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Party time at the Festival de Cannes on day eight: Elsa Hosk, Irina Shayk, Eva Longoria, Doutzen Krœs


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 25, 2017/23.31




Jacovides-Borde-Moreau/Bestima; Dominique Charriau; Stéphane Feugère

You would be forgiven thinking there was a sense of déjà vu at day eight of the Cannes Film Festival, with Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled starring Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell again. Adapted from the novel by Thomas P. Cullinan, a 1971 adaptation had starred Clint Eastwood, and is considered one of the actor’s best works.
   Coppola’s version has had generally positive reviews at Cannes (The Independent was a detractor) but mixed ones in earlier previews.
   Once again, it was red carpet-watching that earned more nods, as well as the L’Oréal Paris Cinema Club party, which commemorates the French cosmetics’ brand’s 20th anniversary at the Festival de Cannes.
   Swedish model Elsa Hosk wore Alberta Ferretti with jewellery by de Grisogono; and Hailey Baldwin wore Ralph & Russo with de Grisogono jewellery. Both ladies showed again that this year’s Cannes Film Festival is about how high the thigh split can go. Kidman chose Michael Kors, while Elle Fanning opted for Rodarte; Jasmine Tookes chose Georges Chakra.
   L’Oréalistas Emily Canham, Irina Shayk, Lara Stone, Maria Borges, Paola Turani, Doutzen KrÅ“s, Ophelie Duvillard, Neelam Gill, Regina Todorenko, Stefanie Giesinger and Lena Meyer-Landrut represented the brand on one of its biggest days at Cannes.
   At the L’Oréal Paris do, Doutzen KrÅ“s, Eva Longoria, Maria Borges, Cindy Bruna, Irina Shayk, Neelam Gill, Alexina Graham, Bianca Balti and Lara Stone all appeared in Balmain, as the two companies celebrated an upcoming Balmain Paris × L’Oréal Paris lipstick collection. Balmain’s creative director, Olivier Rousteing, was in attendance at both the première and the evening party.

Getting there







Gareth Cattermole

Red carpet























Pascal le Segretain; Neilson Barnard; Stéphane Cardinale/Corbis; Dominique Charriau; Gisela Schober

L’Oréal Paris Cinema Club party: photocall












































































Stéphane Feugère



































Steven Herteleer

Party time at the Festival de Cannes, day seven: Barbara Palvin, Elsa Hosk, Camila Morrone, Ming Xi, Rita Ora


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 24, 2017/14.39




Joe Schildhorn/BFA.com; Venturelli

Day seven at the Festival de Cannes saw the film festival commemorate its 70th anniversary, with celebrities gathering for a group photo, and Isabelle Huppert kicking off the ceremony by singing ‘Happy birthday’. That evening, the festival also paid tribute to the victims of the Manchester terrorist bombing that occurred the night before with a moment of silence at the steps of the Palais des Festivals.
   Former Palme d’Or winners were on hand for the photo, including Jane Campion, still the only female director in 70 years to walk off with the top prize at Cannes.
   An official dinner followed, and some celebrities did double-duty attending that and the annual de Grisogono party at the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc on the Cap d’Antibes.
   Day seven celebrities on the red carpet included Bianca Balti (in Alberta Ferretti; jewellery by de Grisogono), Rita Ora (in a nude Elie Saab spring 2017 haute couture floor-length dress; jewellery also by de Grisogono), Lily-Rose Depp (in a white Chanel gown), Elle Fanning (in Vivienne Westwood), Monica Bellucci (in a Stella McCartney jumpsuit), Bella Hadid (in Dior, with a thigh-high split), Julianne Moore (in Givenchy), Susan Sarandon (in Alberta Ferretti), Jessica Chastain (in Alexander McQueen), Fan Bing Bing (in Elie Saab), Natasha Poly, and Eva Herzigova (in Roberto Cavalli; jewellery by Chopard).
   Balti’s fellow L’Oréalistas Barbara Palvin, Natalia Cabezas, Guan Xiaotong (關曉彤, a.k.a. Traey Miley), Patry Jordán, Svetlana Khodchenkova, Priscilla Alvarez Sánchez and Eva Longoria represented the French cosmetics’ brand as it celebrated its 20th anniversary at Cannes. Doutzen KrÅ“s joined Longoria and Palvin on the L’Oréal Paris’s beach studio for more promotions. The company also issued a series of portraits and a video starring Palvin, showing make-up looks through the last seven decades.
   Palvin’s red-carpet look featured L’Oréal Paris’s True Match Illuminating Powder (in Icy Glow), two Matte Addiction lipsticks (in no. 633, Moka Chic, and 634, Greige Perfecto), Infallible Blush Paint Palette (in pink), Super Liner Perfect Slim (in Intense Black) and the Brow Artist (no. 106, Brunette).
   At the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc for the Love on the Rocks party, hosted by de Grisogono boss Fawaz Gruosi, were Elsa Hosk, Camila Morrone, Hailey Baldwin, Antonio Banderas, Dite Anata, Cindy Bruna, Rita Ora, Tomer Sisley, Natasha Poly, Amy Jackson, Ming Xi, Doina Ciobanu, Victoria Silvstedt, Chris Tucker, Tina Kunakey, Jenaye Noah, and Harvey Weinstein.
























Gareth Cattermole; Pascal Le Segretain; Antony Jones; Venturelli; Stephane Cardinale/Corbis; Gisele Schober;










Anita Dykes; Venturelli, Gisela Schober; Dominique Charriau



































Antony Jones; Joe Schildhorn/BFA.com

Barbara Palvin and 70 years

Barbara Palvin: 70 years of make-up by Lucire










Jonas Breslin

Sonam Kapoor, Eva Longoria, Jourdan Dunn, Jenaye Noah light up the Cannes red carpet on day six


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 23, 2017/15.32




Stéphane Cardinale/Corbis; Olivier Borde; Gareth Cattermole

Monday’s screening of the Colin Farrell–Nicole Kidman starrer The Killing of a Sacred Deer at the Festival de Cannes—the Cannes Film Festival—saw L’Oréalistas Sonam Kapoor, Eva Longoria, Andie MacDowell, Caroline Receveur, and blogger Kristina Bazan, as well as Kidman herself, Juliette Binoche, Jourdan Dunn, Sara Sampaio, Jenaye Noah, and Kristin Scott Thomas.
   Kapoor chose a gown from the Elie Saab couture range on her first red-carpet appearance for the French cosmetics’ giant, Longoria wore a Marchesa tulle dress (from its pre-autumn 2017 collection), MacDowell wore Roberto Cavalli with a Roger Vivier clutch. Kidman chose Calvin Klein by Appointment for her Cannes première, and Binoche wore Balmain. Dunn also chose Elie Saab, from the spring–summer 2017 couture range, with jewellery by de Grisogono. Sampaio wore Francesco Scognamiglio from his spring–summer 2017 couture collection, complemented by Avakian jewellery. Scott Thomas wore Schiaparelli, complemented by de Grisogono jewellery; Noah, whose shoes were by Giuseppe Zanotti, also chose de Grisogono for her jewellery.

































Gareth Cattermole; Dominique Charriau; Venturelli; Stéphane Cardinale/Corbis; Jacovides–Borde–Moreau/Bestimage; Olivier Borde; Gisela Schober; Antony Jones; Pascal le Segretain

L’Oréal Paris close-ups





Jonas Bresnan

Sir Roger Moore, UNICEF ambassador and longest-serving James Bond actor, passes away


NEWS  by Jack Yan//14.42


UNICEF


© Danjaq LLC/United Artists

Top: Sir Roger Moore was a UNICEF goodwill ambassador from 1991 to 2017. Above: Moore on the set of Live and Let Die, his first James Bond film, in 1972.

Actor and UNICEF ambassador Sir Roger Moore has passed away in Switzerland, aged 89.
   His children by his third wife Luisa, Deborah, Geoffrey and Christian, issued a statement today, saying that their father had had a short battle with cancer.
   â€˜The love with which he was surrounded in his final days was so great it cannot be quantified in words alone,’ they said.
   Roger George Moore was born October 14, 1927, in Stockwell, the son of George Alfred Moore, a policeman, and Lillian Moore (née Pope). An only child, Moore had a talent for art, one that he maintained through his life, and began in the film business as a trainee animator, joining the Association of Cinema Technicians’ union as a teenager. Through friends, he began doing work as an extra, and through that he was encouraged to join RADA. His father, an amateur actor, was supportive of this, and his fees were paid for by film director Brian Desmond Hurst.
   He married a fellow RADA student, Doorn van Steyn, in 1946. After World War II, he was conscripted for national service, and was commissioned into the Royal Army Service Corps. After three years in the army, Moore found himself unemployed, with Hurst soon hiring him for a tiny role in Trottie True. Television and stage work followed, as well as modelling for knitwear. His marriage to van Steyn soon fell apart. In 1952, Moore began a relationship with Dorothy Squires, the Welsh singer, who was 13 years his senior, causing a scandal at the time. They were married in Jersey City in July 1953. Moore eventually picked up a contract with MGM, beginning there on April Fool’s Day, 1954. Moore’s early films, where his highest billing was third, were unsuccessful, and after Diane, a 1956 film starring Lana Turner, flopped, he was fired, with five years remaining on his original seven-year contract.
   In 1956, the TV series Ivanhoe came Moore’s way, where he played the title role of Sir Wilfred of Ivanhoe. As the series ended, Warner Bros. called Moore, and he returned to Hollywood movies, first with The Miracle (1959), but also found himself on TV series, first with The Alaskans and then, Maverick, where he took over from James Garner. In 1961, while filming The Rape of the Sabine Women in Italy, Moore left Squires for the actress Luisa Mattioli.
   However, it was The Saint, back in the UK, that made Moore a household name. Moore had tried to acquire the television rights for the Leslie Charteris books himself, but was unsuccessful. Producers Bob Baker and Monty Berman had managed to secure them, and offered the lead role of Simon Templar to Moore. The series ran for 118 episodes, and Moore was said to have been the first British television millionaire. Thanks to his membership of the Association of Cinema Technicians, he directed some episodes of The Saint as well. When Baker and Berman went their separate ways during production, Moore became Baker’s junior partner. Toward the end of 1968, Squires agreed to grant Moore a divorce and he and Mattioli were married.
   After The Saint, Moore starred in Crossplot, a spy caper that felt much like a longer episode of The Saint, made by many of the same crew. He also starred in The Man Who Haunted Himself, which critics usually say showed Moore’s true range as an actor. Moore himself tended to be self-deprecating about his acting abilities, which potentially limited the types of roles he was offered.
   Perhaps similar to his Simon Templar character was Lord Brett Sinclair in The Persuaders, a role that Moore played for one season in 1970–1, alongside Tony Curtis. The concept had been trialled in an episode of The Saint, called ‘The Ex-King of Diamonds’, with Stuart Damon as Templar’s sidekick. Grade had sold the series before Moore had agreed to do it, and convinced him to do it by saying, ‘The country needs the money. Think of your Queen.’
   The Persuaders, at the time the most expensive show on television (with much of the money going to the leads’ salaries) was successful in most markets but the crucial US one. It was during this time that Moore was shoulder-tapped to succeed Sean Connery as James Bond, and plans for a second season of The Persauders, and talk of Noël Harrison taking over for Moore, came to nought.
   It is possible that an obituary for Moore would be far less significant if he had not risen to take on one of the most hallowed cinematic roles in British cinema, that of Ian Fleming’s James Bond, for Live and Let Die in 1973. Moore played the secret agent seven times for Eon Productions, and even spoofed his role in The Cannonball Run in 1981, a record number of times. Moore kept working in film outside of Bond, including Peter Hunt’s Gold in 1974, Shout at the Devil opposite Lee Marvin in 1976, The Wild Geese in 1978 with Richard Burton and Richard Harris, and as the cat-loving Rufus Excalibur ffolkes in North Sea Hijack (a.k.a. ffolkes) in 1979. Moore also played a post-plastic surgery Chief Insp Clouseau in Curse of the Pink Panther in 1983. In another dramatic role, one often overlooked, Moore played Dr Judd Stevens in Bryan Forbes’s thriller The Naked Face in 1984.
   Post-Bond, Moore made fewer films. Willy Bogner’s Feuer, Eis & Dynamit in 1990 featured Moore and his son, Geoffrey; Michael Winner’s romp Bullseye, with Michael Caine, followed the same year, and featured Moore’s daughter, Deborah. Younger audiences would know Moore from Spice World in 1999.
   Audrey Hepburn invited Moore to a UNICEF event in 1991. Hepburn had been a goodwill ambassador for the organization, and Moore eventually joined, paid the sum of $1 a year. It was for his work for UNICEF that Moore was knighted in 1999.
   Moore had been diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1993. After taking stock, he and Mattioli separated in 1993, and Moore set up home with Swedish-born socialite Kristina Tholstrup in Monaco soon after. Mattioli granted Moore a divorce in 2000, and he and Tholstrup married in 2002. Tholstrup had accompanied Moore on most of his UNICEF tours.
   As Sir Roger Moore, he had authored numerous books, including My Word Is My Bond, his autobiography, and his last appearance was on stage at the Royal Festival Hall in November 2016.
   A private funeral will be held in Monaco.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Festival de Cannes, day five: Sonam Kapoor, Mary J. Blige, Araya A. Hargate; Eva Longoria promotes L’Oréal Paris


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 22, 2017/2.21




Pascal Le Segretain, Venturelli

The Cannes Film Festival’s fifth day’s screening of The Meyerowitz Stories at Cannes saw L’Oréalistas Sonam Kapoor, Araya A. Hargate, Andie MacDowell, Iris Berben, Heike Makatash and YouTuber EnjoyPhoenix, as well as Dustin Hoffman, Ben Stiller, Jessica Chastain, Mary J. Blige, Coco Rocha, Olya Kurylenko, Laetitia Casta, Isabelle Huppert, Karena Ng, Greta Gerwig, Barbara Meier and Molly Sims. Away from the red carpet, Eva Longoria promoted L’Oréal Paris at a boutique meet-and-greet and surprised unwitting customers who didn’t expect a Hollywood star to serve them.
   Kapoor chose a custom pink gown from Elie Saab couture on her first red-carpet appearance for the French cosmetics’ giant, while ‘Champoo’—Hargate—proudly displayed her five-month pregnancy in an Alexis Mabille autumn–winter 2014–15 gown complemented with jewellery by Chopard. MacDowell chose Roberto Cavalli paired with Giuseppe Zanotti shoes and also Chopard jewellery. Chastain went for Christian Dior couture spring–summer 2017, with shoes by Giuseppe Zanotti and jewellery by Piaget. Casta wore a black Yves Saint Laurent autumn–winter 2017–18 dress.
   Blige wore a dress by Reem Acra with jewellery by Avakian.
   L’Oréal Paris said Kapoor’s look used True Match Illuminating Powder (in Icy Glow), Color Riche Nude Palette (pink), Color Riche lipstick (organza), Brow Artist Expert (ebony), Infallible Paint Blush Palette (amber) and Volume Million Lashes mascara.



Gareth Cattermole













Venturelli, Dominique Charriau, Gisela Schober, Stéphane Cardinale/Corbis, Pascal le Segretain


Eva Longoria surprises shoppers at a L’Oréal boutique by Lucire

Boutique meet-and-greet









Gareth Cattermole

Behind the scenes





Gareth Cattermole

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Araya A. Hargate, Kendall Jenner, Ming Xi dial up the glamour at Festival de Cannes, day four


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 21, 2017/12.51




Andreas Rentz; Venturelli; courtesy Giambattista Valli

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan wowed the Cannes Film Festival crowds at the première of Robin Campillo’s Aids drama 120 battements par minute (120 Beats Per Minute) in a stunning strapless red Ralph & Russo gown.
   L’Oréal Paris’s global make-up director Val Garland used True Match foundation (in Amber Gold) and concealer (no. 10) for the Bollywood actress and former Miss World, along with a deep magenta shade for her lips (Color Riche Matte Addiction, no. 430, Mon Jules) paired with a brighter red (no. 346, Scarlette Silhouette), Super Liner Perfect Slim (in Intense Black), and Mega Volume Miss (in Manga Black).
   For the first time, Rai Bachchan brought her daughter, Aaradhya, who rode with her in the Renault van to the Festival. For once the actress was in danger of being upstaged by Aaradhya, dressed in pink and clearly enjoying her princess moment.
   Rai Bachchan’s fellow L’Oréal Paris spokeswomen Araya A. Hargate wore a fuchsia dress from Zuhair Murad’s spring–summer 2017 collection, and Liya Kebede wore a Paco Rabanne design from the autumn–winter 2017–18 collection.
   Ming Xi wore an Albert Ferretti dress complemented by jewellery from de Grisogono (a High Jewellery necklace and earrings with, inter alia, white diamonds and blue sapphires; a High Jewellery bracelet in white gold set in white diamonds and emeralds), and accompanied de Grisogono boss Fawaz Gruosi on the red carpet. Pamela Anderson also chose de Grisogono jewellery, namely the Anelli earrings in pink gold set with white diamonds and the Allegra bracelet in pink gold set with white diamonds.
   Sara Sampaio opted for Giorgio Armani Privé with jewellery by Avakian, and Kristen Stewart, of course, wore Chanel, from its resort 2018 collection. Kendall Jenner wore a Giambattista Valli dress with Chopard jewellery.
   L’Oréal Paris also released two close-up beauty shots of Rai Bachchan from earlier in the week.





Gareth Cattermole










Andreas Rentz; Venturelli; Dominique Charriau



Venturelli; Pascal le Segretain




Venturelli; Pascal le Segretain


Aishwarya Rai Bachchan by Lucire

Behind the scenes


Jonas Bresnan

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Rihanna among the most glamorous at Festival de Cannes, day three


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 20, 2017/13.29




Venturelli; Pascal Le Segretain; Andreas Rentz; courtesy Dior

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan always causes a stir when she heads to the Festival de Cannes, both as a L’Oréal Paris spokeswoman and as an actress in her own right. This year, her powder blue ballroom gown, by Filipino designer Michael Cinco, was covered with beads and featured a massive skirt—comfortably the biggest we’ve seen so far over the last three days.
   Rai Bachchan’s gown was from Cinco’s appropriately named Impalpable Dream of Versailles collection.
   L’Oréal Paris’s global make-up director Val Garland and her team gave the Bollywood actress and former Miss World a look using the company’s True Match foundation (in Amber Gold) and concealer (no. 10) were complemented by Color Riche Matte Addiction (in Greige Perfecto), Infallible Blush paint palette (in Amber), Volume Million Lashes (in Fatale) and Infallible Nudist Lip Paint Off White (no. 208).
   Joining Rai Bachchan on the red carpet were fellow L’Oréal Paris spokeswomen Li Yuchun, Julianne Moore, and Thylane Blondeau. Behind the scenes, meanwhile, were Chompoo Araya A. Hargate and Elle Fanning, who popped into L’Oréal Paris’s Cinema Club on Friday.
   Other head-turning celebrities at the première of Netflix’s Okja were Bella Hadid (in Christian Dior, with a Bulgari snake), Rihanna (also in Dior, resplendent in white and looking much like a wedding outfit), Jessica Chastain (in Givenchy) and Lily Collins (in Ralph & Russo), who appears in the film.
   The première did not go well for the Netflix film, already the subject of controversy because it was not released into French cinemas. The Meyerowitz Stories, which stars Ben Stiller, is another film purchased by Netflix that will also not be shown on general cinematic release in France.
   Okja was projected at the wrong aspect ratio and suffered from sustained heckling from the audience.








Gisela Schober; Andreas Rentz; Tristan Fewings; Dominique Charriau


Elle Fanning at L’Oréal Paris’s Cinema Club by Lucire

Behind the scenes




Jonas Bresnan; Gareth Cattermole

Three by Ekman: the Royal New Zealand Ballet shows its witty, ingenious side


NEWS  by Jack Yan//12.01



Stephen A’Court

Swedish-born choreographer–director Alexander Ekman, it transpires, was the first person Francesco Ventriglia called when he was first appointed artistic director of the Royal New Zealand Ballet. Ekman, says Ventriglia, creates choreography that is ‘different, brave, intelligent, witty and fun,’ and he sees the work as being the equivalent of ‘good food’ for the dancers. The three ballets in Three by Ekman are certainly that: modern and relevant, yet somehow also timeless in their appeal. Tuplet, Episode 31 and Cacti keep audiences gripped, while taking us on a journey into unexplored territories.
   They aren’t fully unexplored, mind: regular RNZB attendees will remember Cacti from last year’s trio of ballets in Speed of Light, but seeing it again this time was a renewed pleasure, and connecting it to two more Ekman ballets gives it an extra dimension. As the third ballet, Cacti was a fitting conclusion: when you’re in Ekman’s world, you almost want to stay in it in an attempt to understand the creativity that drives this talented and important modern choreographer. It’s a world that’s energizing, spontaneous, but cheekily self-aware.
   The first foray into that world is Tuplet, a clever 18-minute introduction where the dancers’ own breaths, voices, and the sounds of their bodies become the rhythm. Composer (and a fellow Swedish-born international talent) Mikael Karlsson’s music has a dose of Bart Howard’s ‘Fly Me to the Moon’ as performed by Victor Feldman helped set the mood. Video projections, which were also designed by Ekman, feature slowed-down black-and-white clips of jazz musicians, highlighting the improvised nature of the dance, performed by six dancers standing on white square mats. New Yorker and Parsons alum Nancy Haeyung Bae designed the costumes, which aided the movement well, and Amith Chandrashaker the lighting, which balanced the the dancers with the video screens above. The conclusion was clever and a taste of Ekman’s humour: he showed silent films of audiences applauding as the live one at the St James Theatre did the same while the curtain fell.
   A video introduction to Episode 31 followed, showing the RNZB’s dancers learning the ballet. It’s a tradition of Episode 31, where a short film is made in the city in which it is performed. The film shows that the dancers were not restricted to the studio, as they ventured out from the Theatre in flash-mob style to various Wellington landmarks such as the cable car and the Botanic Garden; Mayor Justin Lester is caught walking by as the company vigorously dances Episode 31 on the waterfront. (The video is below, though we recommend you don’t spoil the experience.) The dance is a celebration of youth, energy and pace, fitting given its origins as a piece created for Julliard (and first performed in 2011; the video there made use of New York City landmarks such as the Subway). Karlsson once again composed the music, with costumes by Julliard’s Luke Simcock, and lighting by Nicole Pearce. Simcock’s visually deconstructed black and white costumes happily mix genders (e.g. skirts and collared dresses with prints of jackets), as does the make-up on the dancers (mustachioed faces on pale white). The pacy performance itself is contrasted with one dancer who moved in slow motion across the front of the stage; the curtain rose and fell to show vignettes of the action going on behind, leaving you wondering: are we really seeing vignettes or are the dancers repositioning themselves intentionally in preparation for the next reveal? The lighting rig came down, flooring was lifted up and moved, and a second slow-motion dancer wandered with a sign reading ‘Beautiful’ in a stark, all-cap Helvetica (the design of this sign itself is an exercise in irony). As with other Ekman ballets, spoken words accompany the action, with poetry (and this is the programme’s list) by Christina Rossetti, William Allingham, Eleanor Farjeon, Robert Louis Stevenson, William Hughes Mearns and Edward Lear.
   A second video came after the interval, where Ekman is seen on a ferry to Somes Island in Wellington, contemplating choreography and its connection to its surroundings. Will I affect the island or will the island affect me? You can’t but help find Ekman’s quirky personality endearing and you form a connection with the choreographer—and understand that there is a method here, from a man who constantly looks for ways to push ballet forward.
   There’s less chaos in Cacti than in Episode 31. Here, spoken word also features, in an unsubtle dig at postmodernism and the pretentious reviews modern dance might get (one only hopes this article is not an example), with a recording written and voiced by Spenser Theberge. The New Zealand String Quartet accompanies the action here, with both composed and improvised music, at least for the first part of Cacti, before classical music (Haydn, Schubert, and Beethoven) takes over. The 16 dancers move their white tiles, shouting and clapping as they added to the rhythm, before bringing in cactus plants on-stage. Ekman himself designed the set and costumes; Tom Visser also worked on the set and designed the lighting. The second part, a duet between characters Aram and Riley, is another humorous Ekman take, where the audience can hear the streams of consciousness from the pair (played by Alexandre Ferreira and Laura Saxon Jones today). As noted in our review last year, Cacti breaks down the pretence and complexity of ballet into basic statements: the two characters are disengaged from any story and just want to get the dance done. The stuffed cat that is thrown on stage still surprises on a second viewing, and we note that it was a different colour this time.
   When Cacti was part of Speed of Light, we only got a dose of Ekman’s style. This time, we were immersed, and Three by Ekman feels more satisfying and complete. It’s one of the RNZB’s most enjoyable modern ballets, and it’s consistent throughout, not just in the expertise of the dancers, but in the tone and ingenuity of the three works.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Three by Ekman tours till June 15. For venue and booking information, visit www.rnzb.org.nz.

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