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Kate Upton on three covers for Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue 2017, photographed by Yu Tsai


NEWS  by Lucire staff/February 15, 2017/10.49




Yu Tsai/Sports Illustrated

Above: Each of Yu Tsai’s covers for the 2017 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, on sale now in the US.

As with 2016, Sports Illustrated has gone with three covers for its annual Swimsuit Issue—except this time, all three covers are of one model, Kate Upton. All three were shot in Fiji by Taiwanese-born photographer Yu Tsai (蔡宇).
   Upton landed the cover in 2012 and 2013. Previous models to have managed covering the Issue in three different years were Christie Brinkley (who, at 63, returns to model in 2017’s number), Kathy Ireland, Daniela PeÅ¡tová, and Cheryl Tiegs. Elle Macpherson has five covers to her name.
   Other models in the 2017 edition are Nina Agdal, Ashley Graham, Hannah Jeter, Chrissy Teigen, Brinkley’s daughters Alexa Ray Joel and Sailor Brinkley Cook; Barbara Palvin, Bianca Balti, Bo Krsmanović, Danielle Herrington, Hailey Clauson, Hannah Ferguson, Kate Bock, Kelly Gale, Lais Ribiero, Mia Kang, Myla Dalbesio, Robyn Lawley, Rose Bertram, Samantha Hoopes, and Vita Sidorkina; and athletes Simone Biles, Genie Bouchard, Aly Raisman, Serena Williams and Caroline Wozniacki,
   Swimsuit editor M. J. Day said in a release, ‘The women of SI Swimsuit 2017 are a collection of change agents, pioneers, power brokers and breakout stars-in-waiting who have in their own way redefined the cultural conversation around beauty. These ladies embody character and beauty—and they prove that when it comes to beauty, there is not one singular definition. This is the very essence of SI Swimsuit, and it’s our guiding principle as we move forward.’
   Publisher Time, Inc. has tied in Facebook Live shows, a Snapchat global live story, Giphy GIFs, 360-degree videos, YouTube videos, Instagram videos, app-exclusive content, and more. Others are encouraged to share their ideas of female beauty and confidence with the hashtags #WhatIModel and #LoveYourSwimsuit. A TV behind-the-scenes special débuts on DirecTV Now today (February 15); a live red carpet show will stream from New York on February 16; and a Vibes music, food and culture festival in Houston follows on February 17–18.
   The Issue’s shoots were done in Turks & Caicos, Fiji, Tulum, México, Anguilla, Sumba Island, Indonesia, Kakslauttanen, Finland, Curaçao, and Houston, Texas. Sponsors include DirecTV Now, Edge, Lexus and Smirnoff.

News in brief: Ryan Reynolds roasted as Man of the Year; Karl Lagerfeld Paris launches new collection


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/February 14, 2017/20.13




Paul Marotta/Getty Images

Karl Lagerfeld Paris has launched a ‘Social Collection’ of eveningwear designed specifically for the North American market. The brand, its name licensed from Lagerfeld but targeting a broader audience, has priced the collection at between US$168 and US$398, with sizes ranging from 0 to 16 (US).
   The collection features 13 designs with styles ranging from off-the-shoulder gowns to long-sleeved cocktail dresses. Details include sequins, lace, pearl, floral appliqués, three-dimensional fabric details and woven accents.
   The collection is now available online at KarlLagerfeldParis.com, and from March at select Lord & Taylor and Dillard’s retail locations.
   Earlier this month, the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, the US’s oldest theatrical organization, honoured Canadian actor Ryan Reynolds with its Man of the Year award at a roast at Harvard University.
   Past recipients include, inter alia, Clint Eastwood, Tom Hanks, Robert de Niro, Harrison Ford, Justin Timberlake, Robert Downey, Jr, Chris Pratt, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt.
   The group said in a statement that it’s ‘proud to honour such a talented and diverse actor, whose seamless transition across multiple genres captures audiences and keeps them coming back to see what’s next.’ Reynolds has been nominated for a Golden Globe for his work in the film Deadpool, which also netted a Golden Globe nomination for best comedy or musical picture. The film also received a Writers’ Guild of America nomination for best adapted screenplay and a PGA Award nomination for best picture.
   The celebration started when Reynolds was taken for a tour of Farkas Hall, followed by a seminar with the members of the Hasty Pudding Theatricals. During the evening, he was invited to a traditional roast and made to earn his Pudding Pot with a series of tasks such as acting out a traditional Canadian wedding, complete with lap dance, and auditioning for a role in Deadpool 2.
   Finally, Marc Jacobs Beauty has announced that top make-up artists Michael Ashton, Sarah Tanno, and Hung Vanngo have become the brand’s ambassadors for 2017. The trio can lay claim to celebrity clients such as Adèle, Lady Gaga, and Kaia Gerber. The three will continue to promote Marc Jacobs Beauty’s Artistry Ambassador programme.—Nathalia Archila







Paul Marotta/Getty Images



Ashley Graham releases limited-edition swimwear line for Swimsuits for All


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/February 13, 2017/9.57

Model Ashley Graham has launched a limited-edition swimwear collection, Ashley Graham × Swimsuits for All, that celebrates ‘every body, every age, every beautiful’. Graham, who modelled one of the three covers in last year’s Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, sees her new collection make its first promotional appearance in the 2017 number this week.
   The new collection features a 16-piece line of bikinis, one-pieces and cover-ups priced between US$70 and US$150. It is the brand’s first full collection available in US sizes 6 to 22, available at SwimsuitsforAll.com.
   The campaign’s photographs and video were shot in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and encourages women to celebrate their uniqueness. The collection was inspired by the festive spirit of the island.
   â€˜I was so excited to shoot with local women for this shoot, non-models who represent all different body shapes, proving that everyone can look gorgeous in my swimsuits,’ said Graham. ‘”We’re continuing to shift perceptions of beauty and encouraging more [inclusiveness] in the fashion industry. I’m proud that my collection is the first to offer sizes 6 through 22, and I cannot wait to see even more ladies rock these sexy suits!’—Nathalia Archila

Iris Apfel, Julien Macdonald will be on board Queen Mary 2 for Transatlantic Fashion Week


NEWS  by Lucire staff/February 9, 2017/12.01

Fashion icon Iris Apfel, 95, is one of the VIPs sailing on the Queen Mary 2 for Cunard’s second annual Transatlantic Fashion Week, running from August 31 to September 7, 2017.
   Apfel, known for her flamboyant personal style and her work in the fashion industry (including campaigns for and collaborations with Swarovski, MAC, Kate Spade, HSN, Wise Wear and others), will present a Q&A session on board and introduce a showing of Iris, Albert Maysles’ 2014 documentary which had premièred at the New York Film Festival.
   Other VIPs on board the cruise are Julien Macdonald, historian Colin McDowell, and former Saks Fifth Avenue merchandise director Gail Sackloff. Models from Storm Model Management will also be on board, walking the catwalks over seven days.
   The cruise will feature runway shows, dinners and exclusive unveilings, says Cunard.
   The Queen Mary 2 departs Southampton on August 31, and will arrive in New York in time for the spring–summer 2018 fashion week. Fares start at NZ$2,029 per person, twin share, subject to availability and with conditions. Further information is available at www.cunard.com or by telephone on 0800 543-431 in New Zealand.


Above: With her signature oversized jewellery and glasses, Iris Apfel’s presence will be unmissable this autumn on board Cunard’s Queen Mary 2.

Natalia Vodianova fronts H&M’s Conscious Exclusive campaign in a gown made from recycled polyester


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/February 8, 2017/23.11



Natalia Vodianova stars in H&M’s Conscious Exclusive campaign, highlighting the brand’s use of Bionic, a recycled polyester made from recovered shoreline waste.
   H&M Conscious is the Swedish retailer’s sustainable, socially responsible collection, with the Exclusives going a step further with limited-edition designs and, usually, a high-profile spokesmodel.
   The key design this season is an ethereal plissé pleat gown in powder pink in Bionic.
   H&M, which had been named as one of Medinge Group’s Brands with a Conscience in 2008, has been increasing its use of sustainable materials, now reaching 20 per cent. It is now one of the world’s biggest users of recycled polyester and one of the biggest buyers of organic cotton.
   H&M Conscious Exclusive shows that style and sustainability can go together.
   â€˜I am proud to appear in the H&M Conscious Exclusive campaign. It’s amazing to see the advances in sustainable fabrics that are used in the collection, pointing towards a more sustainable future for all fashion,’ said Vodianova.
   â€˜For the design team at H&M, this year’s Conscious Exclusive is a chance to dream and create pieces that are both quirky and beautiful. It’s great to be able to show just what is possible with sustainable materials like we have done with the delicate plissé dress made of Bionic,’ said Pernilla Wohlfahrt, H&M’s head of design and creative director.
   The 2017 collection will also include children’s pieces. The collection will go on sale in c. 160 stores worldwide, from April 20.—Nathalia Archila





Documentary series coinciding with Christian Dior’s 70th anniversary starting February 9 on More4


NEWS  by Lucire staff/February 1, 2017/21.50



Top: Maria Grazia Chiuri takes a bow after her first collection. Above: From the archives, Christian Dior himself measuring a model.

With Christian Dior celebrating its 70th anniversary this year, with a feature appearing in an upcoming Lucire and an exhibition at the NGV, it’s the perfect time to take a look back at one of France’s (and fashion’s) most storied names.
   More4 will broadcast a two-part series in the lead-up to London Fashion Week, called Inside Dior, an observational documentary airing on Thursday, February 9 at 9 p.m., and the following week on February 16 at 9 p.m.
   From a house that began with one head designer, and his pioneering New Look, to a billion-dollar brand, the series examines Dior’s past and present.
   The first episode begins with a star-studded party at Christian Dior’s restored summer mansion, La Colle Noire, outside Grasse in the south of France, hosted by Charlize Theron. The Dior cruise 2017 show at Blenheim Palace and a haute couture show form the core of the episode, with behind-the-scenes footage of Dior staff getting ready for the shows, and clients who are entertained at opulent, formal dinners in Paris. It also deals with the company’s search for a new creative director to replace Raf Simons.
   The second episode follows Dior’s first female creative director, Maria Grazia Chiuri, preparing for her first collection at Paris Fashion Week (noted in Lucire issue 36). It also looks at Christian Dior’s beauty business, examining François Demachy, the company’s nose, on creating a Dior perfume, and Peter Philips, its make-up director, on creating a catwalk look. The episode ends as celebrities Kate Moss, Rihanna, and Natalie Portman arrive along with the world’s press at Chiuri’s first Dior spring 2017 catwalk show.


Above: Bella Hadid and other models walk at the conclusion of the Dior cruise 2017 show.

SAG Awards: Claire Foy, Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, Emily Blunt, Viola Davis shine on red carpet, while on stage, stars get political


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/January 30, 2017/23.18


Dimitrios Kambouris, Kevin Mazur, Christopher Polk, Stefanie Keenan, John Sciulli, Emma McIntyre, Matt Winkelmeyer, Frazer Harrison

The 23rd annual Screen Actors’ Guild Awards, held at the Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center on Sunday, honoured outstanding performances from 2016 in film and television.
   From the moment the ceremony began, the stars wasted no time diving right into politics. Hollywood’s most popular actors didn’t hold back: faces like Emma Stone, Kerry Washington, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Bryan Cranston, Ashton Kutcher and Simon Helberg expressed their opposition to US president Donald Trump and his newly imposed immigration ban.
   Helberg and his wife Jocelyn Towne carried a sign ‘Refugees welcome’ and had ‘Let them in’ emblazoned across the chest respectively, Veep’s Julia Louis-Dreyfus called the Muslim ban ‘un-American’, Moonlight’s Mahershala Ali spoke out against the persecution of minorities, and Orange is the New Black’s Taylor Schilling called attention to the importance of diversity. But the most rousing speech came from Stranger Things’ David Harbour.
   â€˜I would just like to say, in light of all that’s going on in the world today, it’s difficult to celebrate the already celebrated Stranger Things, but this award from you who take your craft seriously and earnestly believe, like me, that great acting can change the world is a call to arms from our fellow craftsmen and women to go deeper. And through our art to battle against fear, self-centredness and exclusivity of our predominately narcissistic culture and through our craft to cultivate a more empathetic and understanding society by revealing intimate truths that serve as a forceful reminder to folks that when they feel broken and afraid and tired, they are not alone. We are united in that we are all human beings and we are all together on this horrible, painful, joyous, exciting and mysterious ride that is being alive.
   â€˜Now, as we act in the continuing narrative of Stranger Things, we 1983 Midwesterners will repel bullies. We will shelter freaks and outcasts, those who have no home. We will get past the lies. We will hunt monsters and when we are at a loss amidst the hypocrisy and the casual violence of certain individuals and institutions, we will, as per Chief Jim Hopper, punch some people in the face when they seek to destroy the weak and the disenfranchised and the marginalized. And we will do it all with soul, with heart, and with joy. We thank you for this responsibility. Thank you.’
   Denzel Washington, who had hitherto been nominated the most times but failed to win, broke the drought by scoring a SAG award for his performance in Fences.
   Netflix’s most expensive drama, The Crown, was rewarded with two wins, for lead actress Claire Foy, and supporting actor John Lithgow, whose incredible portrayal of Winston Churchill was recognized by the Guild, though it was the network’s Stranger Things that scooped the prize for best drama series. Matt Smith, who co-starred with Foy, joined her on the red carpet.
   Foy wore a brooding, floral Valentino gown, while Emma Stone stunned in Alexander McQueen. We also spotted Viola Davis in Vivienne Westwood, Natalie Portman in Christian Dior, Meryl Streep in Valentino, Naomie Harris in Lanvin, Thandie Newton in Schiaparelli, Michelle Williams in Louis Vuitton, Danielle Brooks in Christian Siriano, Michelle Dockery in Elie Saab, Kate Hudson in Christian Dior, Salma Hayek and Nicole Kidman both in Gucci, and Emily Blunt in Roberto Cavalli.
   Lily Tomlin was awarded the SAG Lifetime Achievement Award.
   The full list of winners is detailed below.—Nathalia Archila


From Taraji P. Henson to Nicole Kidman: best dressed at the SAG Awards

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
Captain Fantastic
Fences
Hidden Figures
(winner)
Manchester by the Sea
Moonlight

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role
Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea
Andrew Garfield, Hacksaw Ridge
Ryan Gosling, La La Land
Viggo Mortensen, Captain Fantastic
Denzel Washington, Fences (winner)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Amy Adams, Arrival
Emily Blunt, The Girl on the Train
Natalie Portman, Jackie
Emma Stone, La La Land (winner)
Meryl Streep, Florence Foster Jenkins

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series
The Crown
Downton Abbey
Game of Thrones
Stranger Things
(winner)
Westworld

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series
Millie Bobby Brown, Stranger Things
Claire Foy, The Crown (winner)
Thandie Newton, Westworld
Winona Ryder, Stranger Things
Robin Wright, House of Cards

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
Sterling K. Brown, This Is Us
Peter Dinklage, Game of Thrones
John Lithgow, The Crown (winner)
Rami Malek, Mr Robot
Kevin Spacey, House of Cards

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a TV Movie or Limited Series
Riz Ahmed, The Night of
Sterling K. Brown, The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story
Bryan Cranston, All the Way (winner)
John Turturro, The Night of
Courtney B. Vance, The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a TV Movie or Limited Series
Bryce Dallas Howard, Black Mirror
Felicity Huffman, American Crime
Audra McDonald, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill
Sarah Paulson, The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story (winner)
Kerry Washington, Confirmation

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role
Mahershala Ali, Moonlight (winner)
Jeff Bridges, Hell or High Water
Hugh Grant, Florence Foster Jenkins
Lucas Hedges, Manchester by the Sea
Dev Patel, Lion

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
Viola Davis, Fences (winner)
Naomie Harris, Moonlight
Nicole Kidman, Lion
Octavia Spencer, Hidden Figures
Michelle Williams, Manchester by the Sea

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series
The Big Bang Theory
Blackish
Modern Family
Orange Is the New Black
(winner)
Veep

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series
Anthony Anderson, Blackish
Tituss Burgess, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Ty Burrell, Modern Family
William H. Macy, Shameless (winner)
Jeffrey Tambor, Transparent

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series
Uzo Aduba, Orange Is the New Black
Jane Fonda, Grace and Frankie
Ellie Kemper, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep (winner)
Lily Tomlin, Grace and Frankie

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble
Captain America: Civil War
Doctor Strange
Hacksaw Ridge
(winner)
Jason Bourne
Nocturnal Animals

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble
Game of Thrones (winner)
Daredevil
Luke Cage
The Walking Dead
Westworld

Mary Tyler Moore’s most famous TV shows altered lives for the better


NEWS  by Jack Yan/January 26, 2017/12.38


Jack Yan

You’re going to make it after all When visiting Minneapolis many years ago, I photographed the now-famous statue of Mary Tyler Moore doing the “hat toss” from the credits of The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

When I asked my colleague Nathalia Archila to write an obituary for Mary Tyler Moore, it reminded me of an episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show where Mary Richards’ boss, Lou Grant, asks her to update obituaries as part of her job. It seems there are plenty of links in my life to The Mary Tyler Moore Show, a show I grew up watching.
   I have a connection with the show as a fan: I once ran the biggest email list for the series and its spinoffs. Called The Mary & Rhoda List, it was a place where other fans could discuss their favourite moments and keep up to date with the stars. It was originally run with a bunch of addresses, before I shifted it to Egroups, which later became Yahoo! Groups. For many years now, while I’m still listed as the admin, it’s been run by Sandy McLendon, a US-based fan.
   The list did catch the eye of co-star Valerie Harper, who one year sent me a nice autographed copy of her book for Christmas, along with a wee note. It was an acknowledgement of a job well done. But when Facebook and social media became the norm, the group became much less frequented.
   But why did this show have such an impact? In the 1970s, there was the backdrop of feminism, and watching The Mary Tyler Moore Show did give me the notion that women should be treated as equals to men. An underlying feminist theme existed in many of the episodes, and the absence of pay parity was directly addressed in one of them. I was too young to have noticed the references to Mary spending the night at a boyfriend’s or the fact she was on the Pill, but what I did see as a child was a Mustang-driving woman who had an independent life and a nice apartment. Why couldn’t all women do what they wanted and not be subject to what society dictated? Perhaps it appealed to my nonconformist mindset, something which I’ve had my entire life.
   I can’t be the only middle-aged man today who gained some awareness of feminism and equal rights through this show.
   I might have even gained the notion of working in the media through The Mary Tyler Moore Show—after all, plenty of people became comedy writers after seeing The Dick Van Dyke Show—and, perhaps to a similar degree, Tabitha (think The Mary Tyler Moore Show if Mary Richards was a witch living out in California).
   In reruns I discovered the snappy writing and directing of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and when you compare it to the shows that had just gone before—The Beverly Hillbillies comes to mind—it was realistic, urban and sophisticated. American films had become more gritty around that time, and television followed. While somewhat idealized, and certainly not as downbeat as All in the Family, the successful US remake of Till Death Do Us Part, you could associate with the characters. You simply couldn’t on the other show about a Texas oil millionaire living in Beverly Hills. Showing it to my other half tonight, she remarked at how little it had actually dated: there still isn’t pay parity for women, for instance, and women over 30 are still under pressure from society and, sometimes, family, on whether they will get married and have kids. I worked out that this show aired 47 years ago, and 47’s a lot nearer to 50 than it is to 40. Half a century and we’re still not giving women their due.
   It’s a show I have enjoyed regularly, including its reruns in the late 1990s, though, interestingly, its most acclaimed episode, ‘Chuckles Bites the Dust’ (1975), isn’t my favourite. I even had the 2000 TV movie, Mary & Rhoda, recorded by friends in the US and air-mailed over here, though it was such an appalling production that I wondered if it was worth the trip.
   Again in reruns, I became a fan of The Dick Van Dyke Show. I wasn’t born during that show’s original run; instead, I had seen van Dyke and Carl Reiner’s later effort, The New Dick Van Dyke Show. And Dick van Dyke, of course, was the silver-haired man giving us fire safety messages on New Zealand TV then, presumably adaptations of US PSAs.
   The Dick Van Dyke Show gave us a look at an extremely fun job—that of comedy writers—but there was also plenty of romance between van Dyke’s Rob Petrie and his screen wife, Laura, played by Moore. Maybe that, too, was idealized, but I see elements of that in my own relationship—that if you’ve got to keep it going, you need to inject some fun. I saw myself as a Rob Petrie kind of guy, and I might never have watched the earlier show if it wasn’t for Moore’s involvement.

continued below





Jack Yan

Above, from top: Sign at the Mary Tyler Moore Table at Basil’s. The Mary Tyler Moore Table at Basil’s at the Marquette Hotel. Where the exterior shots of Mary Richards’ first house were filmed, at Kenwood Parkway. The Midwest Plaza, where the fictional WJM-TV was located.

   Naturally, when I was in Minneapolis, the setting of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, I stalked the locations of the house used in the exterior shots of Mary’s original apartment, had a jog along the Lake of the Isles, snapped a photo of where the fictional WJM-TV was, as well as visited the statue of Moore on Nicollet Mall (once Nicollet Avenue) that commemorates her "hat toss" in Reza S. Badiyi’s opening credits for the sitcom.
   I headed to Basil’s at the Marquette Hotel for lunch and sat at what is now called the Mary Tyler Moore Table—Moore sat at this table with an unnamed actor in later versions of the credits—and, naturally, I got there by Ford Mustang, the same make and model of car she drove in the show.
   When Moore’s death was announced this morning here, it gave me time to reflect on just how big a part her work had played in my life. And how the messages of her ‘two Camelots’—two highly successful, much-watched TV series—resonated with me in different ways.
   The last time I saw Moore on TV, she was in a sitcom that co-starred Betty White, Hot in Cleveland. It reunited Moore with Harper, White (who was the sexually charged Sue Ann Nivens on The Mary Tyler Moore Show), Georgia Engel and Cloris Leachman (Georgette and Phyllis on The Mary Tyler Moore Show). The fact she’s now gone means we won’t get these surprise reunions any more. However, we can still wander down memory lane, and her work is widely available on DVD.
   As we wandered in this piece, what we probably should be aware of is how hard-fought the victories of the feminist movement were. We must also realize, particularly in Moore’s own country, how there are forces prepared to undo them: their presidential elections evidenced this, with men and women quite divided on whom each group chose. Some would rather see us go back to the past, to an era even before the Petries. However, progress must continue, as we’ve more to gain from diverse voices—yet another message I recall from The Mary Tyler Moore Show.—Jack Yan, Publisher

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