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H&M collaborates with LA-based Brock Collection for a romantic, voluminous summer

Filed by Lucire staff/June 24, 2021/14.49


Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) has teamed up with the Los Angeles-based label Brock Collection for its latest collaboration.
   Romantic, feminine and well crafted, the collection comprises dresses, blouses, tops, denim jeans and denim shorts, as well as a range of accessories including scarves, sunglasses and handbags.
   Light and summery, the Brock Collection × H&M collaboration has the American label’s hallmarks of vintage inspiration and careful cuts. Details include ruffles and floral prints, while volume is very much the trend, with balloon sleeves and voluminous skirts.
   The collection is made from organic linen, organic cotton, recycled cotton, recycled polyester and Tencel Lyoocell.
   The campaign features Julia Campbell, Patricia Manfield (Heir), Alva Claire Mc Kenzie, Dulcie Gibbons, MaryGrace Tropeano, Dohuyn Kim, Ajok Daing and Sherrie Silver, with Silver also acting as choreographer.
   Brock Collection was founded in 2014 by Parsons alumni Laura Vassar and Kristopher Brock. The duo noted in a release, ‘Brock Collection has always been about connecting the threads between uptown polish paired with a down to earth ease, which we are so happy to bring to a new audience. Each piece in the collection is special and carries a certain romantic charm, but is totally effortless.’
   Maria Östblom, head of design at H&M, said, ‘We’re thrilled to be collaborating with Brock Collection, who are well known for their luxe craftsmanship, impeccable fits and structures, and have quite the celebrity following. But there’s also beauty in the fact that their designs always feel down-to-earth, thoughtful and easy to wear—I believe that’s the key to their success. We want to celebrate romance and make it accessible to the many. By adding more sustainable materials, it creates … a collaboration I hope our customers around the world will fall in love with.’
   The collection is available at hm.com and at select H&M stores in the US from June 24.









 


Monokel Eyewear introduces biodegradable sunglasses

Filed by Lucire staff/May 6, 2021/12.08




Stockholm archipelago-based Monokel Eyewear has always made sunglasses that last, but its latest collection ensures that they do—only up to a point.
   Its spring–summer 2021 collection, anchored on the Edvard Munch quotation, ‘From my rotting body, flowers shall grow, and I am in them, and that is eternity,’ is fully bio-based and biodegradable, with the company saying, ‘still made to last, but not forever.’ Lenses are by Carl Zeiss Vision.
   Monokel had used recycled acetate made from cotton and wood fibres, but its latest type will now decompose, and won’t wind up in landfills or as microplastics in our oceans.
   There are three shapes: Polly, a wide, oval frame with thick temples; Memphis, with a rectangular front, sharper edges, a medium width but a slim depth; and Forest, inspired by vintage reading glasses, and featuring hinges, rivets and a keyhole nose bridge. Each frame is hand-crafted, with the process taking over three months.
   Third-party lab tests and factory audits are conducted with each production run, says Monokel. You can find out more at monokel-eyewear.com.


 


Simone Rocha is H&M’s next designer collaboration

Filed by Lucire staff/January 14, 2021/15.28




H&M

London-based Irish designer Simone Rocha is the next collaborator with H&M, with a collection launching March 11, comprising clothing for women, men and children—the first time Rocha has completed a collection for the entire family. Each category includes a full wardrobe. Also under the Simone Rocha × H&M banner are jewellery and pearl-embellished footwear.
   As with previous designers, the collection makes references to previous work, especially Rocha’s mixed heritage of Hong Kong and Ireland, but with new twists.
   H&M says in a release, ‘We see glimmers of Tudor courtiers, wild florals, portraits and photographs, dolls and trinkets. There is tartan, beading, florals, pinks, reds, and bespoke fabrications, developed in-house, exclusively for this collaboration.’
   The launch date coincides with Rocha’s 10th anniversary.
   ‘I am so thrilled to be working with H&M on this very special collection,’ she says. ‘It truly is a celebration of the signatures of my brand, and the influences that have shaped me. As a designer, and as a customer, I’ve been such a fan of the H&M collaboration concept. Margiela, Alber Elbaz, Comme des Garçons—it’s such an amazing list of alumni to be a part of.’
   Rocha says she is pleased that she can offer her designs to a wider audience, and for those who may have missed a piece the first time.
   Ann-Sofie Johansson, creative adviser for Hennes & Mauritz, adds, ‘Simone Rocha has been on the H&M wish list for some time. This collaboration offers a new audience the chance to own a very special piece of design history. All of us at H&M have been so inspired to work with a female designer who spends so much time thinking about contemporary femininity, and womanhood, and who is so committed to excellence in craft and design, from the process of developing special fabrications, to pushing silhouettes, shapes and embellishments. Every garment within this collection is unique, special and the result of years of work and meticulous research.’
   Daisy Edgar-Jones, Adwon and Jesewa Aboah, Robbie Spencer, and Tess McMillan appear in the campaign.


H&M

 


H&M’s new Conscious Exclusive collection to feature Eastman Naia Renew cellulosic fibre

Filed by Lucire staff/November 20, 2020/22.48


Lucire is the first fashion partner of UN Environment.

One of fabrics used by H&M’s Conscious Exclusive autumn–winter 2020–1 collection, being released December 1, is Eastman Naia Renew cellulosic fibre.
   Naia Renew is made from 60 per cent certified wood fibres and 40 per cent recycled waste plastics, including carpet fibres and plastic packaging—traditionally hard to recycle materials that would otherwise have headed to a landfill.
   Eastman has had experience in dealing with processing waste plastics that traditional mechanical recycling processes cannot, including polyester, polypropylene, polyethylene, and polystyrene. It was once part of the same group as Eastman Kodak, but was spun off in the 1990s into a separate company.
   The material is said to be comfortable, easy to care for, and feel luxurious. It is fully traceable, and has certified biodegradability. The recycled content is achieved by allocating plastics using an ISCC-certified mass-balance process. Eastman adds that it can be produced at scale, and is available as a filament yarn and a staple fibre.
   ‘We’re delighted to collaborate with H&M as we work toward building a circular fashion economy,’ said Ruth Farrell, Eastman’s global marketing director of textiles. ‘Together, Naia and H&M are working toward a vision to make sustainable fashion accessible for all, playing active roles in conserving resources, fostering innovation and demonstrating a passion for sustainability that will help transform our industry.’

 


H&M Studio channels the 1970s, with Irina Shayk, Jameela Jamil, Sasha Lane, Indya Moore

Filed by Lucire staff/September 24, 2020/14.24




The 1970s have well and truly returned, and we don’t just mean with the uncertain economic mood. H&M’s Studio collection for autumn–winter 2020–1 reflects this, too, with a collection called The Refined Rebel, inspired by the 19th-century writer, Violet Paget (who used Vernon Lee as her nom-de-plume), and her residence at the Palmerino villa in Firenze. Despite officially referencing Paget, the style is very much 1970s, with big lapels and a slight flare for suits, including some outlandish colours in green and blue; big-shouldered coats and dresses in a multi-coloured print resembling splashes of paint; recycled polyester frilled blouses; a grey deconstructed sleeveless coat; and chunky-heeled boots. The clothes are gender-fluid, suiting the times, but in the mode of 1970s David Bowie, who was there well before the mainstream. The colour palette is azure blue and malachite green, says H&M, with champagne pink and marbled prints.
   The campaign has been shot separately from different parts of the world, given distancing rules and travel restrictions in place. Barbie Ferreira, Veronika Heilbrunner, Celeste, Alton Mason, Young Emperors and Mia Kong have each done their own interpretations of the collection and the imagery brought together by H&M. Meanwhile, Irina Shayk, Jameela Jamil, Sasha Lane and Indya Moore have donned designs from the range in a series of celebrity images.
   Customers are invited to share their own images from the range.
   ‘The AW20 Studio collection muse is not afraid to challenge the status quo. This collection is for those that celebrate being oneself above all else. We hope our customers feel inspired to dress with a carefree, rebellious attitude,’ said H&M’s creative adviser, Ann-Sofie Johansson.
   ‘In keeping with H&M’s strive for innovation, the H&M Studio team experimented with an exciting new campaign format for AW20. Adapted for today’s climate, this new way of working gives our global cast the creative freedom to style, photograph and express themselves in the comfort of their own space. We hope the new collection and campaign encourages everyone to celebrate their style,’ said Kattis Bahrke, H&M’s head of creative marketing and communications.




 


As predicted in Lucire six years ago: Ikea moves into fashion

Filed by Lucire staff/August 20, 2020/13.08


It took six years for the prediction to come true: author and management consultant Stefan Engeseth forecast in 2014, as first published in Lucire, that Ikea would extend its brand into fashion next.
   The story, which ran here first, was eventually picked up by the international media.
   Last month, Ikea announced it was releasing its first clothing line through its Harajuku store in Tokyo, with pre-sales beginning on July 31. The collection, dubbed Efterträda, features streetwear staples, as well as a tote bag, bath towels, an umbrella and water bottles.
   The clothing and bags are made from eco-friendly cotton and the water bottles are reusable.
   Helping launch the line’s look book are Bunta Shimizu, Moeka Shiotsuka, Kyohei Hattori, and Nene.
   Engeseth says, ‘It’s amazing, fun, and cool to see how Ikea is moving. Since fashion brands such as Zara and H&M are moving into furniture, it is necessary to stay modern and relevant.
   ‘The potential of dressing up over 100 million Ikea family members has the potential to be bigger than many fashion brands today.’

 


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