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How ethical are the clothes we buy today?

Filed by Lucire staff/May 7, 2021/12.23

Top photograph: Amanda Vick/Unsplash

Our garments speak volumes of our values and set the stage for the image we want to build of ourselves. We wear red to portray power. Black is our surefire way to exude sophistication. Silk is luxurious while denim is urban and rebellious. The clothes we put on every morning tell a story—but they also build our intricate relationship with the world.
   What might feel good on your skin might not lie so comfortably on your conscience. With sweatshops, underaged workers, toxic dyes, and seasonal collections rushing to the shelves, the restless beat of fast fashion has stirred many to take a different approach. We now have access to a wide selection of brands that are paving the road toward a better, cleaner, safer future.

Ethical stamps and labels
Fortunately for us, fashion aficionados, it’s relatively easy to come across labels that can be trusted today. However, you can also go beyond what you find online and research what your locally present brands are all about. Perhaps they can offer ethical certification to show just how committed they are to the cause, and what they are doing to make a difference.

Local shops for a greater impact

Becca McHaffie/Unsplash

Large-scale fashion brands often lack the transparency we need to know if they don’t have any sweatshops handling the manufacturing, or similarly unethical processes behind their public image. Small, local businesses are the ones that offer all that information openly—you can easily find their manufacturing facilities or design shops around the corner and talk to their employees.
   In eco-conscious regions like Australia, everything from casualwear to formalwear can be purchased in the same spirit. The selection of ethical women’s workwear in Australia is also on the rise, and many professional women are choosing the kind of attire that lasts for years on end. This philosophy combines the idea of timelessness and the spirit of local brands to support the development of ethical fashion.

Long-lasting, not seasonal
As alluring as it is to switch our wardrobes at the turn of every season, that is precisely what keeps the wheels of fast fashion turning. We can do better. Opting for timeless instead of trendy, and choosing durable pieces made of materials that can last for more than a couple of months should be one of the pillars of ethical shopping.
   Go for garments made of sustainable and durable fabrics like linen, hemp, and bamboo. Look for other alternatives that will keep your items wearable for a good, long while.

Brand transparency and reports

Mr Lee/Unsplash

Brands that turn to vague terminology and zero access to real data are the ones we should steer clear of. Fashion labels that are transparent in the kind of efforts they are making are the ones we can turn to for truly ethical dressing. Be it accessories the likes of Elvis & Kresse, or athleisure, you can easily find brands that share their impact with the public.

The fabrics and dyes in use
Sustainable processing and manufacturing are two major aspects of ethical brands. Microplastics in synthetic fibres tend to cause irreparable damage to the marine world and the entire planet. As for the toxic dyes so frequently used, they also cause immense damage to water even in urban areas where that same water should be safe for drink and the local ecosystems.
   Some brands are looking for ways to recycle and repurpose for the sake of ethics. Like Coco Veve from Britain and Horizon Athletic from Australia, many are making way for smarter choices in fabric selection, for us to make better choices in how we dress.
   Ethical brands don’t hide behind vague terminology such as ‘responsible’ or ‘clean’. They showcase the impact of their work in data, reports, and employee reviews, and they make sure you can access it all in a matter of clicks.
   The idea that ethical clothing is costly should be dismantled right away—it all depends on the price you’re willing to pay for the health of your family, yourself, the people participating in the making of your clothing, and the natural world. Is the extra couple of dollars really going to offset your budget as much as toxic dyes and unfair labour can devastate our economies and the planet for the long haul? The choice is, ultimately, yours to make.—Peter Minkoff

Peter Minkoff is a fashion and lifestyle editor at Trend Privé magazine. Follow Peter on Twitter for more tips.

 


GHD celebrates 20th anniversary with limited-edition Couture collection

Filed by Lucire staff/April 15, 2021/11.47




Time really has flown, with GHD (Good Hair Day) celebrating its 20th anniversary. The company commemorates this milestone with a limited-edition Hair-itage Couture collection.
   In its 20 years, GHD’s R&D laboratories have developed tools for hair heat styling that are now used by 200,000 stylists around the world, and sold in over 30 countries. GHD sells 2 million tools every year, and has won over 300 beauty awards.
   The tools maintain a consistent 185°C heat, which is the optimum temperature for styling without compromising hair health.
   It wasn’t just the stylists who told us that GHD was on to a winner, but those early adopters who then told their friends—we hadn’t seen any stylers get that level of word of mouth. When Lucire published its first print editions, GHD was there as a major supporter, directly from its head office in the UK—people who recognized that the two brands were in sync.
   And no, this isn’t a paid spot—we’re as excited about this 20th anniversary as they are.
   The Couture range comprises the Platinum Plus styler (NZ$410 with chrome heat-resistant bag), the Helios hair drier (NZ$340) with 30 per cent more hair shine versus naturally dried hair; the Gold styler (NZ$350, also with chrome heat-resistant bag); and the Style gift set (NZ$59), an exclusive chrome wash bag with mini paddle brush, travel-size Bodyguard heat protect spray, and two GHD silver clips. All are available through GHD élite salons and ghdhair.com/nz.

 


SMoss’s Great Again charts the course of the Trump presidency

Filed by Lucire staff/April 11, 2021/2.08





Lucire travel editor Stanley Moss, writing as SMoss, has put together a limited edition volume documenting the presidency of Donald J. Trump, available in both a hardcover collectors’ edition and a smaller paperback.
   Entitled Great Again, the book begins with a cover showing a worn ‘Make America Great Again’ cap discarded on the pavement. Inside are images from the 45th presidency, including press coverage, artwork, memes and other cultural artefacts from the four-year period.
   The large-format version measures 30 cm square and retails for €102, with the price going up to €120 after April 15. The price includes international shipping. Its smaller counterpart measures 20 cm square, and is available at €51 (€60 after April 15).
   They are privately printed in Italy. Both are individually numbered hand-signed by the author.
   They are available only by special order through emailing the author at info@diganzi.com, and will not be made available on Amazon. There are some videos showing the books and their contents at the official page, www.secondguesspress.com/greatagain-book.


 


Specsavers shows modern classics for autumn–winter 2021

Filed by Lucire staff/April 8, 2021/12.09

Carla Zampatti


Hugo

Specsavers’ autumn–winter 2021 collection features a number of well known brands, with the emphasis on modern classics. Even though there’s an appetite for more unconventional fashion in Australasia, with COVID-19 relatively under control compared to many other parts of the world, eyewear remains on a safer path, with familiar shapes such as the aviator, club master, square and round eye. However, it’s in the details where there’s variety, with contrasting shades and tortoiseshell bringing freshness to the season.
   Specsavers’ head of frames, Juan Carlos Camargo, noted in a release, ‘From oversized aviators by Hugo to sophisticated square frames by Marc Jacobs, there’s a little something for everyone.
   â€˜The autumn–winter range provides a good base of classic styles to build your glasses wardrobe around. We see tortoiseshell and soft gold emerge as important colours for subtle opulence, while textured metals add a stylish touch. These are staples that work smarter, and harder and will be wardrobe additions that never go out of style.’
   Brands include Carla Zampatti, Marc Jacobs, Viktor & Rolf, Hugo, and Alex Perry. Prices begin at NZ$299 for two pairs, single vision. They are available now online at specsavers.co.nz or at Specsavers stores nationally.

Viktor & Rolf

Levi’s

Alex Perry

Deus Ex Machina

 


Labelhood kicks off Shanghai Fashion Week autumn–winter 2021–2 with hit live-streamed show

Filed by Lucire staff/April 7, 2021/21.34


Labelhood, China’s first fashion incubator combining design and brand management, has presented its first show at the Tank Shanghai complex, opening Shanghai Fashion Week’s autumn–winter 2021–2 Shanghai Fashion and Lifestyle Carnival.
   The show was hosted by beauty influencer Li Jiaqi, and streamed on his Taobao channel, which allowed audiences to purchase the items they saw in the show. On the show were Deepmoss’s Liu Xiaolu, 8on8’s Gong Li, and Yirantian’s Guo Yirantian. Labelhood selected 26 items from 13 brands, including Private Policy, the Flocks, and Motoguo, as well as established labels such as Uma Wang, Yirantian, and Deepmoss.
   Estimated views exceeded 10 million, according to Labelhood, with online sales also exceeding that number. There had been no need to discount, with brand development more the focus of the event.
   Labelhood, or Leihu to give its transliteration from Chinese, has run its services for 12 years, and collaborated with Li to get its independent brands in front of a larger audience.
   This season the incubator hosted 32 brands at its Labshowroom.
   Labelhood has four physical retail stores in Shanghai, Nanjing and Guangzhou, and has branded spaces in Lane Crawford in Shanghai, Beijing, Chengdu and Hong Kong. It also has a Tmall presence, and supported its designers to open there, including Tirantian, Shushu/Tong. Deepmoss and Motoguo. In addition, it has cooperative deals with over 100 retail channels, including SKP, Galeries Lafayette and Net-à-Porter.
   The incubator has successfully attracted younger buyers who favour independent designers.


 


Miss Spa launches a new body sculpting line just in time for summer

Filed by Jody Miller/April 2, 2021/22.57



Say sayonara to scars and ciao baby to that double chin. K-beauty brand Miss Spa premières their new line of body skin care products, being released online at Ulta and Walgreen’s this month. Miss Spa Sculpt features full-body serums, medical-grade silicone patches and easy-to-use beauty tools any skin care junkie should have in her arsenal.
   The new line is built on the belief that anyone can achieve professional spa results at home, and that skin care isn’t just for your face any more. The full-body serums are infused with nourishing and brightening ingredients like hyaluronic acid, hibiscus extract, aloe and peptides. The reusable Miss Spa Sculpt medical-grade silicone patches target scars, wrinkles and creases on your neck, décolletage and anywhere on your body. The face and body microneedling set, LED light therapy and germanium rolling tools make spa-quality treatment available at home.
   Miss Spa Sculpt empowers women to create their own personalized skin care routines with high-quality skin care products. Miss Spa Sculpt celebrates inclusion, diversity and embracing the skin you’re in. Bonjour beautiful body!

 


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