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In brief: Robbie Williams, Ayda Field Williams, Mads Mikkelsen celebrate Marc O’Polo’s 50th; H&M to open in Wellington


NEWS  by Lucire staff/July 7, 2017/14.19




Joerg Koch; Gisela Schober

Marc O’Polo celebrated its 50th anniversary (hashtagged #MOP50 and #MOPxRobbie) at its flagship store on Theatinerstraße in München, with special guests Robbie Williams, his wife Ayda Field Williams, Mads Mikkelsen, and DJ Marcus Kavka. The four held a panel discussion that was live-streamed via Facebook.
   The Williamses had worked with Marc O’Polo on its Iconic Capsule Collection, and presented the 50th anniversary designs live at the store.
   The collection comprises 20 contemporary–casual pieces, including sweatshirts, a hoody dress and a bomber blouson for women, and a hoody, crew-neck sweater, and tracksuit top for men. Williams’s signature is embroidered on the sleeves, while the women’s sweatshirts feature the words ‘Love my life’ and ‘Come undone’, taken from his song titles.
   Williams has opted for pink for one of the men’s designs. Peter Lindbergh shot the campaign imagery.
   Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) has announced that it will open a second New Zealand retail store, in the country’s capital, Wellington. The opening is set for late 2017, and will be located at the Queensgate mall in Lower Hutt. No other details were on hand.
   The first store in the country, at Sylvia Park in Auckland, opened successfully in 2016.







Joerg Koch; Gisela Schober


Robbie Williams and Ayda Field Williams on Marc O’Polo by Lucire


Marc O’Polo celebrates its 50th anniversary by Lucire

Royal New Zealand Ballet promises an ‘epic’ production with Romeo and Juliet, opening August 16


NEWS  by Lucire staff/July 6, 2017/21.15



Ross Brown

The most anticipated ballet of the year in New Zealand, the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s production of Romeo and Juliet, set to the music of Sergei Prokofiev and choreographed by the company’s outgoing artistic director, Francesco Ventriglia, has its world première on August 16 in Wellington. The sets and costumes have been designed by three-time Academy Award-winning designer James Acheson (who won for Dangerous Liaisons, The Last Emperor, and Restoration).
   Other talents behind the full-length, three-act ballet are dramaturge Mario Mattia Giorgetti, choreographic assistant Gillian Whittingham, and guest ballet master Frédéric Jahn. The New Zealand Symphony Orchestra’s associate conductor Hamish McKeith will conduct orchestras in Wellington, Christchurch, Auckland and Dunedin.
   The company’s biggest production of the year, there will be 13 scene changes and over 90 costumes.
   It is Ventriglia’s second full-length ballet for the RNZB, with work beginning in October 2016. His successor, Patricia Barker, has started as the new artistic director as the reins are handed over, noting, ‘It’s a very exciting time to have joined the RNZB—this production promises to be exquisite while it transports us to the heart of Verona. The energy in the studio is captivating. I have enjoyed getting to know the RNZB dancers and I’m looking forward to seeing them inhabit these iconic characters.’
   Ventriglia said, ‘To create a brand new classical ballet of one of the greatest stories and the most beautiful scores is so invigorating. I’m taking great care to respect Shakespeare and Prokofiev’s great works plus drawing inspiration from Franco Zeffirelli’s 1968 multi-Academy Award-winning film. I’m also working with a dream team of collaborators and the very talented artists of the RNZB, who I’d like to thank for their incredible work.
   ‘James Acheson’s magnificent sets make me feel right at home, like I’m in Verona in the height of an Italian summer. All of the costumes are exquisite. We have been very true to the Renaissance period and I know audiences will also be transported to the time and place where our star-crossed lovers meet.’
   The production promises to be ‘epic’, with 22 performances scheduled from August 16 to September 24 in Wellington (with Orchestra Wellington), Christchurch (with the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra), Auckland (with the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra), Rotorua, Dunedin (with the Dunedin Symphony Orchestra), Invercargill, Palmerston North, and Napier.
   The season is sponsored by Ryman Healthcare. More information can be found at www.rnzb.org.nz.

In brief: Deadly Ponies Man’s 2017 latest; Vivienne Westwood previews Berlin festival; Patricia Barker is new RNZB artistic director


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 13, 2017/21.01




Andrei; modelled by Henry Humphreys, hair by Lauren Gunn/Colleen, make-up by Lochie Stonehouse/MAC Cosmetics

Deadly Ponies Man has launched its latest collection for 2017, inspired by the ocean, using Ink bovine leather and shearling, and brass highlights. It’s meant to convey the idea of a ‘moody seascape’ and an ‘intrepid voyager’, which the promotional images suggest. That’s interpreted with classic items such as the Phantom duffle (now a weekender with zips going right down the side) and a range of travel accessories; and if the seascape idea isn’t evident enough, a notebook inside Deadly Ponies Man’s compendium has pastel blue and white hues resembling water washing up on beaches.




   Bread & Butter by Zalando previewed its second festival of style and culture in Berlin, with the theme of Bold. Jefferson Hack moderated the evening, with Dame Vivienne Westwood the VIP of the evening. Others who spoke included Zalando brand marketing VP Carsten Hendrich; and a panel featuring Aitor Throup, Adwoa Aboah, Erika Bowes, Fergus Purcell and MikeQ. A light show, an interactive mirror installation, and a real-time face-projection mapping photo booth followed, with a live performance by Abra and DJs Zora Jones, Bambii and Why Be concluding the night. Other guests included Marie Nasemann and Peaches. The main event takes place September 1 to 3 at Arena Berlin, with more updates via Bread & Butter’s Instagram and Facebook.
   Patricia Barker is the new artistic director of the Royal New Zealand Ballet, and takes up her post this month, succeeding Francesco Ventriglia. Barker is a former prima ballerina and, most recently, artistic director of Grand Rapids Ballet in Michigan. Ventriglia has programmed the RNZB’s 2018 national tours and Barker will realize these. Ventriglia is the guest choreographer for the company’s major commission, Romeo and Juliet, for which rehearsals begin now—the company says this will ensure a smooth transition with the outgoing and incoming directors working side by side for two months. RNZB board chair Steven Fyfe noted, ‘From a large number of excellent applications from New Zealand and all over the world, the board was greatly impressed by Patricia’s vision for all aspects of the RNZB’s activities, together with her experience as an artistic leader. Her knowledge of both contemporary and classical repertoire, as a dancer, coach and director also makes her an outstanding fit for the RNZB.’
   Barker is the RNZB’s 12th artistic director and the second woman to hold the position (after Una Kai in 1973–5).










Isa Foltin; Alexander Körner

Stella by Tory & KO.’s new boutique: home fragrances, cruelty-free cosmetics, and contemporary jewellery


NEWS  by Jack Yan/June 7, 2017/23.06




Above: Tory & KO. will offer jewellery, cosmetics and home fragrances at its new store, opening Friday.

Jewellers Tory & KO. have announced a new luxury boutique on the ground level of the Old Bank Arcade in Wellington, New Zealand, and are introducing two bespoke home fragrances, as well as a range of mineral-based, cruelty-free, Canadian-made cosmetics, a hand cream, and candles to be sold at the new premises.
   The new store, focusing on jewellery, cosmetics and giftware, will have Stella branding and complements the existing store, which remains on the mezzanine floor of the Old Bank Arcade. It opens on Friday, June 9.
   Co-founder Victoria Taylor notes that the Stella by Tory & KO. range has been part of the company for some time. Stella is the company’s contemporary line, with many of its designs having a celestial theme. The jewellery uses gold, silver, champagne and galaxy diamonds, and deep blue midnight sapphires. ‘It’s precious jewellery, and nothing synthetic has been used,’ she adds.
   It grew from the main range and attracted such widespread support from the company’s clients that Taylor and co-founder Kirstin O’Brien felt it was time to launch its own concept space.
   ‘We wanted to create a luxurious experience for our customers, where they can enjoy the excitement of our ever-growing Stella by Tory & KO. brand and enjoy the additional sparkle provided by our new cosmetics range and bespoke, in-house created candle and home fragrances,’ says O’Brien.
   Stella is named for O’Brien’s daughter.
   The upstairs atelier continues to offer bespoke and one-off pieces, says Taylor.
   Tory & KO. can count the Duchess of Cambridge among its wearers, along with Amber Valletta, Robin Tunney, Evangeline Lilly, and numerous other celebrities. It also received a commission from the Governor-General of New Zealand on the occasion of HM Queen Elizabeth II’s 90th birthday.
   The new store is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Monday through Thursday, and till 7 p.m. on Friday. On Saturday, the opening hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sundays and public holidays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.—Jack Yan, Publisher




Michael Beel scoops top honour at Industry New Zealand Hair Awards; Derek Elvy inducted into Hall of Fame


NEWS  by Sopheak Seng/May 29, 2017/23.54




Guy Coombes

Talented hairstylist and regular Lucire contributor Michael Beel of Buoy Hairdressing has taken out the top prize at this year’s Industry New Zealand Hair Awards in Auckland.
   His collection is a major departure from his usual work, which sees him focus on big volume and luxury hair. This collection recalled that glamour but in a more ’80s grunge vibe, with short choppy bobs and chic mullets. This was pieced together with bold colouring in chunky panels to create texture and visual interest.
   As part of the prize for winning New Zealand Hairdresser of the Year, Beel has also won a trip sponsored by Wella to work backstage at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in New York.
   While the competition was tough this year with many stand-out and strong collections from all over the country, Beel’s collection stood out for his artistry and direction, in being able to predict and read the Zeitgeist of fashion hair trends.
   Beel was not the only winner of the night from the Buoy salon team. Derek Elvy, who founded the acclaimed salon was inducted into the Hall of Fame for his long, outstanding career in hairdressing.
   Creator of the industry awards, Sara Allsop, said that Elvy being this year’s choice was an easy one.
   ‘His photographic work was ground-breaking in the ’90s. He paved the way and set the standard in production and creativity which showed New Zealand hairdressers what could be achieved when you collaborated with other creatives. At the time no one else was doing anything close to what he produced.’
   In the 21st century, Elvy continued to be awarded for his creative photographic collections.—Sopheak Seng, Fashion and Beauty Editor



Photographed by Guy Coombes
Hair by Michael Beel
Colour by Chinney Yeap
Styled by Sopheak Seng
Make-up by Hil Cook
Models from Kirsty Bunny Management and street cast

Three by Ekman: the Royal New Zealand Ballet shows its witty, ingenious side


NEWS  by Jack Yan/May 20, 2017/12.01



Stephen A’Court

Swedish-born choreographer–director Alexander Ekman, it transpires, was the first person Francesco Ventriglia called when he was first appointed artistic director of the Royal New Zealand Ballet. Ekman, says Ventriglia, creates choreography that is ‘different, brave, intelligent, witty and fun,’ and he sees the work as being the equivalent of ‘good food’ for the dancers. The three ballets in Three by Ekman are certainly that: modern and relevant, yet somehow also timeless in their appeal. Tuplet, Episode 31 and Cacti keep audiences gripped, while taking us on a journey into unexplored territories.
   They aren’t fully unexplored, mind: regular RNZB attendees will remember Cacti from last year’s trio of ballets in Speed of Light, but seeing it again this time was a renewed pleasure, and connecting it to two more Ekman ballets gives it an extra dimension. As the third ballet, Cacti was a fitting conclusion: when you’re in Ekman’s world, you almost want to stay in it in an attempt to understand the creativity that drives this talented and important modern choreographer. It’s a world that’s energizing, spontaneous, but cheekily self-aware.
   The first foray into that world is Tuplet, a clever 18-minute introduction where the dancers’ own breaths, voices, and the sounds of their bodies become the rhythm. Composer (and a fellow Swedish-born international talent) Mikael Karlsson’s music has a dose of Bart Howard’s ‘Fly Me to the Moon’ as performed by Victor Feldman helped set the mood. Video projections, which were also designed by Ekman, feature slowed-down black-and-white clips of jazz musicians, highlighting the improvised nature of the dance, performed by six dancers standing on white square mats. New Yorker and Parsons alum Nancy Haeyung Bae designed the costumes, which aided the movement well, and Amith Chandrashaker the lighting, which balanced the the dancers with the video screens above. The conclusion was clever and a taste of Ekman’s humour: he showed silent films of audiences applauding as the live one at the St James Theatre did the same while the curtain fell.
   A video introduction to Episode 31 followed, showing the RNZB’s dancers learning the ballet. It’s a tradition of Episode 31, where a short film is made in the city in which it is performed. The film shows that the dancers were not restricted to the studio, as they ventured out from the Theatre in flash-mob style to various Wellington landmarks such as the cable car and the Botanic Garden; Mayor Justin Lester is caught walking by as the company vigorously dances Episode 31 on the waterfront. (The video is below, though we recommend you don’t spoil the experience.) The dance is a celebration of youth, energy and pace, fitting given its origins as a piece created for Julliard (and first performed in 2011; the video there made use of New York City landmarks such as the Subway). Karlsson once again composed the music, with costumes by Julliard’s Luke Simcock, and lighting by Nicole Pearce. Simcock’s visually deconstructed black and white costumes happily mix genders (e.g. skirts and collared dresses with prints of jackets), as does the make-up on the dancers (mustachioed faces on pale white). The pacy performance itself is contrasted with one dancer who moved in slow motion across the front of the stage; the curtain rose and fell to show vignettes of the action going on behind, leaving you wondering: are we really seeing vignettes or are the dancers repositioning themselves intentionally in preparation for the next reveal? The lighting rig came down, flooring was lifted up and moved, and a second slow-motion dancer wandered with a sign reading ‘Beautiful’ in a stark, all-cap Helvetica (the design of this sign itself is an exercise in irony). As with other Ekman ballets, spoken words accompany the action, with poetry (and this is the programme’s list) by Christina Rossetti, William Allingham, Eleanor Farjeon, Robert Louis Stevenson, William Hughes Mearns and Edward Lear.
   A second video came after the interval, where Ekman is seen on a ferry to Somes Island in Wellington, contemplating choreography and its connection to its surroundings. Will I affect the island or will the island affect me? You can’t but help find Ekman’s quirky personality endearing and you form a connection with the choreographer—and understand that there is a method here, from a man who constantly looks for ways to push ballet forward.
   There’s less chaos in Cacti than in Episode 31. Here, spoken word also features, in an unsubtle dig at postmodernism and the pretentious reviews modern dance might get (one only hopes this article is not an example), with a recording written and voiced by Spenser Theberge. The New Zealand String Quartet accompanies the action here, with both composed and improvised music, at least for the first part of Cacti, before classical music (Haydn, Schubert, and Beethoven) takes over. The 16 dancers move their white tiles, shouting and clapping as they added to the rhythm, before bringing in cactus plants on-stage. Ekman himself designed the set and costumes; Tom Visser also worked on the set and designed the lighting. The second part, a duet between characters Aram and Riley, is another humorous Ekman take, where the audience can hear the streams of consciousness from the pair (played by Alexandre Ferreira and Laura Saxon Jones today). As noted in our review last year, Cacti breaks down the pretence and complexity of ballet into basic statements: the two characters are disengaged from any story and just want to get the dance done. The stuffed cat that is thrown on stage still surprises on a second viewing, and we note that it was a different colour this time.
   When Cacti was part of Speed of Light, we only got a dose of Ekman’s style. This time, we were immersed, and Three by Ekman feels more satisfying and complete. It’s one of the RNZB’s most enjoyable modern ballets, and it’s consistent throughout, not just in the expertise of the dancers, but in the tone and ingenuity of the three works.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Three by Ekman tours till June 15. For venue and booking information, visit www.rnzb.org.nz.

Tailor Skincare launches Your Blend, an innovative, customized two-step moisturizing formula


NEWS  by Jack Yan/May 5, 2017/23.47




Jack Yan

Tailor Skincare, riding high from the award-winning Renew, launched its Your Blend line at Power Yoga Living Studio in Wellington on Friday.
   Founder Sara Quilter, wearing Wilson Trollope and, appropriately for a yoga studio, barefoot, welcomed Tailor staff, clients and supporters—including her parents—and told a confident and heartfelt story on why she created Your Blend.
   Your Blend, described as a ‘personalized multifunctional, morning and night moisturizer’, is a two-step formula, using two extracts as a customized solution for each wearer’s skin and lifestyle. A quick online consultation, which takes into account genetics, environmental factors and skin type generates a recommendation for the two extracts. Your Blend addresses both the skin type (extracts numbered 1–3) and skin concern (4–6), in attractive packaging designed in-house by their communications’ and marketing manager, Stacy Heyman.
   Tailor Skincare recommends adding Renew for best results.
   In a quick post-speech chat to Lucire, Quilter mentioned the inspiration hit her while holidaying in Bali, and she was driven by her belief that everyone should get the best skin care possible.
   The event saw Good Buzz kombucha, Peter Yealands wine, and Soul Organics super juices served to VIPs.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Tailor Renew: does exactly what it says on the box


NEWS  by Jack Yan/April 18, 2017/14.20

Tailor Skincare’s Renew is a probiotic serum that’s already picked up an Innovation Award for Best Formulation from the New Zealand Society of Cosmetic Chemists. For the service of our readers, we put it to the test, as we do with other products that come across our desk.
   In the case of Renew, I wanted to get a real-world sense of how it might work. Believing in “tested on humans”, my other half came to the rescue, putting the serum on one hand but not the other at night.
   Within a day there was a noticeable difference where the serum had been applied: the skin felt softer and smoother to the touch, even healthier. Things continued to improve over the week: it really works.
   It did exactly what Tailor claims: it stimulated and revitalized the skin, thanks to its probiotic lysate and grape seed extract. The lysate-based Prorenew Complex CLR ingredient is unique to Tailor, while grape-seed extract is a known antioxidant that protects the skin. These work with the body’s own processes.
   ‘Renew’ is an honest claim—here’s a product whose name is a real claim to what it does.
   Tailor recommends that it be used for the face and neck after cleansing and moisturizing, using ‘a pea-sized amount’. It works with all skin types.
   Tailor Renew, retailing for NZ$69, is made in New Zealand, and is cruelty-free.—Jack Yan, Publisher

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