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Prince William plays polo for charity at Maserati tour leg; La Martina designs commemorative shirts


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 13, 2017/22.54




Stuart Wilson

After HRH Prince Harry played polo for his charity, his brother, HRH Prince William, the Duke of Cambridge, played for the Maserati team as part of the company’s international polo tour, at the Beaufort Polo Club in Tetbury, Gloucestershire on Sunday. The match was in aid of Child Bereavement UK and Fields in Trust, the latter of which the Duke is patron.
   The Duke played in the match as part of the tour’s UK leg alongside England international Malcolm Borwick, and Bruce Merivale-Austin and Henry Porter. On the opposing Dhamani 1969 team were HH Maharaja Padmanabh Singh of Jaipur, Karan Thapar, Nina Clarkin and Olly Tuthill.
   VIPs present included Lady Violet Manners, Ricky and Sheena Kothari, Andreea Panciuc, Kitty Spencer, Narendra Singh, Alejandra Borwick, Adrian Simonetti, and Gachi Ferrari.
   Dhamani 1969 won 7–6½, with Porter the Most Valuable Player.
   Maserati showed off its range at the venue, including its latest Levante SUV. Apparel company La Martina is its co-sponsor, having created a unique polo shirt for the Maserati team to mark its support.
   The shirt is made of silk from Como, and only four have been made, one for each player.
   La Martina has also created a Beaufort Edition polo shirt to commemorate the UK leg, with embroidered La Martina and Maserati logos, and a Union Jack printed on the front.
   The next leg is in Spain on July 22, at the Santa Marìa Polo Club in Sotogrande.

















Stuart Wilson

GHD celebrates 16th anniversary with limited-edition purple straightener


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 6, 2017/23.54



Is it really 16 years since GHD (Good Hair Day, and officially styled all in lowercase) launched its first styler?
   From Yorkshire to the world, GHD is one of the 21st century’s great hair industry successes. To commemorate its anniversary, it is launching a limited-edition version of the original GHD styler. This time, it’s in purple.
   The styler works for all hair types and lengths, and the straightening remains as easy as ever. It has ceramic heaters, a sleep mode (it switches off after 30 minutes of inactivity), a round barrel, and a 2·8 m swivel cord. It works with any voltage around the world.
   Founded by hairstylist and salon owner Robert Powls and investors Martin Penny and Gary Douglas, GHD’s reputation spread without any above-the-line advertising initially. The original styler was invented by Kim Tae-Cheol, who had sent Powls a sample of his design. Powls approached Penny and Douglas and suggested they purchase the production and distribution rights. They each put in £15,000—by the second year they profited £4 million on sales of £12 million. By the third year sales were £37 million. Today, four GHD stylers are sold every minute.
   The term GHD has entered the vernacular, and earned itself fans such as Victoria Beckham, Jessica Alba, Ella Eyre, girl group Little Mix, and Millie Mackintosh.

Filed under: beauty, hair, history, London, Lucire

London’s City Concours to show and sell rare, significant cars—Aston Martin, Ferrari, Bugatti represented


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 1, 2017/20.06


Tim Scott

The City Concours in London, taking place June 8–9, will host a selection of classic and iconic cars, some of which are for sale. An Aston Martin DB5 that had been used by Ogle Design to preview the DB6 interior from JD Classics, a DB2/4 Mk II FHC with a 3·7-litre engine and four-speed gearbox from Nicholas Mee, a Ferrari 458 Speciale with the optional Blu Nart Racing Stripe and titanium exhaust system from Romans International, and a 599 GTO from Fiskens are among those which visitors can walk away with. Organizers say there will be over 100 rare cars at the event, held at the Honourable Artillery Company grounds, near to the Liverpool Street and Moorgate stations. Tickets and hospitality are available at www.cityconcours.co.uk.
   JD Classics will also show a Ferrari 599 SA Aperta and a Mercedes 300SL; Romans will show a Ferrari 458 Speciale A and ‘two other ultra-rare modern Ferraris,’ according to organizers; and Fiskens will display an Aston Martin DB6 Volante and a Bentley 4·5-litre “short chassis”. Atalanta Motors, Clayton Classics, H. R. Owen, Stratstone of Mayfair and Will Stone Historic Cars will also participate. There will also be a Maserati Tipo 200SI, Jaguar D-type, Bugatti Veyron and McLaren P1.

Sir Roger Moore, UNICEF ambassador and longest-serving James Bond actor, passes away


NEWS  by Jack Yan/May 23, 2017/14.42


UNICEF


© Danjaq LLC/United Artists

Top: Sir Roger Moore was a UNICEF goodwill ambassador from 1991 to 2017. Above: Moore on the set of Live and Let Die, his first James Bond film, in 1972.

Actor and UNICEF ambassador Sir Roger Moore has passed away in Switzerland, aged 89.
   His children by his third wife Luisa, Deborah, Geoffrey and Christian, issued a statement today, saying that their father had had a short battle with cancer.
   â€˜The love with which he was surrounded in his final days was so great it cannot be quantified in words alone,’ they said.
   Roger George Moore was born October 14, 1927, in Stockwell, the son of George Alfred Moore, a policeman, and Lillian Moore (née Pope). An only child, Moore had a talent for art, one that he maintained through his life, and began in the film business as a trainee animator, joining the Association of Cinema Technicians’ union as a teenager. Through friends, he began doing work as an extra, and through that he was encouraged to join RADA. His father, an amateur actor, was supportive of this, and his fees were paid for by film director Brian Desmond Hurst.
   He married a fellow RADA student, Doorn van Steyn, in 1946. After World War II, he was conscripted for national service, and was commissioned into the Royal Army Service Corps. After three years in the army, Moore found himself unemployed, with Hurst soon hiring him for a tiny role in Trottie True. Television and stage work followed, as well as modelling for knitwear. His marriage to van Steyn soon fell apart. In 1952, Moore began a relationship with Dorothy Squires, the Welsh singer, who was 13 years his senior, causing a scandal at the time. They were married in Jersey City in July 1953. Moore eventually picked up a contract with MGM, beginning there on April Fool’s Day, 1954. Moore’s early films, where his highest billing was third, were unsuccessful, and after Diane, a 1956 film starring Lana Turner, flopped, he was fired, with five years remaining on his original seven-year contract.
   In 1956, the TV series Ivanhoe came Moore’s way, where he played the title role of Sir Wilfred of Ivanhoe. As the series ended, Warner Bros. called Moore, and he returned to Hollywood movies, first with The Miracle (1959), but also found himself on TV series, first with The Alaskans and then, Maverick, where he took over from James Garner. In 1961, while filming The Rape of the Sabine Women in Italy, Moore left Squires for the actress Luisa Mattioli.
   However, it was The Saint, back in the UK, that made Moore a household name. Moore had tried to acquire the television rights for the Leslie Charteris books himself, but was unsuccessful. Producers Bob Baker and Monty Berman had managed to secure them, and offered the lead role of Simon Templar to Moore. The series ran for 118 episodes, and Moore was said to have been the first British television millionaire. Thanks to his membership of the Association of Cinema Technicians, he directed some episodes of The Saint as well. When Baker and Berman went their separate ways during production, Moore became Baker’s junior partner. Toward the end of 1968, Squires agreed to grant Moore a divorce and he and Mattioli were married.
   After The Saint, Moore starred in Crossplot, a spy caper that felt much like a longer episode of The Saint, made by many of the same crew. He also starred in The Man Who Haunted Himself, which critics usually say showed Moore’s true range as an actor. Moore himself tended to be self-deprecating about his acting abilities, which potentially limited the types of roles he was offered.
   Perhaps similar to his Simon Templar character was Lord Brett Sinclair in The Persuaders, a role that Moore played for one season in 1970–1, alongside Tony Curtis. The concept had been trialled in an episode of The Saint, called ‘The Ex-King of Diamonds’, with Stuart Damon as Templar’s sidekick. Grade had sold the series before Moore had agreed to do it, and convinced him to do it by saying, ‘The country needs the money. Think of your Queen.’
   The Persuaders, at the time the most expensive show on television (with much of the money going to the leads’ salaries) was successful in most markets but the crucial US one. It was during this time that Moore was shoulder-tapped to succeed Sean Connery as James Bond, and plans for a second season of The Persuaders, and talk of Noël Harrison taking over for Moore, came to nought.
   It is possible that an obituary for Moore would be far less significant if he had not risen to take on one of the most hallowed cinematic roles in British cinema, that of Ian Fleming’s James Bond, for Live and Let Die in 1973. Moore played the secret agent seven times for Eon Productions, and even spoofed his role in The Cannonball Run in 1981, a record number of times. Moore kept working in film outside of Bond, including Peter Hunt’s Gold in 1974, Shout at the Devil opposite Lee Marvin in 1976, The Wild Geese in 1978 with Richard Burton and Richard Harris, and as the cat-loving Rufus Excalibur ffolkes in North Sea Hijack (a.k.a. ffolkes) in 1979. Moore also played a post-plastic surgery Chief Insp Clouseau in Curse of the Pink Panther in 1983. In another dramatic role, one often overlooked, Moore played Dr Judd Stevens in Bryan Forbes’s thriller The Naked Face in 1984.
   Post-Bond, Moore made fewer films. Willy Bogner’s Feuer, Eis & Dynamit in 1990 featured Moore and his son, Geoffrey; Michael Winner’s romp Bullseye, with Michael Caine, followed the same year, and featured Moore’s daughter, Deborah. Younger audiences would know Moore from Spice World in 1999.
   Audrey Hepburn invited Moore to a UNICEF event in 1991. Hepburn had been a goodwill ambassador for the organization, and Moore eventually joined, paid the sum of $1 a year. It was for his work for UNICEF that Moore was knighted in 1999.
   Moore had been diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1993. After taking stock, he and Mattioli separated in 1993, and Moore set up home with Swedish-born socialite Kristina Tholstrup in Monaco soon after. Mattioli granted Moore a divorce in 2000, and he and Tholstrup married in 2002. Tholstrup had accompanied Moore on most of his UNICEF tours.
   As Sir Roger Moore, he had authored numerous books, including My Word Is My Bond, his autobiography, and his last appearance was on stage at the Royal Festival Hall in November 2016.
   A private funeral will be held in Monaco.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Lomaka Gallery, a contemporary art space, opens in London


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 12, 2017/11.50

On April 26, artist and collector Olga Lomaka opened a new art space, Lomaka Gallery, in the heart of London. On opening night, the gallery presented a selection of artworks by established artists as well as emerging talent from around the world. The guest list was ample, featuring modern culture figures, art critics, collectors and business people. The private viewing, organized by Fashion PR Buro with the support of Fashion TV, gave visitors a chance to enjoy a mix of different art styles and talk to the artists about the inspiration behind their work.
   The unique exposition of Lomaka Gallery comprises the works of Colombian artist Albeiro Tomedes, Swiss artist T. P. Hardisty, and the artistic Russian duo Tvorogov Brothers. Art admirers were also treated to a video performance of extravagant French actress Olya Mareva presenting poetry about a snowstorm in the middle of nowhere.
   Gallery director Olga Lomaka is truly passionate about supporting artists purely based on their talent and ability. Lomaka Gallery collaborates with some of the most distinctive and innovative artists working today.
   Tomedes’ work is influenced by the impact of development on the natural environment and local Amazonian culture. The deconstruction of many of Tomedes’ paintings echoes the destructive forces impacting the Amazon.
   Hardisty utilizes everyday simple objects such as plastic toy ducks, vehicle selectors and colourful pencils as an opening into his art world. The simplicity of objects that Hardisty uses invites observers to make multiple glances before hidden meanings are revealed. There are elements of his work that tease viewers as they remain hidden during the consecutive observations.
   Tvorogov Brothers invite viewers to interact with their work by looking for an interpretation within themselves. The artists’ fixation on the connection between anthropomorphisms and psychic energy is apparent within the body of work being exhibited.
   Set in the heart of London’s Fitzrovia, Lomaka Gallery is a new contemporary art space. Operating outside conventional practice and the contemporary art system, Lomaka Gallery welcomes a broad audience to an extensive exhibition programme, supporting work of a group of artists who collectively defy categorization.—Elina Lukas, Correspondent and Photographer

Filed under: culture, living, London, Lucire

The Body Shop, Botanicals Fresh Care, Ultra Doux: L’Oréal advances natural beauty and environmental initiatives


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/May 9, 2017/23.32



Top: Shidong Yan, director of the Centre for Environmental Education and Communications of Ministry of Environmental Protection; Tom Szaky, TerraCycle founder and global CEO; Haoran Liu; Zhenzhen Lan, Vice President, L’Oréal (China). Above: The Body Shop British Rose Premium Selection (NZ$95·50), and the British Rose collection.

It’s nice that the Body Shop can also source from its home country of the UK, and the British Rose collection ensures that its origins—as well as one of botany’s most celebrated flowers—are in the name.
   The collection is made with organic, hand-picked and air-dried roses, used to create a youthful and fresh scent. These products are rich in vitamin C to give the skin a gentle, soft and silky effect. The British Rose collection includes the Instant Glow Body Essence (NZ$47·25), a body lotion with a lightweight and lasting formula that hydrates the skin over 24 hours, leaving it feeling smooth and soft. The British Rose shower gel (NZ$17·50) is perfumed with essences of hand-picked rose; the Petal Soft hand cream (NZ$9·95) is lightweight, won’t grease the skin, and is absorbed immediately. The British Rose Instant Glow body butter (NZ$38·95) is a velvet-soft moisturizer that is light to the touch but rich on moisture, providing 24-hour hydration; and the exfoliating gel body scrub (NZ$42), with real rose petals, helps reveal smoother, fresher skin. The Beauty Bag (NZ$39·50) includes the shower gel, body butter and hand cream (in 60 ml, 50 ml and 30 ml respectively), and the Premium Selection (NZ$95·50) has the shower gel and body butter but in larger quantities (250 ml and 200 ml respectively), the same hand cream, and a 250 ml bath foam.
   Parent company L’Oréal is getting into the natural beauty market with a second line specifically for hair, called Botanicals Fresh Care. Now available in New Zealand, the new hair care line sources from Egyptian geranium leaves, Cretian safflower, Bulgarian coriander seed oil, and French camelina flowers, from the most sustainable producers.
   Geranium essential oil is an antioxidant rich in fatty acid; safflower oil is rich in lipids; coriander seed oil has Omega 6 properties; and camelina oil is rich in Omega 6 and Omega 9.
   The Botanicals Fresh Care range is divided into four: Botanicals Geranium Colour Radiance for coloured hair, Botanicals Safflower Rich Nourishment for dry hair, Botanicals Coriander Revitalizing Strength for fragile hair and Botanicals Camelina Smooth Ritual for frizzy hair. The products are vegan, free of silicone, parabens, and colourants, retailing at NZ$17·99 each.
   Finally, Ultra Doux—which occidental readers might be more familiar with as a Garnier range—is a separate L’Oréal line in China, aimed at the mass market who wants natural hair care. The brand has teamed up with TerraCycle, a specialist in recycling hard-to-recycle consumer waste. At an event in Shanghai, L’Oréal China VP Zhenzhen Lan, Chinese government rep Shidong Yan, TerraCycle CEO Tom Szaky, and Ultra Doux spokesman Haoran Liu launched the partnership, which is claimed to be the first comprehensive solution for hair care packaging waste in China.
   Individuals or communities can sign up to a recycling programme, and collect the packaging, to be shipped free to charge to TerraCycle. The organizations expect that millions of pieces will be collected, so they do not wind up in landfills or incinerators. For every unit of waste collected, the programme will contribute 1å…ƒ to the individual’s charity of choice. All plastic waste collected through the programme will be made into desks and chairs and donated to a school in China.
   Ultra Doux has also opted for renewable, bio-derived plastics and sustainably sourced cardboard for its packaging, as well as more naturally derived ingredients.—Nathalia Archila and Lucire staff



Vegan and cruelty-free pampering from the Body Shop this season


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/April 28, 2017/13.20


For this upcoming season, we have a list of must-haves from the Body Shop. They are products that we’ve selected and love from one of our favourite brands, with high-quality cruelty–free products and accessible prices.
   For those who loved the classic Down to Earth palettes, the Body Shop brings a new product: customization eye-shadow palettes. These are 100 per cent vegan, contain babasusu and sesame oil, have no added parabens, mineral oils or petroleum, and are suitable for sensitive eyes. This versatile idea will allow you to mix your favourite colours to create your look, and easily go from day to night. They are priced at NZ$12·92 per shadow.
   The Camomile Sumptuous Cleansing Butter (NZ$32·50) and the Luxury Facial Flannel (NZ$10·25) are perfect for the end of the day when you want clean and fresh skin. The camomile cleanser is a perfect make-up remover that gently and effective melts away the make-up and lets your skin feeling pampered, clean and soft. The camomile is sourced from Norfolk, England, and the butter works on all types of make-up. The flannel, on the other hand, is super-soft, perfect for facial washes and leaves the skin feeling softer and smoother.
   Finally, we are obsessed with the Body Shop’s new range of cruelty-free brushes. They feel really soft on the skin and give you a natural and professional make-up look. Prices range from NZ$22·95 for the pointed liner brush, to NZ$34·95 for the foundation-buffing, slanted contouring and angled blush brushes. There are also the eye-shadow crease and flat shader brushes (NZ$23·75 each), pointed highlighter brush (NZ$32·95), and fan blush brush (NZ$26·95).—Nathalia Archila




Hooking up: Blu and Ministry of Sound; Kathy Ireland Worldwide and Larson-Juhl


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 22, 2017/12.14




John Phillips

With vaping gaining greater acceptance, Blu, a leading e-cigarette brand, has teamed up with the Ministry of Sound in London. Celebrities attending the celebration of the partnership included Pixie Geldof, Nicola Roberts, Vanessa White, Louise Thompson and Ryan Libbey, with DJs Hernan Catteneo and Nick Warren performing.
   Another partnership this week saw Kathy Ireland Worldwide joining forces with Larson-Juhl and the Buffalo Works to create branded art and wall décor. Larson-Juhl specializes in picture frame design, manufacturing and distribution, while the Buffalo Works manages brands and licenses art. Ireland said of the agreement, ‘To finally join forces with Larson-Juhl and the Buffalo Works is a dream come true for many reasons. Larson-Juhl is a member of the Berkshire Hathaway business family. We began our Kathy Ireland Home collection with a Berkshire Hathaway flooring company. Our first retail client was Irv Blumkin and Nebraska Furniture Mart, still clients and dear friends, all these years later.’







John Phillips

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