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Chanel releases Coco Mademoiselle l’Eau Privée, a night scent; Keira Knightley fronts campaign

Filed by Lucire staff/August 28, 2020/0.52



Keira Knightley is the face of Chanel’s Coco Mademoiselle l’Eau Privée, the house’s latest take on the Coco Mademoiselle range first launched in 2001.
   Overseen by Olivier Polge, Chanel’s in-house parfumier, l’Eau Privée has been described as ‘a watercolour scent’, dialling down the wooden notes in favour of orange, jasmine, rose and musk. Chanel says it remains true to the original oriental fragrance but is more ‘confidential’ and delicate. It is seen as a “night scent”.
   The bottle (50 and 100 ml) is in translucent frosted glass, with the words l’Eau Privée in gold lettering, looking more subtle against the contents.
   With the new addition, Coco Mademoiselle comes in five varieties: eau de toilette, eau de parfum, eau de parfum intense, parfum, and the new l’Eau Privée.





 


Katherine Langford named brand ambassador for L’Oréal Paris

Filed by Lucire staff/June 23, 2020/16.07


Katherine Langford, the 24-year-old Australian actress known for her role as Hannah Baker in 13 Reasons Why, is the new L’Oréal Paris international ambassador.
   Langford, who hails from Perth, WA, was a nationally ranked swimmer before embarking on an acting career, with a Skype audition for 13 Reasons Why. On the silver screen, she was one of the ensemble cast in the Daniel Craig starrer Knives Out, playing Meg Thrombey, and starred as Leah in Love, Simon, about a young man who comes out. Her next role is as Nimue in Cursed, a retelling of the Arthurian tales but with women in the main roles.
   Langford has become a role model for youth and is an advocate for mental health. She is also passionate about equality across gender, sexual orientation, age and race.
   She currently has 16·4 million followers on Instagram, making her a particularly influential celebrity for the French giant to reach a millennial audience.
   ‘L’Oréal Paris is the brand that creates what’s next in beauty with an essential message: everyone is worth it. It is all about learning how to love yourself, how to be bold, how to be confident!’ said Langford. ‘People my age should not be afraid to be themselves, because that’s what makes us beautiful. When you know you are worth it, you live your life to the fullest. Having always valued empowerment, I can say that I am very grateful to be part of such an inspiring group of women spokespersons.’
   ‘We are thrilled to welcome Katherine to the L’Oréal Paris family. She is a role model, a talented and confident young woman using her platform for positive influence. Katherine’s star will only continue to rise. As a young radiant heroine who encourages people to believe in themselves, she’s the perfect spokesperson to embody our signature brand message: we are all worth it,’ said Delphine Viguier-Hovasse, L’Oréal Paris’s global brand president.
   Langford’s first campaign breaks later in 2020, for Air Mascara and Casting Crème.

 


Hublot launches Big Bang E smartwatch, with enhanced features

Filed by Lucire staff/June 5, 2020/9.39

Hublot, an LVMH subsidiary that celebrates its 40th anniversary this year, has showcased its new Big Bang E (officially styled as BIG BANG e) watch, following up from the original Big Bang of 2005 and its first connected version in 2018.
   The Swiss luxury brand’s latest offering has a black ceramic or titanium case in a “sandwich” construction, comprising 42 components, 27 for the K Module case. The hour numerals are metallized under the sapphire crystal, which is covered with an AMOLED high-definition touchscreen. Pushing down on the crown activates the controls. In addition to the analogue watch function, there is a perpetual calendar with a moon phase or a second time zone. The watch is water resistant to 30 m.
   Powered by Google Wear OS, users can download additional apps on Google Play. It also connects to Google Assistant and Google Pay.
   As part of its launch, and as part of the #HublotLovesArt movement, the first edition will show eight dials created by artist Marc Ferrero. Every three hours, the dial changes colour. On each full hour, a five-second animation plays. These are shown in the video below.
   ‘Electronic watches were created in Switzerland using quartz in the 1970s. Fifty years later, we are continuing in the same innovative vein by producing a second smartwatch which boasts an extremely high level of technological sophistication, whilst embodying all the æsthetic values, technical features and excellence that have ensured the reputation of our Big Bang collection. Ever more faithful to our “Art of Fusion” motto, we wanted the Big Bang E to unite Hublot’s highly advanced technical materials with the very latest innovations from today’s digital world,’ said Ricardo Guadalupe, CEO of Hublot.
   Hublot will make the Big Bang E available on its website and on China’s Wechat network, before it becomes available in boutiques and the traditional retail network.

 


Facebook’s demise wouldn’t affect us much

Filed by Jack Yan/May 30, 2020/11.14

Like many other publications, Lucire sends updates to Facebook, Twitter and Mastodon. Occasionally we’ll Instagram an image to a story. However, we’ve had reservations about social media, especially Facebook, for over a decade. In November 2010, we wrote on our Facebook page, ‘We have stopped the automated importing of notes to this Facebook page. These stories receive around 200–400 views each, but that also means that our site loses 200–400 viewers per story.’ At that stage we probably had around 600 fans on the Lucire fan page, showing you just what cut-through pages were getting before Facebook intentionally broke its sharing algorithm to force people to pay to get the same reach. (Reach dropped 90 per cent overnight.) We didn’t feel any desire after that to build social media presences, because we spotted the con—as did this YouTuber:

   Back then, Facebook allowed the importing of articles via RSS, which meant everything from Lucire’s news pages automatically wound up on the social network. It was a crazy idea, when you look back: it wasn’t designed to drive traffic to our main site, it only made Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg rich as you spent more time in their walled garden.
   Even after we stopped, we still shared headlines to Facebook, thinking that these would entice fans sufficiently to click through. At one stage, we could see referrals from Facebook among our stats, but these days, there is no correlation between the Facebook reach numbers and the actual views of the story on our own site.
   In 2016, NPR posted a headline to its Facebook page, ‘Why Doesn’t America Read Anymore?’ but the contents of the article read, ‘We sometimes get the sense that some people are commenting on NPR stories that they haven’t actually read. If you are reading this, please like this post and do not comment on it. Then let’s see what people have to say about this “story.”’ You can predict what happened: the link got plenty of comments. Anyone who says that Americans don’t get irony is gravely mistaken.
   Even in the late 2000s I was saying we lived in a ‘headline culture’ where people might never read the article itself, and social media have exacerbated this phenomenon. Many social media today, including the largest sites, are little more than glorified Digg sites, places where links are shared, but not necessarily places which drive traffic.
   Of course there will be exceptions to the rule, but generally, social media do not mean engagement. A 2015 study by Parse.ly showed that social media-referred readers engage the least with a given article. Search engine-referred readers were slightly better. But the best came from those who were already loyal readers on the site.
   In an age of “fake news” I do not believe the statistics will have improved, particularly on websites whose businesses thrive on outrage. People are divided into tribes where they seem to derive some reward for posting more links that support that aims of those tribes: a situation rife for exploitation, if certain countries’ investigations are to be believed. Certainly as early as 2014 I was warning of a ‘bot epidemic’, something that only became mainstream news in 2018 with The Observer’s exposé about Cambridge Analytica.
   But none of that bad news broke the addictions many people have to these websites. On our ‘about’ page on Facebook, we note: ‘Fast forward to (nearly) the dawn of the 2020s. We won’t lie to you: we’re not fans of how Facebook says one thing and does another. In our pages, we’ve promoted based on merit, and Facebook wouldn’t actually pass muster if it was a fashion label.
   ‘We know Facebook is tracking you, often more than your settings have allowed. Therefore, we’re consciously trying to limit the time you spend on this website.
   ‘However, we also know that we should maintain a Facebook presence, as there are many of you who want that convenience.’
   Nonetheless, I regularly wonder if that convenience is even worth it if there is no correlation with readership.
   Twice this month I was locked out of Facebook, because, allegedly, there was unusual activity. If checking your Facebook on a far less regular basis—say a couple of times a week—is unusual, then I’ll expect to get locked out far more frequently. As the importing of our Tweets to Facebook is driven by another program (on IFTTT), and that is linked to my personal account (one that I haven’t updated since 2017), then each time Facebook blocks me, it breaks the process. It’s also a website that has bugs that were present when I was a regular user in the late 2000s through to the mid-2010s, including ones where we cannot even share Lucire links because the site automatically ruins the address, rendering the previews anywhere from inaccurate (claiming the page doesn’t exist) to useless (taking you to a 404). Only the text link will work.
   We get the occasional like and share from our Facebook, although these do not inform our editorial decisions.
   We won’t go so far as to proclaim the end of social media, regardless of how angry the US president gets with fact checks; but we’ve been sceptical about their worth for publishers for a long time, and there are increasing days where I wonder whether I’ll even bother reconnecting the sharing mechanism from Twitter to Facebook if Facebook breaks it again. The question I’m really asking is: does the presence of links to our articles matter much to you?
   Ultimately, I care about all our readers, including Facebook users, and that remains the overriding motive to reconnect things one more time after Facebook locks me out. And I suppose the lock-outs in 2020 are much better than the ones during most of the 2010s, where Facebook forced you to download a “malware scanner” on false pretences, planting hidden software with unclear purposes on to millions of computers around the world. Their record is truly appalling, and if Facebook vanished overnight, I wouldn’t shed a tear.—Jack Yan, Publisher

 


Dyson Corrale hair straightener to be released in New Zealand July 7

Filed by Lucire staff/May 29, 2020/3.47

Dyson now has a New Zealand launch date for its Corrale hair straightener, which had been announced in March.
   July 7 is tipped to be its Kiwi release date, with the straightener available from dyson.co.nz. Registrations of interest can be made at discoverdyson.co.nz/beauty-launch. Customers have a choice of black nickel–fuchsia or purple–black.
   The Corrale has flexing plates for enhanced style with less hair damage. By flexing, they can shape and gather hair, applying heat and tension evenly and keeping it aligned.
   It has three heat settings (165°C, 185°C and 210°C) for the user to adjust based on their hair type and style, and a four-cell lithium-ion battery that fully recharges in 70 minutes, providing 30 minutes’ of cordless use. Retail price is NZ$749.
   Michael Beel, Dyson styling ambassador and three-time New Zealand hairdresser of the year says, ‘With conventional hair straighteners, hair tends to slip out from the plates as you’re passing the styler through, forcing you to go over the same section of hair multiple times, which results in excessive heat damage. With the Dyson Corrale straightener’s flexing plates I have more control and love how it gathers the hair to keep it where it needs to be for a more even style with less reliance on heat. Plus, it’s cord-free so it’s perfect for on-the-go touch-ups. As a professional stylist, my clients often express concerns about the health of their hair, so to have a straightener that enhances styling with less hair damage, saves me time and provides the freedom to style anywhere, it truly is game-changing.’
   After the online launch on July 7, the Corrale hits retailers (Smith & Caughey, Sephora, David Jones and selected Farmers stores) on July 14.


 


Sofia Vergara, Foster Grant team up on new affordable eyewear line and charity initiative

Filed by Lucire staff/May 21, 2020/13.03



FGX International, part of Essilor International, the French optics’ company, has launched the Sofia Vergara × Foster Grant range of reading glasses, sunglasses and SunReaders for outdoor reading.
   In addition, Vergara and the Foster Grant brand have announced a Specs for Specs charity initiative, where the company will donate one pair of reading glasses to RestoringVision, the world’s largest non-profit provider of reading glasses to people living in impoverished communities around the world, for every pair of Sofia Vergara × Foster Grant eyewear sold.
   Some 2,700 million people lived with uncorrected vision, and 1,000 million need reading glasses to correct their vision. Since 2008, FGX has donated over 11 million pairs to RestoringVision to help this cause.
   The Sofia Vergara × Foster Grant range is keenly priced between US$31 and US$41, and is available at fostergrant.com/sofia-vergara-foster-grant, www.readers.com, and www.walmart.com. The range, curated by Vergara, comprises 24 styles in fashionable colours.
   Vergara collaborated with Foster Grant creative director and senior vice-president of product development, Matthew Coon. The reading glasses feature a range of magnifications for both traditional readers, and advanced lenses with a blue light coating. The SunReaders are available with a full magnification lens or a hidden bifocal style. All sunglasses and SunReaders have 100 per cent UVA–UVB lens protection.
   ‘I have loved creating my eyewear collection with Foster Grant. Not only does the brand have such a rich heritage and solid commitment to giving back to those in need, but they were fun to work with while bringing my ideas to life,’ said Vergara in a release. ‘I wear readers myself, and now that I am home reading so much more, I know how important they are to so many of us. I also know a woman wants to feel good when wearing them, wherever she is. I wanted to offer fashionable, chic, fresh eyewear styles, allowing women to not just to see, but to see beautifully.’
   ‘Teaming up with Sofia Vergara will allow us to shine a new, bright light on a significant global health issue, only exasperated through these current challenging times that as a company, we’re committed to solving,’ said Lisa Lord, FGX’s vice-president of licensing. ‘Sofia’s collection of Foster Grant eyewear gives our customers a stylish assortment at such accessible prices, with the added bonus of knowing you’re giving back with every pair purchased. We’re thrilled and thankful to partner with Sofia on this incredible endeavour, and hope her collection inspires fun and fashion, as well as very real solutions for global needs right now.’


 


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