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June 19, 2015

Phoenix Organics’ Love Project helps clean up New Zealand’s polluted rivers

Fenella Clarke/22.55

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Top Phoenix Organics’ promotional image for its latest venture to tackle river pollution. Above The sites for the Love Project’s tree-planting between June and September. Below left A #loveyourwater promotional card, with wildflower seeds embedded within.

On June 5, Phoenix Organics started planting native plants along polluted rivers for the Love Project, a venture which started last year with the company helping to remove 5,000 â„“ of rubbish from New Zealand beaches.
   When figures were released by regional councils last month revealing that more than half of New Zealand rivers were unsafe to swim in and that Waikato, Bay of Plenty, Wellington, Canterbury and Northland were the worst, Phoenix knew it had to help.
   Co-founder of Sustainable Coastlines, Sam Judd, said, ‘Working with Phoenix Organics, we’re helping communities to stop pollution at its source by setting up riparian planting events—these help reduce pollutants entering rivers by reestablishing native vegetation.’
   Phoenix is hoping that through the Love Project, its customers will feel inspired to make a real difference in New Zealand’s coastal areas.
   â€˜We’ve been committed to sustainability since day one and believe New Zealand should continue to build on its clean, green image through involving communities in projects like this,’ said Steve Cook, marketing manager for Phoenix Organics.
   The Love Project is also partnering with environmental artist Martin Hill, based in Wanaka, to create a sculpture during the project, with more information about being released late July.
   Auckland saw the first planting day on June 5 at Wakaaranga Creek; Wellington follows on June 26 at Owhiro Stream. Christchurch’s day is on July 31 at Travis Wetland, while Nelson’s is on August 21 at Corder Park. Northland and Waikato are in September.
   To find out more, you can look at Phoenix Organics’ Facebook and Instagram as well as the hashtag #loveyourwater.—Fenella Clarke


Above Phoenix Organics has planted one tree on behalf of Lucire publisher Jack Yan.

June 10, 2015

New Zealand Eco Fashion Week launches with mayoral reception

Jack Yan/4.43

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Masanori Udagawa/Photowellington

Lucire is UNEP's first fashion industry partnerThe third New Zealand Eco Fashion Week had its launch last night, hosted by the Mayor of Hutt City, Ray Wallace.
   The Dowse Art Centre played host to the mayoral reception. Denise Anglesey, the founder and director of the event, introduced her team, and it was apparent from the very swish launch that feedback from the 2014 week on how to take things to the next level had been taken on board. It also demonstrated a growing confidence from the Mayor and council in the event.
   Anglesey had secured Miranda Brown, one of New Zealand’s best known socially responsible designers, to headline for the Saturday show, and tickets to the event were selling faster than in previous years.
   Peruvian Fair Trade shoe brand Inkkas, jewellery label Sylver & Shackel, Gem Chérie, Ron Tekawa, Dane Dagger, Julia May, Undivided and others showed that Angelsey’s event attracted designers from well beyond the region, and the 2016 event, she noted, could include a name from the US.
   The Hutt City Council had come on board as the premier partner for New Zealand Eco Fashion Week, with Mayor Wallace noting his concern about the disposable culture that had emerged in recent times. He believed that this was extremely harmful for the environment, and praised the eco-fashion movement.
   The Mayor also believed Hutt City to be a thriving, creative hub, with a growing part of the economy participating in its Technology Valley. He saw New Zealand Eco Fashion Week playing a strong part in the city’s creativity.
   German-made Sante, a natural, organic make-up brand with a 100 per cent plant base, will be used on all 45 models at the event, and is a gold sponsor. The Hodge Group and Coffee News are the event’s other two gold sponsors.
   Also present were Panache Model Agency, Salon Revue, and Peter Yealands Wines, which provided the alcohol at the launch.
   The programme extends beyond the Saturday show; full details are at its website. There are talks from Brown on Thursday, a pop-up shop at 127 Jackson Street, Petone, a make-up demonstration, and a wardrobe swap.—Jack Yan, Publisher


Masanori Udagawa/Photowellington


Jack Yan

Top Model Allie O’Regan is made up using Sante natural cosmetics at New Zealand Eco Fashion Week. Above Inkkas’ Fair Trade, eco-friendly shoes made by Peruvian artisans.

June 9, 2015

Michael Beel wins New Zealand Hairdresser of the Year with Oriental Bloom collection

Fenella Clarke/4.13

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Wellington-based hairdresser Michael Beel has won New Zealand Hairdresser of the Year at Sydney’s Hair Expo, thought of as the “Oscars of hairdressing” in some circles, last night.
   The winning collection, named Oriental Bloom, was inspired by orchids, the work of Georgia O’Keeffe and the glamour of 1930s Shanghai. Beel also wanted the collection to be all about sculptural hair. This was the fifth time he entered, realizing a life-long ambition to get the top accolade. In previous years, Beel won the Educator of the Year award in 2013 and Industry Hairdresser of the Year in 2014.
   Beel started working at a hair salon in Dunedin for extra cash before started his apprenticeship. He then moved to Wellington to finish it. For the last 13 years, Beel has been working at Buoy Hairdressing, and is now the creative director of the salon. He is an educator for both GHD and L’Oréal Professionnel, and his work has featured in numerous fashion magazines, including Lucire.
   His winning collection was styled by Dan Ahwa, photographed by Jessica Sim, with make-up by Kiekie Stanners from MAC.—Fenella Clarke

May 22, 2015

Superb and deeply meaningful: the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s Salute: Remembering WW1 impresses

Jack Yan/12.27

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Ross Brown

Above Dancer Joseph Skelton in the core image used for Salute: Remembering WW1.

Three years in the planning, the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s Salute: Remembering WW1 commemorated the Great War in a memorable, respectful, and meaningful way, with a mixed programme that saw two world premières tonight.
   Gareth Farr’s specially commissioned score for Andrew Simmons’ Dear Horizon opened proceedings, with what could be described as a cinematic theme with a strong melodic base as the action unfolded on stage. Tracy Grant Lord’s backdrop, of barbed wire barriers used in World War I, loomed over dancers lying on the stage, as a lone ballerino walked among them. Lighting came on gradually, Jason Morphett’s design using shadows and darkness to build tension. This sombre start gave way to a beautiful, haunting and contemporary choreography, with an underlying bleakness, as Simmons highlighted the loss suffered in war. Costumes were grey, further emphasizing the sense of despair and focusing us on the dancers’ movements. The solo cello by Rolf Gjelsten gave a sense of minimalism that contrasted other elements of the brassy, powerful Farr score. While composed for the ballet, and only complete with the action, it’s not hard to imagine the work released on its own for lovers of ballet and cinematic scores.
   An all-male cast of twelve followed in Soldiers’ Mass. The genius behind Jiří Kylián’s choreography was how it conveyed emotion: a highly energetic and graceful ballet where the dancers move in a unified way, into battle constantly, pulling each other from the front and yet, still confronting, then falling to, the enemy. The score, by Bohuslav Martinů, set to the text by Jiří Mucha, was played back, and one scene sees the men lip-synching proudly to the Czech lyrics, yet with a sense of what they knew would follow. The ballet finishes as it started, with 12 backs to us, each dancer dropping his shirt in another representation of death as well as the annexation of the Sudentenland by Hitler in World War II. Shirtless ballerinos, incidentally, seemed to elicit greater applause from the audience as they took their bows. This restaging was by Roslyn Anderson, who had helmed the 1998 RNZB production of Soldiers’ Mass, with lighting design by Kees Tjebbes.
   After the interval, Johan Kobborg’s Salute injected comedic moments into a classical ballet, set to the score by nineteenth-century composer Hans Christian Lumbye. It saw the return of live music after the recording in Soldiers’ Mass, performed by the New Zealand Army Band. These skilful musicians adapted themselves easily to the lighter atmosphere, with Sgts Riwai Hina and David Fiu, and Pvts Joseph Thomas and Tom Baker rearranging Lumbye’s music to the Band. Natalia Stewart’s costumes (jackets with epaulettes for the men, red peplums and plenty of tulle for the women) shone on stage in a very cheerful ballet involving different sets of dancers, highlighting different aspects of love, from shyness and confusion to overconfidence and partnership; as well as the inevitable farewells as men went off to war.
   The battle vignette, with the General leading the charge, was equally enjoyable, interspersed with the long waits the women endured back home, before the conclusion as the soldiers returned home. Created for the University of North Carolina School of the Arts in 2010, Kobborg intended it to be a reflection of what happens when young people come together; the RNZB dancers showed their expressiveness in a ballet that injected a light-heartedness to the evening. Salute was staged by Florica Stanescu, with Morphett again behind the lighting design, with a brightness and cheer in contrast to his earlier work.
   While the RNZB often picks the cheery production number to end on, it chose Neil Ieremia’s Passchendaele, a world première, which gave this reviewer initial fears that the infamous battle would leave audiences on a down note. The fear was unfounded, because of the scale of Ieremia’s ballet, involving 19 dancers, and the superb execution in dance of this tragic battle, notable for being the day on which more New Zealanders had died or had been wounded than on any other day. Dwayne Bloomfield, formerly of the New Zealand Army Band, composed the score, which the band performed: the moments of martial music signalled the flawed advance by the New Zealand Division under Gen Haig. The dancers moved with great pace at times, in groups, on- and off-stage, representing the power of the soldiers and artillery, through impossible conditions. At other moments they recalled memories of home, contrasting with the loss that families suffered. Geoff Tune’s backdrops, in red and black, signified the blood on the battlefields, and his first one hinted at skulls, shifting gradually to other scenes of burned trees and desolation. The end of Passchendaele was chilling, after the soldiers each fell, their loved ones releasing them, as knocks were heard around the St James, representing the messenger bringing home to 845 New Zealand families the worst news they could receive.
   Ieremia was ingenious in how his choreography brought so much emotion and energy to the performance that the house was left in admiration. The message was indeed cautionary, telling us about the human tragedies of war, but the RNZB and the NZAB brought it to life with such conviction that Passchendaele received the greatest applause of the evening. It was a high note after all, but one that was more absorbing. Salute: Remembering WW1 is a superb programme, and a fresh way of appreciating the messages in the ongoing centenary commemorations of New Zealanders fighting ‘the war to end all wars.’—Jack Yan, Publisher

Salute has been supported by the Lottery Grants Board, New Zealand Defence Force, Qantas, the Göthe-Institut, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, national sponsor Vodafone, and Pub Charity. Dates are May 22–4 in Wellington; May 28–30 in Christchurch; June 3 in Dunedin; June 10 in Hamilton; June 13 in Takapuna; June 17–20 in Auckland; and June 24–5 in Napier. The Royal Ballet will feature the UK première of Passchendaele in November. Further information can be found on the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s website at rnzb.org.nz.

May 18, 2015

Karst is the New Zealand School of Dance’s most innovative season yet

Jack Yan/13.09

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Stephen A’Court

Top New Zealand School of Dance third-year contemporary students. Above Latisha Sparks, William Keohavong and Jadyn Burt.

The New Zealand School of Dance always puts on a stellar performance, especially with its final-year class, but Karst, its Choreographic Season for 2015, adds some unexpected and welcome twists, and puts audience members into the performance, at least during the first half.
   Arriving at Te Whaea, you’re aware something is different: instead of the waiting area that you’re accustomed to, there’s blackness. The auditorium, meanwhile, has become the new waiting area, with TV screens showing the final-year students’ faces in the centre, and the tables moved within. As the show started, we were escorted to the catwalk above the plaza, where the show takes place.
   Wind over Sand (See below) gives you a different perspective as we viewed this from above, or on the stairwell, and there was some getting used to seeing a performance while standing. However, this didn’t detract from the enjoyment at all, and, as it turned out, Wind over Sand was simply a prelude to the cleverer and more entertaining numbers that were to follow. Audience members in wheelchairs were wheeled to ground level and watched from there, but would have had the same appreciation we did.
   Felix Sampson, one of the class of ’15, motioned us comically to come down from the stairs, surrounding the stage, where Jadyn Burt danced to Exhibit: J, using a single box as her prop, positioning herself on each side as she explored it.
   Seated at what would be our vantage points for the rest of the evening, Samuel Hall and Jag Popham began their number stood at different corners of the set, one motioning ever frantically while the other stood still. Without Regard contrasted movements and styles as the pair moved closer on stage.
   Another seamless segue, as bright lights shone from the end of the building, and we were into Volume, set to Planningtorock’s ‘Public Love’, with the notes asking, ‘If you could live in that place every day? Think of the possibilities.’ But, like some of the performances in Karst, those possibilities had a catch, the choreography signalling the old adage of, ‘Be careful what you wish for.’ (Manifest) the Subliminal, similarly, strikes at the idea of balance, with backgrounds moving, essentially reiterating that the universe is structured the way it is for a reason. Upset that balance, and there is chaos. Loscil’s ‘Esturine’, with its repetitive rhythms and crackles contributed to an airy, almost lonely effect.
   Fragile Mortalities was the first number that blended visual effects as each dancer brought out a television screen with their face on it, looking cheerful, yet each began revealing their insecurities more and more, performing their internal collapses. In a similar world of paranoia, You Are My, set to the Harry Roy arrangement of ‘You Are My Sunshine’ saw cheer erupt each time the music started, but the despair soon strikes one dancer, then more and more, in different forms; words displayed at the back of the set disintegrated from hopeful to hopeless. At this point, one wondered if this reflected concerns students had about their lives in 2015; after all, who are better insights into the Zeitgeist, and more focused on the future than those who have settled in their careers?
   The 79 Bonnie Special brought the mood up slightly with the background video showing what appeared to be an old cassette-recorded programme. A tribute to New Zealand singer Connan Mockasin, using his song ‘Do I Make You Feel Shy?’, this was a comedic take, with Georgia Rudd donning a silk gown and shades, and lip-synching into a microphone, perhaps telling a tale of fleeting fame and the low-rent world that some inhabit, thinking they are on the A-list. Again, it seemed to be on the pulse of where popular culture is, in what might be deemed a post-reality-show world. Such shows still air, but in terms of the cycle, are they beyond maturity?
   Unfortunate Help, with Jessica Newman and Latisha Sparks in the main roles, see the dancers together with lengthy cardboard tubes, but pulled apart, others’ attempts at rejoining failing to unite the pair, who also fall into their darkness. At its end, Rowan Rossi emerges on stage, curious about the state of affairs, and we hear Sampson utter complete sentences for the first time, beckoning others to go as he and Rossi begin Only in Istanbul. Sampson narrates the piece, joking about Rossi and providing personal details about him, and the two come to dance in unison. Only in Istanbul is described as ‘A rigmarole’ in the programme notes, and the description fits: the movements are expert, but the story culminates in ‘Istanbul, Not Constantinople’ and the entire cast reemerges for Absent Ritual, a number that leaves Karst on an upbeat, positive note.
   Te Aihe Butler’s music, which is at the fore in Absent Ritual, actually comes through in many of the numbers, and is the effective, unseen uniting force behind Karst. It deserves special mention.
   Taken together, one does have to ask: where are society and culture today? Are we in times where we are leaving some of our citizens behind? What is the value of fame if it lacks fulfilment? If the students, who choreographed the works, are forcing us to ask these questions, then they have succeeded.
   The season is directed by Victoria Colombus, an NZSD graduate, and is the most innovative Lucire has reviewed at the venue. Colombus rightly used the space to great effect, and we hope that there will be future performances there. Removed from the traditional shape of the auditorium, the students made very effective use of their new stage, and the architectural structure helped give a scale beyond what the auditorium offers.
   Toi Whakaari: New Zealand Drama School students worked on the lighting, which also showed a youthful passion combined with professionalism, while Donna Jefferis’s costumes were the icing on the cake.
   The season runs at Te Whaea in Newtown, Wellington, till May 23, with tickets from NZ$12 to NZ$23. Bookings are available at www.nzschoolofdance.ac.nz.—Jack Yan, Publisher

May 8, 2015

Two world premières form part of the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s Salute, ahead of an international tour

Lucire staff/2.36

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Ross Brown

Top Neil Ieremia’s Passchendaele with RNZB dancer William Fitzgerald. Above Kirby Selchow dances Andrew Simmons’ Dear Horizon.

The Royal New Zealand Ballet has revealed more about Salute, its commemoration of World War I, that premières in Wellington on May 22, with a nationwide tour after its stint there. As revealed in Lucire earlier this month, two of the specially commissioned pieces having their world première in Wellington will also be seen abroad, with the Royal Ballet hosting the RNZB in November 2015 at the Royal Opera House. Leeds, Canterbury and Roma are on the list of stops for the tour, Francesco Ventriglia, the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s artistic director revealed today.
   The two premières, both commissions by the RNZB, are from choreographers Neil Ieremia and Andrew Simmons, set to scores by Dwayne Bloomfield and Gareth Farr, respectively. The world-class New Zealand Army Band will also collaborate on Salute, touring to each of the seven centres on the national tour.
   Ieremia’s Passchendaele, with the Bloomfield score, will also feature works by Auckland artist Geoff Tune, inspired by his artist grandfather’s World War I diaries and recent visits to Gallipoli and Passchendaele.
   Ieremia said in a release, ‘The grotesque and brutal nature of war robs humans of humanity—my intention is to do what little I can to remind us of our own. From the haunting journey through the music, to the refined expression in the dancers’ bodies, encapsulating the very human impact of war—this creative process has already left an indelible mark on my spirit. I feel I have grasped a very, very small insight into something that should never be forgotten.’
   Simmons’ Dear Horizon is a new commission and his fifth for the company, and features a specially commissioned score by Farr, written for the New Zealand Army Band and cellist Rolf Gjelsten of the New Zealand String Quartet.
   Simmons said, ‘It is a very special honour to have been asked to create something for the company as part of this commemorative programme. War cannot really be celebrated and fêted, however the human aspect and participation should always be remembered. I wanted to create a work that reflects upon emotions of those affected by conflict.’
   The set and costumes for Dear Horizon have been designed by Tracy Grant Lord, who also designed the RNZB’s Cinderella (2007) and Romeo and Juliet (2004).
   As detailed last month, the Salute programme also features Johan Kobborg’s Salute and Jiří Kylián’s Soldiers’ Mass.
   Salute has been supported by the Lottery Grants Board, New Zealand Defence Force, Qantas, the Göthe-Institut, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, national sponsor Vodafone, and Pub Charity.
   Dates for Salute are May 22–4 in Wellington; May 28–30 in Christchurch; June 3 in Dunedin; June 10 in Hamilton; June 13 in Takapuna; June 17–20 in Auckland; and June 24–5 in Napier.
   Further information can be found on the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s website at rnzb.org.nz.

May 6, 2015

Goodness Natural Beauty Lab launches chia seed oil skin care range

Lucire staff/12.16

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Popping on our radar is a new range from Goodness Natural Beauty Lab. Its point of difference is using certified organic chia seed oil as the main ingredient for its new skin care line: the oil itself is lightweight and has what the company calls a ‘perfect’ three-to-one ratio of omega 3 to omega 6 essential fatty acids.
   This ratio is an ideal for skin healthy and goodness, and the chia oil is considered a ‘super-oil’ that can help nourish and hydrate skin, and promote anti-inflammatory support. A few drops, according to Goodness, ‘sorts out the essential fatty acids, minerals, B-vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants and general goodness’.
   The oil is extracted using a cold pressed method, which means Goodness doesn’t have to use solvents and other artificial ingredients. There’s also no artificial fragrance or colourants.
   The range starts at NZ$15·95 for the 75 ml Every Week face scrub; the Every Day cream cleanser and Every Morning moisturizer, both in 75 ml packs, retail at NZ$19·95; while the two flagship products are the certified organic chia seed oil (20 ml) and the Every Evening cream (75 ml) at NZ$23·95.
   It is now available in selected Farmers and New World stores in New Zealand; see goodnessproducts.com or call 64 4 473-1286 for more retail information.

Filed under: beauty, Lucire, New Zealand
April 19, 2015

It’s all about the eyes with the Body Shop’s latest releases

Lucire staff/5.19

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The Body Shop focuses on the eyes with its latest releases. It has launched two Matte Kajal eyeliners, in white and black. One complaint we often see at Lucire with kohl eyeliners is the difficult application, especially as some need three or four passes before getting any colour. The Body Shop’s Italian-made Matte Kajals—the Body Shop has opted for the Hindi term—don’t suffer from that problem: they are easy to apply and smudge, and enriched with Community Fair Trade beeswax from Cameroon. Each retails for NZ$25 and appear at the Body Shop’s New Zealand retail outlets and online from Monday, April 20.
   The Body Shop suggests that the white can come in handy to counteract redness and help make the eye look larger, and it can enhance eye-shadow colours. It can also be used under the brow, blending downards to create an eye-lift, while defining the brow.
   The look can be completed with the new Super Volume Mascara from the Body Shop, retailing at NZ$27·50. Like the Matte Kajals, the pigmentation is good and smudge-free, and stays on well during the day, though care is needed with the brush. The Body Shop adds that contact lens wearers won’t have any trouble with it. Knowing that it hasn’t been tested on animals is a huge bonus for our times, and it features Community Fair Trade marula oil from the Eudafano Women’s Cooperative in Namibia, an initiative that helps 1,750 women in the region.
   The company is also releasing its Velvet Gel Pen (NZ$19·95), Skinny Thin Felt Liner (NZ$22·95) and Bold Oversized Felt Liner (NZ$22·95).

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