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February 27, 2016

Gala Italia: New York gets a taste of the best Italian wines

Lola Cristall/2.33



The 31st edition of Gala Italia certainly proved to be a lavish, elegant and classy event at the Pierre Hotel in New York City. The Italian Wine & Food Institute’s (IWFI) event combines delectable wines with good food amongst enjoyable company. Chef Ashfer Biju and pastry chef Michael Mignano served enticing dishes with appetizing, high-end ingredients, paired with a selection of nine different wines ranging from sparkling to deliciously sweet, each intended to revive the senses. The variety of wines were: 2006 Ferrari, Riserva Lunelli, Trento DOC; 2014 Planeta, Chardonnay, Sicilia IGT; 2013 Tenuta Santa Caterina, Silente delle Marne, Monferrato Bianco DOC; 2011 Marchesi Antinori, Villa Antinori Chianti Classico DOCG Riserva; 2008 Tenute Lunelli, Carapace, Montefalco Sagrantino DOCG; 2008 Condù, Sangiovese di Romagna DOC Riserva; 2007 Mezzacorona, NOS Teroldego Rotaliano DOC Riserva; 2012 Bertani, Villa Arvedi, Amarone della Valpolicella Valpantena DOCG; and 2011 Sorrentino, Fior di Ginestre, Passito IGT Pompeiano. They provided various tastes for different palates with immensely flavoured textures to accompany the five-course menu, including a cheese platter.
   Ferrari’s Riserva Lunelli, made using a traditional method called metedo classico evoked succulent flavours in one sip. A bouquet of savoury aromas erupted while sipping on delectable Tenute Lunelli’s Carapace, appropriately accompanying a tasty citrus semolina olive oil cake.
   Roma-based Eredi PisanĂČ’s menswear fashion collection featured a number of pieces as the company toured the Grand Ballroom to introduce guests to sophisticated ensembles. As the intimate crowd continued to indulge in a delectable meal in the midst of this exquisite ambiance, a select few, who had contributed to the victory of Italian wine in the US, were recognized for their work and honoured with an award by the IWFI’s president, Lucio Caputo. Vittorio Assaf and Fabio Granato (the Serafina Restaurant Group), Sirio Maccioni (Le Cirque), Mary Ewing-Mulligan, MW (the president of the International Wine Center), Florence Fabricant (a New York Times food writer), John F. Mariani (a food and wine editor and author) and Adam Stru (founder and chairman of wine enthusiast companies), were recognized for their contributions to the wine industry.—Lola Cristall, Paris Editor

February 14, 2016

Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue 2016 has three covers: Ronda Rousey, Ashley Graham, Hailey Clauson get the honours

Lucire staff/6.36




James Macari; Frédéric Pinet

In a break with tradition after 52 years, Sports Illustrated has three different Swimsuit Issue covers in 2016—and that means three different cover girls. UFC champion Ronda Rousey, body activist and model Ashley Graham, and SI rookie Hailey Clauson each have a cover for 2016.
   The announcement was made during the live broadcast of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2016 Revealed, hosted by Nick Cannon and Rebecca Romijn.
   Graham and Clauson were photographed by James Macari in Turks & Caicos, and Rousey by FrĂ©dĂ©ric Pinet in the Bahamas, in body paint by Joanne Gair, whose work can be seen in issue 35 of Lucire. Other locations included the Dominican Republic, Tahiti, Malta and Zanzibar.
   The issue goes on sale February 15, coinciding with launches in print, digital, and mobile, and a New York City fan festival. Virtual-reality content is also included through the SI Swimsuit app.
   Clauson said on finding out she had made the cover, ‘I’m shaking and crying. I love it so much because it represents three different strong and beautiful women.’
   Graham said, ‘I’m insanely speechless. I cannot comprehend how I feel right now. This will go down in the books forever. It is a historic moment. Not only is this the first time that I’m in the issue, but I’m on the cover and sharing this honor with two of the most stunning women. This is for all the women who didn’t think they were beautiful because of their size. This is for them.’
   Rousey said, ‘It’s a real honour being part of such a historic issue that really pays homage to different body types of women and not promoting just one cookie-cutter image for every woman, but showing that the healthiest version of every body type is the sexiest version out there. And I couldn’t be happier 
 I think I was just as honoured to get it as to be there in person to watch Ashley’s reaction.’
   Other models in this issue include Irina Shayk, Nina Agdal, Lily Aldridge, Rose Bertram, Kate Bock, Hannah Davis, Emily DiDonato, Hannah Ferguson, Gigi Hadid, Erin Heatherton, Samantha Hoopes, Chanel Iman, Bo Krsmanović, Robyn Lawley, Tanya Mityushina, Barbara Palvin, Sofia Resing, Kelly Rohrbach, Chrissy Teigen, Lindsey Vonn and Caroline Wozniacki.
   The TV special also included a performance by Ne-Yo and the presentation of the Jule Campbell Award to former SI model Elle Macpherson.

January 27, 2016

Emanuel Ungaro celebrates 50th anniversary, launches La Diva eau de parfum at Petit Palais

Lucire staff/4.57




Pascal le Segretain

Emanuel Ungaro celebrated its 50th anniversary on Tuesday, with a party at the Petit Palais in Paris, and launched its La Diva perfume to coincide with the occasion.
   Creative director Fausto Puglisi and president Asim Abdullah played host to 600 guests, who were shown a virtual history of the house in images, choreographed and created by Ali Mahdavi and scored by Monarchy, on the wall of the venue. Salvatore Ferragamo Group CEO Michele Norsa introduced La Diva, with the façade of the Petit Palais showing a projection of the new fragrance’s press image, modelled by Charlotte Free. Ferragamo Parfums has licensed the Emanuel Ungaro brand for the fragrance.
   Guests included Suzy Menkes, Kristina Basan, Elodie FrĂ©gĂ©, FrĂ©dĂ©rique Bel, Leila Ndabirabe, Zahia Dehar, Estelle LefĂ©bure, Catherine Baba, Laurie Cholewa, Karole Rocher, Blanca Li, Jin Weng, Bojana Panić, Alexia Niedzielski, Elizabeth von Guthman, Axelle Lafont, Prince Wenzeslaus of Liechtenstein, Lola le Lann, CĂ©sar Domboy, Richard Orlanski, FrĂ©dĂ©ric Taddei, Ariel Wizman, Nicolas and Alexandre Lestrat, Kyle Eastwood, Kamel Ouali, Aure Atika, Isabelle Funaro, Amanda Sthers, Fausto Puglisi, Ali Mahdavi, Benjamin Belin, Manu KatchĂ©, FrĂ©dĂ©rique Lopez, and Sofiia Manousha.
   Musical trio LEJ (Lucie, Elisa and Juliette) performed live at the Petit Palais, while Marie-AmĂ©lie Seigner took over with her DJ set as guests danced till late into the evening.
   The fragrance goes on sale in March, as eaux de parfum in 30, 50 and 100 ml sizes, priced from €39 to €69. The fragrance has top notes of pear and raspberry, midnotes of pink peppercorn, basenotes of honey and vanilla, with a floral heart, enriched with notes of patchouli. Firmenich’s Marie Salamagne created the scent.

















Pascal le Segretain


























Victor Boyko

September 23, 2015

Tommy Hilfiger and Jeffrey Deitch host Rock Style exhibition launch in London

Alex Barrow/3.42




Darren Gerrish

On Monday, the Rock Style exhibition’s official opening was celebrated at Sotheby’s S2 gallery in London. Hosted and curated by famous fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger and art dealer Jeffrey Deitch, the exhibition celebrates the innovative connection between music and fashion, as examined in Tommy Hilfiger and Anthony De Curtis’ book, Rock Style, written in 2000.
   Hilfiger himself has been a notable figure of fashion for 30 years and has dressed celebrities such as Lily Aldridge, Zooey Deschanel, Snoop Dogg and Naomi Campbell. Although he no longer runs the company, Hilfiger is still heavily involved in the fashion industry. De Curtis complements him perfectly with his music-critic background, writing for publications such as Rolling Stone, The New York Times and Relix, making them the perfect duo to have written the book Rock Style.
   The show exhibits numerous photographs of rockers over the years, as well as paintings of idols such as Deborah Harry, Joey Ramone, Sid Vicious and George Harrison done by street artist and graphic designer Shepard Fairey. The exhibition emphasizes the nature of fashion, music and identity, and how the three collaborate to create the worlds that these stars lived in. The very essence of nostalgia and fashion experimentation is captured in the large images, ones that depict the unique identity of each performer. The iconic leathers and studs of Sid Vicious, the radical prints and colours of Jimi Hendrix, and the very photogenic nature of David Bowie, is captured in these prints. In creating a visual exhibition, the show brings the book to life and provides a sentiment and fond memory of the rock star idols of the ’50s through to today.
   Notable attendees of the Rock Style exhibition launch included Tommy and Dee Hilfiger, Melissa Odabash, Harrods fashion director Helen David, editor of British GQ Dylan Jones, Sir Philip Green, Bob Gruen, Gered Mankowitz, Tim Jeffries, Fru Tholstrup, Justine Picardie, Katie Martin, Tamara Beckwith, Melissa Odabash, Don Letts, Caroline Rush, Stephen Webster, Mark Quinn, Henry Hudson, Philip Colbert, Steve Varsano, Lisa Tchenguiz, and Jaye Kamel, as well as other artists and socialites.—Alex Barrow













Darren Gerrish

September 11, 2015

New York Fashion Week spring–summer 2016, Day 2 videos: Givenchy, Jason Wu, Betsey Johnson, Nicole Miller, Zang Toi

Alex Barrow/23.14

Givenchy captures the trademark flair that has been evident through previous years of work. At this year’s spring–summer 2016 fashion show, inspiration for the collection was drawn from the delicate mystery of nightwear. Black and white silks with laced camisole-like features were teamed with heavy thick robes to capture the essence of the evening. As the collection developed, the styles took a radical turn towards elaborate, exotic pieces teamed with equally exaggerated headdresses, typical of Givenchy models. In menswear, heavy suits were contrasted with unusual cropped cutout shirts. Throughout the show the black and white them resonated.
   Jason Wu’s collection seems to lack any direct channel of inspiration with different fabrics and styles in his spring–summer 2016 collection. With a noticeable colour palette of red and teal, Wu’s collection experiments with chiffon, lace, tulle, knits, silks and leathers to create a wide appealing ĂŠsthetic collection. With the occasional collaboration of contrasting fabrics in one outfit, Wu’s abilities are no doubt in good form for this year’s fashion week.
   Betsey Johnson’s collection is in a complete league of its own, with its kooky carnival meets punks meets rainbow radical appeal. Elaborate tulle dresses with colour-popping accessories and contrasting patterns make up the collection. Johnson’s vision is clearly one of playing with fashion and testing the boundaries.
   Other designers which showed their collections on Day 2 included Zimmerman, Wes Gordon, Kate Spade, Custo Barcelona, Yigal AzrouĂ«l, Pamella Roland, Nicole Miller, CG, Zang Toi, Idan Cohen, Karigam, and Kye.—Alex Barrow

Givenchy

Jason Wu

Betsey Johnson

Idan Cohen

Karigam

Kye

Nicole Miller

Zang Toi

September 10, 2015

New York Fashion Week spring–summer 2016, Day 1 videos: BCBG, Erin Fetherston, Tadashi Shoji

Alex Barrow/23.16

BCBG Max Azria presented their collection on Day 1 of New York Fashion Week with a hippy flair of contrasting textures, colours, and prints. With a trending theme of bucket hats and chunky leg warmers, teamed with clashing layers of various clothes, the disheveled look was surprisingly effective.
   Erin Fetherston’s collection encompassed the epitome of romance and femininity. With floaty fabrics and pastel hues, as well as downplayed bohemian patterns, the collection played with the romance of ’40s fashion and the flower power of the ’60s and ’70s. The overarching tone however suggested innocence, playfulness and romance.
   Tadashi Shoji’s designs, too, place heavy emphasis on the beauty of floaty fabric. This collection focuses on the fabrics rather than necessarily on the shape of those wearing them. Embroidered silks, textured fabrics and long floral feature gowns are dominant in the collection. Romantic long pastel pieces tend to be a focus point, made ever more beautiful by the minimal styled hair and natural make-up of the models.
   Other designers which presented their collections on Day 1 were Tome, Desigual, Nicholas K, Ohne Titel and Kids Rock.—Alex Barrow

BCBG

Erin Fetherston

Tadashi Shoji

Tome

Desigual

Nicholas K

Ohne Titel

Kids Rock

August 18, 2015

Fan Phenomena: James Bond gives 007 fans more; while Sugoi invites you to the world of Bill Murray

Jack Yan/12.09

In the year of a new James Bond movie, many books emerge. Invariably, there’ll be one on the films themselves, taking readers through the 50-plus years of the Eon Productions’ series, and, if it’s very comprehensive, the 1950s CBS TV version of Casino Royale, the 1967 spoof of the same name, and Never Say Never Again will rate more than a mention. There’ll be something about Ian Fleming, and another book on one aspect of the Bond world (gadgets, stunts, music, or something else). Seasoned Bond fans will think the circus is in town again, because the new book about the films adds little to their existing knowledge.
   Claire Hines’s Fan Phenomena: James Bond, from Intellect Books (ÂŁ15·50, US$22, releasing November 15), is something different altogether: Bond from an academic and completely cultural viewpoint. Intellect is famous for its titles on popular culture and creative practice, with a rigorous academic bent, and Fan Phenomena: James Bond continues the series but takes the reader into the world of Ian Fleming’s super-spy.
   Hines serves as editor, and there are 11 very distinct contributions to her volume, dealing with everything from canonicity to 007’s appearance as ‘Ladykiller Jimmy’ in Alan Moore’s comics; Bond as a cult brand and cultural phenomenon to the clothes he wears; from the James Bond films through a feminist viewpoint to analyses of his masculinity and identity. Interspersed between these are four ‘Fan Appreciation’ sections, featuring an interview with ĂŒber-fan and former Bond novel continuation author Raymond Benson, artist and collector Peter Lorenz, 007 Museum owner James Bond (who had his name legally changed by deed poll) and cross-players CousinCecily and Winter.
   Even the most seasoned Bond fan might not have considered the impact of the character, books and films, and the book fulfils a very important role: it gives them something new. William Proctor’s analysis of continuity gets the book off to a healthy start after Hines’s introduction, though typographically it suffers: the type is inexplicably small, though the layout is modern and the visuals help lift things. Getting Raymond Benson in there early on also helps position Fan Phenomena: James Bond as a book for the cognoscenti as well as those who want an academic examination, and Benson reveals a little more behind the scenes of his years as the official continuation author.
   Matthew Freeman, in considering the many media in which Bond occupies, including the gaming world, shows just how the phenomenon breaks the established rules and succeeds, while JesĂșs JimĂ©nez-Varea and Antonio Pineda’s chapter on Moore’s comics is bound to take many fans into uncharted territory. Joshua Wille’s chapter on fan edits does the same: while many know about ABC-TV’s cutting of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service when it aired on US TV, but there are numerous fan edits made in the digital era that had this author hunting the forums.
   Artist Peter Lorenz’s Bond film posters are stunning and present a nice visual break before Lucy Bolton’s chapter analysing the phenomenology of Bond. Bolton’s piece is perhaps closest to those Bond “collectable” books that come out with the films as she analysed the films from Dr No to Skyfall, and fans may have their own interpretations of their cultural significance through the years. Editor Hines’s own chapter looks at Bond as cult brand, and is fascinating in her study of the 1960s Eon films. Hines reconciles how cult and mainstream come together with the Bond series, successfully. Lisa Funnell gives Bond a feminist slant and the enjoyment she derives as an assistant professor teaching women’s studies.
   Stephanie Jones looks at the Bond lifestyle but primarily through the analysis of one work, The Complete James Bond Lifestyle Seminar, which she reveals is relatively light on Bond references, leading to a less satisfying chapter—though it could hardly be blamed on Jones. Llewella Burton’s chapter on Bond and fashion, and how it became a style through the rise of merchandising as the movies became blockbusters with Goldfinger is punctuated by photos from Galeries Lafayette as it opened a James Bond boutique in 1965, again gold dust for Bond fans. Karen Brooks’s and Lisa Hill’s chapter analyses the new and old masculinities through the three Daniel Craig films of 2006, 2008 and 2012.
   Crossplayers CousinCecily and Winter talk about their love of James Bond and Q, leading neatly on the final chapter by Elizabeth J. Nielsen, which deals with Bond’s homoerotic moments and subtexts. She traces them to Fleming himself in the torture scene in Casino Royale, before covering the flirting between Bond and the new Q in Skyfall, which itself has a phenomenon, attracting both women and the LGBTQ community.
   This is a volume for the intelligent Bond fan, someone who appreciates learning about the impact of Ian Fleming’s creation. Of course the films are covered more, as it was through them that Bond became a global phenomenon. The reader walks away having been better informed: this is not a Bond book for the light reader who wants reassurance of the facts they already know, but one which gives them something more satisfying to consider.




Top A scene from What About Bob?, by Jon Boam. Centre Lost in Translation, by Grace Danico. Above Lost in Translation, by Henry Kaye.

On a briefer note, but still tied with film, Sugoi Books has released an A5 book called Cook Your Own Food: a Bill Murray Scratch and Sniff, retailing at £6. There are 20 pp., with 10 smells, with some stunning illustrations, with artists reinterpreting key moments from Murray’s films, focusing on his culinary habits. ‘Scratch the smelly pads at the top right and enter the world of Bill Murray,’ the publisher asks, and you are spoiled with scenes from Lost in Translation, Caddyshack, Groundhog Day, What About Bob?, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and others. For £6, the illustrations are so good it doesn’t even matter if you have a poor sense of smell.—Jack Yan, Publisher

June 24, 2015

Mila Kunis celebrates with Gemfields in London on its new find in Mozambique

Fenella Clarke/5.29




David M. Benett

As its brand ambassador, actress Mila Kunis attended Gemfields’ ruby launch party in London on Tuesday night.
   Kunis wore two pieces from FabergĂ©’s Devotion collection: a pair of earrings set with diamonds, 10 oval Mozambican rubies totalling 9·32 ct, and a ring set with diamonds and one 5 ct oval Mozambican ruby. She also wore FabergĂ©’s Regalia diamond and ruby bracelet set with 176 Mozambican rubies totalling over 17 ct.
   This party celebrated the launch of Gemfields’ newly found ruby deposit in Montepuez, Mozambique, one of the most significant of its type in the world. Gemfields has previously specialized in high quality emeralds and amethysts from Zambia, until finding this deposit in Mozambique.
   Gemfields is a leading supplier of responsibly sourced coloured gemstones and has experts on hand to make sure that they are not harming the environment or its people. ‘It’s really a luxury to own jewellery and gemstones. If you’re in the position to do so, you’re fortunate. Given that, I think it’s important to pay attention to what you’re wearing and where it came from,’ said Kunis, who has been the brand ambassador for Gemfields since 2013.
   The actress looked positively glowing, only nine months after giving birth, accompanying the jewellery with a white dress, a pair of white stilettos and a pop of red lipstick to match the rubies.—Fenella Clarke







David M. Benett

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