habitat helping communities to live more sustainably.
   ‘10. Reduce the environmental footprint of our stores every time we refurbish or redesign them.
   ‘11. Develop and deliver three new sustainable packaging innovations.
   ‘12. Ensure that 70% of our total product packaging does not contain fossil fuels.
   ‘13. Power 100% of our stores with renewable or carbon balanced energy.
   ‘14. Reduce by 10% the energy use of all our stores every year.’
   The Body Shop’s international CSR and campaigns’ director, Chris Davis, added, ‘We have set ourselves ambitious, inspiring and measurable targets for our commitment. We are developing new practices to enrich the planet in which we operate whilst helping our company grow and prosper. Our new commitment combines all the experience and knowledge of our expert people with new advances in science and technology.
   ‘It means understanding how our business is contributing to our existence on the planet, understanding what we need to change to contribute to a sustainable future by working backwards from a visionary end point to the here and now and asking ourselves what comes next. We’ll continue to work in partnership with suppliers, NGOs, academics, governments and other businesses to deliver the innovation and changes needed to make our ambitions a reality.’
   The Body Shop has traditionally been known for its commitment to corporate social responsibility with its founder, the late Dame Anita Roddick, honoured by the Medinge Group think-tank in Sweden in 2008. The Group noted, ‘Dame Anita Roddick showed admirable leadership not only in the Body Shop but as an advocate for Fair Trade, the environment, corporate social responsibility, free speech and other causes through her personal work. Much of this can be found at anitaroddick.com, which was updated personally until her passing. All of this reflects a personal brand that is consistent and honed, supported by causes, many of which are compatible with the Medinge Group’s own aims. Anita Roddick believed in living her own personal brand as much as for her audiences, including the media, and had few detractors, something which cannot be said for many other high-profile types.’

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