Lucire: News


June 20, 2016

News in brief: La Roche–Posay shows Anthelios and My UV Patch innovations; stand-outs from ISPA press event

Lucire staff/19.38

While summer may be just around the corner in the northern hemisphere and folks Down Under are heading toward cooler temperatures, French dermatologist-based skin care brand La Roche–Posay is spreading the word about the importance of year-round sun protection with their SOS, Save Our Skin, campaign. Atop a high-rise overlooking bustling downtown Los Angeles, media attendees enjoyed a breakfast seminar while discovering their most recent Anthelios sun care innovations and the new pioneering My UV Patch. Available in stores in June, the patch is the first stretchable skin sensor designed to monitor UV exposure. The Patch has photosensitive dyes that change colour when exposed to UV rays. Using a scanner-equipped cellphone and La Roche–Posay’s app, you can find out your personalized level of exposure and get advice on what to do to protect your skin this summer.
   La Roche–Posay’s Skinchecker 2·0 video (see below) takes full advantage of our culture’s love of viral animal videos to get an important message across.
   Just a few miles down the road at the ultra-posh Montage Beverly Hills, the International Spa Association hosted their annual press event showcasing spas and resorts that not only pamper the body, but nurture the spirit and promote holistic health and wellness. While indulging in selected mini-treatments, attendees learned about each brand’s latest offering and unique philosophy. Though too numerous too mention, we thought there were a few stand-outs.
   The raw grandeur of Crystal Lake is the setting of Reno’s Atlantis Resort Spa, which features a Brine Inhalation Light Therapy Lounge and a whole body healing Rasul Ceremonial Chamber.
   On the banks of a sacred river in Wisconsin, the Aspira Spa takes guests on a quest of mind and spirit. Their spa is a place of profound harmony with customized light and sound therapy and bathing experiences. You can even get a mani-pedi beside a crackling fire gazing under a starlit sky.
   Débuting a sleek new logo, updated colour scheme and an organic body care line, national chain Massage Envy shows that wellness can be affordable and accessible.—Jody Miller, LA Correspondent

June 17, 2016

Sponsored video: Chris Fonseca breaks barriers, with Smirnoff Ice Electric

Lucire staff/14.12

Via Chris Fonseca, on Instagram

We love ideas that challenge convention (otherwise this title wouldn’t exist), and Chris Fonseca’s work does just that.
   He’s a dancer, choreographer and dance instructor who happens to be profoundly deaf after suffering meningitis as a child. But that didn’t stop Fonseca from developing a love of dance, and it’s that love that the Smirnoff Ice Electric Flavors range taps into with its latest campaign.
   This hasn’t been created cynically for marketing Smirnoff—Fonseca has been teaching in South London, where both deaf and hearing people go to learn how to dance. He has, however, taken the idea across the Atlantic thanks to Smirnoff, and you can see his New York class for yourself on social media (check out Fonseca’s Instagram at for more). Among those at one New York class were Jeremy Strong, a choreographer for Jason DeRulo, and C. J. Salvador, a dancer for Justin Bieber, notes Vibe, which attended in May.
   Fonseca’s absolutely right: there’s no reason a deaf person cannot be great at dancing, and he gets his students to count the beat through vibrations, especially the bass. He further incorporates the lyrics of the song into his dance. His aim is to break barriers, and to make sure that that deaf people can do whatever they wish. ‘[Being deaf] does not stop me from making everyday achievements,’ he told the BBC.
   â€˜I always say to those young people not feeling body-positive to keep going, like everyday barriers, challenges, keep going: you don’t know how close you are to making a breakthrough. Keep believing anything is possible. Your time is coming soon.
   â€˜My motto is: dreams don’t work unless you work. Dreaming, believing, and achieving.’
   A very telling image on his Instagram shows Fonseca leading his class and on the mirror are the words, ‘How do you know if you don’t try?’, a term that he has hashtagged as well. Smirnoff, meanwhile, has taken more polished shots for its Ice Electric campaign, promoting its non-carbonated, plastic-bottled line—their idea is that you can take your Smirnoff drinks on to the dance floor more readily than when it was bottled in glass.
   His teaching has reached the media, including a cover story for the British Deaf News, which he hashtagged as his proudest moment.

Post sponsored by Smirnoff

June 16, 2016

From supermodels to film: celebrating the work of Peter Lindbergh at Kunsthal Rotterdam

Lucire staff/13.41

Top: An image that kicked off the 1990s, with supermodels Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz, Christy Turlington and Cindy Crawford in New York, appearing on the cover of British Vogue in January 1990. Copyright ©1990 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery). Centre: Wild at Heart, with Cindy Crawford, Tatjana Patitz, Helena Christensen, Linda Evangelista, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Karen Mulder and Stephanie Seymour, Brooklyn, 1991, appearing in Vogue. Copyright ©1991 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery). Above: Kate Moss, Paris, 2015, wearing Giorgio Armani, spring–summer 2015. Copyright ©2015 by Peter Lindbergh (courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery).

An exhibition on Polish-born, French-based photographer Peter Lindbergh, entitled Peter Lindbergh: a Different Vision on Fashion Photography, opens at the Kunsthal Rotterdam on September 10 at 5.30 p.m., running through February 12, 2017. It marks the first Dutch exhibition of Lindbergh’s work.
   Some of the most iconic fashion images of the past generation have been shot by Lindbergh, whose work is regularly seen in various editions of Vogue, and in The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, Harper’s Bazaar, The Wall Street Journal Magazine, Visionaire, Interview and W. Exhibitions of his work have been held around the world beginning with the V&A in 1985. Lindbergh’s black-and-white 1990 Vogue photograph of Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz, Christy Turlington and Cindy Crawford was one that helped cement the reputation of the supermodels, if not arguably kicking off the era itself. Lindbergh’s work gave a sense of reality about his subjects, with his humanist, documentary approach.
   Said Lindbergh in an Art Forum interview earlier this year, ‘A fashion photographer should contribute to defining the image of the contemporary woman or man in their time, to reflect a certain social or human reality. How surrealistic is today’s commercial agenda to retouch all signs of life and of experience, to retouch the very personal truth of the face itself?’
   The exhibition features over 220 photographs and includes exclusive and previously unseen material, including personal notes, Polaroids, storyboards, films and prints. It is divided into nine different sections, representing the different themes in Lindbergh’s creative development: Supermodels, Couturiers, Zeitgeist, Dance, the Darkroom, the Unknown, Silver Screen, Icons, and an exclusive Rotterdam Gallery. This final section contains Lindbergh’s work for the October 2015 issue of Vogue Nederland, with Lara Stone and Elise Hupkes at the Port of Rotterdam.
   Lindbergh’s critically acclaimed Models: the Film (1991) will be screened, along with interviews with Grace Coddington, Nicole Kidman, Mads Mikkelsen, Cindy Crawford and Nadja Auermann.
   Guest curator Thierry-Maxime Loriot points out that the exhibition is not chronological, but a narrative about the photographer.
   The Kunsthal Rotterdam noted, ‘Peter Lindbergh introduced a new realism into photography. His timeless images redefine the norms of beauty. Lindbergh’s visual idiom is influenced by the language of film and by playing with the type of the strong, self-willed woman, from the femme fatale to the heroine, but also the female dancer and the actress. His Å“uvre is characterized by portraits that radiate a certain lack of inhibition and physical grace.’
   The exhibition is accompanied by a hardcover monograph, Peter Lindbergh: a Different Vision on Fashion Photography, retailing for €59,99 (link at, US$69·99 (link at or £44·99 (link at Amazon UK), curated by Loriot, designed by Paprika of Montréal, and published by Taschen. The introduction has been authored by Kunsthal director Emily Ansenk, while the book features an essay on Lindbergh’s work by Loriot with commentaries from, inter alia, Jean Paul Gaultier, Nicole Kidman, Grace Coddington, Cindy Crawford and Anna Wintour.

May 12, 2016

A Billion Lives has world première in New Zealand, revealing powerful forces aiding the tobacco industry

Jack Yan/11.16

Jack Yan

Above: The team behind A Billion Lives, and Doc Edge organizers Dan Shannon and Alex Lee.

Those of us outside the vaping world have probably looked at e-cigarettes, wondering why on earth these could be better for your health. Or we may have thought they were a fad, since the only people I knew who vaped were tech hipsters, who enjoyed vaping as though it was a matter of course, and nothing to be curious about—thereby keeping their habit a closed shop. But then, perhaps they were tired of repeating themselves, and had settled into being comfortable with their e-cigs.
   A Billion Lives is a documentary that takes a look into this world, but it does so much more. The title refers to the number of people who can be saved if they give up smoking, but there are powerful forces at play to ensure that people don’t. And those forces have ensured that there is misinformation about vaping and the potential for the technology to save lives.
   Filmmaker Aaron Biebert, who directed and narrated the film which had its world première in Wellington as part of the Doc Edge Festival, journeyed to 13 countries on four continents to find similar patterns worldwide: here is a life-saving technology of e-cigarettes, but governments were banning them or fining citizens over their use, ignoring the science and deciding to be complicit with the tobacco industry in keeping people addicted to a harmful product. Instead, governments spend money spreading lies about e-cigarettes, calling them a gateway to cigarettes, or that one could get formaldehyde poisoning, claims that the film demonstrably refutes. E-cigarettes are not completely safe, and the film acknowledges that, but they have proven to be a successful tool to help those giving up smoking, especially where mainstream solutions have failed.
   In his own country, the US, Biebert points out that governments collect far more revenue from cigarette taxation than from several industries combined, and have no real incentive to cut off the flow of dollars. E-cigarettes, which were invented by pharmacist Hon Lik in China, were conceived as a way to give up smoking, and have been successful for 30 million people around the world. A Billion Lives points out that nicotine is not what causes lung cancer, and that the US Surgeon-General has said as much. What are harmful are the tar and 4,000 chemicals in modern cigarettes. It equates nicotine with coffee in terms of addictiveness, and the figure of 95 per cent less harmful than a typical cigarette featured prominently in the film. Vaping essentially allows one to get the pleasure of nicotine without the harm of the tar and toxins.
   Yet as a society, we have come to equate nicotine as being the evil, addictive substance, and that’s no accident.
   This point is made halfway into the film, with a good part of the first section looking into the history of cigarettes (Flintstones sponsor announcements for Winston cigarettes elicited laughs from the audience), and David Goerlitz, the Winston male model from the 1980s, being a particularly effective interviewee, discussing how he went from a smoking advocate earning millions to having a crisis of conscience when his brother developed lung cancer and died. Goerlitz went to the other side, and became a high-profile spokesman who was able to talk in plain language just what governments, Big Tobacco, and Big Pharma (which sells patches and gum, and would like to continue doing so) were doing. Health professionals were being marketed to far more than the public, permitting Big Pharma to continue to sell its products, the film notes.
   Biebert was able to get other interviewees at a very high level, including Dr Derek Yach, the former executive director of the World Health Organization, and Dr Delon Human, former president of the World Medical Association, among others, speaking plainly about how lives could be saved through vaping e-cigarettes, a tool which could get smokers to kick their habit.
   Meanwhile, the pro-smoking side was represented through historical clips—you get the feeling that we had only touched the surface of what was out there, with corporations spending thousands of millions to fund biased studies and get on to our airwaves.
   Beautifully shot and scored, this independently funded feature tells a story about our times and just why so many citizens today are wary of their governments and multinational corporations. Those who oppose global trade agreements, for instance, do not do so in isolation—and while A Billion Lives takes no political side, it does tap into the Zeitgeist of our modern suspicion about what is on our airwaves and what are the motives behind it. Like Adam Curtis, whose documentaries seek to explain the complex in simple terms, Biebert has done the same, narrating and directing, although he appears on camera as well when narrative gaps need to be plugged. He is an honest, frank speaker, and gives the film a personal touch.
   Young smokers who tried e-cigarettes were often people who already smoked and saw them as a way to give up their addiction, and most, Biebert pointed out in a post-screening Q&A, were not even using nicotine in their e-cigarettes.
   Yet the state of California, where Biebert is based, spent $75 million telling us about the evils of e-cigarettes, said the director in his Q&A; while in the film, he points out that US federal funds were being illegally used for lobbying activities. The American Lung Association had deceived the public, too, notes Biebert, who told the audience, ‘If you get powerful charities on side, you can do anything.’ The increasing restrictions on e-cigarettes in the US, the subject of federal lawsuits, was equated to ‘Prohibition II’.
   Dr Marewa Glover of End Smoking NZ, who introduced the film at its première, said that young people were using e-cigarettes as a way round peer pressure, when people in their circle smoked.
   However, Australia has already banned e-cigarettes, with one interviewee, Vince, who sold them, telling a story about being raided by authorities and now faces losing his home as he fought the government on principle. He believed firmly he was saving lives. There are massive fines for vaping in Brunei and Hong Kong. There were restrictions in New Zealand, too, noted Glover, although those who sought to misinform were technically in breach of the country’s health legislation.
   Biebert says he is neither a smoker nor a vaper; but all good documentary-makers, he had a commitment to get the right information out there. He acknowledges that vapers have not given themselves the best image, either, and that A Billion Lives can only be one small part of getting the truth out.
   â€˜We need to cut the head off the monster,’ said Biebert, ‘and the monster is being funded by big business. We need more than the movie. People need to get the right information.’
   He added, ‘The truth ends up winning. Even condoms were illegal in the US at one time.’
   A Billion Lives will begin making its way to other countries. The website is at, while the movie’s Instagram is at abillionlivesfilm.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Above: The author (centre) joins Aaron Biebert, director (left) and Jesse Hieb, producer, for a photo.

February 27, 2016

Gala Italia: New York gets a taste of the best Italian wines

Lola Cristall/2.33

The 31st edition of Gala Italia certainly proved to be a lavish, elegant and classy event at the Pierre Hotel in New York City. The Italian Wine & Food Institute’s (IWFI) event combines delectable wines with good food amongst enjoyable company. Chef Ashfer Biju and pastry chef Michael Mignano served enticing dishes with appetizing, high-end ingredients, paired with a selection of nine different wines ranging from sparkling to deliciously sweet, each intended to revive the senses. The variety of wines were: 2006 Ferrari, Riserva Lunelli, Trento DOC; 2014 Planeta, Chardonnay, Sicilia IGT; 2013 Tenuta Santa Caterina, Silente delle Marne, Monferrato Bianco DOC; 2011 Marchesi Antinori, Villa Antinori Chianti Classico DOCG Riserva; 2008 Tenute Lunelli, Carapace, Montefalco Sagrantino DOCG; 2008 Condè, Sangiovese di Romagna DOC Riserva; 2007 Mezzacorona, NOS Teroldego Rotaliano DOC Riserva; 2012 Bertani, Villa Arvedi, Amarone della Valpolicella Valpantena DOCG; and 2011 Sorrentino, Fior di Ginestre, Passito IGT Pompeiano. They provided various tastes for different palates with immensely flavoured textures to accompany the five-course menu, including a cheese platter.
   Ferrari’s Riserva Lunelli, made using a traditional method called metedo classico evoked succulent flavours in one sip. A bouquet of savoury aromas erupted while sipping on delectable Tenute Lunelli’s Carapace, appropriately accompanying a tasty citrus semolina olive oil cake.
   Roma-based Eredi Pisanò’s menswear fashion collection featured a number of pieces as the company toured the Grand Ballroom to introduce guests to sophisticated ensembles. As the intimate crowd continued to indulge in a delectable meal in the midst of this exquisite ambiance, a select few, who had contributed to the victory of Italian wine in the US, were recognized for their work and honoured with an award by the IWFI’s president, Lucio Caputo. Vittorio Assaf and Fabio Granato (the Serafina Restaurant Group), Sirio Maccioni (Le Cirque), Mary Ewing-Mulligan, MW (the president of the International Wine Center), Florence Fabricant (a New York Times food writer), John F. Mariani (a food and wine editor and author) and Adam Stru (founder and chairman of wine enthusiast companies), were recognized for their contributions to the wine industry.—Lola Cristall, Paris Editor

February 14, 2016

Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue 2016 has three covers: Ronda Rousey, Ashley Graham, Hailey Clauson get the honours

Lucire staff/6.36

James Macari; Frédéric Pinet

In a break with tradition after 52 years, Sports Illustrated has three different Swimsuit Issue covers in 2016—and that means three different cover girls. UFC champion Ronda Rousey, body activist and model Ashley Graham, and SI rookie Hailey Clauson each have a cover for 2016.
   The announcement was made during the live broadcast of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2016 Revealed, hosted by Nick Cannon and Rebecca Romijn.
   Graham and Clauson were photographed by James Macari in Turks & Caicos, and Rousey by Frédéric Pinet in the Bahamas, in body paint by Joanne Gair, whose work can be seen in issue 35 of Lucire. Other locations included the Dominican Republic, Tahiti, Malta and Zanzibar.
   The issue goes on sale February 15, coinciding with launches in print, digital, and mobile, and a New York City fan festival. Virtual-reality content is also included through the SI Swimsuit app.
   Clauson said on finding out she had made the cover, ‘I’m shaking and crying. I love it so much because it represents three different strong and beautiful women.’
   Graham said, ‘I’m insanely speechless. I cannot comprehend how I feel right now. This will go down in the books forever. It is a historic moment. Not only is this the first time that I’m in the issue, but I’m on the cover and sharing this honor with two of the most stunning women. This is for all the women who didn’t think they were beautiful because of their size. This is for them.’
   Rousey said, ‘It’s a real honour being part of such a historic issue that really pays homage to different body types of women and not promoting just one cookie-cutter image for every woman, but showing that the healthiest version of every body type is the sexiest version out there. And I couldn’t be happier … I think I was just as honoured to get it as to be there in person to watch Ashley’s reaction.’
   Other models in this issue include Irina Shayk, Nina Agdal, Lily Aldridge, Rose Bertram, Kate Bock, Hannah Davis, Emily DiDonato, Hannah Ferguson, Gigi Hadid, Erin Heatherton, Samantha Hoopes, Chanel Iman, Bo Krsmanović, Robyn Lawley, Tanya Mityushina, Barbara Palvin, Sofia Resing, Kelly Rohrbach, Chrissy Teigen, Lindsey Vonn and Caroline Wozniacki.
   The TV special also included a performance by Ne-Yo and the presentation of the Jule Campbell Award to former SI model Elle Macpherson.

January 27, 2016

Emanuel Ungaro celebrates 50th anniversary, launches La Diva eau de parfum at Petit Palais

Lucire staff/4.57

Pascal le Segretain

Emanuel Ungaro celebrated its 50th anniversary on Tuesday, with a party at the Petit Palais in Paris, and launched its La Diva perfume to coincide with the occasion.
   Creative director Fausto Puglisi and president Asim Abdullah played host to 600 guests, who were shown a virtual history of the house in images, choreographed and created by Ali Mahdavi and scored by Monarchy, on the wall of the venue. Salvatore Ferragamo Group CEO Michele Norsa introduced La Diva, with the façade of the Petit Palais showing a projection of the new fragrance’s press image, modelled by Charlotte Free. Ferragamo Parfums has licensed the Emanuel Ungaro brand for the fragrance.
   Guests included Suzy Menkes, Kristina Basan, Elodie Frégé, Frédérique Bel, Leila Ndabirabe, Zahia Dehar, Estelle Lefébure, Catherine Baba, Laurie Cholewa, Karole Rocher, Blanca Li, Jin Weng, Bojana Panić, Alexia Niedzielski, Elizabeth von Guthman, Axelle Lafont, Prince Wenzeslaus of Liechtenstein, Lola le Lann, César Domboy, Richard Orlanski, Frédéric Taddei, Ariel Wizman, Nicolas and Alexandre Lestrat, Kyle Eastwood, Kamel Ouali, Aure Atika, Isabelle Funaro, Amanda Sthers, Fausto Puglisi, Ali Mahdavi, Benjamin Belin, Manu Katché, Frédérique Lopez, and Sofiia Manousha.
   Musical trio LEJ (Lucie, Elisa and Juliette) performed live at the Petit Palais, while Marie-Amélie Seigner took over with her DJ set as guests danced till late into the evening.
   The fragrance goes on sale in March, as eaux de parfum in 30, 50 and 100 ml sizes, priced from €39 to €69. The fragrance has top notes of pear and raspberry, midnotes of pink peppercorn, basenotes of honey and vanilla, with a floral heart, enriched with notes of patchouli. Firmenich’s Marie Salamagne created the scent.

Pascal le Segretain

Victor Boyko

September 23, 2015

Tommy Hilfiger and Jeffrey Deitch host Rock Style exhibition launch in London

Alex Barrow/3.42

Darren Gerrish

On Monday, the Rock Style exhibition’s official opening was celebrated at Sotheby’s S2 gallery in London. Hosted and curated by famous fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger and art dealer Jeffrey Deitch, the exhibition celebrates the innovative connection between music and fashion, as examined in Tommy Hilfiger and Anthony De Curtis’ book, Rock Style, written in 2000.
   Hilfiger himself has been a notable figure of fashion for 30 years and has dressed celebrities such as Lily Aldridge, Zooey Deschanel, Snoop Dogg and Naomi Campbell. Although he no longer runs the company, Hilfiger is still heavily involved in the fashion industry. De Curtis complements him perfectly with his music-critic background, writing for publications such as Rolling Stone, The New York Times and Relix, making them the perfect duo to have written the book Rock Style.
   The show exhibits numerous photographs of rockers over the years, as well as paintings of idols such as Deborah Harry, Joey Ramone, Sid Vicious and George Harrison done by street artist and graphic designer Shepard Fairey. The exhibition emphasizes the nature of fashion, music and identity, and how the three collaborate to create the worlds that these stars lived in. The very essence of nostalgia and fashion experimentation is captured in the large images, ones that depict the unique identity of each performer. The iconic leathers and studs of Sid Vicious, the radical prints and colours of Jimi Hendrix, and the very photogenic nature of David Bowie, is captured in these prints. In creating a visual exhibition, the show brings the book to life and provides a sentiment and fond memory of the rock star idols of the ’50s through to today.
   Notable attendees of the Rock Style exhibition launch included Tommy and Dee Hilfiger, Melissa Odabash, Harrods fashion director Helen David, editor of British GQ Dylan Jones, Sir Philip Green, Bob Gruen, Gered Mankowitz, Tim Jeffries, Fru Tholstrup, Justine Picardie, Katie Martin, Tamara Beckwith, Melissa Odabash, Don Letts, Caroline Rush, Stephen Webster, Mark Quinn, Henry Hudson, Philip Colbert, Steve Varsano, Lisa Tchenguiz, and Jaye Kamel, as well as other artists and socialites.—Alex Barrow

Darren Gerrish

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