Lucire: News


November 25, 2015

H&M collaborates with Musée des Arts Décoratifs at the Palais du Louvre for Conscious Exclusive collection

Lucire staff/8.35

Hennes & Mauritz’s next collaboration is with the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in the Palais du Louvre in Paris, this time for its H&M Conscious Exclusive collection, with Julia Restoin Roitfeld as the face of the new campaign.
   â€˜I am honoured to be the ambassador of such a unique project. I think that the idea of creating a collection inspired by the history of art and fashion is fantastic. Especially since it is made with innovative and sustainable materials which are the future of fashion,’ says Roitfeld.
   H&M Conscious is the Swedish retailer’s sustainable, socially responsible collection, and this Exclusive collaboration sees the company work with materials such as beads and rhinestones made from recycled glass and Denimite, which is made from recycled denim. ‘We brought the idea of sustainability to new levels,’ noted Ann-Sofie Johansson, H&M’s creative adviser. ‘We have created contemporary styles imbued with a sophisticated charm.’
   The collection has been inspired by the museum’s archives, and will be launched on April 7, coinciding with the opening of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs’ Fashion Forward: Three Centuries of Fashion exhibition. H&M’s designers have also looked at the work of artists such as Gustave Moreau for the collection.
   H&M promises a line of ‘modern red-carpet pieces infused with tactile charm, a nostalgic æsthetic and a historical legacy.’ It features both clothing and accessories for women.
   The company is the exclusive sponsor of the exhibition, which will feature styles from its own archives, including items from its first collaboration in 2004 with Karl Lagerfeld and the latest collection.
   The collection will retail in 100 stores worldwide and online at

November 24, 2015

Video and photos: double win for J. W. Anderson at British Fashion Awards 2015; Gwendoline Christie wins Style Award

Lucire staff/3.01

Mike Marsland/British Fashion Council

Jonathan Anderson, the man behind the label J. W. Anderson, has scooped both the men’s and women’s Designer of the Year awards at the British Fashion Awards last night, held at the Coliseum in London.
   Anderson has previously won the men’s prize, in 2014, the New Establishment Designer award in 2013, and the Emerging Womenswear Designer award in 2012.
   As detailed earlier by the British Fashion Council, Karl Lagerfeld won the Outstanding Achievement Award for his contribution to the fashion industry.
   Other heavyweight names on the night included Tom Ford, who was recognized with the Red Carpet award, for creating global awareness of one’s designs in the media (Lady Gaga collected on his behalf); Burberry, with the Creative Campaign award for its editorial and advertising; and Alessandro Michele for Gucci as the International Designer.
   The much-acclaimed Isabella Blow Award for Fashion Creator was given to Nick Knight, for his contribution to the global fashion industry.
   Charlotte Olympia won the Accessory Designer award, and Stella McCartney was recognized as the best brand. Erdem won the Establishment Designer award for its retail and ecommerce presences, while Mary Katrantzou won the New Establishment Designer award.
   Jourdan Dunn won the award for Model of the Year. Game of Thrones actress Gwendoline Christie was named the winner of the British Style Award, which was voted on by 6,000 people.
   Of the three emerging designer awards, the winners were Thomas Tait for womenswear, Grace Wales Bonner for menswear, and Jordan Askill for accessories.
   VIPs attending or presenting included British Fashion Council chair Natalie Massenet, Victoria and David Beckham, Tinie Tempah, Cheryl Fernandez-Versini, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Sarah Burton, Naomi Campbell, Anna Wintour, Angela Scanlon, Liv Tyler, Nick Grimshaw, Lily Allen, Poppy Delevingne, Rita Ora, Robert Konjic, Mollie King, Alexa Chung, Yasmin Le Bon, Laura Bailey, Pierre Denis, Imran Amed, Markus Lupfer, Gareth Pugh, Elisa Sednaoui, Michael Polish, Sandra Choi, Alexandra Shulman, FKA Twigs, Sophie Dahl, Sam Rollinson, Jack Whitehall, Jim Chapman, Immy Waterhouse, Elisa Sednaoui, Georgia May Jagger, Olga Kurylenko, Olivier Rousteing, Faustine Steinmetz, Harold Tillman, Jefferson Hack, Marc Hare, Christopher Raeburn, Stephen Jones, Molly Goddard, Susanna Lau, Kate Beckinsale, Mario Testino, Malaika Firth, Jamie Bochert, Charlotte Simone, Edie Campbell, Lulu Kennedy, Salma Hayek and François-Henri Pinault, Roksanda Ilincić, Lilah Parsons, Katie Grand, Carson McColl, Giles Deacon, Lewis Hamilton, Nadja Swarovski, Daisy Lowe, David Burton, David Koma, Lara Stone, Lucky Blue Smith, Fernando Jorge, Sid Bryan, Jack Guinness, Sarah-Jane Crawford, Pixie Lott and Oliver Cheshire, Helen Wright, Emilia Wickstead, Erin O’Connor, Anya Hindmarch, Henry Holland, Noomi Rapace, Craig Green, Adrian Joffe, Astrid Andersen Mollie King, Jo Elvin, Patrick Grant, Peter Pilotto, Sophia Sanchez de Betak, Christopher de Vos, Christopher Kane, Sophia Neophitou-Apostolou, Joseph Altazurra, Richard Nicoll, Tanya Burr, Kate Bosworth, Karlie Kloss, Joanna Lumley and Jennifer Saunders (as Patsy Stone and Eddy Monsoon), Orlando Bloom, Suzy Menkes, Alasdhair Willis, Alice Dellal, Chloë Green, Arizona Muse and Amy Cole.
   Sponsors for the evening included principal partner Swarovski, presenting partners MAC and Toni & Guy, and official sponsors Ciroc, Marks & Spencer, Mercedes-Benz and St Martins Lane. Other supporters included Diptyque Paris, Fashion & Beauty Monitor, Fiji Water, Nikki Tibbles, Warsteiner and Wild at Heart.

Red carpet

Gwendoline Christie interview

Lucky Blue Smith

Suzy Menkes

Jack Whitehall

Alessandro Michele

Rita Ora


Jourdan Dunn

Lady Gaga

Mike Marsland/British Fashion Council

Winners’ enclosure
Lady Gaga accepts on behalf of Tom Ford

Jourdan Dunn

Karl Lagerfeld


Alessandro Michele for Gucci

Stella McCartney

J. W. Anderson, Menswear Designer of the Year

J. W. Anderson, Womenswear Designer of the Year

Mike Marsland/British Fashion Council

Highlight reel

November 23, 2015

Stolen Girlfriends’ Club creates limited-edition straps for Samsung Gear S2 Classic smartwatch

Lucire staff/10.50

Stolen Girlfriends’ Club has created a collection of four customized leather watch straps for the Samsung Gear S2 smartwatch, in an official collaboration with the Korean electronics’ giant.
   The limited-edition straps, in black and brown crocodile, and green and blue snake, will be made available as a gift to some Samsung customers. They are made in New Zealand.
   The retro styling is intentional. As Marc Moore, Stolen Girlfriends’ Club’s creative director, noted, ‘I was really inspired by vintage watch straps for this collaboration with Samsung on the new Gear S2 Classic. I’ll be honest, I haven’t been a huge fan of some of the smartwatches being launched by brands lately—just because they look so “techy”, it doesn’t leave much option for people that are into fashion. So I was pretty excited when I first saw the Gear S2 Classic, I knew instantly that a vintage-styled strap would work great. We had a bit of fun with the colours and textures of the leather we sourced whilst keeping it really wearable and quite classic.’
   By rotating the face bezel, the Gear S2 goes to different screens, or skips to another track or zooms in on a map, making navigation particularly simple. The watch features health and fitness apps, a two- to three-day battery life, Android Bluetooth pairing, and push notifications via mobile phones. The straps can be changed further and the watch face can be customized via the Samsung Gear app. Retail price in New Zealand for the basic S2 is NZ$549, and the S2 Classic is NZ$649, available both online and at offline retailers.

November 22, 2015

Bed|Stü opens LA boutique: Kelli Berglund, Jaime King, Ali Landry, Brooke Burke, Jeff Schroeder attend

Elyse Glickman/10.27

City chic made its way to Malibu Country Mart when Bed|Stü, crafters of hand-wrought boots, shoes, belts and handbags, opened its first brick-and-mortar store just before the American Thanksgiving holiday. Fashionistas from across Los Angeles made the trek to the tiny shopping enclave to see the full fall–winter collection for women and men, ahead of its public opening, on November 21. A lucky few taste-makers also got to step out (literally) with a pair of Bed|Stü’s Isla boots, a sturdy but feminine wardrobe staple. They could also add a monogram or pattern (via hand-branding) to further personalize them.
   Bed|Stü opened for business in a small Los Angeles warehouse in 1995, as a firm focused on hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind accessories that were also affordable (prices today run between US$200 and US$350). Today, the company still steers clear of mass production, and continues to use natural leathers, vegetable-based tanning process, and hand-finished products. Other features include sturdy Goodyear welted soles and hand-sewn tailoring to ensure the life of the investment.
   Celebrities on hand included actress and model Jaime King, Ali Landry, Brooke Burke-Charyet, Kelli Berglund (Disney’s XD Lab Rats) Big Brother host Jeff Schroeder and his wife Jordan Lloyd.
   Landry was overheard saying, ‘Everywhere I look there is a new pair I want!’ Dozens of people who joined the crowd to try on boots, get an on-site manicure by Nail Garden, and sip Malibu Family Wines and beer by Peroni agreed. Outside of Los Angeles, shoe mavens can shop the collection internationally at—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor

November 18, 2015

A masterful Graduation Season at the New Zealand School of Dance, with two world premières

Jack Yan/14.14

Stephen A’Court

Top Concerto, part of the New Zealand School of Dance Graduation Season 2015. Above Sarah-Foster Sproull’s Forgotten Things, with the unfamiliar sight of a string of fists, waving in the space.

The New Zealand School of Dance Graduation Season performances, which began tonight (Wednesday), are always a highlight. It’s the culmination of a lot of hard work from second- and third-year students, and the six performances this year offer a very entertaining mix, especially for lovers of classical ballet.
   In previous years, the NZSD has put more contemporary dance on the menu, but the mixture in tonight’s programme was equally welcome. Paquita, the grand-pas, kicked off the evening, choreographed by Anna-Marie Holmes after Marius Petipa. The students showed immense promise, and we wouldn’t be surprised to see many of them dance professionally in ballet before long. Yayoi Matches, in the title role, and Yuri Marques da Silva, who hails from Brazil, danced the role of Lucien, increasingly captivated us during the performance. The costumes were hand-made by Donna Jefferis, assisted by the students of the Diploma of Costume Construction at Toi Whakaari: New Zealand Drama School, according to the NZSD.
   Forgotten Things took us to the other end of the spectrum with an incredibly inventive contemporary performance. With bare arms and hands, contrasting the black outfits worn by every dancer, we were exposed to unusual shapes: what does a string of fists look like as they wave in mid-air like the legs of a squid in the sea, or the hands of two dozen dancers opened out in antler formation? The idea behind the dance was to show cell division, phagocytosis and metamorphosis, translating the microscopic to human size. The beauty came from the fluid movement unusual shapes that we form with our arms, legs and hands when they are put together en masse, and we’d go so far as to say this was the cleverest dance of the evening. Sarah Foster-Sproull, a graduate herself, choreographed in her fourth commission, collaborating with the students: although trained in classical dance while at NZSD, she now choreographs contemporary dance, and, based on what we saw, very successfully. The second- and third-year students here gelled, and this dance showcased their coordination. The level of rehearsal in Forgotten Things, a world première, was evident.
   Cnoditions of Entry (the misspelling is intentional) was another contemporary première, and hugely enjoyable. NZSD alumnus Thomas Bradley (class of 2012), choreographed and provided the score made up of electronica and bass noises, and even designed the costumes along with Jefferis. Bradley’s notes indicate that the dance was in two parts: the first created a mutual understanding between them; the second conveying ‘exhaustion suspension apology and defeat’. It began in darkness, with orange-hooded, androgynous dancers huddled in a group. Abrupt movements, angular, backwards steps conveyed a confusion, as though the society that had been formed was suddenly devoid of structure or rules, feeling like the aftermath of war. Rectangular lights shone on the two sides of the stage as dancers struggled to move toward it, escaping their personal prisons; the term ‘techno-dystopia’ came to mind.
   Tarantella, a George Balanchine ballet with the masterful (and new father, with a one-month-old baby) Qi Huan as the répétiteur, saw us say at the conclusion of the pas de deux: ‘Hire these two now.’ Danced by Megan Wright and Jeremie Gan, this light-hearted yet passionate ballet needed the pair to master some very quick steps and changes of directions, and while inspired by Neapolitan street dance, the foundation is classical. It is not an easy ballet but we couldn’t fault either Wright or Gan.
   Playing the game of contrasts in the programme, the contemporary As It Fades, originally commissioned by T.H.E Dance Company of Singapore and created by Kuik Swee Boon in 2011, was an energetic performance, and showed what the dancers were capable of, with strong, purposeful movements, accompanied by the strings in Max Richter’s ‘Jan’s Notebook’ and ‘November’, which painted a world struggling to understand itself. The tension sharply vanished at the end where a dancer was surrounded by the others, caught in a chair, exhausted, breathing heavily, conveying that notion of defeat and solitude. As the performance ended, the Richter score did not feel out of place in a bleak science-fiction film from the turn of the 1970s, with credits rolling as a dancer walked off-stage into the darkness, making us wonder what lay beyond the abyss. It was very clever, and got us ready for the final performance.
   That final performance was Concerto, an abstract ballet choreographed by Kenneth MacMillan after he joined the Deutsche Oper in Berlin, with a musical score by Dmitri Shostakovich (many audiences will know his work not from ballet but from the theme tune of Reilly: Ace of Spies; this was his ‘Piano Concerto No. 2 in F’), that premièred in 1966, staged here by Lynn Wallis and coached by Stephen Beagley. Two pianists provided the Shostakovich score, while the 29 NZSD dancers were resplendent in yellow, orange and red, in costumes courtesy of the Australian Ballet. How could one not feel upbeat? The three movements began with the allegro, the corps de ballet doing a well coordinated en pointe, with Yeo Chan Yee and George Liang as the central couple performing some very skilful, quick turns. By this point the classical dancers were all in the swing of things, and there was not a single hesitation as Concerto moved to the andante and a romantic pas de deux from Lola Howard and Jerry Wan, before the final movement that opened with a beautiful solo from Georgia Powley before the ensemble brought the performance to a spirited, optimistic close.
   The Graduation Season runs till November 28 at the New Zealand School of Dance at at Te Whaea: National Dance & Drama Centre, 11 Hutchison Road, Newtown, Wellington, New Zealand. Each performance is at 7.30 p.m. except for Sunday and Monday; matinees are at 2 p.m. on Sunday, November 22 and Saturday, November 28. Tickets are NZ$33 for adults, NZ$25 for students, seniors and groups of 10 or more, and NZ$18 for children under 13. Bookings are available online.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Stephen A’Court

Top New Zealand School of Dance student Yuri Marques da Silva. Above Georgia Rudd and Christopher Mills.

Amber Griffin

November 17, 2015

MAC Cosmetics’ three December launches: Rebel lipstick, Fluidline eyeliner, and more Huggable lip shades

Lucire staff/13.47

MAC Cosmetics has three débutants for the New Zealand market in December, beginning with MAC Rebel Eyes, hitting counters on the 17th. MAC Rebel lipstick has already been a hit in beauty circles, so this line of gel liners, liners, and an eye pencil is particularly welcome, with prices ranging from NZ$36 to NZ$50 for the Pro Longwear eyeliner.

MAC Cosmetics

   Right after Christmas, on December 26, MAC Fluidline eyeliner, part of its Fluidity range, launches. It combines a pigmented liner with a pen, and MAC describes it as ‘calligraphy for your eyes’. We haven’t tested it yet, but the promotional image suggests that it is a very precise tool and dries very rapidly, and at NZ$40 it hardly breaks the bank. Four shades are on offer: Retro Black, Vintage Brown (a deep, dark shade), Indelibly Blue (navy) and Privet (sea green).

   Finally, on December 31, MAC’s Huggable Lipcolour will be released with even more shades. There are 15 shades that will remain luminous for up to six hours. Plus MAC is releasing Huggable Glass, featuring 12 funkier, long-lasting creamy colours. Retail price is NZ$50.

November 14, 2015

Aigner creates fashion at Bambis for Toni Garrn, Franziska Knuppe, Nazan Eckes, Lena Gercke, Luisa Hartema

Lucire staff/10.16

Alexander Koerner

Exclusives are the name of the game at the Bambis, with Aigner providing clothing and accessories for numerous VIPs as a partner of Germany’s biggest entertainment awards.
   Held at the Berliner Stage Theater, Aigner’s generosity extended to accessories to the celebrities who walked the red carpet at the Potsdamer-Platz. Toni Garrn wore a custom seafoam-coloured crêpe trouser suit with a low-cut back; Garrn will continue to model Aigner beyond its current 50th anniversary year. Jasmin, Miss Bambi 2015, was also decked out in Aigner, while Hans Sigl (in a red tuxedo), DJ Antoine (in a camouflage-patterned tux), Senta Berger, Ursula Karven, Anja Kling, Jana Pallaske, Christine Neubauer, Franziska Knuppe, Lena Gercke, Luisa Hartema, Regina Halmich, Sonja Kiefer, Yvonne Catterfeld, Nazan Eckes, Mareile Höppner, Alexandra Polzin, Palina Rojinski, Mariella Ahrens, Ruth Moschner, and Antoine Konrad all had items from the label. Reinhard Mätzler, Mousse T., Simon Verhoeven, Jose Campos, and Susanne Sigl were also snapped at the event. Aigner CEO Sibylle Schoen and chief designer Christian Beck were present to pose with many of the actors.
   The after-party at the Atrium Tower saw the award winners from the night receive a trophy case from Aigner.

Alexander Koerner

Kryolan works its magic at Bambis: Heidi Klum, Marie Nasemann, Sylvie Meis, Franziska Knuppe among celebs

Lucire staff/9.48

Isa Foltin

The Bambi Awards for 2015, held on Thursday at the Berliner Stage Theater at Potsdamer Platz, partnered this year with family-run cosmetics’ company Kryolan, which created unique looks for attending celebrities.
   Among the celebrities were Heidi Klum, Sylvie Meis, Franziska Knuppe, Marie Nasemann, Oliver Pocher, Lena Gercke, Regina Halmich, Alexa Volquarts, Sabine Lisicki, Hilary Swank, Petra Döhler, Toni Garrn, Rita Ora, Pamela Anderson, Til Schweiger, Eva Padberg, Wolfgang Joop, Alexander Fehling, Nina Ruge, Jessica Schwarz, footballer Mesut Özil and Mandy Capristo, Stefanie Giesinger, Peter Weck, Judith Rakers, Uschi Glas and Dieter Hermann, and Hannah Herzsprung. Representing Kryolan were CEO Wolfram Langer and director Dominik Langer.
   With its origins in theatre make-up, Kryolan has since expanded into other cosmetics, and partners regularly with high-profile events in Germany and abroad. However, it remains the choice for many film and TV productions, and its make-up artists worked on the Bambi celebrities in styling lounges at the venue. ‘Glamorous make-up with a harmonious complexion and accentuated lips or eyes is ideal for an evening event like the Bambi Awards,’ said Dominik Langer in a release. ‘We are pleased to contribute to Bambi with our many years of experience as professional make-up artists.’ As part of the partnership, Kryolan offered two looks for customers, products for which they could get at Kryolan retailers.

Andreas Rentz

Isa Foltin

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