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May 20, 2016

An extensive Scope: NZ School of Dance blends Choreographic Season pieces into thoughtful, cohesive work

Jack Yan/14.13





Stephen A’Court

Above, from top: Connor Masseurs. A scene from Scope. Kent Giebel-Date and Christina Guieb. Christina Guieb.

The New Zealand School of Dance’s Choreographic Season for 2016, Scope, blended its 10 performance so seamlessly, and with related themes, that it worked well as a single, larger piece, despite the many talents and styles involved in choreography, music and dance.
   Each time we attend an NZSD performance, we’re always impressed by how they mix things up. Sometimes, it’s in the style of dancing or the changes to the venue. This time, they’ve surprised us yet again by not having breaks between each work, allowing them to flow naturally. Other than at the beginning, when half-dressed dancers emerged on stage in a row, only to have their neatly folded outfits fall from the sky, there were also no costume changes.
   Scope’s notes hint at the related themes, all centring on the energies that drive life on Earth, and how humanity can be destructive, but also how it can unite and bring people together. The flow did mean it was sometimes difficult to see when one performance finished and another started—this is not meant as a negative criticism, because the effect is that the audience became particularly engrossed.
   The performances flowed so seamlessly thanks largely, we believe, to the collaborative processes by the 10 graduating students of the New Zealand School of Dance, who created and performed their own works, cooperating with lighting and sound designers as well as fellow students in following years. It was particularly immersive, more so than the 2015 season that Lucire thought very highly of.
   In a release, the show’s coordinator, Victoria Colombus, herself an alumna, noted, ‘This year the New Zealand School of Dance students and Toi Whakaari students are cultivating a very collaborative working process. They have been working together to investigate overriding themes and how they can utilize different elements of stagecraft and performance to sew together these common threads.’ It worked.
   â€˜Trophics’, choreographed by Tristan Carter with music by Te Aihe Butler, involved the entire cast, essentially evolving. The first scene showed them essentially running on to the stage but as they progressed, their moves became more complex, as though they discovered they had more limbs and abilities. This evolved into the next performance, printed in the programme with a blank box and the cubed sign as its title, with the introduction of white boxes as props but signifying that we can find peace among our busy lives. Christopher Mills’s ‘Box Cubed’ (for ease of typesetting here) concluded with female dancers calling out to others scattered among the audience, the matriarchy evolved into the patriarchy with ‘Obelus’, a male-exclusive performance that mixed martial arts with the flow of dance, examining themes of rivalry, the toppling of leadership, and the resulting power vacuum. There was thoroughly enjoyable choreography by Jag Popham.
   From here the performances became more otherworldly—and one can see the evolutionary theme continue into a more technical arena. ‘The Private Sphere’ introduced themes of contrast: ‘Plastic fruit and tending flowers. Air freshener and painted landscapes,’ read the programme, but we saw it as humanity’s attempt to introduce technology, but not always in a pleasant way. Dancers mimicked robotic movements as they portrayed artificial materials; could the theme have been the draining of humanity from our everyday lives? From Isaac di Natale’s ‘The Private Sphere’, we moved into Breanna Timms’s ‘Atlas of Intangible’, where the movements became fluid again, almost to show that advancements can see us claw back our humanity. Timms’s idea was to show the connections between all life through energy, how the actions of one influence another, and this was done with great beauty and more tradition in the choreography, helped with music such as Estonian composer Arvo Pärt’s ‘Summa for Strings’.
   Samuel Hall’s ‘Come along and Feel the Kairos’, a reference to that perfect moment, involved audience members in the front row (Lucire’s second-row seat meant the note-taking continued), who became part of a mass performance. Dancers in the centre connected while one remained outside the lines formed by the audience and their guides; and despite the presence of amateurs on stage there was a flow that held our attention.
   â€˜Blight’, choreographed by Tiana Lung, had many layers that tied back to earlier themes of technology and humankind’s attempts to quell nature as a result; a dancer representing new life is controlled and quashed by existing life forms. ‘Shaving a Cactus’, choreographed by Holly Newsome, again introduced a technological theme (helped by Crooked Colours’ ‘Step (Woolymammoth × Tsuruda Remix)’ as the soundtrack) and synthesized voices which dancers. Te Aihe Butler’s music editing for Jessica Newman’s ‘XXX’ took us back to the start thematically, with sound effects that were basic and raw. The whole cast returned for an energetic finalé in Isabel Estrella’s ‘Temenos’.
   Scope, the New Zealand School of Dance’s Choreographic Season for 2016, runs from May 20 to 28 at Te Whaea, the National Dance and Drama Centre, in Newtown, Wellington. Tickets are priced from NZ$12 to NZ$23; bookings and further information can be found at the NZSD’s website at www.nzschoolofdance.ac.nz.—Jack Yan, Publisher


Stephen A’Court

Above: The third-year contemporary students at the New Zealand School of Dance for 2016.

May 19, 2016

Kim Kardashian, Toni Garrn, Paris Hilton, Chanel Iman, Milla Jovovich at de Grisogono party at Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc

Lucire staff/16.04


Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com


Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com

De Grisogono and its founder and creative director Fawaz Gruosi played host to one of the Festival de Cannes’ most anticipated soirées at the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc. A high-fashion jewellery show, with dresses by Elie Saab, followed by an extravaganza by Ekdokimov, the launch of Euronews’s new identity, a dinner for 650 guests, and a private performance by the Earth, Wind & Fire Experience featuring the Al McKay Allstars, DJ Jack E and DJ Willy.
   Given the Zeitgeist, it was Kim Kardashian West (in Lan Yu) who grabbed paparazzi attention on the evening of day 7, but there were plenty of other top stars there, too: Robert de Niro and Grace Hightower, Paris Hilton looking more radiant than ever, Chanel Iman, Ana Beatriz Barros, Milla Jovovich, Toni Garrn and Chandler Parsons, Harvey Weinstein and Georgina Chapman, Bella Hadid (in Givenchy), Siran Manoukian, Hofit Golan, Valeria Golino, Hailey Clauson, Chris Tucker, Denise Rich, Victoria Lopyreva, Mischa Barton, Mohammed al Turki, David Wertheimer and Toghzan Izbassarova, Lara Lieto, Stephen Hung, Amaury Nolasco, Godeliv van den Brandt, Natasha Poly, Maryna Linchuk, Doina Ciobanu, Rose Bertram, Kenneth Cole, Alina Baikova, Gala Gonzalez, Eva Cavalli, Carolina Parsons, Jean-Roch, Édgar Ramírez and Ana de Armas from Hands of Stone, Violetta Gruosi, Amy Jackson, Gregory van der Weil, Ivana Trump and Massimo Gargia.
   And since you can never get by without your Mum, Kardashian West’s mother Kris Jenner was also a VIP at the extravagant soirée held during the Festival de Cannes.
   Gruosi took the opportunity to showcase a flawless, colourless rough diamond weighing 404 ct with flawless clarity, one of the 30 largest top-quality ones ever found, and the largest found in Angola.










































































Barbara Palvin, Izabel Goulart, Lucky Blue Smith, Natasha Poly shine at Festival de Cannes for day 7

Lucire staff/9.47


Pascal Le Segretain


The Festival de Cannes’ seventh day saw the premières of Julieta, directed by Pedro Almodovar, and Personal Shopper, starring Kristen Stewart. But all eyes were on the fashion again at the Palais des Festivals: Natasha Poly and Lara Stone represented L’Oréal Paris, with the Russian model wearing a Prada pink, black and gold strapless gown with bow detail and jewellery by de Grisogono, and the Dutch model also choosing Prada, with a cream gown accessorized with Repossi jewels.
   Barbara Palvin returned for her second year representing L’Oréal Paris, wearing a Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini spring–summer 2016 V-neck gown with ruffled sleeves, Izabel Goulart wore a Ralph & Russo spring–summer 2016 haute couture nude silk satin chiffon robe with pleated godets over a beaded blush pink bustier, with jewellery by de Grisogono and shoes by Giuseppe Zanotti; Karlie Kloss donned a Louis Vuitton long-sleeve sequinned gown; and Luma Grothe wore a sheer Patricia Bonaldi gown with Montblanc jewellery. Lucky Blue Smith, completing the ensemble of L’Oréal Paris spokeswomen on day seven, wore Yves Saint Laurent.
   Also spotted at the Cannes Film Festival were Adriana Lima wore a Prada gown with Chopard earrings from the company’s haute joaillerie collection, Petra NÄ›mcová wore a Saffiya spring–summer 2016 gown with Giuseppe Zanotti sandals and Chopard jewels; and Cindy Bruna wore Zac Posen with jewels by Chopard.



































May 17, 2016

Sonam Kapoor, Aishwarya Rai, Araya A. Hargate, Chloë Sevigny, Heike Makatsch at Cannes’ day 5

Lucire staff/15.08




Tristan Fewings, Venturelli

Sometimes, you can find style at the Festival de Cannes away from the red carpet, and Chloë Sevigny looked fashionable with her Chanel black and silver resin bag from its Paris in Rome 2015–16 collection. But as usual the real action was on the red carpet where we saw sumptuous gowns and jewellery.
   With much anticipation, Sonam Kapoor lit up the red carpet for the Cannes Film Festival première of Mal de Pierres (From the Land of the Moon, adapted from the novel Mal di Pietre and in competition), when she headed there representing L’Oréal Paris, wearing an asymmetrical white dress by Ralph & Russo, along with L’Oréal Paris make-up that’s very on-trend this season: the Super Liner Smokissime Red Carpet Collection and the Superstar mascara, also in a shade called Red Carpet. Going for a more nude look, Kapoor’s make-up artist went for Cushion Nude Magique foundation in Porcelaine, the Accord Parfaît blush in Rose Éclat, and the Color Riche eye-shadow in Marron Glacé.
   Compatriot Aishwarya Rai, who has been wowing audiences already at Cannes, appeared wearing a light pink Rami Kadi dress, but what got people talking was her bright purple lipstick—which husband Abhishek Bachchan has gone on record to say he loves. She complemented her look with de Grisogono’s High Jewellery pink gold tourmalines and emerald ring.
   Araya A. Hargate went for a stunning, black-and-white Jean Paul Gaultier, one of the best red-carpet showcases for the French designer that we have seen. L’Oréal Paris’s make-up artists went with the Superstar Red Carpet mascara again and the same blush, which worked for Hargate’s look, but worked their magic with the Super Liner (in So Couture), Infaillable Powder in Beige Sable for the foundation, and Color Riche L’Ombre Pure (in Snow in Megève) for another natural look. Highlights were provided by L’Oréal Paris’s Color Riche La Palette in red.
   Fellow ambassador Li Yuchun appeared in a three-piece Givenchy suit, while Heike Makatsch wore a Kaviar Gauche pink silk jumpsuit. Iris Berben wore a form-fitting, fringed gown by Talbot Runhof, and Miss Fame donned a black dress with tulle, but had toned down her look from the Zac Posen gown the day before.


















May 15, 2016

Aishwarya Rai, Araya A. Hargate, Blake Lively, Ola Alfares, Li Yuchun, Thylane Blondeau at Festival de Cannes, day 4

Lucire staff/12.10




Venturelli, Andreas Rentz, L’Oréal Paris

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan wore an extravagant golden Elie Saab gown for the fourth day at the Festival de Cannes, attending the première of The BFG (short for Big Friendly Giant), based on the Roald Dahl book, and directed for Disney by Steven Spielberg.
   Rai Bachchan, easily one of the most photographed women at the Cannes Film Festival, was rivalled by her fellow L’Oréal Paris spokeswoman Blake Lively, who shone in a bright blue Atelier Versace gown and showing off her baby bump once more.
   Rai Bachchan wore lipstick from the L’Oréal Paris Pure Reds collection, with jewellery by Boucheron and shoes by Salvatore Ferragamo, marking her 15 years at the Festival.
   Thai actress Araya A. Hargate also represented the French cosmetics’ giant, wearing a Zuhair Murad gown. Bérénice Bejo also chose Versace for her red-carpet walk, Mallika Sherawat wore Georges Hobeika with jewellery by de Grisogono, and Paz Vega wore Stéphane Rolland. Former Miss France Flora Coquerel also attended the première.
   Jordanian lawyer Ola Alfares, Chinese actress–singer Li Yuchun, a very dapper-looking Jing Boran, the Chinese singer, and US drag queen Miss Fame represented L’Oréal Paris in their respective markets.
   It was the first appearance for the company for Thylane Blondeau, the 15-year-old daughter of the recently separated Veronika Loubry and Patrice Blondeau. She would be the youngest “face” from the French brand to appear on the red carpet at Cannes.

























May 12, 2016

Festival de Cannes 2016, day 1: Bella Hadid, Araya A. Hargate, Li Bing Bing, Doutzen Kroes at first première

Lucire staff/12.36



Wednesday marked the start of the 2016 Festival de Cannes—the Cannes Film Festival—and once again the cameras were out for celebrity-spotting.
   Chompoo Araya A. Hargate, the well known Thai actress, attended the Café Society première and opening ceremony in a Ralph & Russo spring–summer 2016 blush pink silk organza strapless ball gown with pin-tucked organza ribbon ruffles cascading over a structured corolla train.
   Bella Hadid wore a nude Roberto Cavalli gown complemented by de Grisogono High Jewellery necklace and Florinda bracelet. She wasn’t alone with choosing de Grisogono for jewellery: Entertainment Tonight’s Carly Steel opted for the Boule white diamond earrings, Vortice white gold bracelet, and Matassa white gold diamond ring to go with her Georges Hobeika gown. Elsa Zylberstein was in a tasteful, sheer bordeaux dress, complemented by de Grisogono’s Melody of Colours earrings and ring. Meanwhile, de Grisogono CEO Fawaz Gruosi had his pick from his company’s range, choosing his New Retro watch.
   Also spotted were Mallika Sherawat in Georges Hobieka, Eva Longoria in Pamella Roland, Julianne Moore in Givenchy, Naomi Watts in Giuseppe Zanotti, Kirsten Dunst in Gucci, and Blake Lively showing her baby bump in Atelier Versace. Leïla Bekhti, Gong Li, Li Bing Bing, Naomi Watts, Doutzen Kroes, Julianne Moore and Susan Sarandon were also resplendent on the red carpet for the première.
   This year, the Festival has a live feed in English and French on YouTube, which are featured at the end of this entry.








English feed

French feed

May 11, 2016

Indulging in nostalgia: new Catalina Island Museum opening

Lucire staff/13.26



Copyright Bunny Yeager/Galerie Schuster

Top: Architect’s rendering of the new Catalina Island Museum façade. Above: Bettie Page on the Florida beach, 1954.

Day trippers appreciate the southern California destination Catalina Island, easily accessible from Los Angeles. You take the ferry boat from Long Beach, cross the channel, and in about an hour, land in the car-free heritage hamlet of Avalon Harbor. There, nothing has changed for years. Long a haunt of Hollywood celebrities and their international guests, Catalina thrives on the tourist trade. In days of yore the allure was deep-sea fishing and exhibition games at the summer home of the Chicago Cubs baseball team. Today the menu includes boutique shopping, dining and people-watching, nature trekking, mountain biking, zip lines and excellent snorkelling.
   The big news this season is the grand opening of the Ada Blanche Wrigley Schreiner Building, new home of the Catalina Island Museum, located at 217 Metropole Avenue, an easy walk from the ferry terminal. Two gala weeks of celebration will occur from June 18 to July 4. A gem of a museum, the institution is devoted to art, culture and history, and the sparkling new facility houses a fine collection of cultural artifact, ceramics, rare photography and nostalgia. A launch exhibition features recently discovered photos of pin-up model Bettie Page, taken in Miami by photographer Bunny Yeager in the 1950s. Other events scheduled include VIP receptions, and Tibetan sand-painting in the skylit atrium. A very reasonable membership to the Museum brings a host of benefits, well worth the charitable contribution. For more information visit www.catalinamuseum.org.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor




Above, from top: A young Norma Jean Baker lived on Catalina in the years before she became Marilyn Monroe. The Chicago Cubs (Stan Hack and Barney Olsen, pictured in 1941) delighted crowds in the summer months. Winston Churchill managed to land a California marlin during a visit.

May 6, 2016

In brief: Paula Sweet releases new book; Kardashians and Jenners mobbed by paparazzi; Cannes controversies

Lucire staff/10.25


Many of you have enjoyed Paula Sweet’s photography in Lucire, and now you can have an entire volume of her work with her new book, Do Not.
   Paula has caught signs all over our planet during her travels, and asks in the synopsis, ‘In a world of limitation and regulation, how aware are you of the restrictions placed on your own existence?’
   The premise is an excellent one that encourages us to think: ‘In this collection of signs discovered all over Planet Earth, the artist and photographer Paula Sweet documents the shrinking area of personal freedom and encourages us to rethink the contrary: if a sign is to be placed, should it not encourage us to some productive or positive action?’
   Lucire readers can enjoy a 40 per cent discount for a limited time (US$39·56, marked down from US$65·94), commencing early May 2016, if you use this link here.
   Meanwhile, in the celebrity world, this latest compilation from Celebrity Wire shows how manic things are—and we don’t think there’s much personal freedom for some of these 2016 “names”. Except it isn’t signs restricting their freedom, but a gauntlet of paparazzi. Kanye West and Kim Kardashian, Kendall Jenner and Kris Jenner are seen and photographed leaving homes and heading into clubs and restaurants; “it” couple Katy Perry and Orlando Bloom head into a waiting cab; new Calvin Klein fragrance face and rising actress Margot Robbie left her apartment; and Emma Roberts had lunch, and a dozen followed her home. Surprisingly, Justin Bieber kept a low profile as he walked through LAX, while Christina Applegate gave a thumbs-up but obscured the lower part of her face as she left the terminal. It’s definitely not the life, thank you!
   In our second video, Jane Fonda speaks about the second season of Grace and Frankie at the Netflix première. She notes that during the course of the new season, Grace realizes Frankie is good for her, and they become friends.
   Finally, with the Festival de Cannes about to kick off, Cover looks at five recent controversies to hit the event.


Celebritywire


Celebritywire


Cover

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