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Markus Hansen’s Library for Claude Lévi-Strauss opens in Paris

Filed by Lucire staff/July 3, 2021/13.51



Opening today, the newest addition to the Musée de la Chasse is an exciting permanent installation by artist Markus Hansen entitled Library for Claude Lévi-Strauss, which celebrates one of the fathers of structuralism. Hansen’s career, influenced by the likes of Josef Beuys and the Fluxus movement, spans installation art, painting, photography and architecture. The artist says the new conceptual work represents an ideal library which samples the multiplicity of knowledge and the plurality of sources, concealed under a trellis of feathers. Well worth a look and highly recommended.
   One of the lesser-known treasures of Paris, the museum is home to a noteworthy collection which includes paintings, taxidermy and historic objects, housed in a remarkable historic building located at 62, rue des Archives, in the 3rd arrondissement.
   Claude Lévi-Strauss had an extensive collection of ethnographic art from Brazil, North Africa and North America. He donated 1,478 pieces which are today displayed at the Musée Quai Branly in the 7th.
   Now that Paris is suddenly back in business, the sidewalk tables are filling and the popular museums have reopened. A visit to a smaller museum will mean no crowds and the luxury of leisurely browsing extraordinary rooms and objects. And a first-hand encounter with the incisive installation vision of Markus Hansen is a rare delight in a landscape of overblown hyperbole.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor

 


DS to ferry journalists in plug-in hybrid models during Paris Fashion Week

Filed by Lucire staff/June 22, 2021/22.22


Much like Renault has done for the Festival de Cannes, DS wants to show off its luxury credentials by being the official transport for Paris Fashion Week’s men’s shows this week.
   The fleet comprises 25 cars, with both the DS 9 E-Tense 225 saloon and the DS 7 Crossback E-Tense 4×4 300 crossover present. Both are plug-in hybrids with electric-only modes, ferrying journalists and influencers around Paris.
   The saloon is the French brand’s latest attempt to capture the innovative spirit of the Citroën DS, stylistically one of the most avant-garde production cars ever made.
   The six-day event runs from June 22 through 27.
   DS began working with Paris Fashion Week in 2019.

 


Airelles Château de Versailles, Le Grand Contrôle: vivre comme le roi

Filed by Lucire staff/June 6, 2021/23.24





Rénée Kemps

This week, in an eagerly awaited launch, Airelle’s seventh property, Airelles Château de Versailles, Le Grand Contrôle opened outside Paris. The first hotel to operate within the grounds of the Château de Versailles, it’s situated in a building constructed by Louis XIV’s favourite architect, Jules Hardouin-Mansart, in 1681. Guests have access to the 2,000-acre gardens, historic palace halls, apartments and grounds, including areas of the Château that are normally closed to visitors. Here is a property where you can raise the bar on your expectations.
   Exclusivity is the watchword with only 14 meticulously restored regal rooms and suites, including a 120 m² signature suite. You will enjoy views over the Orangerie, the Pièce d’Eau des Suisses and the Château. Finished in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century style, the light-filled rooms feature authentic colours and fabrics, chandeliers, art and objects, artefacts and original period furniture. Opulent historical features recreated include parquet flooring, fabrics, stonework and wood panelling. Time to brush up on your Revolution-era French: you may happen upon a love letter from Madame De Staël to her lover Louis, Comte de Narbonne-Lara.
   You will discover many other bonuses to this remarkable one-of-a-kind offering, not the least of which is a new dining experience from Alain Ducasse, Ducasse at Château de Versailles, Le Grand Contrôle. The salon has views onto the Orangerie parterre, a bell rings at 8.30 p.m. to signal the beginning of dinner, and in addition to a dazzling multi-course heritage menu, Ducasse offers a Sunday royal brunch. A table not to be missed.
   The on-site Valmont spa features a 15 m indoor swimming pool and a wealth of exclusive treatments.
   Luxury at this level allows for excessive flights of the imagination. The allure of private events in such a unique venue might include intimate weddings, private dinners or exclusive launches, for up to 54 guests. Imagine hosting an event inside the Palace itself followed by an exclusive overnight takeover, accommodating up to 36 guests across the 14 rooms and suites.
   Guests may also choose to add on private tours; after-hours access to the Hall of Mirrors; a Marie Antoinette-themed day including a costume fitting; a private performance at the Royal Opera; or private dining with a string quartet, all at additional cost.
   Luxury at this level does not come cheap, but it’s worth every penny. Rates at Airelles Château de Versailles, Le Grand Contrôle start from US$2,077 including a dedicated butler; daily tours of Château de Versailles and the Trianon; access to the Palace grounds and Orangerie; use of boats and golf carts on hand to explore the Grand Canal and gardens at leisure; breakfast, afternoon tea and minibar.
   The prestigious hotel collection comprises Le Grand Contrôle, Les Airelles in Courchevel, La Bastide in Gordes, Mademoiselle in Val d’Isère and Château de la Messardière and Pan Deï Palais in Saint-Tropez.—Stanley Moss, Travel Editor









Rénée Kemps

 


Adut Akech named Estée Lauder’s newest face, campaigns appear July

Filed by Lucire staff/June 3, 2021/21.44

Adut Akech is Estée Lauder’s newest brand ambassador, joining the beauty company’s current roster of models, including Ana de Armas, Anok Yai, Bianca Brandolini d’Adda, Carolyn Murphy, Diana Penty, Grace Elizabeth, Karlie Kloss, Kōki, and Yang Mi.
   Her campaigns for make-up and skin care will begin in July.
   Akech was named model of the year at the Fashion Awards in 2019 and featured on the Time 100 Next list the same year.
   South Sudanese by ethnicity, Akech was born en route to the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya. Her family then settled in Adelaide, South Australia, where she joined a modelling agency and walked in Melbourne Fashion Week. In 2016, she was cast as a catwalk exclusive in the Yves Saint Laurent spring–summer 2017 show, making her fashion week début. Akech has regularly walked for major labels and appeared in campaigns. She has modelled in editorials in at least seven international editions of Vogue, and covered at least three; she has also appeared in I-D, Elle Hrvatska, L’Officiel Singapore, Numéro, and many others. She recently began working with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to promote causes supporting refugees around the world.
   ‘To be part of the Estée Lauder family is a dream come true. Estée Lauder has such an amazing heritage, and the story of Mrs Estée Lauder continues to be an inspiration to women around the world. Like her, I hope to inspire girls everywhere to never give up on following their dreams,’ said Akech in a release.
   ‘Adut is one of fashion’s biggest and most influential stars,’ said Stéphane de la Faverie, group president for the Estée Lauder Companies, and global brand president, Estée Lauder and AERIN. ‘We believe her incredible story, personality and beauty will help us continue to inspire and connect with our consumers and establish her as a beauty icon of her generation.’

 


Karnit Aharoni shows off latest designs for spring–summer 2021

Filed by Lucire staff/May 28, 2021/3.15





Greg Alexander/Méphistopheles

New Zealand- and UK-educated, France-based Karnit Aharoni, profiled earlier in Lucire, has shown new entries for spring–summer 2021, inspired by her grandmother and the photographs of her from the 1930s. Aharoni has chosen to combine the 1930s inspiration with the wild west, on the basis that we currently live in times of change and chaos, and there’s anticipation about what’s to come.
   The fabrics are 100 per cent natural and environmentally responsible, sourced from Italy and France, and the clothes are produced in France and Portugal. The shoot was helmed by photographer Greg Alexander in Paris, with Sebastien Vienne art-directing. Hair and make-up were by Carine Larchet (for La Roche–Posay) and Eugène Perma, with Angline of Élite Milano modelling.
   ‘I believe what we are going through at the moment are changes which would have happened anyway, even without COVID,’ said Aharoni. ‘I keep walking the path I’ve started with … small quantities, responsible production and partners, season-less pieces.
   ‘I am a woman and I come from a line of very strong women. My grandmother was an incredible person as well as my mother, both very strong and creative. I also have two sisters, two daughters, and friends. I’m always sensitive to their feedback, comments and needs. It’s the contemporary femininity.’









Greg Alexander/Méphistopheles

 


Are these the trends we’ll remember the 2020s by?

Filed by Jack Yan/May 12, 2021/23.35

A fashion magazine seems to have a few roles. The first is to create a record of trends, not just reporting on them but preempting them, as a snapshot of where society is at any given moment. The second is arguably to chart culture itself, and just what the Zeitgeist is.
   If the articles in this May 2021 number of Lucire KSA is any indication, there is a complexity in design right now. Perfume bottles, jewellery and watches in our ‘Luxury Line’ pages at the back of the magazine are an indication: we seem to marvel at the intricacies of complex jewellery right now, and the “in” watch is the skeleton type, where the inner workings are exposed for all to see.
   But it’s not just in these accessories and beauty products; Meg Hamilton’s Paris Fashion Week report reveals layered clothing, tweed coats with knitted patterns, Norwegian sweaters, floral prints and padding. Even Stella McCartney, who delivered punchier colours without as much complexity in the patterns, told of volume with bell-bottom trousers.
   Volume is in, and a fashion historian might point to other times when that has been the case. I won’t explore that in this editorial, but I am intrigued about the reasons. Are they reflections of how we view our lives as being complex? Is the volume something we demand because we need protection from such an uncertain world? Meg’s thesis is quite the opposite: we are emerging from our cocoons, and it’s end of the hibernation forced upon us by COVID-19.
   The reality is that we won’t know for sure till some time has passed and we reflect on the times we live in, and each decade falls into a caricature of its one outstanding trend. It’s why westerners think of miniskirts for the 1960s and Laura Ashley for the 1970s, and the 1980s were the decade of power dressing. The 1990s might be summarized by grunge, and logomania might well dominate the 2000s. These are not accurate constructs: they are shortcuts that we give periods of time to convey a sense of nostalgia or, when it comes to film, to purposely set something in a certain era that audiences can collectively reminisce about. And in so many cases, they are ex post facto justifications of those eras, allied with social and political trends.
   If we were to take a punt on how this era will be remembered, we need to keep those non-fashion trends in mind. And maybe these times will be remembered for their complexity, even if every generation thinks they are living through the most complex period in history. The items you see in this issue might well come to represent this decade, more than the necklines of dresses that revealed instead of concealed that we saw out the 2010s on. Ultimately, however, only time will tell.—Jack Yan, Founder and Publisher


Above: From the Stella McCartney autumn–winter 2021–2 collection.

 


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