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Andalou Naturals arrives in New Zealand, with affordable, natural skin care

Filed by Lucire staff/May 11, 2021/2.35



Andalou Naturals merited a mention in Lucire when we spotted them at Natural Products Expo West in Anaheim, Calif. back in 2017 and, finally, it’s made it to our shores here at our New Zealand head office, with a well thought out cruelty-free skin care range and, as in the US, decent prices for a range that’s non-GMO, 98 per cent naturally derived.
   It’s clear which one caught our eye the most: Andalou Naturals’ Brightening Honey Pumpkin Glycolic Mask (NZ$27·99), with fruit stem cells, vitamin C, and glycolic AHA, blended with manuka honey and organic pumpkin. This one’s 99 per cent naturally derived, with a mix of certified organic and Fair Trade ingredients, suitable for combination skin types. The pumpkin and glycolic AHA exfoliate the skin, while the honey hydrates, leaving skin tingling initially. Leave it on overnight and come but looking refreshed the next morning.
   The Brightening Probiotic + C Renewal Cream (NZ$39·99) also uses fruit stem cell complex and vitamin C, plus skin-friendly probiotic microflora. It’s an effective moisturizer and works under make-up.


   And if we thought the pumpkin mask was a treat, Andalou Naturals also has the Avo Cocoa Skin Food Mask (NZ$27·99), with fruit stem cell complex, resveratrol CoQ10, organic avocado oil and (you’ll notice the scent) pure dark cocoa, which is rich in antioxidants. It’s part of its age-defying line. The result: smoother, brighter and softer skin.
   Andalou Naturals also has a fruit stem cell Revitalize Serum (NZ$39·99) and a Deep Wrinkle Dermal Filler (NZ$34·99) as part of the age-defying line. The serum, with fruit stem cell complex, resveratrol CoQ10 and goji glycopeptides support collagen and elastin in the skin, while the dermal filler has the addition of capuacu butter to reduce skin tension and plump and smooth fine lines and wrinkles. It’s particularly well priced for a filler and has a noticeable effect on those fine lines.
   We recognize everyone’s skin is different, so others’ experiences may differ. Our judgement is this is a high-performance, well priced range that should do as well here as it has done overseas. Chemist Warehouse now stocks Andalou Naturals in New Zealand, with a much broader line than we’ve featured here, including gluten-free and vegan items. More information can be found at its Australian website, andalou.com.au.

 


Have palette, will travel: Anastasia Beverly Hills preps summer 2021 palettes for take-off

Filed by Lucire staff/May 10, 2021/3.25




Above, from top: The warm and wearable Italian Summer palette. Sun-kissed hues await inside the golden Off to Costa Rica palette. Online exclusive, Tropical Getaway, is a departure from ordinary bronzers and shimmer powders.

Leave it to Anastasia Soarer of Anastasia Beverly Hills to have her eye on what her customers truly want when it comes to colour, convenience and a touch of luxury. While her focus was on making the most of masking up by upgrading brows in a customizable way last fall, this summer, her focus is on easy, glowy glamour inspired by Italy, Costa Rica, southeast Asia and Belize—destinations we’ve missed during quarantine.
   The Tropical Getaway, an online exclusive, offers the most dramatic of the trio of trios, consisting of Coconut bronzer, Belize highlighter and Dragon Fruit blush. Off to Costa Rica evokes the sun and rain-drenched hues of central America with Amber Brown bronzer, Sunset Beach highlighter and the bright coral Hibiscus blush. The very wearable Italian Summer puts a Mediterranean glow within reach with its Pompia bronzer, Sardania highlighter and Camellia blush. The luxe formulas, suitable for all skin types and tones, are layerable and lasting, as well as packaged in stylish, sparkly compacts. We think these (retailing for US$58) mark the perfect intersection of minimalist to-go beauty and maximum versatility.
   For more information, other summer beauty essentials and pro-tips, visit www.anastasiabeverlyhills.com. Palettes are also available at Ulta Beauty and Sephora sites and brick-and-mortar stores.

 


Catherine Zeta-Jones premières her luxury fashion collection

Filed by Jody Miller/April 14, 2021/23.19

casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
Udo Spreitzenbarth

Casa Zeta-Jones is the newly launched dream child of Catherine Zeta-Jones. Fashion-forward and creative, Zeta-Jones wanted to build a brand that inspired beauty in everyday life. She pulled her own inspiration from the captivating elegance of old Hollywood to create a ready-to-wear collection that is luxurious and irrefutably wearable.
   ‘We have created a collection that not only embodies my vision but speaks to my customer, a multi-faceted, modern and confident woman who’s living a dynamic life,’ comments Zeta-Jones on the collection that features natural fabrics and a colour palette derived from nature.
   Zeta-Jones collaborated with Fred Tutino, the creative director of the Casa Zeta-Jones ready-to-wear collection. Upon working together, Tutino states, ‘Before I met Catherine I knew she had exceptional personal style, but as we spoke more I began to realize Catherine really understands design, colour, finishing, proportion and fabric.’
   The collection is made using luxurious natural fabrics such as silks, cottons and cashmeres. Whether it’s for easy day dresses, chic yet casual sweaters and knit lounge pants, or your new favourite go-to luxurious blouse and perfect form-fitting pant for an evening out, everything has a premium look and feel. The collection is fashion-forward but designed to convey effortless style.—Jody Miller, Correspondent

casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
casa zeta-jones lucire
Udo Spreitzenbarth

 


Caire package: unboxing empowered ageing and self-care

Filed by Lucire staff/February 26, 2021/9.26


Above: Chef Carla Hall discussing her favourite “liquid” recipes.

With age comes wisdom … as well as moments of nostalgia. In unwrapping the two inaugural products of the Caire Beauty collection (Caire Triple Lift Molecule Mask and Caire Theorem Serum Boost), founders Lorrie King and Celeste Lee, along with noted chef Carla Hall, fondly recalled their college days, first travels across Asia and youthful dreams. However, they all agreed they were in the exact place where they needed to be in life.
   Of course, like stamps in a passport, they acknowledged that they also had the marks of every place they visited to get there in the forms of wrinkles, age spots and other annoyances. They also pointed out during the virtual product launch and cocktail party, completed with Hall’s refreshing lemon, ginger and collagen mocktail, that even the best prepared among us managed to forget about taking certain precautions on our personal journeys. (In my case, covering the face, but neglecting the neck and cleavage area).
   While the discussion of age, ageing, ageism and the media’s obsession with youth touches a certain nerve in every woman, the Caire founders, Hall and other special guests, such as Claire Gill of National Menopause Foundation, stressed the way we collectively and individually address this reality can make all the difference. We can’t turn the clock back, but why would we want to if we can be proactive and age with pride moving forward, and not lose sight of the wonderful things we’ve learned and experienced that makes life richer?
   Or, as Gill pointed out, ‘We can change how we talk about menopause and what we call it. The medical terminology is not how we have to define it. We can change that, and I love hearing that women want that!’ In response to a comment I made in the event chat room about influencer culture making a once non-age oriented industry (journalism) more ageist, she replied, ‘Totally agree about the influencer culture. We need more women influencers over 40 talking about positive ageing rather than anti-ageing.’ To which, Lee added, ‘At Caire, we like to say age-mpowering.’
   As the name suggests, Defiance Science is Caire’s own Ph.D.-developed science that addresses the specific signs of skin ageing that are caused by hormone decline and menopause, such as facial sags and under-eye bags, loss of firmness and structure in the face and neck—while providing the users knowledge of why these changes are happening and suggesting they can do something about it.
   ‘We really wanted to understand why our skin suddenly changed in our 40s and early 50s,’ says Lee, who started her career in beauty with Givaudan, the world’s largest maker of flavours and, later, established her own boutique consultancy, working with numerous top-tier brands and portfolios including Pernod Ricard, Kopari, Coty, Colorescience and Avon. ‘Even though we all worked in beauty over 20 years, we discovered a dirty secret: nobody wanted to discuss the impact of changing hormones on ageing, either because leading brands either didn’t know how or simply didn’t want to solve it.’
   Beyond the conversation of what ‘self-care’ actually means to women over 40 (and those who haven’t hit it yet), the creators of the line explained that their first goal was to develop ‘formulations [that] take a revolutionary hormone defying approach’ to occupational hazards regarding ageing, such as sags, bags and skin volume. The science behind them involved infusing skin with molecules and triggering skin to turn on “latent” molecules.
 While use of hyaluronic acid has proliferated in products from the affordable pharmacy varieties to high-end boutique and spa lines, and is also in Caire’s product DNA, the experts agreed that success in bringing about a more youthful appearance relates to the right combination of skin care, proper diet and a more positive outlook on ageing.
   One major takeaway was that good products, like the person using them, multi-task as they work as make-up primer as well as a moisturizer, toning agent and topical vitamin supplement. While it is estimated that 99 per cent of anti-ageing skin care only treats the hydration on the skin’s surface, the research that went into Caire involved examining and treating what goes on beneath where skin cells actually start. The products’ vegan, clean and cruelty-free formulas reinforce skin structure up from the inside out to impart a smoother, suppler, and more resilient skin. However, the formula is safe for usage around the eye, nasolabial and neck areas, and deliver nutritive and skin-building benefits for up to an hour after application.
   ‘It was super-important to me to ensure that Caire science be both clean and clinically sound,’ affirmed King, who started her career in beauty and CPG at Unilever, spearheading the iconic Elizabeth Taylor and Chloé franchises. Later she was CMO on the US launch team of Boots in the US, global marketing lead for Halle Berry and Céline Dion and other fragrance brands at Coty. She adds, ‘There are dozens of skin care companies in the world. And yet women over 40 and 50, which is the single largest group of women in the country, are not offered sophisticated solutions created specifically for them. It’s fundamentally disrespectful to women that teen acne is the only hormone problem that gets studied.’
   Caire Therom Serum Boost is available in the following sizes: 1 oz for US$56, 0·5 oz for US$34, and a Mini Sampler Trio of 0·1 oz droppers for US$32. Caire Triple Lift Molecule Mask is available in the following sizes: 1 oz for US$52 and 0·4 oz for US$12. The Caire Defiance Science Duo (1 oz serum and 1 oz mask) is available for US$100. Caire Beauty is exclusively available at cairebeauty.com.

 


Halsey launches new make-up range, About-Face

Filed by Lucire staff/January 4, 2021/22.15


Halsey has launched a make-up range, About-Face (styled all in lowercase), launching direct to consumers on January 25 at www.aboutface.com, and through Ipsy in a year-long partnership.
   About-Face’s messaging is all about individuality and self-expression, ‘recognizing that there is no one version of us,’ says the company. ‘Inspired by music, fashion and art, About-Face honours inclusivity, acceptance, experimentation and the democratization of beauty for our multiple identities.’
   Grammy-nominated multi-platinum singer–songwriter, artist and author Halsey, whom Lucire’s Elyse Glickman headed to Coachella with in 2017, is a self-taught make-up artist as well, and has done her own for performances, editorials and music videos. As a result, she had built up a deep knowledge of the products, to the point where she would blend and colour-correct to achieve the desired effect. She also understood what high performance entailed in make-up formulations.
   ‘Make-up is an art and art is about happy accidents, not any one ideal of perfection,’ she said. ‘I always feel the most free when I am creating looks without following any rules. The beauty industry has norms, but I want to encourage people to challenge those standards and allow things to be imperfect and fun.’
   There are three lines within About-Face: Light Lock, a face highlighter range; Matte, with high-intensity colours for the face, eyes and lips; and Shadowstick, a range of cream eyeshadow crayons. In total, there are 10 product categories, including beauty tools and limited-edition cosmetic bags. All products are vegan, clean and cruelty-free. Prices range from US$17 to US$32.
   About-Face’s next drop is in February, with a matte lip range called Anti-Valentine’s Day.

 


Future imperfect

Filed by Jack Yan/December 15, 2020/10.59




Adi Constantin/Unsplash

Above, from top: The real 2015 and one photo that summarizes the decade: Kendall and Kylie Jenner go shopping for Ugg shoes in New York, and take a selfie. The 2015 of fiction: Michael J. Fox outside a cinema in Back to the Future Part II (1989). Still from Ridley Scott’s 1982 film Blade Runner, set in a Los Angeles of 2019, in some ways mirrored more by the metropolises of China. Unpredictable to most: few in the 20th century, with perhaps the exception of Norman Macrae, foresaw the rise of China to this extent—Shanghai’s cityscape could have been the stuff of science fiction 30 years ago. Below right: Twins Alan and Alex Stokes with another TikTok video.

Travel editor Stanley Moss sent me a news item on twin brothers who staged a mock bank robbery on public streets for their social media accounts. The brothers, Alan and Alex Stokes, have nearly 28 million followers on TikTok, and over 5½ million on YouTube. One prank saw an Über driver, not involved with them, held at gunpoint by police. Now, Orange County, California district attorney Todd Spitzer says the brothers could face criminal charges for putting the public and the police in danger.
   While social media have done a lot of good, there are those who take things to an unhealthy extreme for the sake of an audience. Once upon a time, there would be a controlled set and paid actors, but the Stokes brothers decided to do their stunts in the real world.
   They’re not alone in doing outrageous things for an audience, and this isn’t a piece about the decline or the dangers of social media influencers, a topic that Lucire has covered for some time. It’s whether this environment—the incident took place in 2019—could have been something that any of us foresaw in earlier times.
   People are notoriously bad at predicting decades into the future. This magazine has attempted to look a few months forward, such as our recent story about what a post-COVID world might look like, with China as an example (Lucire issue 42; Lucire KSA September 2020). However, once we begin looking at years and decades things look fuzzier.
   The twins’ pranks could have been foreseen mid-decade: people have been seeking attention for social media since they became the norm, and those who potentially make a living from it—with 28 million followers it’s likely that they do—might wish to see just how far boundaries could be pushed. In societies which are less outwardly focused, it is possible that they did not consider the consequences or the harm to others.
   But could this world have been foreseen in, say, 2010? Or 2000? A glance back through our culture shows predictions of our time looking very different the further back you go.
   In Blade Runner (1982), Ridley Scott foresaw a crowded technological world where androids (‘replicants’) walk among humans. Set in 2019, Scott’s vision is dystopian, with human colonies on other planets, flying cars, and overcrowding. The last point is probably accurate in terms of our global population; Scott envisaged skyscrapers and street scenes devoid of natural light. Down on the streets of his 2019 Los Angeles is a mixture of cultures, with English used alongside other languages. Blade Runner’s Los Angeles is a dirty place, with lots of old stuff that lacks the sheen of the latest signage and advertisements, just as our urban world is today. Science fiction films often make the mistake of giving everything a modern, new sheen, but "blanket newness" doesn’t ever exist in real life: visual futurist and conceptual artist Syd Mead understood this well.
   The protagonist in the film, Deckard, is disenchanted with the technologist society that places little emphasis on human emotion; in some ways it illustrates how humans have become slaves to technology rather than having technology improve their lives. Memories can be implanted into replicants; today one supposes that editing photos on social media paint an idealistic and not always real story about our humanity. Once upon a time a photo album was private, with stories attached to them; today social media and online photos are often offered without explanation, to show one side of life—no wonder studies reveal that social media can make some people more depressed as they gaze at their friends’ seemingly perfect existences.
   Blade Runner might not look like 2019, nor was it right on androids and planetary colonization, but in many ways Scott identified the themes that make humans lonely because of technology.
   Later in the 1980s, Back to the Future Part II (1989) also had flying cars in its world of 2015. Robert Zemeckis, the director and co-writer of the film, said that the future could not be predicted so he and Bob Gale, who co-wrote, decided to have fun with it. Their 2015 is an intentional parody: an antagonist with microchip implants in his brain, hover boards, which are wheel-less skateboards that defy gravity, and a nostalgic hangout for young people called Café ’80s. In the cinema yet another Jaws sequel played, with a holographic projection coming out into the street as part of its promotion. Light switches at home are voice-activated, while what was once a posh neighbourhood was, in 2015, considered a lower-class area. Faxes hung on walls while videophones and multiple tv screens on a wall were part of the 2015 household.
   There’s less cerebral thinking here as it’s played for laughs, though video calls and voice activation are reasonably on the mark, as is the theme of urban decay. It’s not unusual to see a society nostalgic for the past—in fashion we saw our share of 1980s, even 1990s, revivals during the 2010s. An obsession with screens, as the teenage Marty McFly, Jr has in 2015, is accurate, even if those screens weren’t all on the wall, but hand-held.
   Wim Wenders’ 1991 film Bis ans Ende der Welt (Until the End of the World) only had to go as far as 1999, and is more accurate what it predicted: a highly digital society, with hand-held assistants, search engines, and consumer GPS. Wenders foresaw a commercialized East Berlin—a reasonable prediction given the Wall had recently come down—and a San Francisco with a massive income disparity. However, the new invention where brainwaves can be read and dreams can be turned into digital images remains the realm of science fiction. Its main character, Claire, lives an empty life of endless parties before she decides to return to Europe to spend time with friends.
   The films are correct in some respects, illustrating that the human condition hasn’t changed much: it’s always possible to feel lonely and outcast from the world, and it is up to the filmmaker to identify causes. A designer must make similar predictions if a collection or a product is to be a hit: what is it about the human condition in the coming year that we expect to be highlighted? As we stand on the verge of 2021, is it a sense of optimism, that things will get better now that two companies have announced COVID-19 vaccines? Or is it a sense of caution? And how are these expressed? Those that somehow address human feelings, no matter how they are expressed, tend to do better than high concepts that are divorced from what people are going through.
   Some of it will come down to instinct—what are termed intuitive predictions. The more experience one has, the better the prediction one might make. Students of history are often well equipped to look into the future based on their knowledge of the past; our older citizens may well have witnessed phenomena similar to what they see today.
   Statistical predictions, meanwhile, rely on data and algorithms, and the more data one has, and the more reliable they are, the better the prediction. Factor in external events and their impact. Meteorologists rely on these for their forecasts, and designers might be in a position to do the same.
   One individual who had a better record than most was the former deputy chief editor of The Economist, Norman Macrae. He foresaw the rise of China, the ubiquity of the internet, and growing income inequality decades before they hit, all through hard, economic analysis.
   Norman Macrae is an anomaly in how accurate he was, as it is rare to allow for those external events accurately. The further out your prediction is going to be, the more external events you face, with increasing potential to render them inaccurate—just as we had with Blade Runner. Its sequel, naturally, had to take place in 2049 for the world it created to remain just out of reach of us.
   And while some events are cyclical, it can be tricky predicting just how long that cycle is. Economics is one field where smarter practitioners could work it out, but lay people might not see the cycles when they are living it.
   The 1980s were regarded by marketers as a "me decade": in the west this was fuelled by consumerism and free-market ideologies, but more than one author then predicted that the 1990s would be more a "we decade", more caring and more collective. It didn’t happen: the cycle was far longer than any of them expected, to the point where we have just been through a selfie decade aided by cellphones whose forward-facing cameras are often better than the backward-facing ones.
   The decade we have left behind was one that might be remembered for the Kardashians, who shot to fame precisely because the sight of self-indulgent celebrities caught the Zeitgeist. Many a successful Instagram account, especially in the modelling and glamour modelling fields, are founded on selfies, as everyone wants to be seen to be living their glamorous best. The Stokes twins took this to the next, dangerous, and selfish level, in a country that seems to encourage it.
   In 2021, it might be fair to ask if “weism” has finally arrived. Countries that have managed to push the COVID-19 curve down—e.g. China, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia—have done so with an eye on the collective good, demonstrating that we are stronger together. Have we tired of selfies? Certainly Facebook and Instagram engagement continues to fall each year. TikTok may be on the rise because of its novelty, but are enough of us now beginning to enjoy what nature has for us that we can put down the phones?
   In earlier issues (see Lucire KSA June 2020) we covered how some of nature has returned because of our lockdowns, and it seems the countries that respect nature more are the ones who have come out the other side more quickly.
   That’s perhaps an easy one to forecast. But it will still depend on how we see the human experience—just what mood will we, as people, possess in the year ahead.
   Additionally, Simon Sinek, in his book The Infinite Game, believes that having a just cause can overcome those unexpected external factors. It isn’t about having a finite position in the future, or some defined endgame; instead, it’s about understanding what you stand for and nurturing that for the long term. Here at Lucire, for instance, we have never stopped looking to the whole world for our stories, in the belief that the world can come together if we are exposed to more of it. We believe our readers are intelligent, hence we run stories like this: we are not in the business of dumbing down, and never have been. The quest for knowledge—the human thirst for it, and to gain an advantage as evolution would have us do—is part of the condition that doesn’t go away. And in the 2020s, we’re hoping people might want to pursue depth again, coming out of the selfie and Kardashian decade.
   Those that remained sure of their purpose through COVID-19 in 2020 have probably endured without facing some crisis over what they stand for. That’s ultimately what we have to create: a sense of purpose within us. We can look to the future as much as we like, and we can make an educated guess about what people will be going through, but the most sure thing is what we can do about ourselves.—Jack Yan, Founder and Publisher

 


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