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Alber Elbaz, former Lanvin artistic director, dead at 59

Filed by Lucire staff/April 25, 2021/10.51

Alber Elbaz
Above: Alber Elbaz as photographed by Lucire Paris editor Lola Saab.

Moroccan-born French designer Alber Elbaz has died at age 59, according to Richemont, which partnered with him on his latest venture, AZ Factory. It is believed Elbaz died from COVID-19, which he had had for three weeks, and had been in an induced coma.
   Elbaz was behind the rejuvenation of Lanvin and helmed the label’s artistic direction from 2001 to 2015.
   Richemont founder and chairman Johann Rupert said in a statement, ‘It was with shock and enormous sadness that I heard of Alber’s sudden passing. Alber had a richly deserved reputation as one of the industry’s brightest and most beloved figures. I was always taken by his intelligence, sensitivity, generosity and unbridled creativity. He was a man of exceptional warmth and talent, and his singular vision, sense of beauty and empathy leave an indelible impression.
   ‘It was a great privilege watching Alber in his last endeavour as he worked to realize his dream of “smart fashion that cares”. His inclusive vision of fashion made women feel beautiful and comfortable by blending traditional craftsmanship with technology—highly innovative projects which sought to redefine the industry.’
   Speaking with him in 2011, Elbaz displayed a sense of humour and a wonderful insight into his work at Lanvin.
   ‘For each woman there are ten different women … even in men there consists ten different men … and that is what this collection is about. It is not only about one person with one type of haircut with one look, but these are different occasions and different personalities. [The different designs represent] individuals and very personal [looks],’ he told Lucire’s Paris editor Lola Cristall.
   On the menswear side, Elbaz explained the approach he took: ‘When we began at first, the image was of a man who was very specifically created being emotional and poetic, and then we advanced [creating] man as more linear, a little more edgy and a little cooler … Then we wanted to go back to our roots: the essentials of where we started. Finally, we realized that it is not one outfit for one man but it is clothing for different men … here we wanted to show the different façades of a man.’
   Elbaz was born in Casablanca, and moved to Israel when he was 10. He studied fashion in Israel after his military service, and went to New York in 1985. There he worked for Geoffrey Beene, before moving to Paris and heading the design at Guy Laroche. Elbaz took over for Yves Saint Laurent at the appointment of Pierre Bergé at the end of the 1990s, until Gucci took over the label. He briefly worked for Krizia before joining Lanvin in 2001.
   Despite bringing the brand back from irrelevance, he fell out with Lanvin’s owner Wang Shaw-Lan and CEO Michele Hubain in 2015 and was ousted from the label, which caused him great distress. After some smaller projects, Elbaz launched AZ Factory with Richemont last January.

 


SMoss’s Great Again charts the course of the Trump presidency

Filed by Lucire staff/April 11, 2021/2.08





Lucire travel editor Stanley Moss, writing as SMoss, has put together a limited edition volume documenting the presidency of Donald J. Trump, available in both a hardcover collectors’ edition and a smaller paperback.
   Entitled Great Again, the book begins with a cover showing a worn ‘Make America Great Again’ cap discarded on the pavement. Inside are images from the 45th presidency, including press coverage, artwork, memes and other cultural artefacts from the four-year period.
   The large-format version measures 30 cm square and retails for €102, with the price going up to €120 after April 15. The price includes international shipping. Its smaller counterpart measures 20 cm square, and is available at €51 (€60 after April 15).
   They are privately printed in Italy. Both are individually numbered hand-signed by the author.
   They are available only by special order through emailing the author at info@diganzi.com, and will not be made available on Amazon. There are some videos showing the books and their contents at the official page, www.secondguesspress.com/greatagain-book.


 


Van Cleef & Arpels releases six new Perlée designs in Middle East ahead of global launch

Filed by Lucire staff/April 3, 2021/10.41


Van Cleef & Arpels has released six Perlée creations, exclusively for the Middle East first, coinciding with the holy season of Ramadan. They are available now in the region, two months ahead of their official global release.
   The new Perlée additions comprise three bracelets and three rings in gold hues. These feature the sweet clover motif, which are Van Cleef & Arpels’ symbol of luck. They also feature a border of gold beads, characteristic of other jewellery in the Perlée range.
   As the jewellery can be mixed and matched, they can suit a wearer’s every mood.
   The Perlée collection débuted in 2008 and draws on the maison’s history. Accented stones and motifs appeared in the 1920s, and it was also during this decade that Van Cleef & Arpels used the round bead setting in the collection. Golden beads became more ample in 1948. From 1963, in the Twist collection, golden beads appeared in more permutations, accentuating ornamental stones such as lapis lazuli and carnelian, and pearls. Bordering golden beads also appeared in Van Cleef & Arpels’ Alhambra collection in 1968. The designs have a direct link to these earlier collections.






 


New fine art prints of celebrated American quilts

Filed by Lucire staff/March 31, 2021/20.43

Here’s an opportunity to add some authentic beauty to your walls.
   Gee’s Bend is an isolated African American hamlet in Boykin, Alabama, found along the Alabama River. The some seven hundred or so inhabitants of this small, rural community are mostly descendants of slaves, and for generations they worked the fields belonging to the local Pettway plantation. Quilts made by the residents are now part of major art collections, including the Smithsonian in Washington, DC.
   The quilting tradition in Gee’s Bend may have been influenced in part by patterned Native American textiles and African textiles. Local Black women pieced together strips of cloth to make bedcovers. They made quilts first to keep themselves and their children warm in unheated shacks that lacked running water, telephones, and electricity. Along the way, they developed a distinctive style, noted for its lively improvisations and geometric simplicity. They are remarkably contemporary and modernist, recollecting works by Klee or Matisse.
   A series of top-quality, collectible hand-signed and numbered lithographic fine art prints have been created from these timeless and distinctive designs.
   The limited edition lithographic prints are rather large in scale, suitable for bold statements in interior spaces. For more information, contact info@approx.blue.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor


Louisiana Bendolph: New Generation, 2007
Colour softground etching with aquatint and spitbite aquatint
Image: 533 × 711 mm (21 × 28 in)
Paper: 787 × 914 mm (31 × 36 in)
Edition of 50
Hand-signed by the artist
US$3,450


Loretta Pettway: Old Beauty, 2007
Colour softground and hardground etching with aquatint and spitbite aquatint
Image: 483 × 425 mm (19 × 16¾ in)
Paper: 711 × 629 mm (28 × 24¾ in)
Edition of 50
Hand-signed by the artist
US$4,025


Mary Lee Bendolph: Get Ready, 2007
Colour softground etching with aquatint and spitbite aquatint
Image: 635 × 838 mm (25 × 33 in)
Paper: 914 × 1,092 mm (36 × 43 in)
Edition of 50
Hand-signed by the artist
US$6,900

 


In brief: James Wines’s Erotica collection; limited-edition Joséphine bag; Bogner Fire & Ice for spring ’21

Filed by Lucire staff/February 14, 2021/11.40





Designer, artist and photographer Paula Sweet, whose work has regularly appeared in our pages, has announced a collection based around the work of SITE (Sculpture in the Environment) founder and principal, architect James Wines. Wines, 88, has created two drawings for the Erotica collection, comprising T-shirts, tops, leggings, pillows, stationery, cups and shower curtains. More at paulasweet.com.

Ludovica Mascheroni has shown Joséphine, a limited-edition pillow bag commemorating International Women’s Day next month. The bag is dedicated to Joséphine de Beauharnais, a patron of the arts, who brought an ancient Persian paisley pattern into vogue in Europe during the 19th century. She was reputed to be the first woman in Europe with an entire wardrobe in the paisley print. The 2021 interpretation on Mascheroni’s pillow bag is hand-made in 100 per cent cashmere, with leather and brass details, and retails for €729.

Bogner’s spring–summer 2021 Cold Hawaii campaign sees its Fire & Ice designs modelled by professional surfers Mor, Vahine, Robert and AJ in northern Denmark, in what the company calls ‘every adventurer’s dream’. There’s solitude, a rough climate and enviable waves, and the designs are equipped to take on those increasingly long days in the season ahead.


 


Jaguar turns continuation efforts to its 1953 Le Mans-winning C-type

Filed by Lucire staff/January 28, 2021/11.49




‘Continuation’ editions are a great money-spinner for car companies with a history: offer a classic based on the original plans, and wait for the well heeled collectors to snap them up. Aston Martin has done it with both the DB4 GT and the James Bond Goldfinger DB5, and Jaguar with the E-type Lightweight.
   Now it’s the turn of the C-type, with eight planned, each to be hand-built. Unlike replicas, these fetch a higher price because of their provenance, being built by the company itself. Jaguar claims the C-types are ‘fully authentic’, with the cars to come from Jaguar Land Rover Classic Works in Coventry.
   The cars will be equipped to the 1953 Le Mans winner specifications, with disc brakes, and the 3·4-litre inline six with triple Weber carburettors. The cars will not be road-legal, but can be used in historic racing and on the track.
   Jaguar used a period C-type for the basis of its new manufacturing data, and, of course, it had exclusive access to the original engineering drawings and records created by aerodynamicist Malcolm Sayer, competitions’ manager Lofty England, and engineers William Heynes, Bob Knight and Norman Dewis.
   Customers can specify their continuation C-types virtually, too, with an online configurator. These can be shared with the hashtag #70yearsofCtype, with Jaguar planning to feature them on its social media.



Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust

Top: Jaguar’s works C-type racing team before the start of the 1953 Le Mans 24 Hours, including Stirling Moss with no. 17. Moss would finish second overall, with Peter Walker. The no. 18 Jaguar C-type of Tony Rolt and Duncan Hamilton wins the 1953 Le Mans 24 Hours.

 


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