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Game of Thrones’ and X-Men’s Sophie Turner named Wella Professionals’ brand ambassador


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 21, 2017/21.24

Sophie Turner, the 21-year-old actress who rose to fame in the HBO TV series Game of Thrones, is the new brand ambassador for Wella Professionals.
   Turner boasts a five million following on Instagram, as well as having a profile through Game of Thrones and the X-Men film series.
   The company says she was chosen because she pushed ‘style boundaries, , making fearless and bold hair-colour transformations.’
   Turner said, ‘I’m honoured to be named the face of Wella Professionals, an iconic beauty brand that encourages women like me to be bold in their choices. Working with them is a great creative collaboration because it gives life to my on-screen characters and allows me to express my personality off-screen, as well.’
   Kicking off next month, she will appear in Wella Professionals’ summer and autumn campaigns. Wella Professionals’ global artist, Sonya Dove, worked with celebrity hairstylist Christian Wood on the campaign. Turner will also appear in global marketing, print and digital advertising, in-store displays, and social media (hashtag #sophiexwella).
   Wella Professionals is targeted at the trade, focusing on salon hair products, professional hair colours and beauty services.
   Laura Simpson, chief marketing officer for Coty Professional Beauty, said, ‘She’s an exceptionally talented artist who represents a generation of women which like to express themselves by wearing premium-looking, sophisticated hair colour. Exceptional hair colour results are only possible in the salon and using the best products and services, something which Wella Professionals proudly offers Sophie as well as millions of women and men around the world.’
   Previously part of Procter & Gamble, Wella was sold to Coty, Inc. in 2015, alongside Max Factor, Cover Girl, Clairol, and P&G’s fragrance business.
   The brand itself dates back to 1880.

ISPA: to live and chill in LA


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 10, 2017/0.21




Courtesy ISPA; Elyse Glickman

While we pick and choose what invitations we accept (especially during the summer), the annual International Spa Association (ISPA) invitation is one we welcome wholeheartedly. While the Montage Beverly Hills hotel has one of the best spas in our area, we truly enjoyed the ‘Trailblazer’-themed event where its ballroom transformed into an international summit of wellness, new product sampling, mini-treatments, and light bites followed with one of our favourite care packages handed to us at the end.
   Like any all-American summer camp, you had interesting arts and crafts projects (BodyBliss’s customized, crystal-filled fragrant essential oil roll-ons for every interesting guest), water activities (massages offered by event regular Kohler Waters Spas), mountain adventures (acupuncture and meditation with Red Mountain Resort Utah staff), beach time (Spa at the Del, Hotel del Coronado manicures and fitness chats); and snack time (Telluride’s the Spa at the Peaks’ Vitality Tasting bar with Naturopathica products).
   There were also interesting people among the “counsellors” at hand, from Los Angeles-based chef Matthew Kinney’s programme in Aventura, Florida (Âme Spa & Wellness Collective at Turnberry Isle Miami Resort), to the wonderful UK-bred staff doing mini-treatments with Elemis at Maryland-based RelĂąche Spa, to the experts from HydroPeptide demoing the new Nimni line at the Spa at Four Seasons and Biltmore Santa Barbara.
   While we loved the care packages—samples and full-sized goodies in a sharp Dakine backpack—there were plenty of wonderful things to discover during the scavenger hunt. We will start with a few of the resorts. The Villagio Inn & Spa, in the lush landscape of Napa Valley, is serenity personified, especially with its recently completed multi-million-dollar makeover. Event guests were invited to experience a mini-facial using the spa’s exclusive imported Espa products.
   The Spa at Two Bunch Palms Resort in Desert Hot Springs, meanwhile, will transport you to the ultimate desert oasis Bohemian-chic spa. An historic building, mud cabañas, outdoor showers and rock alcoves set the mood for down-to-earth healing therapies designed to free the mind and awaken the spirit. Just past the MĂ©xico border in Tecate, Rancho La Puerta expands out into a sprawling and comprehensive retreat with a round-the-clock health and wellness schedule full of classes and workshops tailored to every fitness level and interest.
   The Boulder, Colorado-based line Sanitas is filled with progressive, nature-based products that has become a fave for boutique spas and discerning buyers. To celebrate the launch of their sleek new packaging and website, guests received a generous gift of the niche brand’s favourite products, including the best-selling Vita C Serum and Brightening Peel Pads. While there have been new additions to the Elemis skin care line, the upscale UK-based brand’s breakthrough Pro-Collagen Marine Cream with Padina Pavonicamarine extract continues to be the must-have anti-ageing regimen for women around the globe.
   As mentioned above, Nimni Cream is positioned as HydroPeptide’s prescription for the Fountain of Youth. Formulated by Dr Marcel Nimni, the patented collagen support complex is among the most advanced on the market. Espa, a new UK entry in the world of prestige skin care, features Tri-Active Instant Facial, an age-defying serum, essence and oil wrapped into one dynamic frosted glass bottle. MicroalgĂŠ cell extract, white truffle and pampering oils are the star ingredients in this silky smooth elixir.
   A leader in the world of botanical-based skin care and wellness, Bio-Energy Lift serum packs a powerful plant-infused punch, formulated with a copper and amino acid complex that targets skin laxity by improving cell respiration to restore density and firmness.
   No one can top Natura BissĂ© when it comes to unbridled luxury. The Barcelona line treated guests to a trio of their favourite products which included their triple enzyme exfoliating superstar Glyco Extreme Peel.
   Although the treatments, as usual, filled up weeks before the big day, we found many of the stations were gracious and not only offered some walk-ups, but managed to squeeze us in for extra pampering.







Courtesy ISPA; Elyse Glickman

   A suite at the London Hotel West Hollywood, meanwhile, served as a showcase for the new travel-sized edition of the Dafni Hair straightening ceramic brush. The original, co-invented by Israeli-born engineer Sharon Rabi, 29, caused a sensation so monumental that it’s now available more than 25 countries and has spawned a few imitators. Although straight styles dominated fashion magazine pages and airwaves, Rabi invented the Dafni (named for her younger sister) for a more practical reason—a bob haircut that did not work with her naturally wavy hair. As she had to straighten her locks with a flat iron daily, she realized there had to be a better, faster way to get her strands in place.
   With an assist from her fellow engineer father, using the aerodynamic principles from a well-designed boat as a starting point, she went through five prototypes before launching the product in 2015. The reaction to the brush on its initial release caused the first generation of its website to crash. Today, with a smaller brush, the Dafni Go, ready to hit the waves, it should be smooth sailing for the inventor.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor, and Jody Miller, LA Correspondent

Filed under: beauty, hair, Los Angeles, Lucire

Sir Roger Moore, UNICEF ambassador and longest-serving James Bond actor, passes away


NEWS  by Jack Yan/May 23, 2017/14.42


UNICEF


© Danjaq LLC/United Artists

Top: Sir Roger Moore was a UNICEF goodwill ambassador from 1991 to 2017. Above: Moore on the set of Live and Let Die, his first James Bond film, in 1972.

Actor and UNICEF ambassador Sir Roger Moore has passed away in Switzerland, aged 89.
   His children by his third wife Luisa, Deborah, Geoffrey and Christian, issued a statement today, saying that their father had had a short battle with cancer.
   â€˜The love with which he was surrounded in his final days was so great it cannot be quantified in words alone,’ they said.
   Roger George Moore was born October 14, 1927, in Stockwell, the son of George Alfred Moore, a policeman, and Lillian Moore (nĂ©e Pope). An only child, Moore had a talent for art, one that he maintained through his life, and began in the film business as a trainee animator, joining the Association of Cinema Technicians’ union as a teenager. Through friends, he began doing work as an extra, and through that he was encouraged to join RADA. His father, an amateur actor, was supportive of this, and his fees were paid for by film director Brian Desmond Hurst.
   He married a fellow RADA student, Doorn van Steyn, in 1946. After World War II, he was conscripted for national service, and was commissioned into the Royal Army Service Corps. After three years in the army, Moore found himself unemployed, with Hurst soon hiring him for a tiny role in Trottie True. Television and stage work followed, as well as modelling for knitwear. His marriage to van Steyn soon fell apart. In 1952, Moore began a relationship with Dorothy Squires, the Welsh singer, who was 13 years his senior, causing a scandal at the time. They were married in Jersey City in July 1953. Moore eventually picked up a contract with MGM, beginning there on April Fool’s Day, 1954. Moore’s early films, where his highest billing was third, were unsuccessful, and after Diane, a 1956 film starring Lana Turner, flopped, he was fired, with five years remaining on his original seven-year contract.
   In 1956, the TV series Ivanhoe came Moore’s way, where he played the title role of Sir Wilfred of Ivanhoe. As the series ended, Warner Bros. called Moore, and he returned to Hollywood movies, first with The Miracle (1959), but also found himself on TV series, first with The Alaskans and then, Maverick, where he took over from James Garner. In 1961, while filming The Rape of the Sabine Women in Italy, Moore left Squires for the actress Luisa Mattioli.
   However, it was The Saint, back in the UK, that made Moore a household name. Moore had tried to acquire the television rights for the Leslie Charteris books himself, but was unsuccessful. Producers Bob Baker and Monty Berman had managed to secure them, and offered the lead role of Simon Templar to Moore. The series ran for 118 episodes, and Moore was said to have been the first British television millionaire. Thanks to his membership of the Association of Cinema Technicians, he directed some episodes of The Saint as well. When Baker and Berman went their separate ways during production, Moore became Baker’s junior partner. Toward the end of 1968, Squires agreed to grant Moore a divorce and he and Mattioli were married.
   After The Saint, Moore starred in Crossplot, a spy caper that felt much like a longer episode of The Saint, made by many of the same crew. He also starred in The Man Who Haunted Himself, which critics usually say showed Moore’s true range as an actor. Moore himself tended to be self-deprecating about his acting abilities, which potentially limited the types of roles he was offered.
   Perhaps similar to his Simon Templar character was Lord Brett Sinclair in The Persuaders, a role that Moore played for one season in 1970–1, alongside Tony Curtis. The concept had been trialled in an episode of The Saint, called ‘The Ex-King of Diamonds’, with Stuart Damon as Templar’s sidekick. Grade had sold the series before Moore had agreed to do it, and convinced him to do it by saying, ‘The country needs the money. Think of your Queen.’
   The Persuaders, at the time the most expensive show on television (with much of the money going to the leads’ salaries) was successful in most markets but the crucial US one. It was during this time that Moore was shoulder-tapped to succeed Sean Connery as James Bond, and plans for a second season of The Persuaders, and talk of NoĂ«l Harrison taking over for Moore, came to nought.
   It is possible that an obituary for Moore would be far less significant if he had not risen to take on one of the most hallowed cinematic roles in British cinema, that of Ian Fleming’s James Bond, for Live and Let Die in 1973. Moore played the secret agent seven times for Eon Productions, and even spoofed his role in The Cannonball Run in 1981, a record number of times. Moore kept working in film outside of Bond, including Peter Hunt’s Gold in 1974, Shout at the Devil opposite Lee Marvin in 1976, The Wild Geese in 1978 with Richard Burton and Richard Harris, and as the cat-loving Rufus Excalibur ffolkes in North Sea Hijack (a.k.a. ffolkes) in 1979. Moore also played a post-plastic surgery Chief Insp Clouseau in Curse of the Pink Panther in 1983. In another dramatic role, one often overlooked, Moore played Dr Judd Stevens in Bryan Forbes’s thriller The Naked Face in 1984.
   Post-Bond, Moore made fewer films. Willy Bogner’s Feuer, Eis & Dynamit in 1990 featured Moore and his son, Geoffrey; Michael Winner’s romp Bullseye, with Michael Caine, followed the same year, and featured Moore’s daughter, Deborah. Younger audiences would know Moore from Spice World in 1999.
   Audrey Hepburn invited Moore to a UNICEF event in 1991. Hepburn had been a goodwill ambassador for the organization, and Moore eventually joined, paid the sum of $1 a year. It was for his work for UNICEF that Moore was knighted in 1999.
   Moore had been diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1993. After taking stock, he and Mattioli separated in 1993, and Moore set up home with Swedish-born socialite Kristina Tholstrup in Monaco soon after. Mattioli granted Moore a divorce in 2000, and he and Tholstrup married in 2002. Tholstrup had accompanied Moore on most of his UNICEF tours.
   As Sir Roger Moore, he had authored numerous books, including My Word Is My Bond, his autobiography, and his last appearance was on stage at the Royal Festival Hall in November 2016.
   A private funeral will be held in Monaco.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Three by Ekman: the Royal New Zealand Ballet shows its witty, ingenious side


NEWS  by Jack Yan/May 20, 2017/12.01



Stephen A’Court

Swedish-born choreographer–director Alexander Ekman, it transpires, was the first person Francesco Ventriglia called when he was first appointed artistic director of the Royal New Zealand Ballet. Ekman, says Ventriglia, creates choreography that is ‘different, brave, intelligent, witty and fun,’ and he sees the work as being the equivalent of ‘good food’ for the dancers. The three ballets in Three by Ekman are certainly that: modern and relevant, yet somehow also timeless in their appeal. Tuplet, Episode 31 and Cacti keep audiences gripped, while taking us on a journey into unexplored territories.
   They aren’t fully unexplored, mind: regular RNZB attendees will remember Cacti from last year’s trio of ballets in Speed of Light, but seeing it again this time was a renewed pleasure, and connecting it to two more Ekman ballets gives it an extra dimension. As the third ballet, Cacti was a fitting conclusion: when you’re in Ekman’s world, you almost want to stay in it in an attempt to understand the creativity that drives this talented and important modern choreographer. It’s a world that’s energizing, spontaneous, but cheekily self-aware.
   The first foray into that world is Tuplet, a clever 18-minute introduction where the dancers’ own breaths, voices, and the sounds of their bodies become the rhythm. Composer (and a fellow Swedish-born international talent) Mikael Karlsson’s music has a dose of Bart Howard’s ‘Fly Me to the Moon’ as performed by Victor Feldman helped set the mood. Video projections, which were also designed by Ekman, feature slowed-down black-and-white clips of jazz musicians, highlighting the improvised nature of the dance, performed by six dancers standing on white square mats. New Yorker and Parsons alum Nancy Haeyung Bae designed the costumes, which aided the movement well, and Amith Chandrashaker the lighting, which balanced the the dancers with the video screens above. The conclusion was clever and a taste of Ekman’s humour: he showed silent films of audiences applauding as the live one at the St James Theatre did the same while the curtain fell.
   A video introduction to Episode 31 followed, showing the RNZB’s dancers learning the ballet. It’s a tradition of Episode 31, where a short film is made in the city in which it is performed. The film shows that the dancers were not restricted to the studio, as they ventured out from the Theatre in flash-mob style to various Wellington landmarks such as the cable car and the Botanic Garden; Mayor Justin Lester is caught walking by as the company vigorously dances Episode 31 on the waterfront. (The video is below, though we recommend you don’t spoil the experience.) The dance is a celebration of youth, energy and pace, fitting given its origins as a piece created for Julliard (and first performed in 2011; the video there made use of New York City landmarks such as the Subway). Karlsson once again composed the music, with costumes by Julliard’s Luke Simcock, and lighting by Nicole Pearce. Simcock’s visually deconstructed black and white costumes happily mix genders (e.g. skirts and collared dresses with prints of jackets), as does the make-up on the dancers (mustachioed faces on pale white). The pacy performance itself is contrasted with one dancer who moved in slow motion across the front of the stage; the curtain rose and fell to show vignettes of the action going on behind, leaving you wondering: are we really seeing vignettes or are the dancers repositioning themselves intentionally in preparation for the next reveal? The lighting rig came down, flooring was lifted up and moved, and a second slow-motion dancer wandered with a sign reading ‘Beautiful’ in a stark, all-cap Helvetica (the design of this sign itself is an exercise in irony). As with other Ekman ballets, spoken words accompany the action, with poetry (and this is the programme’s list) by Christina Rossetti, William Allingham, Eleanor Farjeon, Robert Louis Stevenson, William Hughes Mearns and Edward Lear.
   A second video came after the interval, where Ekman is seen on a ferry to Somes Island in Wellington, contemplating choreography and its connection to its surroundings. Will I affect the island or will the island affect me? You can’t but help find Ekman’s quirky personality endearing and you form a connection with the choreographer—and understand that there is a method here, from a man who constantly looks for ways to push ballet forward.
   There’s less chaos in Cacti than in Episode 31. Here, spoken word also features, in an unsubtle dig at postmodernism and the pretentious reviews modern dance might get (one only hopes this article is not an example), with a recording written and voiced by Spenser Theberge. The New Zealand String Quartet accompanies the action here, with both composed and improvised music, at least for the first part of Cacti, before classical music (Haydn, Schubert, and Beethoven) takes over. The 16 dancers move their white tiles, shouting and clapping as they added to the rhythm, before bringing in cactus plants on-stage. Ekman himself designed the set and costumes; Tom Visser also worked on the set and designed the lighting. The second part, a duet between characters Aram and Riley, is another humorous Ekman take, where the audience can hear the streams of consciousness from the pair (played by Alexandre Ferreira and Laura Saxon Jones today). As noted in our review last year, Cacti breaks down the pretence and complexity of ballet into basic statements: the two characters are disengaged from any story and just want to get the dance done. The stuffed cat that is thrown on stage still surprises on a second viewing, and we note that it was a different colour this time.
   When Cacti was part of Speed of Light, we only got a dose of Ekman’s style. This time, we were immersed, and Three by Ekman feels more satisfying and complete. It’s one of the RNZB’s most enjoyable modern ballets, and it’s consistent throughout, not just in the expertise of the dancers, but in the tone and ingenuity of the three works.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Three by Ekman tours till June 15. For venue and booking information, visit www.rnzb.org.nz.

A sense of irreverence and youth at Celebrity Connected’s MTV Movie & TV Awards’ lounge


NEWS  by Jody Miller/May 15, 2017/23.09



Just when you thought awards season was over, MTV pulls out their annual Movie & TV Awards for yet another night of star-gazing revelry with a rebellious, “young Hollywood” twist. As befitting any awards ceremony of note, Celebrity Connected gets the enthusiasm and adrenaline started early with their famed luxury gifting lounge. It could not have found a more appropriate location than the ultramodern and plush W Hotel Hollywood for the lively star-studded event.
   While youth reigned supreme (it is MTV, after all), there were as many notable established as well as up-and-comers parading the red carpet. Al McLean of the Backstreet Boys, singer Alli Simpson, actor–comedian JB Smoove, actor Lil Rel Howery (2017 winner), Michelle Visage (2017 winner), Randy Jackson, Rashad Jennings, actor Sam Huntington, Christian Navarro, Princess Love and others were in on the fun.
   In true gifting-suite fashion, suppliers were out in force showcasing cool products to test, taste and touch. Pure premium golden cannabis oil is the secret ingredient at Speakeasy710, infusing multiple levels of THC into vape cartridges, tonics, balms and more. Mister-e-Liquid is all things e-cigarette and nicotine alternative in a cornucopia of flavours. There are also batteries, chargers, cases and complete vaping kits.
   Cyndie Wade offered custom painted glassware and gifts, ensuring tastemakers would never be at a loss for customizable ideas with a dash of whimsy. Just email a clear photo and some particulars and Wade sends you custom wine glasses, ornaments, treat jars for pets and cookie jars for humans, paintings on canvas and more.
   Using only the finest natural ingredients, DivaStuff creates hand-made beauty products with a global twist. There is something for every skin type and concern and is if that were not enough, the line comprises incredibly affordable products. Stitch & Stone is a Canada-based bohemian inspired boutique featuring clothing, jewellery, and home dĂ©cor proudly showcasing many designers. We love their whimsical apothecary items like Men Don’t Stink, Beard Wash, solid colognes and every woman’s best friend, B’Ver Balm.
   An abundance of sweet treats and beverages were on hand to relieve the appetite worked up on the red carpet. Sweetopia Artisan Chocolates uses and old copper kettle and family recipes for the creamiest, smoothest caramels, truffles and cakes imaginable. Are crave-worth protein bars, shakes and chips even possible? They certainly are thanks to Quest Nutrition. Flavours like Salted Caramel Protein Powder, Sea Salt Protein Chips or the Cookies ‘n’ Cream protein bars ensure healthy eating is never a sacrifice. Press creates delectable, craft-cocktail inspired carbonated drinks, including pomegranate ginger, grapefruit cardamom, blackberry hibiscus and lime lemongrass.
   Other vendors present included Harmless Harvest, Bonjour Clothing Co., Hemp Kitchen, FYM Hot Sauces, and Survivor Apparel—Jody Miller, Correspondent











Usain Bolt, Chanel Iman, Nina Agdal celebrate Kentucky Derby at G. H. Mumm event in NYC


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 7, 2017/1.19




Andrew Toth/Getty Images

Storied champagne house G. H. Mumm has again shown off its new, award-winning bottle design for Mumm Grand Cordon, with Olympian Usain Bolt doing the honours in New York during the Kentucky Derby. Other VIPs attending the event were models Chanel Iman and Nina Agdal, and actor–comedian Mario Cantone.
   The new bottle has been designed by Welshman Ross Lovegrove, with the iconic red sash indented into the glass, with no front label. The design has already won gold at the Grand Prix StratĂ©gies du Design.
   Bolt is Mumm’s “CEO”, or Chief Entertainment Officer, a newly coined title as a celebrity spokesman for the brand, and led the celebrations at the launch.
   The party atmosphere even saw Mumm cellar master Didier Mariotti engage in a battle on the turntables with Bolt, when the pair took over from DJ Chelsea Leyland.
   Mumm Grand Cordon celebrates its 140th anniversary this year. Mumm is the Derby’s official champagne partner.


















Andrew Toth/Getty Images

Naturally organic, inside and out


NEWS  by Lola Cristall/May 6, 2017/22.41


Josh Madson

There is nothing like the feel and smell of natural, organic products. Tiffany Andersen’s Salts Alive Bath and Body collection is all about being organic, vegan, toxin-free and it’s an absolutely fresh sensation. Mineral cell salts, alƓ vera juice and other healthy ingredients come to life in their range of shampoos, conditioners, body lotion, face and body polish as well as hand soap.

   Trilogy is a skin care line celebrated for its range of natural and highly rich products. Its new Rosapene Radiance Serum helps to repair the user’s skin, working deep within the pores. Sea algĂŠ, alƓ vera and rosapene work together to protect the skin from harmful attributes. Trilogy’s new Rosehip Oil Light Blend strikes a balance to regulate the skin’s oil production while targeting wrinkles and fine lines. The oil penetrates into the skin, leaving it feeling silky, clean and healthy.
   All Good started in 1997 with the simple All Good Goop healing balm that aimed to relieve skin ailments including blisters, scars, cuts, scrapes and more, made exclusively for founder Caroline Duell, as well as her family and friends. Eventually the brand launched All Good Goop to the public, along with a number of other products including lip balms, sunscreens, body lotions and deodorants predominantly based on simple, organic and natural ingredients. Each product has a luxurious, creamy texture and a velvety consistency.



   Gaia Herbs have taken the herbal market by storm with an array of natural and organic products. The MacaBoost, with cacao and ginger or vanilla chai flavours, features energy-boosting supplements that can blend into a daily smoothie for the extra stamina needed to recharge for the day. Another effective powder blend is their Turmeric Boost, where a dose of curcumin aims to support key organs. Gaia Herbs’ Supreme Cleanse is a two-week-long programme that aims to cleanse and relieve the body from waste and toxins. The brand’s thorough Liver Cleanse also incorporates a number of active components such as dandelion, artichoke, black radish and milk thistle to detoxify internally.

The American eco-lifestyle magazine Organic Spa Magazine organizes a biannual event from Los Angeles to New York, bringing media and a number of highly anticipated brands together under one roof. The Conrad Hotel in Lower Manhattan welcomed guests at an event where they can get up close and personal with product representatives as well as brand founders.
   Aura Cacia returned with their pure essential oils and powerful chakra-balancing oils. The chosen scents are designed to awaken all the senses to alleviate the mind and soothe the soul. Frankincense, meroli, myrrh, patchouli and rose produce particularly powerful and robust aromas. KPS Essentials, a luxury skin care line, includes ingredients such as argan, coconut, jojoba seed, rosehip oils, green tea and honey, reviving and restoring skin. SpaRitual, launched by Shel Pink in 2004, embraces an eco-friendly concept. Its new limited-edition Passionfruit Agave body collection include a sugar scrub, exfoliating cleansing oil, nourishing oil for body and hair, as well as a body soufflĂ©. For a gorgeous manicure, SpaRitual also presented its innovative long-lasting nourishing vegan nail polish shade that works to fortify one’s nails while making them grow longer. The blend includes red tea and seaweed extract.
   A number of other brands to discover included Boiron USA, Columbia Skin Care, Cancun Tourism, NeoCell, Riviera Maya, Shire City Herbals’ Fire Cider, MyChelle, Nubian Heritage, Deer Lake Lodge, Rejuva Minerals, and more. While some introduced hair and skin care products, others presented hot-spot zen-like destinations.—Lola Cristall, Paris Editor











Alex Lucas

Allbirds extends range with Wool Lounger shoes


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 26, 2017/13.29


Allbirds claims its latest Wool Lounger shoe has ‘soft wool, sleek lines, unstoppable comfort’.
   Already known for the comfort of its existing Wool Runner shoe, the US-based, New Zealand-heritage brand introduced a second style earlier this month.
   Environmentally friendly, the new shoes are breathable and made from the same super-fine New Zealand merino wool, which the company claims makes them ideal to be worn year-round, and even sockless.
   Four shades are available at launch: lemon, navy, pine and slate. Men’s and women’s styles are offered.



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