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Nomos Glashütte scores product design win at Green Good Design Awards

Filed by Lucire staff/May 7, 2021/14.52



The Chicago Athenæum’s Good Design Awards have honoured Germany’s Nomos Glashütte six times for its watches, and now the Green Good Design Awards, which focus on sustainably produced products, have highlighted the company once more for its Tangente Update watch in its product design category.
   Its latest incarnation, the Tangente Neomatik 41 Update, features a ring date at the edge of the dial, with two red markers that frame the current date. It is available with both a white and a midnight blue dial.
   It’s those little things that Nomos Glashütte does that build up the sustainable picture. The cooling oil, metal filings and used brass blanks from the production process are returned to the suppliers to be converted back into raw materials. The water used to rinse newly produced parts is purified and returned to the wider supply. The majority of parts are produced on-site and in-house, shortening supply chains and reducing emissions.
   Find out more at nomos-glashuette.com.

 


How ethical are the clothes we buy today?

Filed by Lucire staff//12.23

Top photograph: Amanda Vick/Unsplash

Our garments speak volumes of our values and set the stage for the image we want to build of ourselves. We wear red to portray power. Black is our surefire way to exude sophistication. Silk is luxurious while denim is urban and rebellious. The clothes we put on every morning tell a story—but they also build our intricate relationship with the world.
   What might feel good on your skin might not lie so comfortably on your conscience. With sweatshops, underaged workers, toxic dyes, and seasonal collections rushing to the shelves, the restless beat of fast fashion has stirred many to take a different approach. We now have access to a wide selection of brands that are paving the road toward a better, cleaner, safer future.

Ethical stamps and labels
Fortunately for us, fashion aficionados, it’s relatively easy to come across labels that can be trusted today. However, you can also go beyond what you find online and research what your locally present brands are all about. Perhaps they can offer ethical certification to show just how committed they are to the cause, and what they are doing to make a difference.

Local shops for a greater impact

Becca McHaffie/Unsplash

Large-scale fashion brands often lack the transparency we need to know if they don’t have any sweatshops handling the manufacturing, or similarly unethical processes behind their public image. Small, local businesses are the ones that offer all that information openly—you can easily find their manufacturing facilities or design shops around the corner and talk to their employees.
   In eco-conscious regions like Australia, everything from casualwear to formalwear can be purchased in the same spirit. The selection of ethical women’s workwear in Australia is also on the rise, and many professional women are choosing the kind of attire that lasts for years on end. This philosophy combines the idea of timelessness and the spirit of local brands to support the development of ethical fashion.

Long-lasting, not seasonal
As alluring as it is to switch our wardrobes at the turn of every season, that is precisely what keeps the wheels of fast fashion turning. We can do better. Opting for timeless instead of trendy, and choosing durable pieces made of materials that can last for more than a couple of months should be one of the pillars of ethical shopping.
   Go for garments made of sustainable and durable fabrics like linen, hemp, and bamboo. Look for other alternatives that will keep your items wearable for a good, long while.

Brand transparency and reports

Mr Lee/Unsplash

Brands that turn to vague terminology and zero access to real data are the ones we should steer clear of. Fashion labels that are transparent in the kind of efforts they are making are the ones we can turn to for truly ethical dressing. Be it accessories the likes of Elvis & Kresse, or athleisure, you can easily find brands that share their impact with the public.

The fabrics and dyes in use
Sustainable processing and manufacturing are two major aspects of ethical brands. Microplastics in synthetic fibres tend to cause irreparable damage to the marine world and the entire planet. As for the toxic dyes so frequently used, they also cause immense damage to water even in urban areas where that same water should be safe for drink and the local ecosystems.
   Some brands are looking for ways to recycle and repurpose for the sake of ethics. Like Coco Veve from Britain and Horizon Athletic from Australia, many are making way for smarter choices in fabric selection, for us to make better choices in how we dress.
   Ethical brands don’t hide behind vague terminology such as ‘responsible’ or ‘clean’. They showcase the impact of their work in data, reports, and employee reviews, and they make sure you can access it all in a matter of clicks.
   The idea that ethical clothing is costly should be dismantled right away—it all depends on the price you’re willing to pay for the health of your family, yourself, the people participating in the making of your clothing, and the natural world. Is the extra couple of dollars really going to offset your budget as much as toxic dyes and unfair labour can devastate our economies and the planet for the long haul? The choice is, ultimately, yours to make.—Peter Minkoff

Peter Minkoff is a fashion and lifestyle editor at Trend Privé magazine. Follow Peter on Twitter for more tips.

 


Monokel Eyewear introduces biodegradable sunglasses

Filed by Lucire staff/May 6, 2021/12.08




Stockholm archipelago-based Monokel Eyewear has always made sunglasses that last, but its latest collection ensures that they do—only up to a point.
   Its spring–summer 2021 collection, anchored on the Edvard Munch quotation, ‘From my rotting body, flowers shall grow, and I am in them, and that is eternity,’ is fully bio-based and biodegradable, with the company saying, ‘still made to last, but not forever.’ Lenses are by Carl Zeiss Vision.
   Monokel had used recycled acetate made from cotton and wood fibres, but its latest type will now decompose, and won’t wind up in landfills or as microplastics in our oceans.
   There are three shapes: Polly, a wide, oval frame with thick temples; Memphis, with a rectangular front, sharper edges, a medium width but a slim depth; and Forest, inspired by vintage reading glasses, and featuring hinges, rivets and a keyhole nose bridge. Each frame is hand-crafted, with the process taking over three months.
   Third-party lab tests and factory audits are conducted with each production run, says Monokel. You can find out more at monokel-eyewear.com.


 


Ruby’s Champ collection rings in a cosy winter

Filed by Lucire staff/May 4, 2021/13.16




Ruby is showing its new collection, dubbed Champ, with its first items going on retail sale on May 14 both on- and offline.
   The collection represents both a change in season as well as change in how we do things: ‘Champ is about taking responsibility, knowing your force and driving change for a world we all belong in,’ reads the company’s introduction.
   Warm and colourful knitwear and suitings stand out for winter, with shades of chocolate, meadow, vermilion, pink and pistachio marle. We’re drawn to the turtlenecks, the long sleeves of the Boby sweater, the looseness of the Champ sweater, the Steffi jacket, and the Lucille swing coat, among others. Looseness and volume give this winter a flowing, comfortable vibe. Find out more at rubynz.com, or check out Ruby’s Instagram at @rubytakessnaps.







 


Coupé crossovers are the latest fad, as Ford Evos and Roewe Jing appear at Auto Shanghai

Filed by Lucire staff/April 19, 2021/21.45



It seems coupé crossovers, low-slung fastbacks riding on big wheels, are the trendy shape for cars now, after a decade dominated by the boxier variety, if Auto Shanghai’s débutantes today are any indication.
   Ford showed its Evos crossover, with hints of the Mustang Mach-E—a car, based on its development code, that started off as a Focus crossover. The new car looks more substantial, and Ford has been clear that it isn’t the model that will replace the Fusion and Mondeo.
   Inside is a “coast-to-coast” screen spanning the entire cockpit width, from the driver’s to the passenger’s sides. All up, the display measures 27 inches, with 4K definition, comprising digital instrumentation, infotainment, and an additional screen for the passenger. AI and a hands-free driving assistance program complete the high-tech package.
   SAIC’s Roewe brand, meanwhile, showed a coupé crossover of its own—with the same colour scheme of white with a black roof, which must be the other automotive trend presently. The Jing (鯨), the Chinese word for whale, has a large grille that is supposed to recall the mammal. It’s part of Roewe’s ‘emotional rhythm’ design philosophy, and the Jing is supposed to ‘accelerating the process of brand rejuvenation, personalization and promoting brand upgrading,’ says SAIC. The shape isn’t as sleek as Ford’s, and the company says it is a concept.

 


Catherine Zeta-Jones premières her luxury fashion collection

Filed by Jody Miller/April 14, 2021/23.19

casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
Udo Spreitzenbarth

Casa Zeta-Jones is the newly launched dream child of Catherine Zeta-Jones. Fashion-forward and creative, Zeta-Jones wanted to build a brand that inspired beauty in everyday life. She pulled her own inspiration from the captivating elegance of old Hollywood to create a ready-to-wear collection that is luxurious and irrefutably wearable.
   ‘We have created a collection that not only embodies my vision but speaks to my customer, a multi-faceted, modern and confident woman who’s living a dynamic life,’ comments Zeta-Jones on the collection that features natural fabrics and a colour palette derived from nature.
   Zeta-Jones collaborated with Fred Tutino, the creative director of the Casa Zeta-Jones ready-to-wear collection. Upon working together, Tutino states, ‘Before I met Catherine I knew she had exceptional personal style, but as we spoke more I began to realize Catherine really understands design, colour, finishing, proportion and fabric.’
   The collection is made using luxurious natural fabrics such as silks, cottons and cashmeres. Whether it’s for easy day dresses, chic yet casual sweaters and knit lounge pants, or your new favourite go-to luxurious blouse and perfect form-fitting pant for an evening out, everything has a premium look and feel. The collection is fashion-forward but designed to convey effortless style.—Jody Miller, Correspondent

casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
Udo Spreitzenbarth

 


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