Lucire: News


November 28, 2015

Prince Harry plays at Sentebale’s sixth annual polo match in South Africa; over £3 million raised

Lucire staff/22.22

Chris Jackson

Sentebale, the charity founded by Prince Harry and Prince Seeiso to help those who are HIV-positive in Lesotho, especially its children, has hosted its sixth annual polo match in association with Royal Salute, raising over £3 million. It was the first time the polo match had been played in South Africa, where Prince Harry is presently touring.
   The polo match saw the Royal Salute team beat Sentebale with a score of 8–7, with the last point scored with six seconds left. Prince Harry himself played alongside Royal Salute world polo ambassador Malcolm Borwick and Sentebale polo ambassador Nacho Figueras. The trophy was presented by Torquhil Campbell, the 13th Duke of Argyll.
   The match followed Sentebale’s opening of the Mamohatu Children’s Centre, which will help communities affected by HIV and Aids.
   VIPs at the Val de Vie Polo Club included Laura Main, George the Poet, Ryk Neethling, Jeannie D., Graeme Smith and Tokyo Sexwale.
   Chivas Brothers’ whisky brand Royal Salute, which was created to mark the coronation of HM Queen Elizabeth II, supports numerous major polo events internationally, with its next one in Jodhpur, India.

Chris Jackson

November 27, 2015

Idris Elba + Superdry Collection, comprising 250 menswear pieces, launches at Regent Street store

Lucire staff/12.12

Superdry Studio

David M. Benett

Jon Furniss

Superdry has collaborated with Idris Elba, the Brit whom we at Lucire keep calling ‘the coolest actor on Earth’ and best known for his role in Luther, on a 250-piece collection, launched Thursday at its Regent Street store.
   And what a perfect spokesman for a premium men’s fashion line, not just because of the press Elba brings.
   Superdry’s founders James Holder and Julian Dunkerton felt an affinity with Elba. Said the actor, ‘We’re three British lads who’ve worked hard to get to where we are. I’m passionate about what I do and always give 100 per cent. If I had the opportunity to have any influence in fashion, this is it. I’m not a designer, but I’m passionate about clothes and I know how men want to look. Functionality and durability were key things for me. It’s a “24-hour” collection; clothing guys can look and feel great in from day to night.’
   Celebrities attending the launch included Noomi Rapace, Alexander M. Johnson, Alexander James, David Haye, Oliver Proudlock, Kat Shoob, Camilla Kerslake, and Craig McGinlay.
   The Idris Elba + Superdry Collection reflects the actor’s tastes with deep tonal colours such as midnight blue, graphite grey and jet black, contrasted with cobalt blue. Bomber jackets, mac and trench coats, joggers, Ts, hoods, shirts, and jumpers feature in the range.
   The company identifies the Leading Leather Racer Jacket as the hero piece of the collection, with a down filling, while the Aviator Down Parka has a fur-trimmed hood, monogrammed lining and internal pocket detailing.
   Shown originally in June during London’s menswear fashion week, the collaboration was made available to the public on Thursday, the same day as the launch party.
   The collection is available from Superdry retail stores and via its website.

David M. Benett

Op–ed: Kiribati’s waking nightmare

Lucire staff/11.22

November 27, 2015

Rt Hon John Key, MP, Prime Minister
Hon Bill English, MP, Deputy Prime Minister
Parliament Buildings
New Zealand

Dear John and Bill,

I’m having a nightmare. I want to tell you guys about it—to tell you to wake me up; shake me if you have to. Scream me awake, and when I am, I want you to tell me it’s not as bad as it seems.
   I’ve landed in Tarawa, Kiribati, where news from New Zealand awaited me that John has declared his faith that climate change can be addressed with technology—scientists have told him the technology isn’t far off.
   At an official dinner, people look at me as though I have some glorious technology news to pass on. I don’t. I went to bed that evening feeling hollow; figures screaming through my head, the voice of that pesky Jim Salinger uttering the most terrifying words I’ve heard in many years: ‘The world has now entered abrupt climate change.’ You know Jim right, the guy with the Nobel Peace Prize? Gosh, I wish he would shut up with all that sense he talks.
   In the same nightmare I wake the next day to be told that 90 per cent of drinking water wells have been contaminated with E. coli, that the crops at vital plantations are no longer growing due to saltwater poisoning the ground. That lagoons which once fed villages have become infested with E. coli, killing a large bounty of marine life. That the ocean-warming and acidification has killed a majority of the coral atoll that forms the very ground I’m stood on. It’s like a really bad apocalypse video game—I’m anxious that zombies are going to duck out from behind the door. I look around at homes whose front doors the ocean now laps, at dead fruit trees once laden with produce killed by the salt seeping into the soil. I’m failing to see what Tony Abbott found so comical about this situation.
   In this nightmare I wonder what kind of technology could possibly solve this. I then remind myself of John’s track record of absolute reliability, and I feel comforted. The law can’t solve this. I mean, even if it could and there were laws to protect these people, there are no lawyers, and they’d be unaffordable for these people if there were. So, technology must be the saving grace.
   I visited the hospital to witness first-hand what an infant mortality rate 10 times that of New Zealand’s looks like. Have you ever seen such a thing? It’s completely shocking; it hit me with a force a hundred times that of any image of a child lying washed up on a shore a world away. I tried to fight back the tears, and the numbing coldness that consumed my body. I tried not to vomit—but later in the privacy of my room I did find solace in a Fiji Airways sick bag. I sat there and waited for the moment I’d be shaken awake. I desperately wanted John to ride in and tell me that the threat of climate migration is many years off and not something to be worried about. I wanted Bill to sit down and tell me that none of it was real, and the sea levels were not rising.
   John, could you go tell that mate of yours Obama to stop being a bloody alarmist; that according to Bill, there’s no proof Alaskan villages are vanishing into the ocean. That entire nations are not facing forced-extinction from the ocean swallowing them alive. You go tell that puffed-up American know-it-all that he’s alarming the masses, causing me nightmares and unwanted anxiety.
   Bill, could you go tell all those apparently credible scientists who’ve won those fancy awards, that 2015 is not the hottest year in history and they’re just plain wrong. Round them up with Malcolm across the ditch (because they give him a hard time as well) and be done with them. Bully them into submission a bit harder. Just shut them up.

Thanks in advance,



I imagined the response coming back something a little like this.

Dear Pearl,

You are far too much of a pretty wee thing to be travelling to such far-flung and irrelevant places like Kiribati in your nightmares; to spend time worrying about such things. Why don’t you pay heed to the advice I gave Keisha Castle-Hughes: try visiting the salon for a bad blow-dry instead?
   Don’t worry about other people. By the time New Zealand starts feeling the full effect of climate change we’ll have the technology available to deal with it.
   I’ve also got Malcolm under control—he’s going to share Nauru so we’ve got somewhere to put all those helpless fellow human beings in the Pacific fleeing the rising sea-levels and food shortages. The ones who think they’re right to turn to us for help. I’m going to stop the boats.
   Meanwhile, the Kardashians have a new season, vote for the fern, and use our new buzz word: technology.
   In the meantime, here’s a Live Lokai bracelet. Hold on to it, because before long the Dead Sea and Everest will be things for the history books.

Merry Christmas,



That’s kind of how this piece came about. I thought I’d write a wee letter. The problem is, the more I wrote and decried the blind buying-in of the latest spin to come out of the ninth floor, the more ridiculous it felt, and the more scared I became in turn. If I’m completely honest, the realization that many—possibly even some reading this piece—didn’t know how absurd the spin had become, worried me to the point of physical sickness. Thanks again Fiji Airways, your sick bags are truly first-class.
   I’m writing this from Kiribati. I’m fully awake. I’m awake in a nightmare. I went to the hospital. I waded through water at high-tide to cross the road infested with human fæces to get there before what they call the ‘morgue’ closed. In a bag at the other end of the room was a pile of clothes and a pair of trainers I never want to see again. I was going to turf them out, but a young woman tasked with showing me around asked if she could have them, since for her wading through the stench of death and fæces was an everyday reality.
   Don’t get me wrong, Kiribati is absolutely beautiful and if it weren’t for the damage wreaked by rising sea levels and climate change, I would focus only on its beauty, but the reality is these threats make the situation people face here far from idyllic. It’s a dire situation, it’s a nightmare.
   A real-life nightmare, there is no amount of shaking that can wake me; though shaking I am, believe me. Shaking from incredulity at the sheer scale of the situation. The problem is I’m not the who needs to be screamed awake. That’s right: if you have ever for one moment entertained the illusion that sea-levels are not rising; that climate change is not the single biggest threat facing humanity; that you can carry on shirking the responsibility to aid in the fight for human survival and dignity, you need to be screamed awake. Will the humanity in you please wake up?
   I’m not saying this with any political leaning. I believe that most of our politicians are drastically failing us all. Who knows what will happen if we leave this to them. I mean, half of those reading this may freak out at the thought of the Green Party controlling the economy, but don’t blink an eyelid at them leading on the issue defined as ‘the single greatest threat to mankind’ by every serious world leader. Why is that? How will the economy exist without our planet?
   Climate change is no longer some far-off theory or problem. It is happening right here and widely through our Pacific backyard. Right now. As you read this climate change is already disrupting our agriculture and ecosystems, our food and water security, our energy, our infrastructure, our health, our safety. Today. Tomorrow. Some more than others but make no mistake it is happening to all of us. It is the issue. An issue that affects all issues, economic included. Everything is and will be impacted. And it becomes more damning with each passing year.
   This matter is far too important to be surrendered to the political domain. This is about humanity. If you think the devastation wreaked by ISIS is as bad as it gets, then please contemplate Mother Nature.
   If the images of parents putting their children into boats because the water was safer than the land left you reeling, then please consider that in the not-too-distant future this will become a reality for many small island states; that many nations in the Pacific will not survive the two-degree cap that Paris is gearing up to gain commitment for in the coming week. They will have to put their children into boats because the water is safer than the land. We have already signed them up for that, and every moment that each of us stands by maintaining the status quo we sign them up for worse—exponentially.
   They will have to flee their homes, forced to migrate due to the lack of food security. Rising sea-levels, along with drastic weather disturbances will make a boat safer than their homes, and these boats will head for our shores.
   Despite this cold hard reality our leaders head into Paris in support of watering a climate agreement down. There’s talk of steps to make the agreement not legally binding. Not many would agree to a marriage or business deal on such terms, I wonder why we are willing to let them negotiate humankind’s survival on such flippant terms.
   During the explosion of the refugee crisis into mainstream media we witnessed both the most hopeful and depraved responses to others’ suffering. I couldn’t help but wonder about the rationale for stopping the boats, for refusing the asylum and migration of those most in need—those least at fault in the destruction of our ecologies, but who will continue to pay the highest price. What possible excuse will we give to keep them out? Do we convince ourselves they’re all terrorists, rapists and murderers to render them exempt from the right to our sympathies, to human dignity? It’s a sad state of affairs that anyone would have to wonder such a thing.
   Leading into the sustainable development goals, New Zealand took a step towards supporting the Pacific, coming out strong and vocal on Sustainable Development Goal 14 (SDG14), which focuses on the conservation and sustainable use of ocean, sea and marine resources. This focus was well warranted, and an open acknowledgement of our responsibility within the region, and our understanding of how many lives depend on the ocean ecologies. I was proud to stand in the General Assembly and hear John Key announce the Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary. It was an important step, but we must be clear that it was but one step in the marathon of steps we need to build a better world.
   In the words of Jim Salinger and virtually every other expert of climate science in the world, the world has entered abrupt climate change. We have already reached tipping-points we cannot mitigate. We are already signed up for things that are going to drastically change life as we know it, this is a cold hard fact. The question that remains now is whether we can summon the courage to turn around and fight for survival. Life is already going to change; but whether we tumble over yet more tipping-points points and the scale of the consequences we face from them is up to us. Sometimes we have little option but to wake ourselves up.
   We have a choice. We can surrender that choice to those who hold offices of power, or we can take that choice into our own consideration. Some say the whole endeavour to pull back from this is hopeless. I’m not willing to accept that. I simply refuse to stand by and let life go without a fight.
   John Key used very interesting rhetoric this week. He used the word ‘faith’. He is placing his faith in technology. Instead I am going to place my faith in humankind—the creators of technology. I am going to place my faith in our ability to comprehend the magnitude of what we face, and choose survival. I ask you to join not just myself, but others around the world in doing so. We still have a fighting chance to make things better. They won’t get better unless we take action and inspire others to do the same. No one is without power: everybody has the capacity to take a few steps.
   I’ve written this for those who know how to challenge the status quo intelligently. The doers, the thinkers, the problem-solvers. I’m not asking anyone to climb something or break laws, just that each person reading this ponders for a minute about how they can contribute, what steps they can take.
   So as we lead into the COP21 talks, billed as a defining moment in human history, at a time when recent events have given us ample reason to desert our faith in our own kind, I encourage every single person reading this to ask themselves what they can do to take action. This weekend millions of citizens around the world are exercising their rights, their freedoms, using their voices and taking to the streets to send world leaders an imperative to act and take meaningful action.
   Mark my words: a decade or possibly two from now it won’t be the Rugby World Cup final you remember with pride. What will be etched in your memory is whether you answered humanity’s call for survival, whether you were one of those who actually did something. Sometimes that something is simply the act of showing up to show solidarity with humankind. In Paris where world leaders have gathered there can be no march, because the worst of humanity put on a display that has left millions of innocent people terrorized. So in the coming week I will be keeping my eyes firmly on Paris, I am marching, I am lending my effort to reinforce the very best in humanity, because if there’s one thing the world needs right now, it’s more of the good.
   It’s only so big, it goes around and we are all on it—Earth. I believe it’s worth saving, do you?—Pearl Going

Disruption, excerpt: ‘Tipping Points’ from Disruption on Vimeo

Above Kiribati President Anote Tong with his TED discussion, ‘My country will be underwater soon—unless we work together’. Click above to watch.

Guest contributor Pearl Going is a global communications’ strategist who has worked broadly across entertainment, human rights and environmental issues. Her most recent work includes the Mercy Campaign, Rohingya Slavery and SIDS. She is an avid climber and has climbed five of the seven summits.

November 26, 2015

Absolut releases dazzling limited-edition Electrik bottles to close 2015

Lucire staff/2.58

The world’s most famous vodka brand, Absolut, has released its limited-edition, celebratory end-of-year bottles, dubbed Absolut Electrik.
   The blue and silver bottles feature semi-transparent coating, representing ‘Absolut’s signature cobalt blue and the electrical conductivity of silver,’ according to the company.
   In a release, Kathryn Love, Absolut’s marketing manager for New Zealand, said, ‘Over the years, we have presented some highly appreciated limited editions, including Absolut Warhol and Absolut Originality. We aim to raise the bar for our limited editions and continue to push creative boundaries. Absolut Electrik follows that tradition.’
   In the New Zealand market, Absolut has even collaborated with local design label Huffer in 2011.
   To make things more interactive this year, Absolut has created an Electrik Mixology platform on, where users can collaborate with an on-screen robot to create a personalized drink. The robot even mixes the drink on the site. Absolut has also released two cocktail recipes for end-of-year parties.
   Absolut Electrik is priced at NZ$55·99 for each one-litre bottle, available from leading liquor retailers throughout New Zealand.

Absolut Electrik Blue Mule cocktail
1 part Absolut Vodka
2 parts ginger beer
Garnish with lime wedge. Built and served in the Mule cup over crushed ice.

Absolut Electrik Neon Lights
2 parts Absolut Vodka
1⅕ parts lemon juice
1⅕ parts pink grapefruit juice
⅘ part simple syrup
⅕ part ginger syrup (1 part freshly squeezed ginger juice with 3 parts simple syrup)
4 raspberries
Top up with soda water. Garnish with raspberries and grapefruit zest. Shake all ingredients except soda, serve in a highball glass with ice.

November 25, 2015

H&M collaborates with Musée des Arts Décoratifs at the Palais du Louvre for Conscious Exclusive collection

Lucire staff/8.35

Hennes & Mauritz’s next collaboration is with the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in the Palais du Louvre in Paris, this time for its H&M Conscious Exclusive collection, with Julia Restoin Roitfeld as the face of the new campaign.
   ‘I am honoured to be the ambassador of such a unique project. I think that the idea of creating a collection inspired by the history of art and fashion is fantastic. Especially since it is made with innovative and sustainable materials which are the future of fashion,’ says Roitfeld.
   H&M Conscious is the Swedish retailer’s sustainable, socially responsible collection, and this Exclusive collaboration sees the company work with materials such as beads and rhinestones made from recycled glass and Denimite, which is made from recycled denim. ‘We brought the idea of sustainability to new levels,’ noted Ann-Sofie Johansson, H&M’s creative adviser. ‘We have created contemporary styles imbued with a sophisticated charm.’
   The collection has been inspired by the museum’s archives, and will be launched on April 7, coinciding with the opening of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs’ Fashion Forward: Three Centuries of Fashion exhibition. H&M’s designers have also looked at the work of artists such as Gustave Moreau for the collection.
   H&M promises a line of ‘modern red-carpet pieces infused with tactile charm, a nostalgic æsthetic and a historical legacy.’ It features both clothing and accessories for women.
   The company is the exclusive sponsor of the exhibition, which will feature styles from its own archives, including items from its first collaboration in 2004 with Karl Lagerfeld and the latest collection.
   The collection will retail in 100 stores worldwide and online at

November 24, 2015

Video and photos: double win for J. W. Anderson at British Fashion Awards 2015; Gwendoline Christie wins Style Award

Lucire staff/3.01

Mike Marsland/British Fashion Council

Jonathan Anderson, the man behind the label J. W. Anderson, has scooped both the men’s and women’s Designer of the Year awards at the British Fashion Awards last night, held at the Coliseum in London.
   Anderson has previously won the men’s prize, in 2014, the New Establishment Designer award in 2013, and the Emerging Womenswear Designer award in 2012.
   As detailed earlier by the British Fashion Council, Karl Lagerfeld won the Outstanding Achievement Award for his contribution to the fashion industry.
   Other heavyweight names on the night included Tom Ford, who was recognized with the Red Carpet award, for creating global awareness of one’s designs in the media (Lady Gaga collected on his behalf); Burberry, with the Creative Campaign award for its editorial and advertising; and Alessandro Michele for Gucci as the International Designer.
   The much-acclaimed Isabella Blow Award for Fashion Creator was given to Nick Knight, for his contribution to the global fashion industry.
   Charlotte Olympia won the Accessory Designer award, and Stella McCartney was recognized as the best brand. Erdem won the Establishment Designer award for its retail and ecommerce presences, while Mary Katrantzou won the New Establishment Designer award.
   Jourdan Dunn won the award for Model of the Year. Game of Thrones actress Gwendoline Christie was named the winner of the British Style Award, which was voted on by 6,000 people.
   Of the three emerging designer awards, the winners were Thomas Tait for womenswear, Grace Wales Bonner for menswear, and Jordan Askill for accessories.
   VIPs attending or presenting included British Fashion Council chair Natalie Massenet, Victoria and David Beckham, Tinie Tempah, Cheryl Fernandez-Versini, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Sarah Burton, Naomi Campbell, Anna Wintour, Angela Scanlon, Liv Tyler, Nick Grimshaw, Lily Allen, Poppy Delevingne, Rita Ora, Robert Konjic, Mollie King, Alexa Chung, Yasmin Le Bon, Laura Bailey, Pierre Denis, Imran Amed, Markus Lupfer, Gareth Pugh, Elisa Sednaoui, Michael Polish, Sandra Choi, Alexandra Shulman, FKA Twigs, Sophie Dahl, Sam Rollinson, Jack Whitehall, Jim Chapman, Immy Waterhouse, Elisa Sednaoui, Georgia May Jagger, Olga Kurylenko, Olivier Rousteing, Faustine Steinmetz, Harold Tillman, Jefferson Hack, Marc Hare, Christopher Raeburn, Stephen Jones, Molly Goddard, Susanna Lau, Kate Beckinsale, Mario Testino, Malaika Firth, Jamie Bochert, Charlotte Simone, Edie Campbell, Lulu Kennedy, Salma Hayek and François-Henri Pinault, Roksanda Ilincić, Lilah Parsons, Katie Grand, Carson McColl, Giles Deacon, Lewis Hamilton, Nadja Swarovski, Daisy Lowe, David Burton, David Koma, Lara Stone, Lucky Blue Smith, Fernando Jorge, Sid Bryan, Jack Guinness, Sarah-Jane Crawford, Pixie Lott and Oliver Cheshire, Helen Wright, Emilia Wickstead, Erin O’Connor, Anya Hindmarch, Henry Holland, Noomi Rapace, Craig Green, Adrian Joffe, Astrid Andersen Mollie King, Jo Elvin, Patrick Grant, Peter Pilotto, Sophia Sanchez de Betak, Christopher de Vos, Christopher Kane, Sophia Neophitou-Apostolou, Joseph Altazurra, Richard Nicoll, Tanya Burr, Kate Bosworth, Karlie Kloss, Joanna Lumley and Jennifer Saunders (as Patsy Stone and Eddy Monsoon), Orlando Bloom, Suzy Menkes, Alasdhair Willis, Alice Dellal, Chloë Green, Arizona Muse and Amy Cole.
   Sponsors for the evening included principal partner Swarovski, presenting partners MAC and Toni & Guy, and official sponsors Ciroc, Marks & Spencer, Mercedes-Benz and St Martins Lane. Other supporters included Diptyque Paris, Fashion & Beauty Monitor, Fiji Water, Nikki Tibbles, Warsteiner and Wild at Heart.

Red carpet

Gwendoline Christie interview

Lucky Blue Smith

Suzy Menkes

Jack Whitehall

Alessandro Michele

Rita Ora


Jourdan Dunn

Lady Gaga

Mike Marsland/British Fashion Council

Winners’ enclosure
Lady Gaga accepts on behalf of Tom Ford

Jourdan Dunn

Karl Lagerfeld


Alessandro Michele for Gucci

Stella McCartney

J. W. Anderson, Menswear Designer of the Year

J. W. Anderson, Womenswear Designer of the Year

Mike Marsland/British Fashion Council

Highlight reel

November 23, 2015

Stolen Girlfriends’ Club creates limited-edition straps for Samsung Gear S2 Classic smartwatch

Lucire staff/10.50

Stolen Girlfriends’ Club has created a collection of four customized leather watch straps for the Samsung Gear S2 smartwatch, in an official collaboration with the Korean electronics’ giant.
   The limited-edition straps, in black and brown crocodile, and green and blue snake, will be made available as a gift to some Samsung customers. They are made in New Zealand.
   The retro styling is intentional. As Marc Moore, Stolen Girlfriends’ Club’s creative director, noted, ‘I was really inspired by vintage watch straps for this collaboration with Samsung on the new Gear S2 Classic. I’ll be honest, I haven’t been a huge fan of some of the smartwatches being launched by brands lately—just because they look so “techy”, it doesn’t leave much option for people that are into fashion. So I was pretty excited when I first saw the Gear S2 Classic, I knew instantly that a vintage-styled strap would work great. We had a bit of fun with the colours and textures of the leather we sourced whilst keeping it really wearable and quite classic.’
   By rotating the face bezel, the Gear S2 goes to different screens, or skips to another track or zooms in on a map, making navigation particularly simple. The watch features health and fitness apps, a two- to three-day battery life, Android Bluetooth pairing, and push notifications via mobile phones. The straps can be changed further and the watch face can be customized via the Samsung Gear app. Retail price in New Zealand for the basic S2 is NZ$549, and the S2 Classic is NZ$649, available both online and at offline retailers.

November 22, 2015

Bed|Stü opens LA boutique: Kelli Berglund, Jaime King, Ali Landry, Brooke Burke, Jeff Schroeder attend

Elyse Glickman/10.27

City chic made its way to Malibu Country Mart when Bed|Stü, crafters of hand-wrought boots, shoes, belts and handbags, opened its first brick-and-mortar store just before the American Thanksgiving holiday. Fashionistas from across Los Angeles made the trek to the tiny shopping enclave to see the full fall–winter collection for women and men, ahead of its public opening, on November 21. A lucky few taste-makers also got to step out (literally) with a pair of Bed|Stü’s Isla boots, a sturdy but feminine wardrobe staple. They could also add a monogram or pattern (via hand-branding) to further personalize them.
   Bed|Stü opened for business in a small Los Angeles warehouse in 1995, as a firm focused on hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind accessories that were also affordable (prices today run between US$200 and US$350). Today, the company still steers clear of mass production, and continues to use natural leathers, vegetable-based tanning process, and hand-finished products. Other features include sturdy Goodyear welted soles and hand-sewn tailoring to ensure the life of the investment.
   Celebrities on hand included actress and model Jaime King, Ali Landry, Brooke Burke-Charyet, Kelli Berglund (Disney’s XD Lab Rats) Big Brother host Jeff Schroeder and his wife Jordan Lloyd.
   Landry was overheard saying, ‘Everywhere I look there is a new pair I want!’ Dozens of people who joined the crowd to try on boots, get an on-site manicure by Nail Garden, and sip Malibu Family Wines and beer by Peroni agreed. Outside of Los Angeles, shoe mavens can shop the collection internationally at—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor

Next Page »


Get more from Lucire

Our latest issue

Lucire 34
Check out our lavish print issue of Lucire in hard copy or for Ipad or Android.
Or download the latest issue of Lucire as a PDF from Scopalto

Lucire on Twitter
Lucire on Instagram