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June 24, 2016

Jameson’s Caskmates launch in New Zealand, blending whiskey and stout; Stadler Form launches art-déco fan

Lola Cristall/23.23


Jameson Caskmates has launched in New Zealand, after its successful run in Ireland last year. Jameson loaned some of its Midleton Distillery casks to the Franciscan Well brewery in Cork to see what would happen to the brewery’s Irish stout, after a plan was hatched by Jameson Master Distiller, Brian Nation, Master of Whiskey Science, Dave Quinn, and Franciscan Well founder and head brewer, Shane Long when they met in Cork. The casks were then returned to the Distillery and filled with Jameson Irish Whiskey.
   The result was a Jameson Caskmates: a triple-distilled, ‘once stouted’ whiskey with a distinctive taste that features notes of coffee, cocoa, butterscotch and gentle hints of hops.
   Jameson expects that those who enjoy craft beer and whiskey will take to the blending of two disciplines, with a particularly versatile drink. Jameson Caskmates is bottled at 40 per cent ABV and goes on sale in New Zealand from July 2016, with an RRP of NZ$55·99.
   Stadler Form’s art-déco Q Fan is a stunning work of art that looks gorgeous in any part of the home. While it’s a considerably quiet fan, the strength of the three blades projects plenty of cool air. Whether the simplicity of silver or the boldness of bronze, each colour flawlessly complements its surroundings. Weighing as light as 4 kg (slightly less than 9 lb) the fan comes in three distinct speed levels, adapting according to the environment. Despite the intensity of the hot temperature, it rapidly releases cool air in a minimal amount of time. Designed by famous designer Carlo Borer, the fan is in the form of the letter Q, its stainless steel shaped into an absolute work of art.
   The brand was founded by Martin Stadler in 1998 in Zug, Switzerland. Stadler Form collaborates with renowned Swiss-based designers including Kurt Zimmerli, Fabian Zimmerli and Mathias Walker. Stadler Form has become an internationally distinguished brand, distributing its array of inventive products to more than 40 countries, including humidifiers, fans, air purifiers, heaters, dehumidifiers and aroma diffusers.—Lola Cristall, Paris editor, and Lucire staff




June 17, 2016

Sponsored video: Chris Fonseca breaks barriers, with Smirnoff Ice Electric

Lucire staff/14.12



Via Chris Fonseca, on Instagram

We love ideas that challenge convention (otherwise this title wouldn’t exist), and Chris Fonseca’s work does just that.
   He’s a dancer, choreographer and dance instructor who happens to be profoundly deaf after suffering meningitis as a child. But that didn’t stop Fonseca from developing a love of dance, and it’s that love that the Smirnoff Ice Electric Flavors range taps into with its latest campaign.
   This hasn’t been created cynically for marketing Smirnoff—Fonseca has been teaching in South London, where both deaf and hearing people go to learn how to dance. He has, however, taken the idea across the Atlantic thanks to Smirnoff, and you can see his New York class for yourself on social media (check out Fonseca’s Instagram at instagram.com/cfofficial for more). Among those at one New York class were Jeremy Strong, a choreographer for Jason DeRulo, and C. J. Salvador, a dancer for Justin Bieber, notes Vibe, which attended in May.
   Fonseca’s absolutely right: there’s no reason a deaf person cannot be great at dancing, and he gets his students to count the beat through vibrations, especially the bass. He further incorporates the lyrics of the song into his dance. His aim is to break barriers, and to make sure that that deaf people can do whatever they wish. ‘[Being deaf] does not stop me from making everyday achievements,’ he told the BBC.
   â€˜I always say to those young people not feeling body-positive to keep going, like everyday barriers, challenges, keep going: you don’t know how close you are to making a breakthrough. Keep believing anything is possible. Your time is coming soon.
   â€˜My motto is: dreams don’t work unless you work. Dreaming, believing, and achieving.’
   A very telling image on his Instagram shows Fonseca leading his class and on the mirror are the words, ‘How do you know if you don’t try?’, a term that he has hashtagged as well. Smirnoff, meanwhile, has taken more polished shots for its Ice Electric campaign, promoting its non-carbonated, plastic-bottled line—their idea is that you can take your Smirnoff drinks on to the dance floor more readily than when it was bottled in glass.
   His teaching has reached the media, including a cover story for the British Deaf News, which he hashtagged as his proudest moment.


Post sponsored by Smirnoff

June 16, 2016

From supermodels to film: celebrating the work of Peter Lindbergh at Kunsthal Rotterdam

Lucire staff/13.41




Top: An image that kicked off the 1990s, with supermodels Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz, Christy Turlington and Cindy Crawford in New York, appearing on the cover of British Vogue in January 1990. Copyright ©1990 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery). Centre: Wild at Heart, with Cindy Crawford, Tatjana Patitz, Helena Christensen, Linda Evangelista, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Karen Mulder and Stephanie Seymour, Brooklyn, 1991, appearing in Vogue. Copyright ©1991 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery). Above: Kate Moss, Paris, 2015, wearing Giorgio Armani, spring–summer 2015. Copyright ©2015 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery).

An exhibition on Polish-born, French-based photographer Peter Lindbergh, entitled Peter Lindbergh: a Different Vision on Fashion Photography, opens at the Kunsthal Rotterdam on September 10 at 5.30 p.m., running through February 12, 2017. It marks the first Dutch exhibition of Lindbergh’s work.
   Some of the most iconic fashion images of the past generation have been shot by Lindbergh, whose work is regularly seen in various editions of Vogue, and in The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, Harper’s Bazaar, The Wall Street Journal Magazine, Visionaire, Interview and W. Exhibitions of his work have been held around the world beginning with the V&A in 1985. Lindbergh’s black-and-white 1990 Vogue photograph of Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz, Christy Turlington and Cindy Crawford was one that helped cement the reputation of the supermodels, if not arguably kicking off the era itself. Lindbergh’s work gave a sense of reality about his subjects, with his humanist, documentary approach.
   Said Lindbergh in an Art Forum interview earlier this year, ‘A fashion photographer should contribute to defining the image of the contemporary woman or man in their time, to reflect a certain social or human reality. How surrealistic is today’s commercial agenda to retouch all signs of life and of experience, to retouch the very personal truth of the face itself?’
   The exhibition features over 220 photographs and includes exclusive and previously unseen material, including personal notes, Polaroids, storyboards, films and prints. It is divided into nine different sections, representing the different themes in Lindbergh’s creative development: Supermodels, Couturiers, Zeitgeist, Dance, the Darkroom, the Unknown, Silver Screen, Icons, and an exclusive Rotterdam Gallery. This final section contains Lindbergh’s work for the October 2015 issue of Vogue Nederland, with Lara Stone and Elise Hupkes at the Port of Rotterdam.
   Lindbergh’s critically acclaimed Models: the Film (1991) will be screened, along with interviews with Grace Coddington, Nicole Kidman, Mads Mikkelsen, Cindy Crawford and Nadja Auermann.
   Guest curator Thierry-Maxime Loriot points out that the exhibition is not chronological, but a narrative about the photographer.
   The Kunsthal Rotterdam noted, ‘Peter Lindbergh introduced a new realism into photography. His timeless images redefine the norms of beauty. Lindbergh’s visual idiom is influenced by the language of film and by playing with the type of the strong, self-willed woman, from the femme fatale to the heroine, but also the female dancer and the actress. His Å“uvre is characterized by portraits that radiate a certain lack of inhibition and physical grace.’
   The exhibition is accompanied by a hardcover monograph, Peter Lindbergh: a Different Vision on Fashion Photography, retailing for €59,99 (link at Amazon.de), US$69·99 (link at Amazon.com) or £44·99 (link at Amazon UK), curated by Loriot, designed by Paprika of Montréal, and published by Taschen. The introduction has been authored by Kunsthal director Emily Ansenk, while the book features an essay on Lindbergh’s work by Loriot with commentaries from, inter alia, Jean Paul Gaultier, Nicole Kidman, Grace Coddington, Cindy Crawford and Anna Wintour.

June 15, 2016

Bugatti, Luisa Via Roma celebrate partnership: Cecilia Capriotti, Grace Chatto, Leonida Ferrarese among VIPs

Lucire staff/12.59




Stefania d’Alessandro

Luisa Via Roma, styled LuisaViaRoma, is a familiar sight to the fashion scene: it’s one of the biggest international concept stores in Firenze and its history goes back to 1930.
   With Bugatti having extended its brand into lifestyle, using founder Ettore Bugatti’s name for its collection, Luisa Via Roma is an ideal partner for the company. The two announced their collaboration at the Bridge of Love installation on the Arno during Pitti Uomo 90 on Tuesday. The Ettore Bugatti Lifestyle Collection will be available from the Luisa Via Roma physical store in Firenze and its website. A classic Bugatti Type 51 racing car from the 1930s was there at the launch.
   Luisa Via Roma will be the first place in Italy which will retail the clothing and accessories’ ranges from the collection, beginning with the autumn–winter 2016–17 collection.
   The launch of the collaboration, entitled Underwater Love, saw VIPs including Bugatti brand manager Massimiliano Ferrari, Paolo Lao, Petite Meller, Grace Chatto of Clean Bandit, Diego Rizzi, Bugatti marketing and communications’ Elke Palmaers, Bugatti creative director Daniele Andretta, Mauro Bucco, Marlen Lissek, Marco Cartasegna, Filippo Cirulli, Federico Oggioni and Luisa Panconesi, Marco Tolentino, Leonida Ferrarese, and Cecilia Capriotti.





















Stefania d’Alessandro

May 26, 2016

The Body Shop launches Bio-Bridges programme, regenerating and protecting 75,000,000 m² of forest

Lucire staff/12.44


Above: The red-shanked douc, or monkey, one of the endangered species that the Body Shop’s Bio-Bridges programme will protect.

On Tuesday, the Body Shop unveiled its Bio-Bridges programme, which aims to regenerate and protect 75,000,000 m² of forest.
   The programme will not only see forests protected from exploitation and unsustainable harvesting, the Body Shop wants to ensure that animals and plant species within them thrive.
   The first project is the Khe Nuoc Trong forest in north-central Vietnam, home of the red-shanked douc, saola (known as the Asian unicorn and one of the rarest animals on earth), Bengal slow loris and Burmese python. All of these species are threatened by hunting and illegal logging, and the Body Shop notes that nearby habitats are still suffering from the effects of Agent Orange used during the Vietnam War. The World Land Trust and Viet Nature Conservation Centre are working with the Body Shop, patrolling the forest and setting up camera traps, while working with the local community, promoting sustainable forest use and farming.
   Promoting this project to Body Shop customers is an in-store and online campaign called Help Reggie Find Love, featuring Reggie, a red-shanked douc. Each customer transaction will restore and protect 1 m² of habitat in Khe Nuoc Trong.
   Christopher Davis, director of corporate responsibility and campaigns for the Body Shop, said, ‘We want to focus on actively enriching the world’s biodiversity. These areas of forest in Vietnam are biological treasure troves that are being destroyed through poaching and illegal logging. Bio-Bridges are an innovative way to create protected corridors of biodiversity that allow the wider forest to flourish and its inhabitants to breed and thrive. In Vietnam, within five to ten years we hope to be able to see endangered species multiply. We’ll be promoting Help Reggie Find Love online and in our stores in 65 countries around the world, helping raise awareness of this serious issue in a different way and allowing our customers to make a direct and positive impact with every purchase.’
   The company has embarked on this latest corporate social responsibility programme as part of its new global Enrich Not Exploit commitment launched in February. It recognizes that protecting and promoting biodiversity is good not only for the planet, including combatting climate change, but for the natural ingredients it sources for its products.
   The second Bio-Bridge programme begins in late 2016 in the Garo Hills in India, in partnership with World Land Trust and Wildlife Trust of India.

May 20, 2016

An extensive Scope: NZ School of Dance blends Choreographic Season pieces into thoughtful, cohesive work

Jack Yan/14.13





Stephen A’Court

Above, from top: Connor Masseurs. A scene from Scope. Kent Giebel-Date and Christina Guieb. Christina Guieb.

The New Zealand School of Dance’s Choreographic Season for 2016, Scope, blended its 10 performance so seamlessly, and with related themes, that it worked well as a single, larger piece, despite the many talents and styles involved in choreography, music and dance.
   Each time we attend an NZSD performance, we’re always impressed by how they mix things up. Sometimes, it’s in the style of dancing or the changes to the venue. This time, they’ve surprised us yet again by not having breaks between each work, allowing them to flow naturally. Other than at the beginning, when half-dressed dancers emerged on stage in a row, only to have their neatly folded outfits fall from the sky, there were also no costume changes.
   Scope’s notes hint at the related themes, all centring on the energies that drive life on Earth, and how humanity can be destructive, but also how it can unite and bring people together. The flow did mean it was sometimes difficult to see when one performance finished and another started—this is not meant as a negative criticism, because the effect is that the audience became particularly engrossed.
   The performances flowed so seamlessly thanks largely, we believe, to the collaborative processes by the 10 graduating students of the New Zealand School of Dance, who created and performed their own works, cooperating with lighting and sound designers as well as fellow students in following years. It was particularly immersive, more so than the 2015 season that Lucire thought very highly of.
   In a release, the show’s coordinator, Victoria Colombus, herself an alumna, noted, ‘This year the New Zealand School of Dance students and Toi Whakaari students are cultivating a very collaborative working process. They have been working together to investigate overriding themes and how they can utilize different elements of stagecraft and performance to sew together these common threads.’ It worked.
   â€˜Trophics’, choreographed by Tristan Carter with music by Te Aihe Butler, involved the entire cast, essentially evolving. The first scene showed them essentially running on to the stage but as they progressed, their moves became more complex, as though they discovered they had more limbs and abilities. This evolved into the next performance, printed in the programme with a blank box and the cubed sign as its title, with the introduction of white boxes as props but signifying that we can find peace among our busy lives. Christopher Mills’s ‘Box Cubed’ (for ease of typesetting here) concluded with female dancers calling out to others scattered among the audience, the matriarchy evolved into the patriarchy with ‘Obelus’, a male-exclusive performance that mixed martial arts with the flow of dance, examining themes of rivalry, the toppling of leadership, and the resulting power vacuum. There was thoroughly enjoyable choreography by Jag Popham.
   From here the performances became more otherworldly—and one can see the evolutionary theme continue into a more technical arena. ‘The Private Sphere’ introduced themes of contrast: ‘Plastic fruit and tending flowers. Air freshener and painted landscapes,’ read the programme, but we saw it as humanity’s attempt to introduce technology, but not always in a pleasant way. Dancers mimicked robotic movements as they portrayed artificial materials; could the theme have been the draining of humanity from our everyday lives? From Isaac di Natale’s ‘The Private Sphere’, we moved into Breanna Timms’s ‘Atlas of Intangible’, where the movements became fluid again, almost to show that advancements can see us claw back our humanity. Timms’s idea was to show the connections between all life through energy, how the actions of one influence another, and this was done with great beauty and more tradition in the choreography, helped with music such as Estonian composer Arvo Pärt’s ‘Summa for Strings’.
   Samuel Hall’s ‘Come along and Feel the Kairos’, a reference to that perfect moment, involved audience members in the front row (Lucire’s second-row seat meant the note-taking continued), who became part of a mass performance. Dancers in the centre connected while one remained outside the lines formed by the audience and their guides; and despite the presence of amateurs on stage there was a flow that held our attention.
   â€˜Blight’, choreographed by Tiana Lung, had many layers that tied back to earlier themes of technology and humankind’s attempts to quell nature as a result; a dancer representing new life is controlled and quashed by existing life forms. ‘Shaving a Cactus’, choreographed by Holly Newsome, again introduced a technological theme (helped by Crooked Colours’ ‘Step (Woolymammoth × Tsuruda Remix)’ as the soundtrack) and synthesized voices which dancers. Te Aihe Butler’s music editing for Jessica Newman’s ‘XXX’ took us back to the start thematically, with sound effects that were basic and raw. The whole cast returned for an energetic finalé in Isabel Estrella’s ‘Temenos’.
   Scope, the New Zealand School of Dance’s Choreographic Season for 2016, runs from May 20 to 28 at Te Whaea, the National Dance and Drama Centre, in Newtown, Wellington. Tickets are priced from NZ$12 to NZ$23; bookings and further information can be found at the NZSD’s website at www.nzschoolofdance.ac.nz.—Jack Yan, Publisher


Stephen A’Court

Above: The third-year contemporary students at the New Zealand School of Dance for 2016.

May 19, 2016

Kim Kardashian, Toni Garrn, Paris Hilton, Chanel Iman, Milla Jovovich at de Grisogono party at Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc

Lucire staff/16.04


Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com


Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com

De Grisogono and its founder and creative director Fawaz Gruosi played host to one of the Festival de Cannes’ most anticipated soirées at the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc. A high-fashion jewellery show, with dresses by Elie Saab, followed by an extravaganza by Ekdokimov, the launch of Euronews’s new identity, a dinner for 650 guests, and a private performance by the Earth, Wind & Fire Experience featuring the Al McKay Allstars, DJ Jack E and DJ Willy.
   Given the Zeitgeist, it was Kim Kardashian West (in Lan Yu) who grabbed paparazzi attention on the evening of day 7, but there were plenty of other top stars there, too: Robert de Niro and Grace Hightower, Paris Hilton looking more radiant than ever, Chanel Iman, Ana Beatriz Barros, Milla Jovovich, Toni Garrn and Chandler Parsons, Harvey Weinstein and Georgina Chapman, Bella Hadid (in Givenchy), Siran Manoukian, Hofit Golan, Valeria Golino, Hailey Clauson, Chris Tucker, Denise Rich, Victoria Lopyreva, Mischa Barton, Mohammed al Turki, David Wertheimer and Toghzan Izbassarova, Lara Lieto, Stephen Hung, Amaury Nolasco, Godeliv van den Brandt, Natasha Poly, Maryna Linchuk, Doina Ciobanu, Rose Bertram, Kenneth Cole, Alina Baikova, Gala Gonzalez, Eva Cavalli, Carolina Parsons, Jean-Roch, Édgar Ramírez and Ana de Armas from Hands of Stone, Violetta Gruosi, Amy Jackson, Gregory van der Weil, Ivana Trump and Massimo Gargia.
   And since you can never get by without your Mum, Kardashian West’s mother Kris Jenner was also a VIP at the extravagant soirée held during the Festival de Cannes.
   Gruosi took the opportunity to showcase a flawless, colourless rough diamond weighing 404 ct with flawless clarity, one of the 30 largest top-quality ones ever found, and the largest found in Angola.










































































Barbara Palvin, Izabel Goulart, Lucky Blue Smith, Natasha Poly shine at Festival de Cannes for day 7

Lucire staff/9.47


Pascal Le Segretain


The Festival de Cannes’ seventh day saw the premières of Julieta, directed by Pedro Almodovar, and Personal Shopper, starring Kristen Stewart. But all eyes were on the fashion again at the Palais des Festivals: Natasha Poly and Lara Stone represented L’Oréal Paris, with the Russian model wearing a Prada pink, black and gold strapless gown with bow detail and jewellery by de Grisogono, and the Dutch model also choosing Prada, with a cream gown accessorized with Repossi jewels.
   Barbara Palvin returned for her second year representing L’Oréal Paris, wearing a Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini spring–summer 2016 V-neck gown with ruffled sleeves, Izabel Goulart wore a Ralph & Russo spring–summer 2016 haute couture nude silk satin chiffon robe with pleated godets over a beaded blush pink bustier, with jewellery by de Grisogono and shoes by Giuseppe Zanotti; Karlie Kloss donned a Louis Vuitton long-sleeve sequinned gown; and Luma Grothe wore a sheer Patricia Bonaldi gown with Montblanc jewellery. Lucky Blue Smith, completing the ensemble of L’Oréal Paris spokeswomen on day seven, wore Yves Saint Laurent.
   Also spotted at the Cannes Film Festival were Adriana Lima wore a Prada gown with Chopard earrings from the company’s haute joaillerie collection, Petra NÄ›mcová wore a Saffiya spring–summer 2016 gown with Giuseppe Zanotti sandals and Chopard jewels; and Cindy Bruna wore Zac Posen with jewels by Chopard.



































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