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Made out of What?!: a digital magazine considers sustainability and style

Filed by Lucire staff/July 12, 2021/16.43

How to merge sustainable vision and fashion? A tough call, and many are still rushing at the answer. A few years ago the American art visionary Denise Domergue established a not-for-profit to engage the first half of that question in the context of art.
   The Made Out of What?! initiative has mounted exhibitions, sponsored artist work, and created a library of informative videos highlighting how artists have engaged and embraced the concept of circular economy. To date they’ve launched a global movement, even going so far as to build an exhibit pavilion in the centre of NYC’s Times Square, a temporary structure made from repurposed materials which attracted global attention. Now a quarterly digital magazine from MOOW tracks the project’s progress.
   The current issue addresses sustainability and style, a topic dear to the hearts of Lucire readers. You can view and download the issue here.
   More importantly, participation, a donation or membership in support of the foundation’s work will make a difference in helping to reimagine Planet Earth in the shape we all would like to see.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor

 


Top-tier luxury offerings in Saint-Tropez

Filed by Lucire staff/June 30, 2021/19.04


In February, we reported the reopening of favourite properties in Saint-Tropez. Word has just come in that Airelles Château de la Messardière reopens July 1 with two exceptional luxury offerings of interest.
   First, from July 1 to October 10, 2021, Château de la Messardière will partner with world-renowned chef Nobu Matsuhisa. The pop-up restaurant Matsuhisa Saint-Tropez will offer guests a signature focus on fresh seafood. The extensive menu will boast a unique blend of Japanese–French fusion cuisine drawn from Matsuhisa’s legendary dishes. An impressive selection of sake is designed to perfectly pair with his culinary masterpieces.
   Interiors of the restaurant will be kept minimal and sleek, with a focus on surfaces that show off the chef’s gastronomic artistry. Another enticement will be the outdoor terrace, with its breathtaking views over Pampelonne Bay. Guests will be able to enjoy spectacular sunsets, followed by Matsuhisa’s delicious presentations under the stars.
   Next, for that Instagrammable luxury moment you crave, why not opt for a private classic cycle sidecar vineyard tour? You can explore the surrounding vineyards of Saint-Tropez in style as you cruise around picturesque villages and rolling countryside with an experienced driver. You’ll get a tour of world-renowned vineyards, followed by wine tasting and a delicious picnic.
   Rates at Château de la Messardière start from US$1,366 in a Classic room based on a new inclusive rate concept. For more information, visit airelles.com/fr/destination/chateau-de-la-messardiere-hotel.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor

 


Protest Sportswear releases fourth Green Up challenge: cleaning up Costa Rica

Filed by Lucire staff/June 23, 2021/0.41

Protest Sportswear is walking the talk with two surfers—Alazne Aurrekoetxea and Laura Coviella—heading to Costa Rica to help clean up the shores as part of their Green Up the Ocean project.
   They helped with the efforts to collect single-use bottles, and tied them together with some bamboo and turned them into a “green” board.
   Ninety-eight per cent of Costa Rica’s energy is renewable, and 25 per cent of its land is protected.
   Aurrekoetxa and Coviella join other Protest athletes who have had their Green Up challenges: team riders Enzo Scotto and Camille Armand cleaned up in Chamonix; team riders Andri and Gian Ragettli learned all about “green essentials”, surviving with the bare necessities in the Swiss wilderness; and kitesurfer Roderick Pijls travelled to Norway entirely carbon-neutral to see and surf under the Northern Lights.
   The challenges appear at Protest’s website at www.protest.eu/en/en/campaign/green-up/.









 


Pressology launches beauty range with Ayurvedic principles

Filed by Lucire staff/May 25, 2021/9.46



Pressology, founded in San Francisco by cell and molecular biologist Sally Nasser, is a conscious plant-based Ayurveda beauty brand using USDA-certified organic formulations to heal and enhance the skin. Ingredients include Moringa oil, lentils, turmeric and jasmine, and the products are all made in San Francisco by strong women of colour.
   Nasser has a background in Ayurvedic medicine and holistic self-care, and says that from a young age, she understood how clean, organic ingredients worked with the natural harmony of the human body. She was sceptical of the ingredients used by many beauty companies and their long-term effects, and began developing her own products using natural ingredients from her parents’ kitchen. She believes in a holistic, whole-body approach, and that what you put on your skin is as important as what you put in your body.
   Items include Pressology’s jasmine rose water, where the jasmine helps with relaxation; its Golden Hour botanical serum with omegas 3, 6, 7 and 9 and vitamins; Moringa Meltdown, a cleansing oil; Moringa Mask, a facial treatment with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents; and, what we think is the key product in this launch range, the red lentil enzyme, a facial treatment that fortifies and strengthens skin.
   To take things a step further, Pressology donates 1 per cent of its annual sales to environmental causes, and gives back to Project Night Night, which provides sleep-time essentials to underprivileged babies and children. Find out more and order at pressologyskin.com.

 


Institute of Positive Fashion Forum aims to make real change for sustainable development

Filed by Lucire staff/May 18, 2021/9.35

The Institute of Positive Fashion Forum will take place digitally on June 10, and runs from 9 a.m. to a final event with Stella McCartney commencing at 6.10 p.m.
   The thought leadership event is designed to galvanize the fashion industry—one of the planet’s major contributors to environmental harm—into action, ahead of COP26.
   Tickets are £150, and speakers include Virgil Abloh, Kering chief sustainability officer Marie-Claure Daveu, British Fashion Council CEO Caroline Rush, Baroness Lola Young of Hornsey, Burberry CEO Marco Gobbetti, Priyanka Chopra Jonas, British Fashion Council chair Stephanie Phair, Parley for the Oceans founder Cyrill Gutsch, Centre for Sustainable Fashion director Dilys Williams, Alexander McQueen CEO Emmanuel Gintzburger, and other luminaries. A more complete list of speakers and the day’s programme are available here.
   Sessions include ‘Positioning Around COP 26: the Role of UK Fashion to Help Fight Climate Change’; ‘Future of Fashion: Innovation for Climate Action’; ‘Fashion and Nature: How Biodiversity Is Moving up the Corporate Agenda’; and ‘Social Justice: Eliminating Exploitation in the Supply Chain’.
   ‘Fashion and Nature’ will feature journalist Bandana Tewari, Dilys Williams, Dr Helen Crowley of Kering, and Michael Wessely of Sheep, Inc.
   The intent is to provide real tools to effect change and ticket-holders are encouraged to make serious commitments to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, the Race to Net Zero, and others.
   Tickets are available here.

 


How ethical are the clothes we buy today?

Filed by Lucire staff/May 7, 2021/12.23

Top photograph: Amanda Vick/Unsplash

Our garments speak volumes of our values and set the stage for the image we want to build of ourselves. We wear red to portray power. Black is our surefire way to exude sophistication. Silk is luxurious while denim is urban and rebellious. The clothes we put on every morning tell a story—but they also build our intricate relationship with the world.
   What might feel good on your skin might not lie so comfortably on your conscience. With sweatshops, underaged workers, toxic dyes, and seasonal collections rushing to the shelves, the restless beat of fast fashion has stirred many to take a different approach. We now have access to a wide selection of brands that are paving the road toward a better, cleaner, safer future.

Ethical stamps and labels
Fortunately for us, fashion aficionados, it’s relatively easy to come across labels that can be trusted today. However, you can also go beyond what you find online and research what your locally present brands are all about. Perhaps they can offer ethical certification to show just how committed they are to the cause, and what they are doing to make a difference.

Local shops for a greater impact

Becca McHaffie/Unsplash

Large-scale fashion brands often lack the transparency we need to know if they don’t have any sweatshops handling the manufacturing, or similarly unethical processes behind their public image. Small, local businesses are the ones that offer all that information openly—you can easily find their manufacturing facilities or design shops around the corner and talk to their employees.
   In eco-conscious regions like Australia, everything from casualwear to formalwear can be purchased in the same spirit. The selection of ethical women’s workwear in Australia is also on the rise, and many professional women are choosing the kind of attire that lasts for years on end. This philosophy combines the idea of timelessness and the spirit of local brands to support the development of ethical fashion.

Long-lasting, not seasonal
As alluring as it is to switch our wardrobes at the turn of every season, that is precisely what keeps the wheels of fast fashion turning. We can do better. Opting for timeless instead of trendy, and choosing durable pieces made of materials that can last for more than a couple of months should be one of the pillars of ethical shopping.
   Go for garments made of sustainable and durable fabrics like linen, hemp, and bamboo. Look for other alternatives that will keep your items wearable for a good, long while.

Brand transparency and reports

Mr Lee/Unsplash

Brands that turn to vague terminology and zero access to real data are the ones we should steer clear of. Fashion labels that are transparent in the kind of efforts they are making are the ones we can turn to for truly ethical dressing. Be it accessories the likes of Elvis & Kresse, or athleisure, you can easily find brands that share their impact with the public.

The fabrics and dyes in use
Sustainable processing and manufacturing are two major aspects of ethical brands. Microplastics in synthetic fibres tend to cause irreparable damage to the marine world and the entire planet. As for the toxic dyes so frequently used, they also cause immense damage to water even in urban areas where that same water should be safe for drink and the local ecosystems.
   Some brands are looking for ways to recycle and repurpose for the sake of ethics. Like Coco Veve from Britain and Horizon Athletic from Australia, many are making way for smarter choices in fabric selection, for us to make better choices in how we dress.
   Ethical brands don’t hide behind vague terminology such as ‘responsible’ or ‘clean’. They showcase the impact of their work in data, reports, and employee reviews, and they make sure you can access it all in a matter of clicks.
   The idea that ethical clothing is costly should be dismantled right away—it all depends on the price you’re willing to pay for the health of your family, yourself, the people participating in the making of your clothing, and the natural world. Is the extra couple of dollars really going to offset your budget as much as toxic dyes and unfair labour can devastate our economies and the planet for the long haul? The choice is, ultimately, yours to make.—Peter Minkoff

Peter Minkoff is a fashion and lifestyle editor at Trend Privé magazine. Follow Peter on Twitter for more tips.

 


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