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June 29, 2016

Oh, pretty woman!

Elyse Glickman/21.06



It’s hard to believe that it’s been 27 years since Julia Roberts’ career and her character in the film Pretty Woman were transformed in the confines of the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel. It also speaks volumes that Julia Roberts and this storied Beverly Hills property (now under the Four Seasons umbrella) still turn heads after all these years.
   Just as Julia Roberts has kept herself up to date, so has the hotel’s spa with some new additions. It was only fitting that the crowd-pleaser movie was playing in the background as beauty bloggers and journalists made the rounds to experience sample treatments including products from just added lines Évolué (officially styled in all lowercase, évolué) and Elemis.
   Évolué, created by Beverly Hills-based Jean Seo, features products integrating nourishing and luxurious ingredients sourced from around the world that mimic what the body naturally produces and loses with age. Besides her bubbly personality, Seo’s other top selling point is that her products are tested actresses and models rather than animals. Although Elemis is one of the UK’s top spa skin care brands, the Spa at Regent Beverly Wilshire will be one of the few US spas to feature the new Elemis Biotec system into several treatments. The focal point of the spa experience is a machine combining five technologies that are scientifically proven to increase cell energy for optimum skin function.



   With the event staged from 5 to 8.30 p.m., we could not think of a better way to spend happy hour, with beauty indulgences replacing food. However, as there were so many treatments in so little time, we each had our own differing sets of treatments. As there are usually drinks during happy hour, this event did not disappoint. Invitees were offered champagne or cold pressed juices by LA Juice to stay refreshed (though water consumption was also recommended.)



Elyse: After starting the evening with a manicure where I went outside my comfort zone, colour-wise (a robin’s egg blue by Creative Nail), I signed up to have a practitioner give my face a workout with a light, effervescent Brightening Antioxidant treatment. Next, I balanced things out with an oxygen facial with Natura Bisse products from Spain, and an indulgent Time Reversal Facial using a cocktail of products from Évolué. Between each 15-minute facial session, I enjoyed experimenting with essential oils by Dõterra (officially, dõTERRA) and had a blissful foot massage expertly handled by a cheery member of the spa staff. The practitioner at the Dõterra display claimed that the nose is a conduit to the psyche. After she guided my nose to the right scent suiting my mood and personality at the moment, she handed me a book and turned it to a page that explained how the aromatic oil could put me in a happier state of mind.

Leyla: I enjoyed the Time Reversal Facial, which uses Évolué’s simple, organic formulations. After removing a day’s worth of foundation, powder and eyeliner with their pure jojoba oil cleanser, they gently exfoliated my skin with a natural and less invasive alternative to microdermabrasion. The Évolué Resurfacing Grains, made with oat and milk powder, gently softened my skin without creating unsightly red patches. The treatment was topped off with a mask of face-plumping elastin and collagen. Next, I treated my face to the Biotech Firm-a-Lift by Elemis, which uses a combination of plant stem cells and hyaluronic acid to nourish the skin and reduce fine lines.
   The æsthetician also used an ultrasonic device to oxygenate the skin and stimulate cell growth. I appreciate the fact that Elemis’s products are steeped in scientific research. They do not make any claims without clinical trials. I followed this with a mini-version of the spa’s Elemis Amber and Orchids body wrap. The æsthetician massaged sweet orchid oil into my tired hands, and wrapped them in warm towels. The fragrance stayed with me for several days. For the final touch, I went to the Lea Journo Hair Salon adjacent to the spa for a lesson in contouring my face, “Kardashian-style”.

Jody: After already indulging in a couple of lovely mini-facials, I pondered whether I should sample another. OK, twist my arm! And lucky for me I did, because the Hydrafacial was my favourite. In a nutshell, it is a soothing hydra-dermabrasion procedure that combines deep cleansing, exfoliation, extraction (that’s right—it replaces painful extractions), hydration, and infusion of antioxidants. The result is skin that is clearer and more luminous without the discomfort or down time. It is an all-in-one facial wonder suitable for all skin types, and the cool mist topping it off is a perfect summer pick-me-up.

   Although the schedule was tight for all the guests, everybody found time to be treated to deliciously cool under-eye “gold” or “diamond” masks by Knesko. Better still, they sent everybody home with a gift bag that itself was the spa “to go”. The care package included a generous envelope with Knesco masks for face and neck, full-sized products from Évolué (Resurfacing Grains and Cleanser) and Elemis’s Biotech Skin Energizing Cleanser and Day Cream, featuring electrolytes and minerals our skin thirsts for. Of course, to maintain those benefits, it’s always good to provide incentive to return and leave it to the pros to work their magic.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor; Leyla Messian and Jody Miller, LA Correspondents

June 20, 2016

News in brief: La Roche–Posay shows Anthelios and My UV Patch innovations; stand-outs from ISPA press event

Lucire staff/19.38



While summer may be just around the corner in the northern hemisphere and folks Down Under are heading toward cooler temperatures, French dermatologist-based skin care brand La Roche–Posay is spreading the word about the importance of year-round sun protection with their SOS, Save Our Skin, campaign. Atop a high-rise overlooking bustling downtown Los Angeles, media attendees enjoyed a breakfast seminar while discovering their most recent Anthelios sun care innovations and the new pioneering My UV Patch. Available in stores in June, the patch is the first stretchable skin sensor designed to monitor UV exposure. The Patch has photosensitive dyes that change colour when exposed to UV rays. Using a scanner-equipped cellphone and La Roche–Posay’s app, you can find out your personalized level of exposure and get advice on what to do to protect your skin this summer.
   La Roche–Posay’s Skinchecker 2·0 video (see below) takes full advantage of our culture’s love of viral animal videos to get an important message across.
   Just a few miles down the road at the ultra-posh Montage Beverly Hills, the International Spa Association hosted their annual press event showcasing spas and resorts that not only pamper the body, but nurture the spirit and promote holistic health and wellness. While indulging in selected mini-treatments, attendees learned about each brand’s latest offering and unique philosophy. Though too numerous too mention, we thought there were a few stand-outs.
   The raw grandeur of Crystal Lake is the setting of Reno’s Atlantis Resort Spa, which features a Brine Inhalation Light Therapy Lounge and a whole body healing Rasul Ceremonial Chamber.
   On the banks of a sacred river in Wisconsin, the Aspira Spa takes guests on a quest of mind and spirit. Their spa is a place of profound harmony with customized light and sound therapy and bathing experiences. You can even get a mani-pedi beside a crackling fire gazing under a starlit sky.
   Débuting a sleek new logo, updated colour scheme and an organic body care line, national chain Massage Envy shows that wellness can be affordable and accessible.—Jody Miller, LA Correspondent

June 17, 2016

Sponsored video: Chris Fonseca breaks barriers, with Smirnoff Ice Electric

Lucire staff/14.12



Via Chris Fonseca, on Instagram

We love ideas that challenge convention (otherwise this title wouldn’t exist), and Chris Fonseca’s work does just that.
   He’s a dancer, choreographer and dance instructor who happens to be profoundly deaf after suffering meningitis as a child. But that didn’t stop Fonseca from developing a love of dance, and it’s that love that the Smirnoff Ice Electric Flavors range taps into with its latest campaign.
   This hasn’t been created cynically for marketing Smirnoff—Fonseca has been teaching in South London, where both deaf and hearing people go to learn how to dance. He has, however, taken the idea across the Atlantic thanks to Smirnoff, and you can see his New York class for yourself on social media (check out Fonseca’s Instagram at instagram.com/cfofficial for more). Among those at one New York class were Jeremy Strong, a choreographer for Jason DeRulo, and C. J. Salvador, a dancer for Justin Bieber, notes Vibe, which attended in May.
   Fonseca’s absolutely right: there’s no reason a deaf person cannot be great at dancing, and he gets his students to count the beat through vibrations, especially the bass. He further incorporates the lyrics of the song into his dance. His aim is to break barriers, and to make sure that that deaf people can do whatever they wish. ‘[Being deaf] does not stop me from making everyday achievements,’ he told the BBC.
   ‘I always say to those young people not feeling body-positive to keep going, like everyday barriers, challenges, keep going: you don’t know how close you are to making a breakthrough. Keep believing anything is possible. Your time is coming soon.
   ‘My motto is: dreams don’t work unless you work. Dreaming, believing, and achieving.’
   A very telling image on his Instagram shows Fonseca leading his class and on the mirror are the words, ‘How do you know if you don’t try?’, a term that he has hashtagged as well. Smirnoff, meanwhile, has taken more polished shots for its Ice Electric campaign, promoting its non-carbonated, plastic-bottled line—their idea is that you can take your Smirnoff drinks on to the dance floor more readily than when it was bottled in glass.
   His teaching has reached the media, including a cover story for the British Deaf News, which he hashtagged as his proudest moment.


Post sponsored by Smirnoff

June 16, 2016

From supermodels to film: celebrating the work of Peter Lindbergh at Kunsthal Rotterdam

Lucire staff/13.41




Top: An image that kicked off the 1990s, with supermodels Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz, Christy Turlington and Cindy Crawford in New York, appearing on the cover of British Vogue in January 1990. Copyright ©1990 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery). Centre: Wild at Heart, with Cindy Crawford, Tatjana Patitz, Helena Christensen, Linda Evangelista, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Karen Mulder and Stephanie Seymour, Brooklyn, 1991, appearing in Vogue. Copyright ©1991 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery). Above: Kate Moss, Paris, 2015, wearing Giorgio Armani, spring–summer 2015. Copyright ©2015 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery).

An exhibition on Polish-born, French-based photographer Peter Lindbergh, entitled Peter Lindbergh: a Different Vision on Fashion Photography, opens at the Kunsthal Rotterdam on September 10 at 5.30 p.m., running through February 12, 2017. It marks the first Dutch exhibition of Lindbergh’s work.
   Some of the most iconic fashion images of the past generation have been shot by Lindbergh, whose work is regularly seen in various editions of Vogue, and in The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, Harper’s Bazaar, The Wall Street Journal Magazine, Visionaire, Interview and W. Exhibitions of his work have been held around the world beginning with the V&A in 1985. Lindbergh’s black-and-white 1990 Vogue photograph of Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz, Christy Turlington and Cindy Crawford was one that helped cement the reputation of the supermodels, if not arguably kicking off the era itself. Lindbergh’s work gave a sense of reality about his subjects, with his humanist, documentary approach.
   Said Lindbergh in an Art Forum interview earlier this year, ‘A fashion photographer should contribute to defining the image of the contemporary woman or man in their time, to reflect a certain social or human reality. How surrealistic is today’s commercial agenda to retouch all signs of life and of experience, to retouch the very personal truth of the face itself?’
   The exhibition features over 220 photographs and includes exclusive and previously unseen material, including personal notes, Polaroids, storyboards, films and prints. It is divided into nine different sections, representing the different themes in Lindbergh’s creative development: Supermodels, Couturiers, Zeitgeist, Dance, the Darkroom, the Unknown, Silver Screen, Icons, and an exclusive Rotterdam Gallery. This final section contains Lindbergh’s work for the October 2015 issue of Vogue Nederland, with Lara Stone and Elise Hupkes at the Port of Rotterdam.
   Lindbergh’s critically acclaimed Models: the Film (1991) will be screened, along with interviews with Grace Coddington, Nicole Kidman, Mads Mikkelsen, Cindy Crawford and Nadja Auermann.
   Guest curator Thierry-Maxime Loriot points out that the exhibition is not chronological, but a narrative about the photographer.
   The Kunsthal Rotterdam noted, ‘Peter Lindbergh introduced a new realism into photography. His timeless images redefine the norms of beauty. Lindbergh’s visual idiom is influenced by the language of film and by playing with the type of the strong, self-willed woman, from the femme fatale to the heroine, but also the female dancer and the actress. His œuvre is characterized by portraits that radiate a certain lack of inhibition and physical grace.’
   The exhibition is accompanied by a hardcover monograph, Peter Lindbergh: a Different Vision on Fashion Photography, retailing for €59,99 (link at Amazon.de), US$69·99 (link at Amazon.com) or £44·99 (link at Amazon UK), curated by Loriot, designed by Paprika of Montréal, and published by Taschen. The introduction has been authored by Kunsthal director Emily Ansenk, while the book features an essay on Lindbergh’s work by Loriot with commentaries from, inter alia, Jean Paul Gaultier, Nicole Kidman, Grace Coddington, Cindy Crawford and Anna Wintour.

Gigi Hadid fronts Stuart Weitzman’s autumn 2016 campaign, shot by Mario Testino

Lucire staff/12.27



Mario Testino

Gigi Hadid is really getting noticed this year, starring in a campaign for Stuart Weitzman launching for autumn 2016.
   Shot by Mario Testino, the black-and-white campaign is, like the spring 2016 one, minimalist—but this time, Hadid is not accompanied by fellow models Joan Smalls and Lily Aldridge.
   The campaign, according to the company, is meant to channel ‘strength and motion’ and Testino was chosen to give the campaign an editorial feel.
   It has been inspired by Hadid’s work-out regimen and shows Hadid boxing and jumping.
   The campaign launches in the US, Italy, France, the UK, the UAE, Germany, Spain, and through Asia. Outdoor advertising will run in LA, New York, Milano, Paris and Hong Kong. Additional video will appear at the Stuart Weitzman website and at its boutiques.

June 13, 2016

Zlatan Ibrahimović launches A–Z sportswear line; Aéropostale shows off summer ’16 trends

Lucire staff/20.24



Aéropostale, Inc. has announced its summer 2016 trends. The international retailer, with 744 stores in the US and Puerto Rico, 41 in Canada and 310 licensees globally, says the season is about getting away, with a range showcasing a classic, simple, retro look. For women, the trends are ‘Topanga Canyon’, a boho-chic, ’60s look; ‘The Left Coast’, inspired by southern California surf culture with vibrant citrus colours; and ‘Castaway’, light and airy looks with floral prints and water-related motifs. For men, Aéropostale forecasts ‘Wet ’n’ Wild’, with bright, coral shades; ‘Nocturnal Surf’, with neon shades mixed with black and contrasted with grey and white; and ‘Tropic Thunder’, with tropical jungle colours.
   Professional footballer Zlatan Ibrahimović has launched his A–Z sportswear line, with a stark, début video about determination and proving the doubters wrong. ‘Play them, beat them, surprise them, never show weakness. Who will conquer? I will,’ says Ibrahimović in his video. ‘You will sweat, cry, scream, bleed … Only one thing will take you from A to Z: you.’ The video was created by Forsman & Bodenfors and directed by Philippe Templeman.
   Ibrahimović says he was driven by what he went through in his past. ‘All the hard work. Feeling different, from where I came. There wasn’t a lot of opportunities. But I took my opportunity. I trained harder than everybody else. I needed to be ten times better than the other ones, because of my background and because of where I came from. This is my way of giving back to all the people out there. This is the people’s brand. I am the people’s man. That is the way it is.’




Daniel Blom/Acne Photography

June 9, 2016

News in brief: Lands’ End Sport launches three lines; Jane Iredale quad bronzers redesigned

Lucire staff/13.35


Lands’ End has extended its brand into a Sport line, which the company says is in line with its founder Gary Comer’s ethos. Comer had invested in developing the Comer Center in Dodgeville, Wisc. in 1989 to promote employee health and wellness.
   Lands’ End Sport includes surf, performance and athletic collections for men and women. The company notes its surf collection is functional and fashionable: rash guards are UPF 50 when wet; neoprene jackets have flatlock seams to prevent chafing; and full suits are made with bonded neoprene to protect the body from irritants. The performance collection comprises three categories: speed (high-impact), studio (low-impact), and street (post-workout wear), again with functional features for moisture wicking in the cases of the first two. Finally, the athletic collection, dubbed Athleisure, comprises polos, T-shirts, sweatshirts, totes and accessories.
   In other news, Jane Iredale’s quad bronzers have been redesigned for summer. Rose Dawn (pink and copper shades), Sunbeam (cool pink and bronze shades), and Moonglow (warm, golden shades) are now more portable, and can be easily applied all over or on cheeks, eyes and even lips. The quad bronzers are formulated with antioxidant protection from pine bark and pomegranate extracts. Each quad retails for £34; the empty compact at £12.

June 8, 2016

LA beauty: Milani Cosmetics and Orly showcase new releases and custom shades

Elyse Glickman/12.20



Top: Milano Cosmetics’ event for LA media. Above: Orly’s “mixologists” create custom colours at Olive & June in Beverly Hills. Below right: The author at the Milani event.

Earlier this year, Mattel released a new line of Barbie dolls with real-world bodies and skin tones. Düsseldorf firm Doob-3D (with stores in New York, LA and San Francisco) does one better by allowing people to have themselves done as a doll or action figure. The proprietary technology takes the form of a room outfitted with 360 degrees worth of cameras. Your Doppelgänger may be a bit of an investment (mine would retail for US$295), but it does build on the “teachable” moment Mattel started with its new Barbie line that all bodies are beautiful in their own way.
   Of course as we all want to be our best selves, in doll or human form, Los Angeles-based Milani Cosmetics came to help local LA media get “dolled up” for the opportunity, while promoting their newest products in the process.
   Tina, my make-up artist endeavoured to take 10 years off me non-surgically with a ‘strobing and contour highlighting’ technique, using Milani’s Conceal & Perfect, an oil-free foundation, using two shades and a brush to evenly distribute and mix the make-up. Next, she moved on to my eyes, using the Everyday Eyes Powder Shadow Collection eye set in the popular Nudes palette, and added extra oomph with Lash Trifecta Lengthens+Curls+Separates tube mascara with a versatile tip. As this mascara passed my stringent contact lens test, it may just end up becoming my go-to brand.
   The finishing touch was a neutral shade of their new Liquid to Matte Amore Matte Lip Crème smear resistant collection. The next day, Leyla Messian and I tried out the collection prior to going out for happy hour. Our verdict is that the colours are first-rate, but the smear resistance only goes as far as the cocktails. Oils from some foods may cause the colour to smear.
   Milani’s other new add-on are its line of nourishing Meta Matte Lusters, which are comparable to the lip oils Clarins rolled out last year (which Jody Miller and I tried out their Orange County event). It’s a very appealing lip treat with a slight tint and a lower price—and it’s vegan, too!
   Orly, a Los Angeles nail products company sold in pharmacies and beauty supply stores, took its act to the beachy, upscale nail salon Olive & June in Beverly Hills. Press got some “hands-on” TLC after a pair of colour “mixologists” created a custom-blended hue. I was looking for the perfect red, and got their version of it in a poppy shade I called ‘Fresh Watermelon’. Perhaps I was inspired by a party earlier in the week at Le Pain Quotidien’s West Hollywood’s flagship restaurant. The chain rolled out its vegan and vegetarian summer menu with Juicero, and fresh watermelon juice coolers were served to wash down all that flavourful goodness.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor




Above: Orly’s Olive & June event, with the son of founder Jeff Pink present. Below: Nibbles from Le Pain Quotidien.


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