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In brief: Longines auctions Kate Winslet Flagship Heritage watches; Trilogy supports Beat the Microbead


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 15, 2017/11.19


Longines is auctioning three limited-edition Flagship Heritage by Kate Winslet watches to benefit her charity, the Golden Hat Foundation. The auction is open online from June 10 to 30, and the successful bidder will receive their watch from Winslet herself at her next public appearance for Longines.
   There are five of these watches, the first owned by the Longines museum and the fifth by Winslet. The middle three are up for auction, with bidding already in the five figures.
   The dial, case and strap have been chosen by Winslet.
   Meanwhile, New Zealand beauty brand Trilogy is supporting the Beat the Microbead campaign by donating NZ$2 for every product sold worldwide to the New Zealand Whale and Dolphin Trust. Trilogy stresses that it doesn’t use plastic microbeads in its products, preferring natural, biodegradable jojoba wax microspheres for its Gentle Facial Exfoliant, and ground rosehip seed powder for its Exfoliating Body Balm.
   Trilogy has been involved with the campaign since 2013. Beat the Microbead has an app to help consumers check if their exfoliant contains natural or synthetic microbeads.

The Body Shop, Cruelty Free International call for global ban on animal testing for cosmetics


NEWS  by Lucire staff/June 2, 2017/2.08

The Body Shop and Cruelty Free International have called for the end of animal testing for cosmetics, and wants the United Nations to create an international convention supporting a ban. Customers are encouraged to lend their voices online to the campaign, as well as in any of the Body Shop’s 3,000 stores, where they can sign a petition.
   It’s a call that’s in line with growing consumer demands, as detailed in Nathalia Archila’s ‘A Guide to Cruelty-Free Cosmetics’ in the latest issue of Lucire.
   Eighty per cent of countries still have no laws banning animal testing for cosmetics, says the Body Shop, while Cruelty Free International estimates 500,000 animals continue to suffer for the cosmetics’ industry annually. A global ban, they believe, is the most effective way to stop the practice.
   Animal testing has never been that reliable, says the Body Shop, and a more accurate modern alternative is the use of artificially grown human skin, which has been validated by authorities.
   The Body Shop’s CSR manager Jessie Macneil-Brown said, ‘The Body Shop passionately believes that no animal should be harmed in the name of cosmetics and that animal testing on products and ingredients is outdated, cruel and unnecessary. This is why the Body Shop and Cruelty Free International have partnered to deliver the largest and most ambitious campaign ever to seek a global ban on the use of animals to test cosmetic products and ingredients.
   ‘This campaign will finish what we both started back in the 1980s. We are calling on at least 8 million people from every corner of the globe who care about animal welfare to join our cause and sign our petition. We will take this petition to the United Nations to call on them to support a global ban on animal testing in cosmetic products and ingredients. With an international convention enforced, consumers would finally be confident that any cosmetics they buy are cruelty-free. It’s time to end animal testing for cosmetics’ purposes once and for all. Join us to make it happen.’
   As well as signing the petition, consumers can use the hashtag #ForeverAgainstAnimalTesting to raise awareness.

The Body Shop, Botanicals Fresh Care, Ultra Doux: L’Oréal advances natural beauty and environmental initiatives


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/May 9, 2017/23.32



Top: Shidong Yan, director of the Centre for Environmental Education and Communications of Ministry of Environmental Protection; Tom Szaky, TerraCycle founder and global CEO; Haoran Liu; Zhenzhen Lan, Vice President, L’Oréal (China). Above: The Body Shop British Rose Premium Selection (NZ$95·50), and the British Rose collection.

It’s nice that the Body Shop can also source from its home country of the UK, and the British Rose collection ensures that its origins—as well as one of botany’s most celebrated flowers—are in the name.
   The collection is made with organic, hand-picked and air-dried roses, used to create a youthful and fresh scent. These products are rich in vitamin C to give the skin a gentle, soft and silky effect. The British Rose collection includes the Instant Glow Body Essence (NZ$47·25), a body lotion with a lightweight and lasting formula that hydrates the skin over 24 hours, leaving it feeling smooth and soft. The British Rose shower gel (NZ$17·50) is perfumed with essences of hand-picked rose; the Petal Soft hand cream (NZ$9·95) is lightweight, won’t grease the skin, and is absorbed immediately. The British Rose Instant Glow body butter (NZ$38·95) is a velvet-soft moisturizer that is light to the touch but rich on moisture, providing 24-hour hydration; and the exfoliating gel body scrub (NZ$42), with real rose petals, helps reveal smoother, fresher skin. The Beauty Bag (NZ$39·50) includes the shower gel, body butter and hand cream (in 60 ml, 50 ml and 30 ml respectively), and the Premium Selection (NZ$95·50) has the shower gel and body butter but in larger quantities (250 ml and 200 ml respectively), the same hand cream, and a 250 ml bath foam.
   Parent company L’Oréal is getting into the natural beauty market with a second line specifically for hair, called Botanicals Fresh Care. Now available in New Zealand, the new hair care line sources from Egyptian geranium leaves, Cretian safflower, Bulgarian coriander seed oil, and French camelina flowers, from the most sustainable producers.
   Geranium essential oil is an antioxidant rich in fatty acid; safflower oil is rich in lipids; coriander seed oil has Omega 6 properties; and camelina oil is rich in Omega 6 and Omega 9.
   The Botanicals Fresh Care range is divided into four: Botanicals Geranium Colour Radiance for coloured hair, Botanicals Safflower Rich Nourishment for dry hair, Botanicals Coriander Revitalizing Strength for fragile hair and Botanicals Camelina Smooth Ritual for frizzy hair. The products are vegan, free of silicone, parabens, and colourants, retailing at NZ$17·99 each.
   Finally, Ultra Doux—which occidental readers might be more familiar with as a Garnier range—is a separate L’Oréal line in China, aimed at the mass market who wants natural hair care. The brand has teamed up with TerraCycle, a specialist in recycling hard-to-recycle consumer waste. At an event in Shanghai, L’Oréal China VP Zhenzhen Lan, Chinese government rep Shidong Yan, TerraCycle CEO Tom Szaky, and Ultra Doux spokesman Haoran Liu launched the partnership, which is claimed to be the first comprehensive solution for hair care packaging waste in China.
   Individuals or communities can sign up to a recycling programme, and collect the packaging, to be shipped free to charge to TerraCycle. The organizations expect that millions of pieces will be collected, so they do not wind up in landfills or incinerators. For every unit of waste collected, the programme will contribute 1元 to the individual’s charity of choice. All plastic waste collected through the programme will be made into desks and chairs and donated to a school in China.
   Ultra Doux has also opted for renewable, bio-derived plastics and sustainably sourced cardboard for its packaging, as well as more naturally derived ingredients.—Nathalia Archila and Lucire staff



Why nixing sugar in your system is not a diet


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 8, 2017/10.58


Above: Summer Rayne Oakes’s SugarDetoxMe: 100+ Recipes to Curb Cravings and Take Back Your Health, the result of a “sugar cleanse” she went on from 2014. To get people off sugar, Summer Rayne’s even created a programme to help others do the same. Below left: Summer Rayne Oakes.

I never thought I could nix my sweet tooth. I just figured it’s something that you’re born with. To a large extent, that’s actually true. Not only are humans programmed to prefer sweet over bitter, (which is no doubt an evolutionary advantage, as many bitter tastes are actually poisonous), but by the time we’re born and as we’re growing, our taste is already fairly developed.
   The latter part is courtesy of a number of factors, including what our mother chose to eat while we were in utero, whether we were breast-fed or formula fed, and even now—what evidence suggests—what our Dads and even grandparents ate. The last point I made is not one to gloss over. If the evidence, which has presented itself today, is correct, then the food choices we put into our bodies today—will affect several unborn generations after us. In sum, we’re making direct health decisions for people who are yet to be born!
   With all of our “advances” in medical care, we must ask ourselves why is life expectancy dropping for the first time since 1993? When I was born in the mid-’80s, type 2 diabetes—a disease that is inextricably linked to our excessive sugar intake—was known as ‘adult-onset diabetes’. Now in just three decades, it’s common among children, affects 1 in 11 adults worldwide, 37 per cent of whom live in the western Pacific region; and one in seven births is impacted by gestational diabetes. In New Zealand alone, nearly 286,000 people were diagnosed with diabetes in 2015—a doubling over the last decade. If the rate continues at this pace, diabetes is projected to cost Kiwis more than $1,000 million in annual health care costs in five years’ time.
   The statistics seem startling enough, but perhaps not as startling as something closer to home, like the amount of free sugars—or sugars not bound by fibre—that we’re consuming on a daily basis. The upper limit of free sugars for the day—and I emphasize the word upper—is 6 teaspoons for a woman, 9 for a man. However, New Zealanders, in particular, are consuming around 27 teaspoons per day per person, according to the Sugar Research Advisory Service. That’s well over three to four times the upper limit for the day!
   About three years ago now, I began working in the world of “good” food. We were experimenting with an idea as to whether we could get farm-fresh food into people’s fridges more efficiently. When working so closely with farmers and food makers, you inevitably home in on what you’re eating—and how it makes you feel. I always considered myself a healthy eater in general. My parents have always been health-conscious and we largely grew our own food. Unlike my parents, however, I struggled with a sugar tooth; one that has left me with many memories of hoarding sweet things. I finally had the time to ask, ‘Why?’ and to begin to probe how this one ingredient has seemingly snuck its way into three out of four products on our supermarket shelves.
   This curiosity and the need to know how to overcome my seemingly innate sugar habit led me on a Nancy Drew-like investigation; I began researching all I could about our relationship to the sweet stuff, and started documenting my “sugar cleanse” via sugardetox.me, which later led to an easy-to-follow, empowering programme to help others do the same and most recently, a cookbook and guide on the very topic.
   Free sugars have become so prevalent in our food that the average person might not even realize that he or she is tipping the sugar scale even before heading out the door in the morning. This particular ingredient has a way of changing our brain chemistry, too—acting as a hyper-stimulus to trigger our brains and bodies to release dopamine, serotonin, and other neurotransmitters. In sum, it keeps us hooked and trapped in a vicious cycle of ups and downs throughout the day.
   It’s part of the reason why reducing or eliminating free sugars from your diet is not a diet. It’s simply removing a potentially deleterious substance from one’s body—much in the same way an alcoholic needs to remove alcohol from his or her system. This may, at first, seem a little counter-intuitive, but the ingredient is heavily taxing our bodies to the point that some scientists are now calling it a ‘chronic [versus acute] liver toxin’. Over time, it affects our body’s own natural abilities to detoxify themselves. This in turn can cause inflammation, energy slumps, skin problems, obesity, and disease. Though some medical practitioners would be hard pressed to call excessive sugar intake an “addiction”, more signs point to the fact that it is—from brain-imaging scans to the rise of sugar-addiction clinics.
   As those of us who have begun to eradicate free sugars from their diets know, you begin to taste real ingredients again. Our taste buds have plasticity, renewing themselves, and adjusting taste preferences to the food we feed our bodies and our cells. A freshly picked summer tomato is sumptuously sweet; but to those of us who are used to overdosing on a hyper-stimulating cola, the best sun-ripened tomato from the farm might seem fairly bland.
   Our appreciation for real food is within our reach—if we give our taste buds time to acclimate from that which is hyper-stimulating. It’s not impossible to curb your sweet tooth, as I have found out. We are, after all, masters of our own destiny. Some of us have to contend with more challenging, uphill battles—but when we have the curiosity and will to understand our body’s needs and wants, then we’re already primed towards a path to better health. I encourage and invite everyone to take the time to explore their own personal cravings and relationship to food, as none of us have the same story or experience. I assure you that when you’re able to put your own puzzle pieces together to see the whole picture, you begin to feel empowered to discover the path towards health that is right for you!—Summer Rayne Oakes, Editor-at-large

Kérastase enters natural hair care market with Aura Botanica range; Toni Garrn spokesmodel


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/April 20, 2017/3.49

Kérastase has introduced its Aura Botanica line in New Zealand, featuring a shampoo (Bain Micellaire), retailing at NZ$48, a conditioner (Soin Fondamental), NZ$52, a treatment (Concentre Essentiel), NZ$79, and an oil mist (Essence d’Éclat), NZ$70. The collection is, on average, 98 per cent natural in origin—a first for this L’Oréal brand—and includes pure hand-pressed Samoan coconut and Moroccan argan oils.
   Kérastase says the Aura Botanica coconut oil has proven to penetrate deeply into the hair, leaving it soft, hydrated and strong. The argan oil, meanwhile, lasts longest on the hair’s surface, nourishing it and keeping hair soft and shiny. Development of the range began in 2013.
   The products have a fragrance with top notes of grapefruit and crushed mint leaves, mid-notes of black pepper, coriander and jasmine, and base notes of rich vanilla and warm amber.
   The products are (again on average) 97 per cent biodegradable, and its packaging is similarly friendly to the environment, with the Bain Micellaire in a 100 per cent recycled polyethylene terephthalate (RPET) bottle, and the Concentre Essentiel bottle is made with 25 per cent recycled glass.
   With interest in natural hair care growing, Kérastase expects a sizeable number of customers will chose Aura Botanica.
   As revealed in January, model Toni Garrn is the face of the Kérastase Aura Botanica range. Twenty-four-year-old Garrn, with 581,000 Instagram followers and a fresh, healthy face, is involved in humanitarian work, her image working well with the natural angle of Aura Botanica.—Nathalia Archila

National Audobon Society hosts 2017 gala: US$1·1 million raised for wildlife and nature


NEWS  by Lola Cristall/April 14, 2017/3.03




Camilla Cerea/National Audobon Society

This year’s National Audubon Society gala took place at the Gotham Hall in New York City in an absolutely elegant setting. Statues of birds and other details contributed to a stunning atmosphere. Loyal members and a number of other attendees, including Audubon board chair Margaret Walker and the organization’s president and CEO David Yarnold, gathered throughout the evening to celebrate the society’s hard work while promoting their important mission. Guests congratulated Frances Beinecke as the proud recipient of the Audubon Medal as well as Nathaniel P. Reed, who received the Lufkin Prize for Environmental Leadership.
   A non-profit organization, the National Audubon Society, is applauded for its extensive work preserving and helping promote the conservation of birds as well as other wildlife and ecosystems nationwide. Appropriately named after John James Audubon, a Franco-American artist, ornithologist and naturalist of the nineteenth century, the organization is strongly committed to the preservation of birds and the natural environment. Audubon groups were formed in the US more than a century ago, predominantly in the state of Massachusetts, eventually expanding nationally over a short period of time.
   With almost 300 guests proudly celebrating the evening, more than US$1·1 million was raised, dedicated to the Society’s conservation endeavours as well as their climate change programme.—Lola Cristall, Paris Editor








Camilla Cerea/National Audobon Society

News in brief: Kristen Stewart behind the scenes for Chanel; H&M announces Global Change Award winners


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 9, 2017/23.52



Chanel

Chanel revealed last week the first of four films for its Gabrielle bag. The photographs had already been shot by Karl Lagerfeld, featuring Kristen Stewart, Cara Delevingne, Caroline de Maigret and Pharrell Williams, each with the ‘aura’ of Gabrielle Chanel in the film.
   The first film, starring Stewart and directed by Daniel Askill, appeared on April 3 on Chanel websites and social networks, while the making-of (as the French call it) is below on Lucire’s Dailymotion channel.
   Danish jewellery brand Pandora has announced that it will enter into a second year’s partnership with Dress for Success, committing to a US$500,000 donation this year, and donating Pandora jewellery to Dress for Success affiliates throughout North America. It will also sponsor Dress for Success events through the year.
   Dress for Success, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, is a not-for-profit that empowers women to achieve economic independence by providing professional attire, support, and developmental tools.
   Readers may remember our story in March about the finalists of the H&M Foundation Global Change Award this year. The online vote, held from March 27 to April 2, saw the €1,000,000 split as follows:

• €300,000 for Grape Leather (team lead: Rossella Longobardo, Italy);
• €250,000 for Solar Textiles (team lead: Miguel A. Modestino, USA and Switzerland);
• €150,000 for Content Thread (team lead: Natasha Franck, US and UK);
• €150,000 for Denim-dyed Denim (team lead: Xungai Wang, Australia); and
• €150,000 for Manure Couture (team lead: Jalila Essaidi, the Netherlands).

A ceremony was held at the Stockholm town hall on April 5.
   ‘We are deeply glad that such a prestigious foundation recognized the value of our innovation and strongly believed in it. Our first objectives will consist in switching from a pilot to an industrial-scale production our fabric and starting a green, cruelty-free revolution within the leather industry, finally solving its related issues and overexploitations,’ said Rossella Longobardo from the team behind wine leather (‘Grape Leather’).


Kristin Stewart behind the scenes for Chanel by Lucire

Five ideas reshaping the fashion industry: H&M Foundation invites public to vote on the best


NEWS  by Lucire staff/March 28, 2017/10.51

H&M Foundation invites the public to vote on the best ideas that can help revolutionize the fashion industry toward a sustainable, waste-free future.
   Initiated in 2015, the competition is now on to its second round, with €1 million up for grabs between five winners. The vote, at globalchangeaward.com, closes on April 2. The public will determine how the €1 million will be split, with the top innovation receiving €300,000. All winners receive an innovation accelerator to help realize their ideas and get industry access.
   The first of the 2016 five is a digital content thread that facilitates the recycling of clothes. By weaving an RFID thread with a digitalized ingredients’ list into the garment, recyclers will know what the garment is composed of.
   There’s a carbon-binding nylon made from water, biomass and solar energy instead of oil. The nylon also binds greenouse gases into the material, to help with a zero-emissions world.
   Third, a vegetal leather made from wine production waste helps with animal welfare, and eliminates the use of oil in making synthetic leather.
   Fourth, old denim is broken down into particles, which are turned into a colouring powder to dye new denim, saving water and energy in production.
   Finally, ‘manure couture’ takes the cellulose in cow manure and turns it into a biodegradable textile, reducing the release of methane gas and harmful substances.
   The result will be announced at a ceremony at the Stockholm city hall on April 5.
   ‘The second round of Global Change Award received 2,883 innovative ideas from 130 countries, which is even more than last year. Cross-border challenges call for a cross-border approach. I am convinced that by bringing people from different industries, with different backgrounds and perspectives together we can make a fundamental shift, speeding up the transition to a circular waste-free fashion industry,’ said Karl-Johan Persson, CEO of Hennes & Mauritz. Fifty-six per cent of the innovations came from women.
   The top five were chosen by an expert panel, comprising: Vikram Widge, had of climate and carbon finance at the World Bank Group; Rebecca Earley, professor in sustainable textile and fashion design at University of the Arts London; Amber Valletta, model, actress, entrepreneur and sustainability influencer; Ellis Rubinstein, president and CEO, New York Academy of Sciences; David Roberts, distinguished faculty, Singularity University; Lewis Perkins, president, Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute; Johan L. Kuylenstierna, executive director for Stockholm Environment Institute; and Dame Ellen MacArthur, founder, Ellen MacArthur Foundation. The late Franca Sozzani, editor-in-chief, Vogue Italia, was an expert panel member in 2015 and 2016, but passed away before helping to select this year’s winners. All members participate pro bono.

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