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Innovative biodegradable shoes win James Dyson Award’s New Zealand competition

Filed by Lucire staff/September 17, 2020/0.44


Lucire is the first fashion partner of UN Environment.

The New Zealand winner of the James Dyson Award is in the fashion sector: Rik Oithuis, a Massey University student, conceived his Voronui Runners, shoes that can be composted at the end of their life.
   Despite many labels trying to do the right thing by the environment—many of which have been profiled by this magazine, a UN Environment partner since 2003—92 million tonnes of textile waste is created each year. As detailed in Lucire, Abigail Beall at the BBC points out that this is ‘equivalent to a rubbish truck full of clothes’ arriving at a landfill every second. Only 12 per cent of the material for clothing is recycled, says Beall. Footwear is one of the culprits in the sector, with the James Dyson Foundation noting that since 1950, the amount of footwear globally has increased from 7,000 million to 23,000 million, with most shoes ending up in landfill. The average pair takes over 50 years to decompose, with footwear representing 1·4 per cent of global climate impacts. The footwear industry’s waste is increasing tenfold, note Theodoros Staikos and Shahin Rahimifard in their research.
   This makes Oithuis’s concept of a biodegradable shoe all the more important to our planet. He says, ‘Currently, footwear materials focus on performance, which is important, especially in runners. However, what isn’t being considered is what happens to the product once it’s no longer of use. The use of adhesives prevents the separation and treatment of materials at the end of the product’s life cycle. I was inspired to design a sneaker using only biodegradable materials with no adhesives—leading the future of sustainable footwear.’
   Oithuis developed a gelatine- and glycerine-based recipe for biodegradable foam, adding natural ingredients to strengthen the material, compress it, and make it more water-resistant. He then 3-D-printed a Voronoi structure using a biodegradable filament to form the skeleton of the sole and mid-sole. The upper was made from a merino wool fabric with 3-D-printed details. The heel and toe caps were inserted with a plant fibre reinforcement, then sewn shut and stitched.
   Runners-up included Massey University students Lisa Newman and Samantha Hughes, who created a hand tool to maintain clean cattle tails and a pædiatric urine sample collection device respectively.
   Rachel Brown, ONZM, founder and CEO of the Sustainable Business Network, Dr Michelle Dickinson, and engineer Sina Cotter Tait judged the national competition.
   Oithuis will receive a £2,000 award to develop his design. He, Newman and Hughes will go on to the international stage, where a top 20 will be selected by Dyson engineers. Sir James Dyson will select the international and sustainability winners from that group. The former will get a £30,000 prize and £5,000 going to their university, and the latter will receive £30,000. Winners will be announced on November 19.

 


Letter from Venezia, July 2020

Filed by Lucire staff/July 15, 2020/12.49





Stanley Moss

The experienced traveller returning today will discover the Venice of 40 years ago.
   It is amazing, starting with uncrowded passageways, the ability to navigate the streets to admire the architecture, and it’s quiet. The droves of Asian visitors have disappeared, nor does one find Americans. Mainly we encounter German tourists, a few French, but mostly Italian speakers. It’s obvious that the rest of the world has shut down. Many of the stores remain shuttered.
   Today I visited the fish market at Rialto Mercato, found Argentine shrimps; went to the produce stand, got a bag of those amazing Sicilian tomatoes; visited the cheese store and got a hunk of Reggiano, some meaty Cerignola olives; and stopped by the coffee store for fresh ground Etiopiano. I went by Rizzardini’s pastry shop and splurged on a pallet of eight pieces to take home.
   I have no problem finding an open table with an unobstructed view, manned by an agreeable waiter, one simply happy to see business reappear. I take out my little watercolour kit, colours, brushes, my postcard-sized pad, order a drink, sketch, then paint at my own pace.
   The weather has turned perfect, and it gets dark around 9 p.m. Venice is the ideal city for getting lost. I’ve been here more times than I can count, but the coolest thing today is the ability to meander down dead-end passages and have to double back on my own steps. It’s too empty to navigate Venice the old way, stop and go, bumping into shoulders, walking downwind of cigarettes, craning one’s neck for landmarks. That Venice has disappeared, and the days of yore are thankfully returned.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor








Stanley Moss

 


Pureology relaunches with reformulated line-up for summer 2020

Filed by Lucire staff/July 12, 2020/11.10

After preparing for two years, Pureology is relaunching for summer 2020, with a fully renovated line-up and reformulations.
   The line-up continues Pureology’s high-performance, professional-grade principles, and comprises shampoos, conditions, treatments and styling products. The formulas are sulphate-, paraben- and mineral oil-free. All formulas remain 100 per cent vegan.
   They are made with Pureology’s Antifade Complex, a patented ingredient blend with sunflower seed, a UV filter and vitamin E, working to protect colour; and Zerosulfate, a blend of corn, coconut and sugar that cleanses without stripping colour. The formulas are highly concentrated, with over 70 applications per bottle.
   With its origins in California, and now part of L’Oréal, Pureology has always kept its finger on the pulse of what makes products responsible and good for its users. The original Pureology products were sulphate-free and 100 per cent vegan, and in its 20th year, the new line has a reduced carbon footprint in its sourcing of ingredients, greater water conservation, and the use of 95 per cent post-consumer recycled plastic packaging, which in turn is 100 per cent recyclable. No products or formulations are tested on animals.
   The new line is already on sale at pureology.com and at Salon Centric, and will be available from August on Ulta, Amazon and Sephora.com.

 


Stegmann extends sustainable EcoWool shoe line

Filed by Lucire staff/July 8, 2020/10.58



Austrian brand Stegmann, founded in 1888 and known for its comfortable wool felt footwear, will release an expanded EcoWool clog line on August 3.
   With an eye on species preservation and supporting heritage sheep breeds, the EcoWool clogs come in four colours: Stonesheep, made with wool from Tyrolean Stone sheep in Austria; Shetland, with wool from Shetland sheep in Scotland; Alpaca, with wool from Peruvian alpacas in the Andes; and Juraschaf, with wool from Juraschaf sheep in Switzerland. The latter two are new to the line.
   The uppers are all shaped and stitched by hand. They are then paired with a sustainably sourced cork–Latex footbed. Stegmann’s production line is carbon-neutral, chemical-free and zero-waste.
   The shoes themselves have been recommended by podiatrists, with their arch, toe, metatarsal bar and heel cup support.
   US customers are invited to place their orders at www.stegmannusa.com.

 


Instagram round-up, April 24: whatever you do, don’t mention the pandemic

Filed by Lucire staff/April 24, 2020/12.19

There’s a lot happening around this time of year, including the Orthodox Easter, Earth Day, the start of Ramadan, and ANZAC Day, and over the last week, celebrities have been Instagramming in a more positive way, even though the COVID-19 pandemic is very much with us.
   Natalia Vodianova (@natasupernova) showed off her dining table spread to commemorate the Orthodox Easter: the Orthodox Church never went with the Gregorian calendar and stuck with when they thought Easter should be, so there is a discrepancy between the two dates. They may well have a point: after all, can one Pope really declare a new starting-point for January 1? Religion aside, Vodianova had a colourful display to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ in her own way.
   American model Kara del Toro (@karajewelll) posed with her vintage Chanel sunglasses, which are arguably in vogue for 2020. Del Toro managed to keep up her high standard of photography on her Instagram—we’re guessing that it pays to have archives! Her most obvious COVID-19-related post was four weeks ago; since then her fans have been able to indulge in escapism through her Instagram account.
   It’s the same with Norwegian-born, Australian-based model and singer Hilde Osland (@hildeee), who gathered up her favourites of her in red, and put them into a single post of nine images. She’s a pro at Instagram: whenever we try to post nine, it crashes! She’s also becoming a pro at TikTok, where some of her content is reposted from.
   Our friend Panos Papadopoulos (@panosofficial) poses with sunnies and a black jacket, with a simple message, and comes close to acknowledging the pandemic: ‘Keep your best mood … the world is changing’, while hashtagging #positivevibes. We’ll gratefully accept!
   We completely admire Samantha Hoopes (@samanthahoopes) for being real and showing off bikini photos taken four months after the birth of her child. She notes, ‘7 months later my skin is still all stretched out! This is a reminder of how fucking awesome our bodies are & our journey into our new bodies is all about Self love & confidence is key! For me it has been a ride from loosing all my weight to figuring out ways to “bounce” back & in all of it I am proud of my new shape, new skin & new body!’ We love her positive attitude and it’s a wonderful message to have in these times.
   No stranger to Instagram, Viki Odintcova (@viki_odintcova) is staying at home in Moskva and playing with make-up, taking a selfie and keeping her message simple.
   Claire Rose Cliteur (@clairerose) poses for a selfie wearing eco-friendly, sustainable fashion brand Pangaia, which has its own material science R&D facility. The label, which was founded last year, may well be the first one that combines this level of research with its own collections.
   Finally, commemorating Earth Day is actress Alexandra Daddario (@alexandradaddario), with a million likes of her image in the forest. The earlier text caption has disappeared in favour of a simple Earth emoji, and maybe that’s all you need.

 


Letter from the Veneto, April 16, 2020

Filed by Lucire staff/April 16, 2020/11.01



Top: Webcam view of Piazza San Marco, April 15, 2020. Above: Nature is taking back its territory. At left, the paper sign taped to the dock reads, ‘Caution! Duck eggs.’ In the background of the photo at left, you can see the controversial Calatrava Bridge. At right, a pair of germano reale (wild ducks) have made a nest on the vaporetto dock.

This week we had the pleasure of a lively conversation with our old friend Gianmatteo Zampieri, general manager of the Baglioni Hotel Luna in Venezia. Currently all Baglioni properties in Italy, UK, France and Maldives are shuttered, but plan to reopen after the virus crisis resolves. The Baglioni Group’s main phone lines in Roma and Milano are open to receive queries, cancellations and rebookings.
   Though its doors remain closed, the Luna in Venezia has a skeleton crew on site attending to maintenance and security. Non-residents can’t get into town without an official document which declares the reason for their travel or presence. You’ll be stopped at the train station if you even try to enter Venezia, and the city is quiet and tranquil, with only the occasional pedestrian or military team in sight. Mr Zampieri recommends logging into the live cams at www.skylinewebcams.com/it/webcam/italia/veneto/venezia/piazza-san-marco.html for a real time view of Piazza San Marco and other Venetian locations. The Rialto Bridge is deserted, and uncrowded phantom vaporetti lazily float by. The St Mark’s Basin stands empty, with only stray small craft passing.
   ‘The Lagoon is like a mirror,’ Mr Zampieri said. ‘There’s not a boat to be seen, the water is crystal clear, and schools of little fish are swimming in the canals. We have a gondola landing at our entrance, and we are seeing little crabs crawling up the gondola poles. Ducks are nesting on the vaporetto docks, and laying eggs there.’
   Mr Zampieri has an optimistic perspective on all this. He says that following these difficult times we’ll be given a chance to return to a Venezia renewed, where the air and water are clean, landmarks uncrowded and Baglioni’s teams rested and ready to welcome back guests.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor

 


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