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Nomos Glashütte scores product design win at Green Good Design Awards

Filed by Lucire staff/May 7, 2021/14.52



The Chicago Athenæum’s Good Design Awards have honoured Germany’s Nomos Glashütte six times for its watches, and now the Green Good Design Awards, which focus on sustainably produced products, have highlighted the company once more for its Tangente Update watch in its product design category.
   Its latest incarnation, the Tangente Neomatik 41 Update, features a ring date at the edge of the dial, with two red markers that frame the current date. It is available with both a white and a midnight blue dial.
   It’s those little things that Nomos Glashütte does that build up the sustainable picture. The cooling oil, metal filings and used brass blanks from the production process are returned to the suppliers to be converted back into raw materials. The water used to rinse newly produced parts is purified and returned to the wider supply. The majority of parts are produced on-site and in-house, shortening supply chains and reducing emissions.
   Find out more at nomos-glashuette.com.

 


How ethical are the clothes we buy today?

Filed by Lucire staff//12.23

Top photograph: Amanda Vick/Unsplash

Our garments speak volumes of our values and set the stage for the image we want to build of ourselves. We wear red to portray power. Black is our surefire way to exude sophistication. Silk is luxurious while denim is urban and rebellious. The clothes we put on every morning tell a story—but they also build our intricate relationship with the world.
   What might feel good on your skin might not lie so comfortably on your conscience. With sweatshops, underaged workers, toxic dyes, and seasonal collections rushing to the shelves, the restless beat of fast fashion has stirred many to take a different approach. We now have access to a wide selection of brands that are paving the road toward a better, cleaner, safer future.

Ethical stamps and labels
Fortunately for us, fashion aficionados, it’s relatively easy to come across labels that can be trusted today. However, you can also go beyond what you find online and research what your locally present brands are all about. Perhaps they can offer ethical certification to show just how committed they are to the cause, and what they are doing to make a difference.

Local shops for a greater impact

Becca McHaffie/Unsplash

Large-scale fashion brands often lack the transparency we need to know if they don’t have any sweatshops handling the manufacturing, or similarly unethical processes behind their public image. Small, local businesses are the ones that offer all that information openly—you can easily find their manufacturing facilities or design shops around the corner and talk to their employees.
   In eco-conscious regions like Australia, everything from casualwear to formalwear can be purchased in the same spirit. The selection of ethical women’s workwear in Australia is also on the rise, and many professional women are choosing the kind of attire that lasts for years on end. This philosophy combines the idea of timelessness and the spirit of local brands to support the development of ethical fashion.

Long-lasting, not seasonal
As alluring as it is to switch our wardrobes at the turn of every season, that is precisely what keeps the wheels of fast fashion turning. We can do better. Opting for timeless instead of trendy, and choosing durable pieces made of materials that can last for more than a couple of months should be one of the pillars of ethical shopping.
   Go for garments made of sustainable and durable fabrics like linen, hemp, and bamboo. Look for other alternatives that will keep your items wearable for a good, long while.

Brand transparency and reports

Mr Lee/Unsplash

Brands that turn to vague terminology and zero access to real data are the ones we should steer clear of. Fashion labels that are transparent in the kind of efforts they are making are the ones we can turn to for truly ethical dressing. Be it accessories the likes of Elvis & Kresse, or athleisure, you can easily find brands that share their impact with the public.

The fabrics and dyes in use
Sustainable processing and manufacturing are two major aspects of ethical brands. Microplastics in synthetic fibres tend to cause irreparable damage to the marine world and the entire planet. As for the toxic dyes so frequently used, they also cause immense damage to water even in urban areas where that same water should be safe for drink and the local ecosystems.
   Some brands are looking for ways to recycle and repurpose for the sake of ethics. Like Coco Veve from Britain and Horizon Athletic from Australia, many are making way for smarter choices in fabric selection, for us to make better choices in how we dress.
   Ethical brands don’t hide behind vague terminology such as ‘responsible’ or ‘clean’. They showcase the impact of their work in data, reports, and employee reviews, and they make sure you can access it all in a matter of clicks.
   The idea that ethical clothing is costly should be dismantled right away—it all depends on the price you’re willing to pay for the health of your family, yourself, the people participating in the making of your clothing, and the natural world. Is the extra couple of dollars really going to offset your budget as much as toxic dyes and unfair labour can devastate our economies and the planet for the long haul? The choice is, ultimately, yours to make.—Peter Minkoff

Peter Minkoff is a fashion and lifestyle editor at Trend Privé magazine. Follow Peter on Twitter for more tips.

 


Monokel Eyewear introduces biodegradable sunglasses

Filed by Lucire staff/May 6, 2021/12.08




Stockholm archipelago-based Monokel Eyewear has always made sunglasses that last, but its latest collection ensures that they do—only up to a point.
   Its spring–summer 2021 collection, anchored on the Edvard Munch quotation, ‘From my rotting body, flowers shall grow, and I am in them, and that is eternity,’ is fully bio-based and biodegradable, with the company saying, ‘still made to last, but not forever.’ Lenses are by Carl Zeiss Vision.
   Monokel had used recycled acetate made from cotton and wood fibres, but its latest type will now decompose, and won’t wind up in landfills or as microplastics in our oceans.
   There are three shapes: Polly, a wide, oval frame with thick temples; Memphis, with a rectangular front, sharper edges, a medium width but a slim depth; and Forest, inspired by vintage reading glasses, and featuring hinges, rivets and a keyhole nose bridge. Each frame is hand-crafted, with the process taking over three months.
   Third-party lab tests and factory audits are conducted with each production run, says Monokel. You can find out more at monokel-eyewear.com.


 


Lancôme and Muséum national d’histoire naturelle to preserve endangered plant species

Filed by Lucire staff/April 22, 2021/12.29


F.-G. Grandin/MNHN; top photo by Agnès Iatzoura/MNHN

Lancôme has partnered with the Muséum national d’histoire naturelle (National Museum of Natural History) with the aim of preserving endangered plant species, in a new conservation project.
   In a statement, its global brand president Françoise Lehmann said, ‘We are proud to participate in the conservation of endangered plant species like the Rose of France (Rosa gallica), as part of a global partnership with the National Museum of Natural History, whose international influence is recognized. The museum is a leading organization when it comes to research and expertise in the field of biodiversity protection and we are proud to take part in this important mission which meets France’s commitments for the Convention on Biological Diversity.
   â€˜Protecting biodiversity is major component of Lancôme’s sustainability programme [dubbed Caring Together for a Happier Tomorrow]. The brand is already spearheading this mission in Grasse and Valensole, in the south of France, where we are growing roses and other plant species in an organic and sustainable way across 25 acres of land.’
   The project is being implemented by the museum’s Conservatoire botanique national du Bassin parisien (the CBNBP, or the National Botanical Conservatory of the Paris Basin), which sees the reintroduction of endangered plant species. Seeds had been collected and banked earlier in the CBNBP’s regions and will be planted in experimental gardens.
   Among those species is Rosa gallica, which ties in with Lancôme’s own symbol, as well as Arnica montana, campanula cervicaria, inula hirta, ranunculus hederaceus and viscaria vulgaris.

 


Salvatore Ferragamo releases F-80 Skeleton Sustainable watch commemorating Earth Day

Filed by Lucire staff/April 5, 2021/12.53

To mark Earth Day 2021 on April 22, Salvatore Ferragamo will release a limited-edition version of one of its watches, but made with low-environmental-impact materials and responsible packaging.
   The F-80 Skeleton Sustainable will be limited to 200 pieces. Its strap is made of post-consumer-recycled PET fibre on the outside and FSC-certified cork on the inside, while the hole covers are made from vegetable-tanned leather.
   Packaging is made of FSC-certified cardboard on the outside, while the wood and metal protective shell is lined with hemp inside, wrapped in post-consumer PET fibre fabric on the outside. The watch support cushion is made from a fully sugar cane-derived bioplastic.
   The automatic movement is housed in a black satin case.
   The watch construction’s climate impact has been measured according to the ISO-14067 Product Carbon Footprint standard. Salvatore Ferragamo has ensured the process is carbon neutral by supporting Rete Clima’s Burgos Wind Project, the largest wind farm in the Philippines.
   The F-80 Skeleton Sustainable is available from April at Salvatore Ferragamo stores, authorized retailers, and online.



 


Reebok, Banana Republic and GMSV mark International Women’s Day

Filed by Lucire staff/March 7, 2021/23.20


Reebok has a campaign called It’s a Man’s World, but with the words struck out, for its International Women’s Day promotion, created by the all-female creative collective Madwomen. Four sneakers in two collections are promoted—the Club C Double, Classic Leather Double, Legacy 83 and Zig Kinetica. The first collection features the sneakers with multiple colours and silhouettes, representing the different facets of a woman; the second shows neutral-toned footwear, representing a clean slate to which a woman can bring her uniqueness.
   The Berlin-based collective has chosen to feature locals: model and stylist Isi Ahmed; make-up artist and photographer Aennikin, and stylist Elli Drake, who styled the campaign.
   The first collection is available from today, and the second from April 1, at reebok.com, priced from US$90.

Banana Republic is celebrating International Women’s Day with its campaign on women who break boundaries, entitled Work Where?. Directed in-house by Banana Republic’s Len Peltier, the campaign shows a montage of videos of real women doing modern work—wearing Banana Republic, of course.
   Subjects include Grammy-nominated recording artist Saint Sinner, recording artist Goapele, street artist Apexer, actor Jimmie Fails, photographer Grady Brannan, real estate developer Mari Swim, executive Todd Palmerton, café owner Lea Sabado, entrepreneur Jamal Blake-Williams, and social media manager Halee Edwards. Movement artist Jon Boogz and screenwriter and artist Chinaka Hodge return for the campaign.
   The company will also make a US$100,000 donation to CARE to help fight poverty, and advance women and girls around the world.

It’s refreshing to see that GMSV (General Motors Specialty Vehicles) has women leading the business in Australasia (Joanne Stogiannis, director; Jodie Lennon, general manager marketing, customer experience and communications; and Dahlia Shnider, vehicle supply chain and systems’ manager) as well as 45 per cent female representation in the wider team. And, of course, General Motors itself is led by Mary Barra, who broke the glass ceiling when appointed CEO of one of the largest car manufacturers in the world in 2014 and has a commitment to diversity.
   â€˜It is common knowledge that the auto industry is skewed heavily towards male representation, so it’s incredibly heartening we’re making gains in changing this balance, albeit as part of a relatively small team,’ said Stogiannis.
   Stogiannis is a GM veteran of 25 years and recalls when she was one of the only women in the room when she started.

 


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