Lucire: News


October 7, 2016

Beauty in brief: Environ launches Youth EssentiA for healthy skin; Madam C. J. Walker launches new oils for hair

Lucire staff/23.25

Environ has improved on its Ionzyme range, with new ingredients (retinyl propionate and BHT) and a longer shelf life, and has given it a new name: Youth EssentiA. It’s positioned as a more premium offering, aiming to reduce visible signs of ageing and creating healthier, smoother-looking skin.
   The new range comprises the Hydra-Intense cleansing lotion, Vita-Peptide toner, Vita-Peptide eye gel, four-step Vita-Peptide C-Quence serums (£89·95 each), an Antioxidant Defence Crème (£66) designed to work with the serums, a Focus frown serum, Focus hydrating serum and Energising Masque.
   Environ’s Kirstin Kruger noted, ‘What people don’t know is that the skin needs to gradually become accustomed to increased levels of vitamin A. The Youth EssentiA range of Vita-Peptide C-Quence serums is based on Environ’s industry-leading Vitamin Step-Up system, which is designed to help skin become gradually more comfortable with increased levels of vitamin A and other ingredients that keep skin looking healthy and beautiful for life.’
   Meanwhile, for hair, Madam C. J. Walker Beauty Culture’s Scent & Shine Oil collection has been launched, with three silicone-free and antioxidant-packed lightweight oils retailing for US$26 each. The brassica seed oil helps smooth and silken heat styled hair; the coconut oil adds shine and protects against humidity; while the Jamaican black castor oil hydrates extra-dry hair and scalps. Each has a subtly scented formula, and can be used whether the hair is wet or dry. The new products are cruelty-free and do not contain parabens, sulphates, phthalates, artificial colours or fragrance, mineral oil, or alcohol.

October 6, 2016

Atterley returns with a UK-focused site for independent labels

Lucire staff/11.56

In February, we learned that Atterley (formerly Atterley Road) would return after entering administration the month before, to be recast as an online retail platform for independent labels.
   Today (October 6), Atterley has gone live with its new site, already representing dozens of independent labels with what the company claims are the lowest commission rates in the business. It delivers to 26 countries, with the site available in 57 languages and 15 currencies.
   Atterley says it has taken 300 further enquiries from UK boutiques and over 250 more from outside the UK wanting to be represented on the site. Many will be added in 2017.
   The original Atterley had started online in 2011 by Kate Starmer Smith, initially representing hard-to-find premium brands. It later created its own label with Scandinavian-styled clothing. Despite backing from Sir Terry Leahy and Bob Willett, the business was forced into administration at the beginning of the year.
   The new Atterley site is the brainchild of founder and CEO Mike Welch, OBE, who brings his tyre retail expertise into fashion. Welch had built up Blackcircles into a successful online enterprise before it was acquired by Michelin last year.
   By acquiring its brand assets, Welch plans to build up Atterley in the UK before expanding offshore, and notes that the fashion sector has been one of the hardest hit in the country when it came to bricks-and-mortar store closures.
   Atterley CMO noted, ‘Boutiques tell us that similar offerings in the market are too expensive and the terms competitors ask them to sign up to are not good for business. We are working closely with our partners to make sure we continue to shape our offer in their best interests. It’s hard enough out there without constraining access to new customers.’
   Welch added, ‘We’re putting the boutiques first by supporting them with the lowest commission rates around, cutting-edge technology and a clear mission to champion their cause, democratize the market-place and focus on delivering a world-class customer experience.’

Filed under: branding, fashion, London, Lucire
October 3, 2016

Summer indulgence: the Body Shop’s Piñita Colada range

Bhavana Bhim/23.24

Summer is just around the corner—why not get yourself ready with a cocktail of coconut and pineapple for the skin? The Body Shop’s Caribbean-inspired Piñita Colada body range is ready to burst your skin with summer freshness.
   The range includes Piñita Colada exfoliating cream, body butter, shower gel and Fresh Body Sorbet. All these products smell divine with the hand-harvested coconuts from the Antilles region of the Caribbean, combined with zesty pineapple from the Santo-Domingo area.
   The Exfoliating Scrub (250 ml, NZ$47·50), smooths and refines the skin with real shredded coconut and pineapple extracts.
   Wash away the heat of the day with the shower gel (250 ml, NZ$17·50). The refreshing lather cleanses the skin.
   The skin-quenching body butter (50 ml, NZ$17·50; 300 ml, NZ$38·95) hydrates the skin in the heat of summer. The butter glides onto the skin without any sticky residue. Immediately the skin is invigorated with the fresh cooling scent.
   Finally, we sampled the Fresh Body Sorbet (200 ml, NZ$27·50). This lightweight product feeds the skin with the cooling moisture of Caribbean extracts.
   Treat yourself this summer and let the happy hour come to you with this limited-edition range. All products will be available in-store in New Zealand beginning October 3.—Bhavana Bhim

September 23, 2016

Gillian Saunders takes top honours at 2016 World of Wearable Art Awards’ Show, with Supernova

Lucire staff/11.00


New Zealand designer Gillian Saunders has scooped the Brancott Estate Supreme Award at tonight’s World of Wearable Art (WOW) Awards’ Show. Saunders, who had entered 15 garments before her winning entry, Supernova, has won eight awards prior to 2016, but this is the first time she has taken out the top prize.
   Saunders, who was born in England, has been involved in television and theatre for most of her working life. She was trained in Yorkshire, and went on to Christchurch, New Zealand, where she worked as a props’ maker for the Court Theatre.
   â€˜I had been making stage props for theatre and TV for years. WOW was the perfect challenge—could I make props for the body as well?’ she said.
   Supernova was inspired by ‘Thierry Mugler’s Chimera dress [from the autumn–winter 1997–8 collection], … the iridescent spiny fins of the Hippocampus from the Percy Jackson movie The Sea of Monsters, and some incredible NASA images taken by the Hubble Telescope,’ she noted. ‘Once all these elements were combined, Supernova was brought to life.
   â€˜The large gems represent new stars being born and the dark shadows represent deep space. Each scale has been individually cut, shaded with marker pens and then hand-sewn on to the garment. Each gem has had its sticky backing removed and then glued on by hand.’
   Saunders also won the Avant-Garde section in this year’s competition, judged by WOW founder Dame Suzie Moncrieff, Zambesi’s Elisabeth Findlay, and sculptor Gregor Kregar.
   Dame Suzie said, ‘Supernova has the design innovation, the construction quality and vibrant stage presence in performance to win WOW’s top award.’
   Saunders’ 2013 design, Inkling, won the Weta Creature Carnival Award and an internship for her at Academy Award-winning Weta Workshop. It is currently part of the WOW international exhibition, touring around the world, and presently at the EMP Museum in Seattle, Washington, where it will be displayed till January, after which the exhibition will head to the Peabody Essex Museum in Boston, Mass.
   She also won the Avant-Garde section in 2007 with Equus: behind Closed Doors, while in 2009, Tikini was second in the Air New Zealand South Pacific section.
   Designers from New Zealand, China, India, England, Australia, and the USA won awards in each section.
   The American Express Open section this year saw Renascence, by Yuru Ma and Siyu Fang of Shanghai take first place. The Spyglass Creative Excellence section was won by Mai (I), by Pritam Singh and Vishnu Ramesh of Gujarat. Queen Angel, by Adam McAlavey of London, won the MJF Lighting Performance Art section.
   Baroque Star, by Natasha English and Tatyanna Meharry of Christchurch, won the Weta Workshop Costume and Film section, netting the duo a four-week internship at Weta Workshop, plus travel, accommodation, and prize money.
   The Wellington Airport Aotearoa section was won by Maria Tsopanaki and Dimitry Mavinis of London, with their creation Princess Niwareka. The World of Wearable Art and Classic Cars Museum Bizarre Bra section was won by Julian Hartzog of Tarpon Springs, Fla., with Come Fly with Me.
   Of the special awards, Dame Suzie chose Incognita, by Ian Bernhard of Auckland, as the most innovative garment, giving it the WOW Factor Award. Renewal, by Alexa Cach, Miodrag Guberinic and Corey Gomes, won the First-Time Entrant Award. The Knight by Jiawen Gan of the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology won the Student Innovation Award. The Sustainability Award, recognizing the protection of our environment and the use of materials that would otherwise be discarded, was won by Bernise Milliken of Auckland, for Grandeer. Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder of Wellington, won the Wearable Technology Award. The Wellington International Award, given to the best international entry, was won by Daisy May Collingridge of Woldingham, Surrey, England, for Lippydeema. Collingridge also won the UK–Europe Design Award with this entry.
   Khepri, by Miodrag Guberinic and Alexa Cach of New York, NY, won the Americas Design Award. Yu Tan of Shanghai won the Asia Design Award with The Renaissance Happens Again, while Cascade, by Victoria Edgar of Geelong, Victoria, won the Australia and South Pacific Design Award.
   The David Jones New Zealand Design Award was won by Voyage to Revolution, by Carolyn Gibson of Auckland.
   The Cirque du Soleil Performance Art Costume Award, chosen by Denise Tétreault, Costumes Lifecycle and Creative Spaces Director of the Cirque du Soleil, was won by Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder. Mulder receives prize money, flights and accommodation for a one-month internship at Cirque du Soleil’s headquarters in Montréal, Québec.
   WOW runs in Wellington, New Zealand, through to October 9, and will be seen by 58,000 people live during its run. It employs over 350 cast and crew.
   This year, 133 entries by 163 designers (some worked in pairs) were received, competing for a prize pool of NZ$165,000.


Renascence, by Yuru Ma and Siyu Fang, Shanghai.

Mai (I), by Pritam Singh and Vishnu Ramesh, Gujarat.

Queen Angel, by Adam McAlavey, London.

Baroque Star, by Natasha English and Tatyanna Meharry, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Princess Niwareka, by Maria Tsopanaki and Dimitri Mavinis, London.

Come Fly with Me, by Julian Hartzog, Tarpon Springs, Fla.

Incognita, by Ian Bernhard, at AUT, Auckland.

Renewal, by Alexa Cach, Miodrag Guberinic and Corey Gomes.

Grandeer, by Bernise Milliken, Auckland.

Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder, Wellington.

Lippydeema, by Daisy May Collingridge, Woldingham, Surrey.

Khepri, by Miodrag Guberinic and Alexa Cach, New York.

The Renaissance Happens Again, by Yu Tan, Shanghai.

Cascade by Victoria Edgar, Geelong, Victoria.

Voyage to Revolution by Carolyn Gibson, Auckland.

July 26, 2016

News in brief: new releases from Kenneth Cole and Madam C. J. Walker; London Fashion Week on Instagram

Lucire staff/12.11

Kenneth Cole’s Black Bold fragrance, from Parlux, is an evolution of the earlier Kenneth Cole Black. The men’s fragrance, on sale in August, is inspired by New York, and is aimed at ‘the man who will take on any challenge, regardless of the odds and who is brave enough to believe that they can make an impact,’ says the company. Kenneth Cole himself notes, ‘For more than 30 years, the company has embraced the essence of New York—its boldness, its energy, and its diversity. I wanted Black Bold to do just that: to celebrate the confident individuals who are the protagonists in their own personal stories of resilience, optimism, and ambition.’
   Cole collaborated with Firmenich master perfumer Harry Fremont. The new scent has top notes of citrus and herbal tones, rounded out with ground nutmeg and a touch of lotus flower, and finished with elements of wood and leathery musks. The campaign, featuring model and artist David Alexander Flinn, was shot by Gregory Harris. The eau de parfum begins at US$46 for 1 fl oz; US$58 for 1·7 fl oz; and US$76 for 3·4 oz.
   Meanwhile, Madam C. J. Walker Beauty Culture’s Jamaican Black Castor & Murumuru Oils Defining Butter Crème has launched at Sephora and, retailing at US$26. The new hair formula revives and gives body to hair, helping give soft curls. The Crème features murumuru oil, giving a conditioning coating that seals in moisture. It is paraben-, sulphate-, and phthalate-free.
   Finally, the British Fashion Council has joined the Instagram age, and invites netizens to follow London Fashion Week for spring–summer 2017 at @londonfashionweek.

June 22, 2016

Aston Martin reveals Vanquish Zagato, with production limited to 99

Lucire staff/22.25

As expected, the Aston Martin Vanquish Zagato concept that was shown at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este at Lake Como has become a production reality, with the company saying that it will produce 99 examples at Gaydon, Warwickshire, with deliveries commencing during the first quarter of 2017.
   Aston Martin says the car is an example of its collaboration with Zagato, though its press information does not say whether the model, based on its Vanquish flagship, was styled by the Italian coachbuilder or done in-house, as it had been for the V12 Vantage Zagato in 2011.
   The company notes that the new car has ‘Aston Martin’s acclaimed dynamic and material qualities with Zagato’s signature design language.’
   At the launch of the concept last month, Zagato CEO Andrea Zagato noted, ‘We pride ourselves on our strong partnership and the creation of the Vanquish Zagato Concept was a true shared experience. It represents the essence of an important design relationship that dates back over fifty years,’ but there was no elaboration on where the design took place.
   The first collaboration began with the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato of 1960, and it was revived under Victor Gauntlett’s leadership of the company in the 1980s with the V8 Vantage Zagato. Neither car was considered attractive on launch, though both were perceived to be future classics—which they became. The DB4 GT Zagato is now valued at over £10 million and has few critics today.
   Subsequent collaborations were the 2002 DB7 Vantage Zagato, which used a lightly modified version of the donor car’s front end so it did not have to be retested for safety; and the 2011 V12 Vantage Zagato.
   The Vanquish Zagato has an engine uprated to 600 PS, with a claimed 0–60 mph time of 3·5 s. The company says the suspension set-up will be unique to the model. It features a unique carbonfibre body that has new round rear taillights, LED technology shared with the Aston martin Vulcan supercar, a sculpted rear end that has a profile similar to that of the DB11, with a downward contour and pronounced spoiler splitting the taillights. There is a pronounced side strake, reinterpreted so it now runs more deeply down the height of the front wing aft of the wheels, and, as expected, there is the famed Zagato double-bubble roof. The Vanquish Zagato is a liftback.
   Inside, the Vanquish Zagato uses herringbone carbonfibre, and shadow and anodized bronze leather, with the option of aniline leather. The seats and doors have a Z-pattern stitch, and the Zagato Z is embossed on headrests and stitched into the centre console.

Filed under: design, history, living, London, Lucire

Kate Moss and Rimmel celebrate 15 years with new lipstick and nail polish collection launched in London

Lucire staff/17.02

David M. Benett

Kate Moss and Rimmel London have released their latest collaboration celebrating the supermodel’s 15-year relationship with the beauty brand.
   The Kate Moss Rimmel 15th Anniversary Collection comprises Moss’s favourite nude and red lip and nail shades.
   Journalists, bloggers and other guests were invited to a London house where Moss modelled two outfits, initially a black Equipment shirt with red hearts, and a green jacket over a sheer black top.
   Guests were treated to manicures using Rimmel’s new Supergel nail polish shades by manicurist Adam Slee, before a lipstick master-class by make-up artist Kirstin Piggott.
   Stylist Zoë Bedeaux and Scott Wimsett hosted a session where Moss talked of her 15-year association and how her fashion outfits inspired the Collection. Guests then could inspect those outfits and discussed how they inspired the nude and red shades.
   In a release, Moss said, ‘I’m incredibly proud of my 15-year relationship with Rimmel. It’s a brand very close to my heart; my first ever lipstick was Rimmel Heather Shimmer. The partnership has strengthened and evolved over the years, with me taking an actively creative role. The new anniversary collection echoes some of my favourite London looks from the last decade and a half. I’ve focused on reds and nudes because they’re the colours I love to wear—each shade reflects a different side of me.’
   In the collection, the Lasting Finish Lipstick by Kate comes in six shades and can last eight hours, numbered 51 through 56; and the Super Gel Nail Polish by Kate gives a shine that lasts for 14 days, and comes in four shades (nos. 15, 42, 44 and 71).

David M. Benett

June 17, 2016

Sponsored video: Chris Fonseca breaks barriers, with Smirnoff Ice Electric

Lucire staff/14.12

Via Chris Fonseca, on Instagram

We love ideas that challenge convention (otherwise this title wouldn’t exist), and Chris Fonseca’s work does just that.
   He’s a dancer, choreographer and dance instructor who happens to be profoundly deaf after suffering meningitis as a child. But that didn’t stop Fonseca from developing a love of dance, and it’s that love that the Smirnoff Ice Electric Flavors range taps into with its latest campaign.
   This hasn’t been created cynically for marketing Smirnoff—Fonseca has been teaching in South London, where both deaf and hearing people go to learn how to dance. He has, however, taken the idea across the Atlantic thanks to Smirnoff, and you can see his New York class for yourself on social media (check out Fonseca’s Instagram at for more). Among those at one New York class were Jeremy Strong, a choreographer for Jason DeRulo, and C. J. Salvador, a dancer for Justin Bieber, notes Vibe, which attended in May.
   Fonseca’s absolutely right: there’s no reason a deaf person cannot be great at dancing, and he gets his students to count the beat through vibrations, especially the bass. He further incorporates the lyrics of the song into his dance. His aim is to break barriers, and to make sure that that deaf people can do whatever they wish. ‘[Being deaf] does not stop me from making everyday achievements,’ he told the BBC.
   â€˜I always say to those young people not feeling body-positive to keep going, like everyday barriers, challenges, keep going: you don’t know how close you are to making a breakthrough. Keep believing anything is possible. Your time is coming soon.
   â€˜My motto is: dreams don’t work unless you work. Dreaming, believing, and achieving.’
   A very telling image on his Instagram shows Fonseca leading his class and on the mirror are the words, ‘How do you know if you don’t try?’, a term that he has hashtagged as well. Smirnoff, meanwhile, has taken more polished shots for its Ice Electric campaign, promoting its non-carbonated, plastic-bottled line—their idea is that you can take your Smirnoff drinks on to the dance floor more readily than when it was bottled in glass.
   His teaching has reached the media, including a cover story for the British Deaf News, which he hashtagged as his proudest moment.

Post sponsored by Smirnoff

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