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Kate Upton on three covers for Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue 2017, photographed by Yu Tsai


NEWS  by Lucire staff/February 15, 2017/10.49




Yu Tsai/Sports Illustrated

Above: Each of Yu Tsai’s covers for the 2017 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, on sale now in the US.

As with 2016, Sports Illustrated has gone with three covers for its annual Swimsuit Issue—except this time, all three covers are of one model, Kate Upton. All three were shot in Fiji by Taiwanese-born photographer Yu Tsai (蔡宇).
   Upton landed the cover in 2012 and 2013. Previous models to have managed covering the Issue in three different years were Christie Brinkley (who, at 63, returns to model in 2017’s number), Kathy Ireland, Daniela Peštová, and Cheryl Tiegs. Elle Macpherson has five covers to her name.
   Other models in the 2017 edition are Nina Agdal, Ashley Graham, Hannah Jeter, Chrissy Teigen, Brinkley’s daughters Alexa Ray Joel and Sailor Brinkley Cook; Barbara Palvin, Bianca Balti, Bo Krsmanović, Danielle Herrington, Hailey Clauson, Hannah Ferguson, Kate Bock, Kelly Gale, Lais Ribiero, Mia Kang, Myla Dalbesio, Robyn Lawley, Rose Bertram, Samantha Hoopes, and Vita Sidorkina; and athletes Simone Biles, Genie Bouchard, Aly Raisman, Serena Williams and Caroline Wozniacki,
   Swimsuit editor M. J. Day said in a release, ‘The women of SI Swimsuit 2017 are a collection of change agents, pioneers, power brokers and breakout stars-in-waiting who have in their own way redefined the cultural conversation around beauty. These ladies embody character and beauty—and they prove that when it comes to beauty, there is not one singular definition. This is the very essence of SI Swimsuit, and it’s our guiding principle as we move forward.’
   Publisher Time, Inc. has tied in Facebook Live shows, a Snapchat global live story, Giphy GIFs, 360-degree videos, YouTube videos, Instagram videos, app-exclusive content, and more. Others are encouraged to share their ideas of female beauty and confidence with the hashtags #WhatIModel and #LoveYourSwimsuit. A TV behind-the-scenes special débuts on DirecTV Now today (February 15); a live red carpet show will stream from New York on February 16; and a Vibes music, food and culture festival in Houston follows on February 17–18.
   The Issue’s shoots were done in Turks & Caicos, Fiji, Tulum, México, Anguilla, Sumba Island, Indonesia, Kakslauttanen, Finland, Curaçao, and Houston, Texas. Sponsors include DirecTV Now, Edge, Lexus and Smirnoff.

Beautifully free spirits: 2017’s Indie Beauty Expo


NEWS  by Jody Miller/February 8, 2017/22.25



On any given day, the California Market Center in Downtown Los Angeles is buzzing with the goings-on of the city’s fashion industry. Racks of clothing are pushed and pulled from here to there, buyers bounce from one showroom to the next. Hopeful designers showcase the next season’s must-have dress or handbag. That all changed when the top floor penthouse hosted the Indie Beauty Expo for three days of free-spirited gorgeousness.
   Now in its third year, the IBE has now become the largest exposition for independent beauty, lifestyle and wellness brands to connect with buyers, media and consumers. The IBE expo hosts over 100 vendors from around the globe in an industry where independent brands have become more influential and integral than ever. This year’s event expanded to include interactive panels of experts, the IBE TV Media Channel, Best in Show awards, workshops and retail advisory services. The event has become such a big deal, in fact, that even legendary make-up scion Bobbi Brown was on hand to lend her expert insights.
   Diversity was the name of the game at this year’s IBE, and we would be hard pressed to select only a handful of stand-outs. Rather, we’ve chosen to briefly highlight many of the visionary brands that made IBE 2017 the premier beauty event for numerous industry insiders and writers.
   Beauty from the inside out is making real headway. HUM Nutrition not only targets nutritional beauty needs with gluten-free and non-GMO supplements, they had the most colourful packaging anywhere. For smoothie lovers, a scoop of Vital Nutrients’ Collagen Peptides or Marine Collagen helps fight father time with all-natural ingredients.
   The make-up-obsessed on the prowl for the perfect lipstick will worship the Hollywood goddess-inspired collection by Julie Hewett. Camellia oil is the secret weapon for lipsticks, encased in a retro golden tube, to keep lips nourished and soft. By contrast, farm-to-face make-up brand Au Naturale’s products are crafted in purely vegan formulas (including the brushes) for a sheer and natural glow.
   Hair care also gets the organic treatment. Beauty with a Twist bottles sulphate-free hair care that smells like a beach vacation, while Lotus RX is the only organic prescription-strength dandruff-control shampoo. For the definitive hair indulgence, Jordan Seban L’Huile is a luxurious blend of oils in a vanity table-worthy artisan bottle.
   Sheet facial treatment masks were everywhere (too bad this wasn’t a Halloween party). Korean import Leaders Insolution combats virtually any skin condition along with some playful packaging. Made from 100 per cent coconut fibres, Florapy hydrating facial masks are infused with healing flowers and aromatherapy.
   Organic nail products are also on-trend. Jessica Cosmetics has launched light-free gel polishes in striking shades. Also on hand were an abundance of skin and body care lines imbued with rare oils from exotic lands. Coincidentally, they all begin with the letter A: Bella Aura, Akar and Amazonia for starters. Allira Naturals is a unique body care line that utilizes raw ingredients and recipes inspired by the Aboriginals.
   Handy-dandy tools and accessories were also generating palpable excitement. There was Dermaflash, the first and only at-home dermaplaning device on the market, and Blackout, a special reusable make-up remover cloth with complexion and environmental benefits.
   The skin care category is the most expansive at any beauty show. IBE was no exception, with representation from the worlds of organic and clinical skin care. There was long-time cult favourite Honey Girl Organics alongside Pûr Attitude, a boutique skin care line whose water-free technology delivers pure hydration, essential nutrients and powerful antioxidants. The Seaweed Bath Company delivers a proprietary blend of hand-harvested seaweed that carries multiple skin and sensory benefits. Renowned naturopath Dr Trevor Cates, a.k.a. the Spa Dr, showcased her high-performance skin care, nutritional supplements, and new book Clear Skin from within. RMD, founded by eminent dermatologist Dr Ronald Moy, employs specific DNA enzymes to repair damaged and ageing skin. Using a curated Cell Protection Protein, Lift Lab is an advanced clinical line designed to restore skin to its youthful state.
   Hey, this was just the beginning! To see for yourself, check out this year’s Best in Show winners at shop.indiebeautyexpo.com.—Jody Miller, LA Correspondent


























Special features to kick off Lucire’s 20th anniversary year


NEWS  by Lucire staff/January 5, 2017/10.31


Paula Sweet

Above: Stanley Moss heads to Punta Ala in one of his best travel pieces to date. Click here to read it.

Welcome to Lucire’s 20th anniversary year.
   Remember that if you don’t see a news update (which will come with an RSS update), you can go to the main part of the website and check out our features.
   In the last couple of weeks, we’ve had Lola Cristall’s 2017 living guide; an archive interview with Thor director Taika Waititi; one of Stanley Moss’s best travel pieces to date, on five Italian centres, and another on Flemings in London; Elyse Glickman heading to Seoul, and Jack Yan testing the Mazda 3, or Mazda Axela. We’ve also looked at a natural skin care range, Kokulu, and made our picks from the spring–summer 2017 shows from New York Fashion Week.
   And, of course, there’s our print edition: issue 36 features stories on Delikate Rayne and author–filmmaker Leslie Zemeckis, and it’s a particularly strong issue on female power. Never mind the outcome of a certain country’s election: as Bhavana Bhim writes in the opening feature in issue 36, women have been increasing their power throughout the ages.
   Expect to see more of our Golden Globes’ suites coverage with Elyse Glickman this weekend in the news section, and more fashion, beauty, travel and living features through January.

Dragonfly launches this season’s must-have cookbook at Mojo St James pop-up venue


NEWS  by Cecilia Xu/December 7, 2016/18.25



Dragonfly has been a local favourite in Wellington Central since it opened: it’s the perfect bar to chill out at after work on any day of the week, even better on a Friday. It’s the spot to hit in the weekend, whether for fine dining or distinctive cocktails. It boasts a spacious and expansive breadth of contemporary environment in its indoor, bar, and outdoor garden seating. The atmosphere is beautifully constructed and decorated, which is what makes it such a magnetic regular spot for the locals, and a gem for the newcomers. It’s subtle, too, with no brash lighting or signage cluttering up its Courtenay Place location.
   Dragonfly’s mixture of modernity, with rustic Asian influences, romanticism and relaxation matches its cuisine perfectly. This is reflected in the launch of their début cookbook, featuring the restaurant’s name on the cover—Dragonfly—Asian Dining Lounge—but referred to as the Dragonfly Cookbook. After years of successful cuisine perfectionism and experience, the book is a compilation of Dragonfly’s finest recipes, credited on the cover to brother and sister co-owners Brent Wong and Tania Siladi, with copy by Siladi and her daughter Jenna. Aided by a copious number of beautiful photographs and food imagery, by restaurant manager Ginny Maddock, who is a trained photographer, the book draws you to want to either dine at Dragonfly, or begin your own rustic Asian food adventure and exploration.
   The book has been painstakingly art-directed, and lavishly printed in Wellington, New Zealand; and priced at NZ$55. Wong explains that they won’t be making much on the book—and once time is factored in, the price will barely cover the cost. However, they see it as a way to share Dragonfly’s expertise. The Dragonfly Cookbook is available at Moore Wilson’s and online at www.orient-nz.com/dragonflycookbook.
   Due to the recent 7·8 Kaikōura earthquake that also affected Wellington, Dragonfly was one of the many businesses and stores closed for safety reasons. However, nearby Mojo in the St James Theatre just metres away has opened its doors for regular night time pop-up openings of Dragonfly. To see many of their regular customers quick to attend this as well as their book launch event on Tuesday night reflects how well Dragonfly is liked and respected by many in the capital, and perhaps a little change in operating venue may be great for the Christmas season.—Cecilia Xu; with Jack Yan, Publisher


From supermodels to film: celebrating the work of Peter Lindbergh at Kunsthal Rotterdam


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 16, 2016/13.41




Top: An image that kicked off the 1990s, with supermodels Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz, Christy Turlington and Cindy Crawford in New York, appearing on the cover of British Vogue in January 1990. Copyright ©1990 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery). Centre: Wild at Heart, with Cindy Crawford, Tatjana Patitz, Helena Christensen, Linda Evangelista, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Karen Mulder and Stephanie Seymour, Brooklyn, 1991, appearing in Vogue. Copyright ©1991 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery). Above: Kate Moss, Paris, 2015, wearing Giorgio Armani, spring–summer 2015. Copyright ©2015 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery).

An exhibition on Polish-born, French-based photographer Peter Lindbergh, entitled Peter Lindbergh: a Different Vision on Fashion Photography, opens at the Kunsthal Rotterdam on September 10 at 5.30 p.m., running through February 12, 2017. It marks the first Dutch exhibition of Lindbergh’s work.
   Some of the most iconic fashion images of the past generation have been shot by Lindbergh, whose work is regularly seen in various editions of Vogue, and in The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, Harper’s Bazaar, The Wall Street Journal Magazine, Visionaire, Interview and W. Exhibitions of his work have been held around the world beginning with the V&A in 1985. Lindbergh’s black-and-white 1990 Vogue photograph of Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz, Christy Turlington and Cindy Crawford was one that helped cement the reputation of the supermodels, if not arguably kicking off the era itself. Lindbergh’s work gave a sense of reality about his subjects, with his humanist, documentary approach.
   Said Lindbergh in an Art Forum interview earlier this year, ‘A fashion photographer should contribute to defining the image of the contemporary woman or man in their time, to reflect a certain social or human reality. How surrealistic is today’s commercial agenda to retouch all signs of life and of experience, to retouch the very personal truth of the face itself?’
   The exhibition features over 220 photographs and includes exclusive and previously unseen material, including personal notes, Polaroids, storyboards, films and prints. It is divided into nine different sections, representing the different themes in Lindbergh’s creative development: Supermodels, Couturiers, Zeitgeist, Dance, the Darkroom, the Unknown, Silver Screen, Icons, and an exclusive Rotterdam Gallery. This final section contains Lindbergh’s work for the October 2015 issue of Vogue Nederland, with Lara Stone and Elise Hupkes at the Port of Rotterdam.
   Lindbergh’s critically acclaimed Models: the Film (1991) will be screened, along with interviews with Grace Coddington, Nicole Kidman, Mads Mikkelsen, Cindy Crawford and Nadja Auermann.
   Guest curator Thierry-Maxime Loriot points out that the exhibition is not chronological, but a narrative about the photographer.
   The Kunsthal Rotterdam noted, ‘Peter Lindbergh introduced a new realism into photography. His timeless images redefine the norms of beauty. Lindbergh’s visual idiom is influenced by the language of film and by playing with the type of the strong, self-willed woman, from the femme fatale to the heroine, but also the female dancer and the actress. His œuvre is characterized by portraits that radiate a certain lack of inhibition and physical grace.’
   The exhibition is accompanied by a hardcover monograph, Peter Lindbergh: a Different Vision on Fashion Photography, retailing for €59,99 (link at Amazon.de), US$69·99 (link at Amazon.com) or £44·99 (link at Amazon UK), curated by Loriot, designed by Paprika of Montréal, and published by Taschen. The introduction has been authored by Kunsthal director Emily Ansenk, while the book features an essay on Lindbergh’s work by Loriot with commentaries from, inter alia, Jean Paul Gaultier, Nicole Kidman, Grace Coddington, Cindy Crawford and Anna Wintour.

In brief: Paula Sweet releases new book; Kardashians and Jenners mobbed by paparazzi; Cannes controversies


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 6, 2016/10.25


Many of you have enjoyed Paula Sweet’s photography in Lucire, and now you can have an entire volume of her work with her new book, Do Not.
   Paula has caught signs all over our planet during her travels, and asks in the synopsis, ‘In a world of limitation and regulation, how aware are you of the restrictions placed on your own existence?’
   The premise is an excellent one that encourages us to think: ‘In this collection of signs discovered all over Planet Earth, the artist and photographer Paula Sweet documents the shrinking area of personal freedom and encourages us to rethink the contrary: if a sign is to be placed, should it not encourage us to some productive or positive action?’
   Lucire readers can enjoy a 40 per cent discount for a limited time (US$39·56, marked down from US$65·94), commencing early May 2016, if you use this link here.
   Meanwhile, in the celebrity world, this latest compilation from Celebrity Wire shows how manic things are—and we don’t think there’s much personal freedom for some of these 2016 “names”. Except it isn’t signs restricting their freedom, but a gauntlet of paparazzi. Kanye West and Kim Kardashian, Kendall Jenner and Kris Jenner are seen and photographed leaving homes and heading into clubs and restaurants; “it” couple Katy Perry and Orlando Bloom head into a waiting cab; new Calvin Klein fragrance face and rising actress Margot Robbie left her apartment; and Emma Roberts had lunch, and a dozen followed her home. Surprisingly, Justin Bieber kept a low profile as he walked through LAX, while Christina Applegate gave a thumbs-up but obscured the lower part of her face as she left the terminal. It’s definitely not the life, thank you!
   In our second video, Jane Fonda speaks about the second season of Grace and Frankie at the Netflix première. She notes that during the course of the new season, Grace realizes Frankie is good for her, and they become friends.
   Finally, with the Festival de Cannes about to kick off, Cover looks at five recent controversies to hit the event.


Celebritywire


Celebritywire


Cover

Fashion Cities Africa gives a snapshot of four cities on a varied, rich continent


NEWS  by Jack Yan/April 18, 2016/3.51

The second largest continent on the planet is, logically, home to a massive number of fashion designers and movements, although out of Africa, there hasn’t been as much recognition of them till recently. Fashion Cities Africa, the book, inspired by the exhibition of the same name at the Brighton Museum & Art Gallery that opens at the end of April, is one high-profile development which seeks to shine a light on the variety present on the continent, while on a similar note, next month’s Africa Fashion Festival in Wellington will do the same for its designers.
   Hannah Azieb Pool, who edits the new book, is a Eritrean-born, London-based journalist, who, along with Helen Jennings, has co-writing duties, resulting in a cohesive, beautifully presented book that examines contemporary fashion in Nairobi, Casablanca, Lagos and Johannesburg. It doesn’t pretend to be a fully comprehensive guide, stating from the outset it is meant to provide mere glimpses on a continent that is incredibly diverse. The foreword by Binyavanga Wainaina, a flâneur, reminds us that there are clusters scattered throughout the land that have their own tendencies, and that her favourite designer is Nigerian, Chioma Chukwulozie.
   The reader is thrown in to the colour of Nairobi, where sibling bloggers Velma Rossa and Papa Petit (a.k.a. Oliver) take one half of the first spread with their über-stylish and proudly urban Kenyan clothes, and stylists, musicians, designers, bloggers and artists profiled on following pages give slices of their lives that shake occidental sensibilities with their own palettes and ensembles. Nairobi, for the most part, emphasizes comfort, and the clothing shot on these pages by Sarah Marie Waiswa demonstrate that the city’s fashion could easily translate to other places, spanning everything from casual to luxury. Adèle Dejak has shown in Milano, for instance, and appeared in Vogue Italia with her collaboration with Salvatore Ferragamo, while John Kaveke and Nick Ondu show the sort of sartorial elegance that could easily influence menswear in other fashion capitals.
   Profiles of some of the personalities from the city follow, reminding us that Nairobi is a crossroads: Ami Doshi Shah is of Indian descent, her family brought there by the British when both countries were under Crown rule, while Ann McCreath is a Scots émigrée who fell in love with the fashion there. There’s a dose of youthful energy, too, with Anthony Mulli, a jewellery designer who started when he was 16, pointing the way forward.
   The book follows a similar structure for subsequent cities, moving on to Casablanca next.
   Lucire readers will be familiar with Morocco thanks to travel editor Stanley Moss’s writings, and Jennings’ chapter, with photographs by Deborah Benzaquen, takes us on a similar journey through the country’s largest city. It was, of course, a home for Yves Saint Laurent at one point, as well as a drawcard for many western celebrities, when a first wave of Moroccan designers became known outside of the region. A second wave, Jennings explains, emerged in the 1980s and 1990s, with Zineb Joundy a graduate of the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture. A greater sense of artistic freedom and Casablanca’s position that blends Arabic, European and indigenous cultures has resulted in some looks that may seem familiar—perhaps thanks to the likes of Saint Laurent and his influence. Again the profiles are well selected, a cross-section of the highly varied cultures in the city: Amine Bendriouich, Amina Agueznay, Yassine Morabite, Saïd Mahrouf, and Zhor, Chadia and Aida Raïs each cover a very different parts of the fashion spectrum, from T-shirts to traditional caftans.
   Once the book gets to Lagos, it’s apparent that there’s a sense of “bubbling under”, with Lakin Ogunbanwo’s photographs, paired with Jennings’ words again, showing slightly more subdued looks for men, but prouder, more flamboyant looks for women. Jennings notes that civil war and Nigeria’s military juntas stalled its fashion scene for some years, before a revival when democracy returned in 1999. Foreign labels were seen as cool till recently, with the country discovering its confidence in its own æsthetic, to the point where one of her interviewees, stylist Bolaji Anumashaun, says that fashion can be one of Nigeria’s ‘greatest exports’. Anumashaun founded thestylehq.com with a pan-African fashion focus, and Arise magazine, founded in 2008, also stepped up the promotion for Nigerian designers. With Nigeria’s GDP now greater than South Africa’s, that confidence is bound to increase, and Jennings looks at Nike Davis Okundaye, who owns the biggest gallery in West Africa in Lagos, and happy to promote young talent. Others, such as Yegwa Ukpo and Amaka Osakwe, both were schooled in the UK before returning to Lagos to found their brands, while PR consultant Zara Okpara and luxury concept store owner Reni Folawiyo complete their city’s picture.
   Johannesburg completes Fashion Cities Africa, and it’s perhaps fair that Pool chose to put it last. Many mistakenly think of South African fashion when they refer to ‘African fashion’, spurred in part by the Republic’s sporting ties to many other countries in the Commonwealth. Victor Dlamini has the photographic duties here, and Pool pens the words, and she goes through the various Jo’burg neighbourhoods, noting that its fashion is more established than Nairobi’s but less self-conscious than Lagos’s. There is a western infusion here in some parts, she notes, but on closer examination there are accessories that reference Soweto streets or Zulu culture. The city even has two fashion weeks: South Africa Fashion Week and Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Joburg, making the city spoiled for choice when it comes to giving its designers a platform. David Tlale, whom Lucire readers will have heard of, and who has shown at New York Fashion Week, hails from here, and Jo’burg designs have a greater sense of familiarity thanks to western media exposure. It oozes colour and vibrancy, much like the photos chosen for Pool’s first chapter on Nairobi, and in similar fashion (pun unintended) there are profiles from across the spectrum: designer Thula Sindi, creative collective, the Sartists, accessories’ and shoe designer Maria McCloy, and womenswear designers Marianne Fassler and Anisa Mpungwe.
   It’s our hope that we can cease talking about ‘African’ fashion and instead replace the dialogue with specific cities or countries, just as we do for smaller continents such as Europe. Just as there is no such thing to fashion observers as ‘European’ fashion, there is equally no such thing as ‘African’ fashion: it is impossible to generalize at a continental level. Both as an informative volume and a coffee-table flick-through (as it is softcover), Fashion Cities Africa succeeds, and it’s exceptionally good value with full-colour photographs (needed for its story, over 196 pp.) at £20 (available via Amazon UK here, or Book Depository here) or US$28·50, (Amazon link here). It is published this month by Intellect Books, as part of its Street Styles series.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Gigi Hadid’s in the Zeitgeist: a Vogue spread, and her make-up artist spills her tips


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 7, 2016/4.38

Gigi Hadid’s in the Zeitgeist right now: not only has she appeared in a spread in Vogue with boyfriend Zayn Malik—himself rustling up plenty of headlines in the music world with his solo career—her make-up artist, Julianne Kaye, who currently has the reputation for being behind the beauty for today’s “it girls”, has been spreading the word with her tips on controlling acne.
   Kaye’s tips have appeared in E Online, including using green concealer over your blemish as it will neutralize the red, and pad on the concealer afterwards. She also has tips on dealing with cystic acne using eye drops (that’s not a typo) and acneic skin (try milk of magnesia), which are summarized in the video below, as well as in the original link.
   We’ve also a video on the Vogue shoot from Napoli—you can get a glimpse of the couple’s very romantic photographs as released by the magazine in the second one below.

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