Lucire


  latest news   fashion   beauty   living   volante   print   tv
  home   community   advertise   contact

Protest Sportswear releases fourth Green Up challenge: cleaning up Costa Rica

Filed by Lucire staff/June 23, 2021/0.41

Protest Sportswear is walking the talk with two surfers—Alazne Aurrekoetxea and Laura Coviella—heading to Costa Rica to help clean up the shores as part of their Green Up the Ocean project.
   They helped with the efforts to collect single-use bottles, and tied them together with some bamboo and turned them into a “green” board.
   Ninety-eight per cent of Costa Rica’s energy is renewable, and 25 per cent of its land is protected.
   Aurrekoetxa and Coviella join other Protest athletes who have had their Green Up challenges: team riders Enzo Scotto and Camille Armand cleaned up in Chamonix; team riders Andri and Gian Ragettli learned all about “green essentials”, surviving with the bare necessities in the Swiss wilderness; and kitesurfer Roderick Pijls travelled to Norway entirely carbon-neutral to see and surf under the Northern Lights.
   The challenges appear at Protest’s website at www.protest.eu/en/en/campaign/green-up/.









 


New Balance releases Everybody’s Welcome collection commemorating Pride 2021

Filed by Lucire staff/June 15, 2021/23.49





For Pride 2021, New Balance has released its Everybody’s Welcome collection of footwear and apparel.
   Queer Hong Kong visual artist Zoie Lam has created the art on the items, conveying an upbeat, positive and colourful mood. The characters are genderless and fun, and show that everyone is welcome, regardless of how they identify. They include T-shirts, singlets and an anorak (from NZ$40), and the Fresh Foam Tempo running shoe (NZ$190), Made in US 574 (NZ$280), 202 sandals (NZ$60) and 57/40 (NZ$220).
   New Balance is supporting InsideOut as part of National Schools’ Pride Week (June 14–20), celebrating rainbow staff and students. The company has donated funds in advance of next year’s week, and gifted the Everybody’s Welcome collection to InsideOut staff across New Zealand.
   InsideOut provides information, workshops and education on LGBTQIA+ issues to schools, workplaces and community organizations.

 


Ministry of Tomorrow enlists Naomi Campbell, Madonna, Halle Berry, Eddie Murphy and others for charity totes

Filed by Lucire staff/June 14, 2021/19.11




After a school located in the largest urban slum in Africa was forced to move because it was not up to code, eco-fashion label Ministry of Tomorrow raised money to help it relocate. Now, however, the school lacks funds to pay its teachers and cover operational expenses, including a daily meal for its students.
   Ministry of Tomorrow, with its Los Angeles retail partner Church Boutique, is stepping up again, teaming up with Christie’s and CharityBuzz, to auction a series of bags to benefit the Chema Vision Children’s Centre in the Kibera division in Nairobi.
   Ministry of Tomorrow’s Julian Prolman, and Church Boutique founders Rodney Burns and David Malvaney, turned to their celebrity friends to paint their art on an MOT tote, made in Nairobi, for the auction.
   Celebrities include Naomi Campbell, Halle Berry, Madonna, Eddie Murphy, Bria Murphy, Maggie Q, Paris Jackson, Zoe Kravitz, Lenny Kravitz, Usher, Lionel Richie, Evan Ross, Raquel Britton, Lee Daniels, David Banda, Ashlee Simpson Ross, and artist Montana Mills of Modern Multiples. Laurie Lynn Stark, of fashion and jewellery brand Chrome Hearts, created her own MOT tote.
   The auction runs through June 15 and the bags are on display at Christie’s in Manhattan, coinciding with luxury bag week at the auction house. All proceeds will be donated to Chema, with a US$100,000 goal set.















 


Pressology launches beauty range with Ayurvedic principles

Filed by Lucire staff/May 25, 2021/9.46



Pressology, founded in San Francisco by cell and molecular biologist Sally Nasser, is a conscious plant-based Ayurveda beauty brand using USDA-certified organic formulations to heal and enhance the skin. Ingredients include Moringa oil, lentils, turmeric and jasmine, and the products are all made in San Francisco by strong women of colour.
   Nasser has a background in Ayurvedic medicine and holistic self-care, and says that from a young age, she understood how clean, organic ingredients worked with the natural harmony of the human body. She was sceptical of the ingredients used by many beauty companies and their long-term effects, and began developing her own products using natural ingredients from her parents’ kitchen. She believes in a holistic, whole-body approach, and that what you put on your skin is as important as what you put in your body.
   Items include Pressology’s jasmine rose water, where the jasmine helps with relaxation; its Golden Hour botanical serum with omegas 3, 6, 7 and 9 and vitamins; Moringa Meltdown, a cleansing oil; Moringa Mask, a facial treatment with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents; and, what we think is the key product in this launch range, the red lentil enzyme, a facial treatment that fortifies and strengthens skin.
   To take things a step further, Pressology donates 1 per cent of its annual sales to environmental causes, and gives back to Project Night Night, which provides sleep-time essentials to underprivileged babies and children. Find out more and order at pressologyskin.com.

 


Nomos Glashütte scores product design win at Green Good Design Awards

Filed by Lucire staff/May 7, 2021/14.52



The Chicago Athenæum’s Good Design Awards have honoured Germany’s Nomos Glashütte six times for its watches, and now the Green Good Design Awards, which focus on sustainably produced products, have highlighted the company once more for its Tangente Update watch in its product design category.
   Its latest incarnation, the Tangente Neomatik 41 Update, features a ring date at the edge of the dial, with two red markers that frame the current date. It is available with both a white and a midnight blue dial.
   It’s those little things that Nomos Glashütte does that build up the sustainable picture. The cooling oil, metal filings and used brass blanks from the production process are returned to the suppliers to be converted back into raw materials. The water used to rinse newly produced parts is purified and returned to the wider supply. The majority of parts are produced on-site and in-house, shortening supply chains and reducing emissions.
   Find out more at nomos-glashuette.com.

 


How ethical are the clothes we buy today?

Filed by Lucire staff//12.23

Top photograph: Amanda Vick/Unsplash

Our garments speak volumes of our values and set the stage for the image we want to build of ourselves. We wear red to portray power. Black is our surefire way to exude sophistication. Silk is luxurious while denim is urban and rebellious. The clothes we put on every morning tell a story—but they also build our intricate relationship with the world.
   What might feel good on your skin might not lie so comfortably on your conscience. With sweatshops, underaged workers, toxic dyes, and seasonal collections rushing to the shelves, the restless beat of fast fashion has stirred many to take a different approach. We now have access to a wide selection of brands that are paving the road toward a better, cleaner, safer future.

Ethical stamps and labels
Fortunately for us, fashion aficionados, it’s relatively easy to come across labels that can be trusted today. However, you can also go beyond what you find online and research what your locally present brands are all about. Perhaps they can offer ethical certification to show just how committed they are to the cause, and what they are doing to make a difference.

Local shops for a greater impact

Becca McHaffie/Unsplash

Large-scale fashion brands often lack the transparency we need to know if they don’t have any sweatshops handling the manufacturing, or similarly unethical processes behind their public image. Small, local businesses are the ones that offer all that information openly—you can easily find their manufacturing facilities or design shops around the corner and talk to their employees.
   In eco-conscious regions like Australia, everything from casualwear to formalwear can be purchased in the same spirit. The selection of ethical women’s workwear in Australia is also on the rise, and many professional women are choosing the kind of attire that lasts for years on end. This philosophy combines the idea of timelessness and the spirit of local brands to support the development of ethical fashion.

Long-lasting, not seasonal
As alluring as it is to switch our wardrobes at the turn of every season, that is precisely what keeps the wheels of fast fashion turning. We can do better. Opting for timeless instead of trendy, and choosing durable pieces made of materials that can last for more than a couple of months should be one of the pillars of ethical shopping.
   Go for garments made of sustainable and durable fabrics like linen, hemp, and bamboo. Look for other alternatives that will keep your items wearable for a good, long while.

Brand transparency and reports

Mr Lee/Unsplash

Brands that turn to vague terminology and zero access to real data are the ones we should steer clear of. Fashion labels that are transparent in the kind of efforts they are making are the ones we can turn to for truly ethical dressing. Be it accessories the likes of Elvis & Kresse, or athleisure, you can easily find brands that share their impact with the public.

The fabrics and dyes in use
Sustainable processing and manufacturing are two major aspects of ethical brands. Microplastics in synthetic fibres tend to cause irreparable damage to the marine world and the entire planet. As for the toxic dyes so frequently used, they also cause immense damage to water even in urban areas where that same water should be safe for drink and the local ecosystems.
   Some brands are looking for ways to recycle and repurpose for the sake of ethics. Like Coco Veve from Britain and Horizon Athletic from Australia, many are making way for smarter choices in fabric selection, for us to make better choices in how we dress.
   Ethical brands don’t hide behind vague terminology such as ‘responsible’ or ‘clean’. They showcase the impact of their work in data, reports, and employee reviews, and they make sure you can access it all in a matter of clicks.
   The idea that ethical clothing is costly should be dismantled right away—it all depends on the price you’re willing to pay for the health of your family, yourself, the people participating in the making of your clothing, and the natural world. Is the extra couple of dollars really going to offset your budget as much as toxic dyes and unfair labour can devastate our economies and the planet for the long haul? The choice is, ultimately, yours to make.—Peter Minkoff

Peter Minkoff is a fashion and lifestyle editor at Trend Privé magazine. Follow Peter on Twitter for more tips.

 


Next Page »

 

Get more from Lucire

Our latest issue

Lucire 43
Check out our lavish print issue of Lucire in hard copy or for Ipad or Android.
Or download the latest issue of Lucire as a PDF from Scopalto

Lucire on Twitter

Lucire on Instagram