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Reebok partners with National Geographic on new collection

Filed by Lucire staff/September 9, 2021/14.20





Reebok has partnered with National Geographic on a collection, which will retail from September 23, 10 a.m. US EST at reebok.com/national_geographic, with Unlocked members getting early access from September 16.
   The designs are inspired by National Geographic’s stories, and the range spans footwear for the entire family, including kids’ silhouettes that begin from US$50.
   Reebok collaborated with two National Geographic explorers and wildlife advocates, ecologist Dr Rae Wynn-Grant and photographer Matthieu Paley.
   Wynn-Grant said in a release, ‘Shoes are the ultimate portal into exploration. They provide protection as we travel through new terrains, but also, over time they often tell amazing stories about the journeys we’ve taken and the experiences we’ve went through.
   ‘I was thrilled to join Reebok and National Geographic to not only shine a light on the incredible environments that inspired the collection but to also provide inspiration for future exploration.’
   There are Club C and Classic Leather designs for children, while adult silhouettes, from US$80, include the Club C Revenge Legacy, Club C, Classic Leather Legacy AZ, Floatride Energy 3 Adventure, and the flagship (US$140) Nano X1 Adventure. Each silhouette features a unique QR code on the tongue taking the consumer into the world that inspired that particular design, with 360-degree immersive videos and perspectives. Children’s models have fun facts on the inner tongue about the shoe’s habitat theme.






 


Pamela Anderson joins Antartica2020 to advocate for the Southern Ocean

Filed by Lucire staff/September 1, 2021/22.04

Actress and activist Pamela Anderson is lending her voice to Antarctica2020, a group calling for the protection of the Southern Ocean and its wilderness.
   She joins other luminaries such as Philippe Cousteau, Sylvia Earle, Slava Fetisov, José Maria Figueres, Geneviève Pons, Ashlan Gorse Cousteau, and others, who are already members of the group.
   ‘The world is warming, and the polar regions are warming the fastest. The Southern Ocean—which has buffered humanity from the full extent of climate change—is reaching a tipping point. Thousands of the world’s leading scientists overwhelmingly conclude that if we don’t take immediate action to tackle the nature and climate crises, ice melt will accelerate, and sea water will rise and warm to terrifying levels. This will have disastrous and irreversible impacts on ocean life and threaten human existence,’ said the group in a release.
   Anderson added, ‘I have been an activist for more than two decades and see more and more how important it is to radically rethink our relation towards nature and animals. The state of our planet affects all our lives. Many people don’t realize that even Antarctica, one of the remotest parts of the world, plays a major role in how our planet functions. We need to do everything we can to safeguard it, which is why I have joined this campaign.
   ‘The climate crisis is melting Antarctica’s ice much faster than predicted. This is already having disastrous impacts on its amazing wildlife such as penguins, seals and whales, all of which are struggling to keep alive amid all these rapid changes to their home. It is absolutely terrifying, as we are speeding towards a number of tipping points, that are the point of no return for the region and the planet.
   ‘We really need world leaders to step up their game and show real political leadership. They can make history this year by protecting these areas in Antarctica and securing the greatest act of ocean protection ever. We must fight for action for ourselves and future generations because there’s too much to lose if we don’t.’
   The ocean current around Antarctica regulates the entire planet’s climate system, keeping it cool and liveable.
   Antarctica2020 works with Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition (ASOC), the Pew Charitable Trusts, Ocean Unite, Sea Legacy and Only One, among others, to protect the Southern Ocean. They have proposals to protect areas in the East Antarctic, Weddell Sea and the Antarctic Peninsula, covering 4,000,000 km², or 1 per cent of the ocean.

 


MoEa launches sustainable sneakers made from fruits and plants

Filed by Lucire staff/August 1, 2021/13.16



We can see MoEa’s bio-based sustainable sneakers, made from fruits and plants, being the next big thing in footwear. Fully vegan, fully recyclable, PETA-audited and approved, and handcrafted in Porto, Portugal, each MoEa pair is made from one fruit and one plant that have been turned into wearable materials.
   The first batch comprises designs where the colour is based on the buyer’s choice of fruit and plant. You can select from pairs made from apple or grape fibre (from waste juice), pineapple fibre (from waste pineapple leaves), or cactus and corn fibre (from skins).
   The lining is made from 70 per cent recycled bamboo, the soles from 40 per cent recycled rubber, and the insoles from recycled wood fibres.
   To stabilize the waste, the fruits and plants are blended with organic cotton, bio-PU or recycled plastic, depending on the plant. On average, 49 per cent of MoEa’s bio-materials are composed of plants or fruit, and emit 89 per cent less carbon dioxide than leather. The recycled materials have been tested to ensure they have the same comfort and durability as leather.
   Wearers can even send back their old pair to be recycled into up to 40 per cent of a new sole.
   The producers are certified, with the materials either USDA bio-preferred or comply with global recycled standards. MoEa donates 1 per cent of its gross sales to WWF and its forest protection programme.
   The shoes can be pre-ordered via MoEa’s Kickstarter, with deliveries commencing September 2021. Prices begin at €89.


 


The Firebird a triumph for the Royal New Zealand Ballet and Loughlin Prior

Filed by Jack Yan/July 29, 2021/14.49







Stephen A’Court

Every element came together for the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s The Firebird

Loughlan Prior’s The Firebird is a triumph for the Royal New Zealand Ballet, one that raises Prior’s own high standards, perfectly suited to the strengths of the company and its regular collaborators.
   Its première at the Opera House in Wellington last night was paired with the classic Paquita, which opened the show. Each ballet is roughly an hour long, with a 20-minute interval in between.
   With the hour’s run time, this is the version of Paquita that’s more regularly seen today, comprising a single act, and letting the dancers shine. It has been staged by Michael Auer and RNZB artistic director Patricia Barker, with Laura McQueen Schultz as ballet master. The costumes by Donna Jeffris and Barker are sumptuous and in the Russian tradition, with a bright set designed by Howard C. Jones and lit by Jon Buswell. Because it has been reduced to the final act, the traditional narrative is gone, but it remains a ballet that demonstrates the skills of the dancers, and there is plenty of energy, thanks to Marcus Petipa’s choreography keeping audiences enthralled.
   Mayu Tanigaito, in the pas de trois on opening night, is one of the RNZB’s greatest assets today as her performance and skill continue to rise, while we also have to note Kirby Selchow’s solo, showing her control and strength. But it was over to Kate Kadow and Laurynas Véjalis to do the most complex moves in the ballet: Kadow spent large parts of the grand pas de deux en pointe, and she executed an impressive series of pirouettes as part of the grand pas variations in the finalé. Véjalis, meanwhile, is a powerful, graceful dancer whose made some impressive and technically difficult leaps.

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Stephen A’Court

   As enjoyable as Paquita was, we weren’t prepared for the dramatic impact and choreographic quality of The Firebird. This is the fourth version of the Stravinsky ballet performed by the company, reimagined completely for the 2020s, and with a message that is directly relevant to audiences today.
   Prior has set his version of The Firebird in a dystopian wasteland, led by the tyrannical Burnt Mask (Paul Mathews, in an excellent turn as the antagonist). The Scavengers from the settlement head out in search of food and water, and it’s on the search that Arrow (Harrison James), left behind by the pack, encounters the Firebird (Ana Gallardo Lobaina).
   It’s a direct contrast to Paquita, with extensive use of animation and graphics by POW Studios’ Marie Silberstein and Tim Hamilton, while Tracy Grant Lord’s costumes and set design place audiences right into the desert of the wasteland. The Firebird’s flames are cleverly projected on her, bringing her powers to life; they have a natural, organic effect. The image of a burning orb is a motif here, signalling both fire and rebirth; NASA imagery of the sun served as an early inspiration. Buswell, here, too works his lighting magic to great effect, taking the colours from the animations and letting both performers and animations do their work. Every aspect came together perfectly with Igor Stravinsky’s score.
   The Firebird is great storytelling at its heart, an intense drama that held us spellbound, that the precise techniques and movements of the dancers served to enhance. Lobaina’s Firebird was largely en pointe as the mythical creature whose feathers could draw water; and with James’s Arrow there are romantic pas de deux moments that, with classical movements at the core, highlighted innovative approaches in Prior’s choreography.
   When the Firebird is brought by the Burnt Mask and his scavengers back to the settlement, there are suggestions of violence danced out on stage. Neve (Sara Garbowski), Arrow’s partner, and Elizaveta (Kirby Selchow), the Burnt Mask’s second in command, play their roles convincingly, especially the final confrontation between the Firebird and the principal antagonists. Here, Lobaina has a chance to shine as the Firebird regains her strength, portrayed by the addition of four ballerinos who add volume to her wings.
   Buswell very cleverly turns off the lights at The Firebird’s final moment, leaving things on a powerful high, and we were left breath-taken with the intensity of the one hour’s drama that had just unfolded.
   Prior wants to remind us that we are fortunate to live in the conditions on Earth that we currently do, and The Firebird is a warning of a world where things have gone drastically wrong for all life on the planet. We have a symbiosis with all earthly life, in which climate action and conservation must be at the fore of what we do. In the uncertain vacuum of a post-pandemic era, The Firebird suggests what could happen if no action is taken.
   No wonder there were members of the audience standing at the end, and numerous curtain calls for the dancers and the team. There is no exaggeration when we say, ‘If you can only see one ballet this year, make it The Firebird’—if we gave star ratings, this was a deserved 10 out of 10.—Jack Yan, Publisher

The Firebird with Paquita tours New Zealand from July 29 to September 2. It runs in Wellington till July 31 inclusive; then heads to Napier (August 6–7), Auckland (August 12–14), Dunedin (August 21), Christchurch (August 26–8), and Palmerston North (September 2). Tickets are available here.

 


Piki Poma creates sustainable fashion made from innovative recycled fibre

Filed by Lucire staff/July 24, 2021/12.02



Sisters Mirna Litović and Ida Babić have created their sustainable label, Piki Poma, with a skirt, two dresses and a scarf made from Repreve, a 100 per cent recycled fibre made from transformed PET plastic bottles.
   The Baal skirt, Fabela slip-on dress, Tago tunic–dress and Momi scarf have a textured, crushed, and pleated appearance. Colours available are black, nude, red, and grey.
   The items are all hand-crafted in Croatia.
   Also part of Piki Poma’s range are its Wow clogs, made from natural vegan materials, with a wooden shoe base and a cork wood upper.
   Its Flirty bag uses vegan leather for its top handle, while the eco-conscious jewellery collection uses natural products, and finished with natural oils. There’s more at pikipoma.com.





 


Stefania Ferrario would rather go naked than wear wool in latest PETA PSA

Filed by Lucire staff/July 20, 2021/11.08

PETA’s latest spokesperson in its ‘I’d rather go naked’ campaign is Stefania Ferrario, the Australian model who’s urging people to ‘leave wool behind’.
   Ferrario’s message is that ‘Ewe can do better! Wear vegan.’
   In the campaign video shown below, Ferrario says, ‘Workers are being paid for the volume of wool they’re producing, so when they’re shearing the sheep, they’re going really fast. The sheep can end up having horrific gashes, bleeding, and then they’ll sew the sheep up without any anæsthetic.’ Viewers are advised that there are distressing scenes.
   PETA and its affiliates’ exposés have revealed that Australian sheep have chunks cut off their backsides during mulesing, and found distressing cruelty at each of the 100 properties they visited.
   Ferrario has over 1 million Instagram followers and has modelled for some of the world’s biggest brands. She joins celebrities such as Alicia Silverstone, Arianwen Parkes-Lockwood, and Joaquin Phoenix in speaking out against the barbarism in the wool industry. PETA notes that wool is ranked on the Higg Materials Sustainability Index as worse for the environment than polyurethane, nylon, and acrylic.

 


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