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New Balance releases Everybody’s Welcome collection commemorating Pride 2021

Filed by Lucire staff/June 15, 2021/23.49





For Pride 2021, New Balance has released its Everybody’s Welcome collection of footwear and apparel.
   Queer Hong Kong visual artist Zoie Lam has created the art on the items, conveying an upbeat, positive and colourful mood. The characters are genderless and fun, and show that everyone is welcome, regardless of how they identify. They include T-shirts, singlets and an anorak (from NZ$40), and the Fresh Foam Tempo running shoe (NZ$190), Made in US 574 (NZ$280), 202 sandals (NZ$60) and 57/40 (NZ$220).
   New Balance is supporting InsideOut as part of National Schools’ Pride Week (June 14–20), celebrating rainbow staff and students. The company has donated funds in advance of next year’s week, and gifted the Everybody’s Welcome collection to InsideOut staff across New Zealand.
   InsideOut provides information, workshops and education on LGBTQIA+ issues to schools, workplaces and community organizations.

 


Vans opens concept store in Wellington, New Zealand

Filed by Lucire staff/June 9, 2021/4.27

Vans is opening a Wellington, New Zealand concept store on Thursday, June 10, the second store the sports’ brand has opened in the country.
   The store is located at Shop 3, 78–80 Cuba Mall, and features a full range of Vans footwear, apparel and accessories, for men, women and youth. There will also be product exclusive to its retail stores and vans.co.nz.
   Vans has partnered with artist Jason Woodside, who has created a custom art piece for the concept store. Woodside will also be in store from noon to 2 p.m., hand-delivering three customized skateboard decks.
   There is also an in-store competition where the decks will be given away. Visitors to the store need to find the Jason Woodside QR code and sign up to enter.

 


Karnit Aharoni shows off latest designs for spring–summer 2021

Filed by Lucire staff/May 28, 2021/3.15





Greg Alexander/Méphistopheles

New Zealand- and UK-educated, France-based Karnit Aharoni, profiled earlier in Lucire, has shown new entries for spring–summer 2021, inspired by her grandmother and the photographs of her from the 1930s. Aharoni has chosen to combine the 1930s inspiration with the wild west, on the basis that we currently live in times of change and chaos, and there’s anticipation about what’s to come.
   The fabrics are 100 per cent natural and environmentally responsible, sourced from Italy and France, and the clothes are produced in France and Portugal. The shoot was helmed by photographer Greg Alexander in Paris, with Sebastien Vienne art-directing. Hair and make-up were by Carine Larchet (for La Roche–Posay) and Eugène Perma, with Angline of Élite Milano modelling.
   ‘I believe what we are going through at the moment are changes which would have happened anyway, even without COVID,’ said Aharoni. ‘I keep walking the path I’ve started with … small quantities, responsible production and partners, season-less pieces.
   ‘I am a woman and I come from a line of very strong women. My grandmother was an incredible person as well as my mother, both very strong and creative. I also have two sisters, two daughters, and friends. I’m always sensitive to their feedback, comments and needs. It’s the contemporary femininity.’









Greg Alexander/Méphistopheles

 


Pop-up exhibition showcases customized Dr Martens shoes by Jimmy D and other creatives

Filed by Lucire staff/May 23, 2021/23.54

A pop-up exhibition for Dr Martens opens today at Westfield Newmarket in Auckland, New Zealand, and will run to May 30. Lochie Stonehouse, Jimmy D, Portia Prince and Miro have each customized a pair of Dr Martens’ 1461 shoe, commemorating 60 years of the design. Their customized shoes are being displayed at level 1 of Westfield Newmarket, opposite Under Armour.
   On Friday, May 28, from 5 to 7 p.m., and Saturday, May 29, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., fans can bring their own Dr Martens footwear to be personalized by Auckland-based artist Finn Wilson.
   Jimmy D’s design is called Femme Fantasy Adventure, and uses metal piercings and a silk bow, ‘which could be interpreted as being about the strength in being femme or “femininity” in general.’ Miro’s design, Day N Night, represents both the dark and bright days experienced by an artist. Make-up artist Lochie Stonehouse’s design, Eat the Rich, evokes punk and the anarchist movement, and features Swarovski crystals; while Portia Prince’s Your Hair Is Your Power is for girls that ‘don’t see their afro or curly hair as magic’ and that it is ‘a pair of shoes I wish I’d had growing up. Wear your crown with pride.’
   Dr Martens’ first boot rolled off the production line on April 1, 1960, and the 1461 shoe was the company’s second style, dating from 1961.

 


Royal New Zealand Ballet’s Giselle revival has a fresh, youthful energy

Filed by Jack Yan/May 12, 2021/12.28





Stephen A’Court

Giselle has become one of the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s signature productions since this version was conceived by Ethan Stiefel and Johan Kobborg in 2012, and each season—this is the third in New Zealand—brings with it a different energy, as well as newfound elements to enjoy. The cast changes this time bring with them a more youthful take, while the production values and design give Giselle a sense of depth and quality.
   Opening night’s Mayu Tanigaito, in the title role, is no stranger to Giselle, having taken the role in the 2016 season on occasion opposite Daniel Gaudiello, though that time Lucy Green and Qi Huan took the leads on opening night. Qi is still missed as one of the great ballerinos of the company, but in his place tonight, Laurynas Vėjalis has the required regal manner to carry out the role of Albrecht.
   Tanigaito is a seasoned dancer yet exudes a youthful quality as Giselle—a perfect casting—and her solo seeing her en pointe with a series of fouettés brought spontaneous applause from the audience at the Opera House in Wellington. Vėjalis and Tanigaito were convincing as young lovers in their pas de deux in the first act; Vėjalis’s solo is happy, upbeat and confident. It’s hats off to Paul Mathews who brought real energy to Hilarion, who is frustrated and hurt by Giselle’s love for Albrecht. Being a taller dancer than Vėjalis, and executing large moves on stage, you could feel Mathews’ Hilarion trying to demonstrate desperately his feelings for Giselle—and one would almost be forgiven for sympathizing with him, if his character hadn’t also brought out a knife at the first sign of feeling he had been jilted.
   We had seen Tanigaito perform the role of Myrtha, queen of the Wilis, in 2016, and it remains a role that has a dominant presence in Act II. Sara Garbowski’s solo at the start of the second act was a skilful and beautiful piece of classical ballet, and there is a beauty to the sight of the veiled Wilis, resplendent in tulle. It’s in this act that the principal roles really shine in this production: Hilarion is consumed by the forces of the Wilis and shows a vulnerable side, while Albrecht dances for his life more passionately than the assured aristocrat of the first act. This is a more touching, emotional act, performed successfully by the principal dancers.
   When you see the minor roles—such as the group of 12 Wilis—you realize that there is plenty of young talent in the company and its future seems assured.
   Special mention must be made once again to Howard C. Jones’s scenic design, and lighting design by Kendall Smith. Natalia Stewart’s costumes remain as exquisite as they did when we first viewed this ballet in 2012. Clytie Campbell, who herself had performed in Giselle in 2012, faithfully staged the revival with Stiefel and Kobborg’s supervision, as neither was able to travel to New Zealand.
   Hamish McKeich faultlessly conducted Adolphe Adam’s music, more than ably performed by Orchestra Wellington, who give the impression of a bigger score.
   After Wellington (May 12–15), Giselle heads to Palmerston North (May 19), Napier (May 22–3), Auckland (May 27–9), Christchurch (June 4–5) and Dunedin (June 9). Hamish McKeich conducts the Adolphe Adam score with Orchestra Wellington, the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra, and the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra in those centres, with the Wellington recording used elsewhere. More details can be found here.Jack Yan, Founder and Publisher





Stephen A’Court

 


Andalou Naturals arrives in New Zealand, with affordable, natural skin care

Filed by Lucire staff/May 11, 2021/2.35



Andalou Naturals merited a mention in Lucire when we spotted them at Natural Products Expo West in Anaheim, Calif. back in 2017 and, finally, it’s made it to our shores here at our New Zealand head office, with a well thought out cruelty-free skin care range and, as in the US, decent prices for a range that’s non-GMO, 98 per cent naturally derived.
   It’s clear which one caught our eye the most: Andalou Naturals’ Brightening Honey Pumpkin Glycolic Mask (NZ$27·99), with fruit stem cells, vitamin C, and glycolic AHA, blended with manuka honey and organic pumpkin. This one’s 99 per cent naturally derived, with a mix of certified organic and Fair Trade ingredients, suitable for combination skin types. The pumpkin and glycolic AHA exfoliate the skin, while the honey hydrates, leaving skin tingling initially.
   The Brightening Probiotic + C Renewal Cream (NZ$39·99) also uses fruit stem cell complex and vitamin C, plus skin-friendly probiotic microflora. It’s an effective moisturizer and works under make-up.


   And if we thought the pumpkin mask was a treat, Andalou Naturals also has the Avo Cocoa Skin Food Mask (NZ$27·99), with fruit stem cell complex, resveratrol CoQ10, organic avocado oil and (you’ll notice the scent) pure dark cocoa, which is rich in antioxidants. It’s part of its age-defying line. The result: smoother, brighter and softer skin.
   Andalou Naturals also has a fruit stem cell Revitalize Serum (NZ$39·99) and a Deep Wrinkle Dermal Filler (NZ$34·99) as part of the age-defying line. The serum, with fruit stem cell complex, resveratrol CoQ10 and goji glycopeptides support collagen and elastin in the skin, while the dermal filler has the addition of capuacu butter to reduce skin tension and plump and smooth fine lines and wrinkles. It’s particularly well priced for a filler and has a noticeable effect on those fine lines.
   We recognize everyone’s skin is different, so others’ experiences may differ. Our judgement is this is a high-performance, well priced range that should do as well here as it has done overseas. Chemist Warehouse now stocks Andalou Naturals in New Zealand, with a much broader line than we’ve featured here, including gluten-free and vegan items. More information can be found at its Australian website, andalou.com.au.

 


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