Lucire


  latest news   fashion   beauty   living   volante   in print   tablet   tv
  home   community   shopping   advertise   contact

The Body Shop, Botanicals Fresh Care, Ultra Doux: L’Oréal advances natural beauty and environmental initiatives


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/May 9, 2017/23.32



Top: Shidong Yan, director of the Centre for Environmental Education and Communications of Ministry of Environmental Protection; Tom Szaky, TerraCycle founder and global CEO; Haoran Liu; Zhenzhen Lan, Vice President, L’Oréal (China). Above: The Body Shop British Rose Premium Selection (NZ$95·50), and the British Rose collection.

It’s nice that the Body Shop can also source from its home country of the UK, and the British Rose collection ensures that its origins—as well as one of botany’s most celebrated flowers—are in the name.
   The collection is made with organic, hand-picked and air-dried roses, used to create a youthful and fresh scent. These products are rich in vitamin C to give the skin a gentle, soft and silky effect. The British Rose collection includes the Instant Glow Body Essence (NZ$47·25), a body lotion with a lightweight and lasting formula that hydrates the skin over 24 hours, leaving it feeling smooth and soft. The British Rose shower gel (NZ$17·50) is perfumed with essences of hand-picked rose; the Petal Soft hand cream (NZ$9·95) is lightweight, won’t grease the skin, and is absorbed immediately. The British Rose Instant Glow body butter (NZ$38·95) is a velvet-soft moisturizer that is light to the touch but rich on moisture, providing 24-hour hydration; and the exfoliating gel body scrub (NZ$42), with real rose petals, helps reveal smoother, fresher skin. The Beauty Bag (NZ$39·50) includes the shower gel, body butter and hand cream (in 60 ml, 50 ml and 30 ml respectively), and the Premium Selection (NZ$95·50) has the shower gel and body butter but in larger quantities (250 ml and 200 ml respectively), the same hand cream, and a 250 ml bath foam.
   Parent company L’Oréal is getting into the natural beauty market with a second line specifically for hair, called Botanicals Fresh Care. Now available in New Zealand, the new hair care line sources from Egyptian geranium leaves, Cretian safflower, Bulgarian coriander seed oil, and French camelina flowers, from the most sustainable producers.
   Geranium essential oil is an antioxidant rich in fatty acid; safflower oil is rich in lipids; coriander seed oil has Omega 6 properties; and camelina oil is rich in Omega 6 and Omega 9.
   The Botanicals Fresh Care range is divided into four: Botanicals Geranium Colour Radiance for coloured hair, Botanicals Safflower Rich Nourishment for dry hair, Botanicals Coriander Revitalizing Strength for fragile hair and Botanicals Camelina Smooth Ritual for frizzy hair. The products are vegan, free of silicone, parabens, and colourants, retailing at NZ$17·99 each.
   Finally, Ultra Doux—which occidental readers might be more familiar with as a Garnier range—is a separate L’Oréal line in China, aimed at the mass market who wants natural hair care. The brand has teamed up with TerraCycle, a specialist in recycling hard-to-recycle consumer waste. At an event in Shanghai, L’Oréal China VP Zhenzhen Lan, Chinese government rep Shidong Yan, TerraCycle CEO Tom Szaky, and Ultra Doux spokesman Haoran Liu launched the partnership, which is claimed to be the first comprehensive solution for hair care packaging waste in China.
   Individuals or communities can sign up to a recycling programme, and collect the packaging, to be shipped free to charge to TerraCycle. The organizations expect that millions of pieces will be collected, so they do not wind up in landfills or incinerators. For every unit of waste collected, the programme will contribute 1元 to the individual’s charity of choice. All plastic waste collected through the programme will be made into desks and chairs and donated to a school in China.
   Ultra Doux has also opted for renewable, bio-derived plastics and sustainably sourced cardboard for its packaging, as well as more naturally derived ingredients.—Nathalia Archila and Lucire staff



Why nixing sugar in your system is not a diet


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 8, 2017/10.58


Above: Summer Rayne Oakes’s SugarDetoxMe: 100+ Recipes to Curb Cravings and Take Back Your Health, the result of a “sugar cleanse” she went on from 2014. To get people off sugar, Summer Rayne’s even created a programme to help others do the same. Below left: Summer Rayne Oakes.

I never thought I could nix my sweet tooth. I just figured it’s something that you’re born with. To a large extent, that’s actually true. Not only are humans programmed to prefer sweet over bitter, (which is no doubt an evolutionary advantage, as many bitter tastes are actually poisonous), but by the time we’re born and as we’re growing, our taste is already fairly developed.
   The latter part is courtesy of a number of factors, including what our mother chose to eat while we were in utero, whether we were breast-fed or formula fed, and even now—what evidence suggests—what our Dads and even grandparents ate. The last point I made is not one to gloss over. If the evidence, which has presented itself today, is correct, then the food choices we put into our bodies today—will affect several unborn generations after us. In sum, we’re making direct health decisions for people who are yet to be born!
   With all of our “advances” in medical care, we must ask ourselves why is life expectancy dropping for the first time since 1993? When I was born in the mid-’80s, type 2 diabetes—a disease that is inextricably linked to our excessive sugar intake—was known as ‘adult-onset diabetes’. Now in just three decades, it’s common among children, affects 1 in 11 adults worldwide, 37 per cent of whom live in the western Pacific region; and one in seven births is impacted by gestational diabetes. In New Zealand alone, nearly 286,000 people were diagnosed with diabetes in 2015—a doubling over the last decade. If the rate continues at this pace, diabetes is projected to cost Kiwis more than $1,000 million in annual health care costs in five years’ time.
   The statistics seem startling enough, but perhaps not as startling as something closer to home, like the amount of free sugars—or sugars not bound by fibre—that we’re consuming on a daily basis. The upper limit of free sugars for the day—and I emphasize the word upper—is 6 teaspoons for a woman, 9 for a man. However, New Zealanders, in particular, are consuming around 27 teaspoons per day per person, according to the Sugar Research Advisory Service. That’s well over three to four times the upper limit for the day!
   About three years ago now, I began working in the world of “good” food. We were experimenting with an idea as to whether we could get farm-fresh food into people’s fridges more efficiently. When working so closely with farmers and food makers, you inevitably home in on what you’re eating—and how it makes you feel. I always considered myself a healthy eater in general. My parents have always been health-conscious and we largely grew our own food. Unlike my parents, however, I struggled with a sugar tooth; one that has left me with many memories of hoarding sweet things. I finally had the time to ask, ‘Why?’ and to begin to probe how this one ingredient has seemingly snuck its way into three out of four products on our supermarket shelves.
   This curiosity and the need to know how to overcome my seemingly innate sugar habit led me on a Nancy Drew-like investigation; I began researching all I could about our relationship to the sweet stuff, and started documenting my “sugar cleanse” via sugardetox.me, which later led to an easy-to-follow, empowering programme to help others do the same and most recently, a cookbook and guide on the very topic.
   Free sugars have become so prevalent in our food that the average person might not even realize that he or she is tipping the sugar scale even before heading out the door in the morning. This particular ingredient has a way of changing our brain chemistry, too—acting as a hyper-stimulus to trigger our brains and bodies to release dopamine, serotonin, and other neurotransmitters. In sum, it keeps us hooked and trapped in a vicious cycle of ups and downs throughout the day.
   It’s part of the reason why reducing or eliminating free sugars from your diet is not a diet. It’s simply removing a potentially deleterious substance from one’s body—much in the same way an alcoholic needs to remove alcohol from his or her system. This may, at first, seem a little counter-intuitive, but the ingredient is heavily taxing our bodies to the point that some scientists are now calling it a ‘chronic [versus acute] liver toxin’. Over time, it affects our body’s own natural abilities to detoxify themselves. This in turn can cause inflammation, energy slumps, skin problems, obesity, and disease. Though some medical practitioners would be hard pressed to call excessive sugar intake an “addiction”, more signs point to the fact that it is—from brain-imaging scans to the rise of sugar-addiction clinics.
   As those of us who have begun to eradicate free sugars from their diets know, you begin to taste real ingredients again. Our taste buds have plasticity, renewing themselves, and adjusting taste preferences to the food we feed our bodies and our cells. A freshly picked summer tomato is sumptuously sweet; but to those of us who are used to overdosing on a hyper-stimulating cola, the best sun-ripened tomato from the farm might seem fairly bland.
   Our appreciation for real food is within our reach—if we give our taste buds time to acclimate from that which is hyper-stimulating. It’s not impossible to curb your sweet tooth, as I have found out. We are, after all, masters of our own destiny. Some of us have to contend with more challenging, uphill battles—but when we have the curiosity and will to understand our body’s needs and wants, then we’re already primed towards a path to better health. I encourage and invite everyone to take the time to explore their own personal cravings and relationship to food, as none of us have the same story or experience. I assure you that when you’re able to put your own puzzle pieces together to see the whole picture, you begin to feel empowered to discover the path towards health that is right for you!—Summer Rayne Oakes, Editor-at-large

Vegan and cruelty-free pampering from the Body Shop this season


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/April 28, 2017/13.20


For this upcoming season, we have a list of must-haves from the Body Shop. They are products that we’ve selected and love from one of our favourite brands, with high-quality cruelty–free products and accessible prices.
   For those who loved the classic Down to Earth palettes, the Body Shop brings a new product: customization eye-shadow palettes. These are 100 per cent vegan, contain babasusu and sesame oil, have no added parabens, mineral oils or petroleum, and are suitable for sensitive eyes. This versatile idea will allow you to mix your favourite colours to create your look, and easily go from day to night. They are priced at NZ$12·92 per shadow.
   The Camomile Sumptuous Cleansing Butter (NZ$32·50) and the Luxury Facial Flannel (NZ$10·25) are perfect for the end of the day when you want clean and fresh skin. The camomile cleanser is a perfect make-up remover that gently and effective melts away the make-up and lets your skin feeling pampered, clean and soft. The camomile is sourced from Norfolk, England, and the butter works on all types of make-up. The flannel, on the other hand, is super-soft, perfect for facial washes and leaves the skin feeling softer and smoother.
   Finally, we are obsessed with the Body Shop’s new range of cruelty-free brushes. They feel really soft on the skin and give you a natural and professional make-up look. Prices range from NZ$22·95 for the pointed liner brush, to NZ$34·95 for the foundation-buffing, slanted contouring and angled blush brushes. There are also the eye-shadow crease and flat shader brushes (NZ$23·75 each), pointed highlighter brush (NZ$32·95), and fan blush brush (NZ$26·95).—Nathalia Archila




Allbirds extends range with Wool Lounger shoes


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 26, 2017/13.29


Allbirds claims its latest Wool Lounger shoe has ‘soft wool, sleek lines, unstoppable comfort’.
   Already known for the comfort of its existing Wool Runner shoe, the US-based, New Zealand-heritage brand introduced a second style earlier this month.
   Environmentally friendly, the new shoes are breathable and made from the same super-fine New Zealand merino wool, which the company claims makes them ideal to be worn year-round, and even sockless.
   Four shades are available at launch: lemon, navy, pine and slate. Men’s and women’s styles are offered.



Enjoying a “beauty rest” at the Mondrian; and hair revival in Beverly Hills


NEWS  by Elyse Glickman/April 24, 2017/13.03




Elyse Glickman

Award show season may be over, and the Coachella fashion parade has run its course. However, Los Angeles’ first heatwave provided a convenient excuse to play hooky from pressing writing assignments to hit Charmed PR’s friendly little showcase of beauty products and a pick-me-up pedicure or manicure. The backdrop of the Mondrian Hotel’s ever-so fashionable and busy rooftop pool provided extra incentive to try out the goodies to prep hair and skin (feet in particular) for sandals, swimsuits, and shorter skirts.
   The Better Skin Cream Company not only came armed with its multitasking Mirakle Cream, but also its new, triple-threat Lava Magik (cleanser, exfoliating scrub and revitalizing mask). Volcanic lava from France is enriched with calendula, sweet orange and grapeseed oils, cucumber, parsley, and chamomile for radiant clean that goes a little more skin deep, with its antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-yeast properties.
   Hair La Vie’s continued the multipurpose beauty theme with a less-is-more line developed by hairstylist and cancer survivor Carla Rivas. She introduced media and web influencers to her philosophy with travel sizes of the shampoo and conditioner, and full-size hair serum and vitamins, all formulated without harmful chemicals or additives. Greater value is added to customer purchases with users knowing 10 per cent of profits will go to charities such as Save the Children, Heifer International, National Breast Cancer Foundation and the Global Fund For Women.
   Even the smiles on people’s faces got a little extra love, not just from Lucy B’s lip glosses, but with Popwhite dental products. This simple system of toothpaste and mouth rinse works along the same lines as colour-correcting foundations and make-up. FDA-approved purple pigments sourced from plants and herbs cancel out yellow residue on teeth for a whiter smile naturally. Coconut oil and xylatol make the process pleasant tasting, to boot.
   Schique Skin Care by Jacqueline Schaffer, MD showcased her beauty how-to book, Irresistible You, as well as her anti-ageing product line built on sulfate and paraben-free formulas, integrating elements from daisy plants known their natural sun protection and vitamin complexes. This back-to-basics line includes a refreshing mist, colour-changing specialty beads, face mask, eye cream, sumptuous moisturizer and creamy firming serum.
   The centrepiece of the festivities was a trio of foot-beautifying items, including LVX Luxury Nail Lacquer, Baby Foot Exfoliant Foot Peel and an anklet from Sterling Forever. LVX lives up to its branding, thanks in part to its gel-like formula that’s seven-free, vegan and cruelty free. Many of the fashion-forward shades have their origins with past collaborations with designers such as Mara Hoffman, Tadashi Shoji, Tracy Reese, Rodebjer and others. I was particularly excited about Baby Foot, as Leyla Messian and Jody Miller raved about the effectiveness of this product, which was featured at Charmed’s beauty event a year ago. A formula of 17 natural extracts makes one’s feet look scary at first, but this is an assurance the product works. Glycolic acid and citric acid peel away dead skin cells softened by alcohol. Salicylic acid, lactic acid and isopropyl stimulate a flaking effect, and although your feet temporarily look haggard, healthy skin is ultimately undamaged and a fresh layer beneath reveals itself.

A couple of weeks ago, Biolage launched its new RAW collection at Beverly Hills’ Brighton Salon. Although reality television personality Ali Fedotowsky was crowned the face of the brand, the concept behind the products is pretty stellar: a sustainable, green hair care line packaged in fresh-pressed juice bottles that are themselves made of sustainable materials. While the salon itself has all the earmarks of a Beverly Hills salon, from luxury brands (Kérastase, Shu Uemura, and Oribe), it is an oasis of neighbourhood salon friendliness and sanity, amid designer labels and celebrity stylists. The laid-back, multicultural staff are more committed to steering clients towards flattering styles than of-the-minute colour and cut trends. Veteran cutter Dani Faraj and colorist Walid Chaya took a less-is-more approach with me that looked fresh and current without leaving me shorn and shell-shocked—no small feat.
   This tiny salon that could offers hair extensions, Brazilian blowouts, bikini-wax and everything else needed for a fresh look. However, they are also big on community outreach, including a wig bank sponsored by the American Cancer Society. Brighton Salon supports the cause by giving a 50 per cent discount to customers who commit to donating their hair for the cause. They also offered a sneak peak at the recently opened Prestige Skin Care (9435 Brighton Way) a few doors down, featuring locally produced luxury lines and an owner who worked at such prestige salons as Christophe before going the “friendly neighbourhood” route.—Elyse Glickman, US West Coast Editor








Elyse Glickman

Kérastase enters natural hair care market with Aura Botanica range; Toni Garrn spokesmodel


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/April 20, 2017/3.49

Kérastase has introduced its Aura Botanica line in New Zealand, featuring a shampoo (Bain Micellaire), retailing at NZ$48, a conditioner (Soin Fondamental), NZ$52, a treatment (Concentre Essentiel), NZ$79, and an oil mist (Essence d’Éclat), NZ$70. The collection is, on average, 98 per cent natural in origin—a first for this L’Oréal brand—and includes pure hand-pressed Samoan coconut and Moroccan argan oils.
   Kérastase says the Aura Botanica coconut oil has proven to penetrate deeply into the hair, leaving it soft, hydrated and strong. The argan oil, meanwhile, lasts longest on the hair’s surface, nourishing it and keeping hair soft and shiny. Development of the range began in 2013.
   The products have a fragrance with top notes of grapefruit and crushed mint leaves, mid-notes of black pepper, coriander and jasmine, and base notes of rich vanilla and warm amber.
   The products are (again on average) 97 per cent biodegradable, and its packaging is similarly friendly to the environment, with the Bain Micellaire in a 100 per cent recycled polyethylene terephthalate (RPET) bottle, and the Concentre Essentiel bottle is made with 25 per cent recycled glass.
   With interest in natural hair care growing, Kérastase expects a sizeable number of customers will chose Aura Botanica.
   As revealed in January, model Toni Garrn is the face of the Kérastase Aura Botanica range. Twenty-four-year-old Garrn, with 581,000 Instagram followers and a fresh, healthy face, is involved in humanitarian work, her image working well with the natural angle of Aura Botanica.—Nathalia Archila

Tailor Renew: does exactly what it says on the box


NEWS  by Jack Yan/April 18, 2017/14.20

Tailor Skincare’s Renew is a probiotic serum that’s already picked up an Innovation Award for Best Formulation from the New Zealand Society of Cosmetic Chemists. For the service of our readers, we put it to the test, as we do with other products that come across our desk.
   In the case of Renew, I wanted to get a real-world sense of how it might work. Believing in “tested on humans”, my other half came to the rescue, putting the serum on one hand but not the other at night.
   Within a day there was a noticeable difference where the serum had been applied: the skin felt softer and smoother to the touch, even healthier. Things continued to improve over the week: it really works.
   It did exactly what Tailor claims: it stimulated and revitalized the skin, thanks to its probiotic lysate and grape seed extract. The lysate-based Prorenew Complex CLR ingredient is unique to Tailor, while grape-seed extract is a known antioxidant that protects the skin. These work with the body’s own processes.
   ‘Renew’ is an honest claim—here’s a product whose name is a real claim to what it does.
   Tailor recommends that it be used for the face and neck after cleansing and moisturizing, using ‘a pea-sized amount’. It works with all skin types.
   Tailor Renew, retailing for NZ$69, is made in New Zealand, and is cruelty-free.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Cartier announces 2017 Women’s Initiative Awards’ laureates in Singapore ceremony


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 14, 2017/23.29



Cartier announced the laureates of its 2017 Women’s Initiative Awards on Wednesday at the Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall in Singapore, the first time the event has been held outside France.
   The awards, which recognize there is a gender gap and aim to reward women entrepreneurs, began in 2006, created in partnership with INSEAD and McKinsey & Co.
   Cyrille Vigneron, CEO of Cartier, and Ilian Mihov, Dean of INSEAD, announced the six laureates, selected by an independent international jury from nearly 1,900 applicants in over 120 countries. Each walked away with a US$100,000 prize, plus a year of mentoring and a place in an INSEAD executive programme.
   Sandi Toksvig, OBE MCed the ceremony.

Latin America
Kickante, Candice Pascoal, Brazil
   Kickante addresses the lack of a crowd-funding platform in Brazil by connecting campaign creators to donors.

North America
Save Water & Co., Katie Anderson, USA
   Save Water & Co. aims to fight high wastage of water in commercial establishments and multi-family properties by using data analytics to improve business processes through water conversation.

Europe
Theya Healthcare, Ciara Donlon, Ireland
   Theya Healthcare offers post-surgery undergarments for women, made of an innovative sourced from bamboo that is more absorbent and more bacterial resistant than other materials.

Sub-Saharan Africa
Unique Quality Product, Salma Abdulai, Ghana
   Unique Quality Product works with farmers, particularly women, in producing and processing of Fonio. The company was formed with an idea of creating sustainable livelihoods for women farmers whose lands are degraded due to its excessive usage and creating a land management system. This innovation has led to sustainable food and fodder security, agroforestry and nutrition.

Middle East and North Africa
Sara and Lara’s Baskets, Sara-Kristina Hannig Nour, Egypt
   Sara and Lara’s Baskets tackles the lack of organic food options in Egypt by delivering weekly shipments of organic products directly to customers in Egypt’s largest cities.

Asia-Pacific
Naireeta Services, Trupti Jain, India
   Naireeta Services addresses the issues of drought and flash floods destroying farmers’ crops. It provides hand-made water management solutions, enabling small farmers to filter and store rainwater underground to become independent from extreme weather conditions and dry periods.


Cartier Women’s Initiative Awards 2017 by Lucire


Cartier Women’s Initiative Awards 2017 laureate… by Lucire






Next Page »

 

Get more from Lucire

Our latest issue

Lucire 36
Check out our lavish print issue of Lucire in hard copy or for Ipad or Android.
Or download the latest issue of Lucire as a PDF from Scopalto

Lucire on Twitter

Lucire on Instagram