Lucire


  latest news   fashion   beauty   living   volante   print   tv
  home   community   shopping   advertise   contact

Elle commemorates 75th anniversary at Chinese edition’s Style Awards

Filed by Lucire staff/October 29, 2020/21.16


Elle might not have been in China for 75 years, but as one of the few countries that has put COVID-19 largely behind it, the French magazine’s landmark anniversary was commemorated in Chengdu, along with Elle China’s Style Awards.
   The Elle China Style Awards took place at Chengdu’s New Century Global Centre, the world’s largest building as measured by floor area (1,700,000 m²), rather than in Shanghai, where it had hitherto been held. The Awards had the theme ‘Traversing the boundaries of influences’.
   The awards went to Liu Song for Photographer of the Year; Wang Ziqian for New Photographer of the Year; Zhao Jiali for Supermodel of the Year; Mao Geping for Beauty Master of the Year; and Yang Guidong and Chen Xuzhi for Designers of the Year.
   Elle China editorial director Nicole Xue also launched the magazine’s ‘Wonder Women’ project with actresses Ma Yili and Tao Hong, Olympic champion Ding Ning, lawyer Guo Jianmei, artist Xiang Jing, and ‘Beidou Goddess’ Xu Ying.
   The magazine also unveiled its 75th anniversary cover at the event.

 


Cover design notes on our 23rd birthday

Filed by Jack Yan/October 20, 2020/10.25

We’ve happily been able to add a few more covers to the montage we published last year on the occasion of our 22nd anniversary. Now 23, we thought an update was in order, and we’ve included our latest issue, which you can order now.
   The story of Lucire’s founding has been covered elsewhere, during more appropriate anniversary numbers.
   Here we’ll just remark at how much has changed design-wise since we went into print seven years after our founding. Some of the early issues have dated; and even if we look at the turn of the decade, heading into the mid-2010s, our layout ideas have aged. This is despite a very earnest effort to make a magazine look “timeless”, an impossible task because one is always affected unconsciously by the trends and moods around us. The photography from this period, interestingly, has stood the test of time far better, which makes us wonder if there has really been that much progress out there.
   Right now, with bandwidth so readily available, we are getting more images than ever to accompany fairly innocent stories, making it tempting to use as much of them as possible. More cramped, less airy layouts are the result, and even though we observe a grid, we’ve definitely been trying to give more bang for the buck on every page. Technology so often drives changes in approach and in design.
   Maybe the new decade will force us to rethink this as people want calmer, more relaxed existences to counter the added stresses of work; whatever the case, we’ll continue to strive to present the best and most informative fashion magazine that we can. We thank our amazing team for creating so much beauty on every level, and we thank our readers for over two decades’ worth of support.—Jack Yan, Founder and Publisher


Jon Moe

Claudia Goetzelmann

Sixteen years separate these two. The commitment to quality and providing an intelligent read has not changed. Coincidentally, both were shot in California, and the older issue has that state’s current First Lady on the cover

 


German actress Tiana Pongs releases insider’s guide to modelling

Filed by Lucire staff/July 2, 2020/12.23

German model and actress Tiana Pongs, who had authored Der kleine Model Guide in her native country some years ago, has released an updated English-language equivalent, Keep Smiling: a Career Guide for Models, from the same publisher, Ebozon Verlag.
   According to the publisher, the guide ‘explains, step by step, how to start, what the everyday life looks like and how emerging models can successfully establish themselves on the international market.’
   Pongs runs through advice on securing an agency, photographers and clients, photo shoots, and general conditions. She also discusses fees, tax advisers, travel, and beauty and nutrition. The book also has a verified list of international agencies.
   She also covers the seedier side of the business, including ‘dirty offers’, as well as personal difficulties such as homesickness.


Tiana Pongs’ original German edition, from the same publisher

 


Facebook’s demise wouldn’t affect us much

Filed by Jack Yan/May 30, 2020/11.14

Like many other publications, Lucire sends updates to Facebook, Twitter and Mastodon. Occasionally we’ll Instagram an image to a story. However, we’ve had reservations about social media, especially Facebook, for over a decade. In November 2010, we wrote on our Facebook page, ‘We have stopped the automated importing of notes to this Facebook page. These stories receive around 200–400 views each, but that also means that our site loses 200–400 viewers per story.’ At that stage we probably had around 600 fans on the Lucire fan page, showing you just what cut-through pages were getting before Facebook intentionally broke its sharing algorithm to force people to pay to get the same reach. (Reach dropped 90 per cent overnight.) We didn’t feel any desire after that to build social media presences, because we spotted the con—as did this YouTuber:

   Back then, Facebook allowed the importing of articles via RSS, which meant everything from Lucire’s news pages automatically wound up on the social network. It was a crazy idea, when you look back: it wasn’t designed to drive traffic to our main site, it only made Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg rich as you spent more time in their walled garden.
   Even after we stopped, we still shared headlines to Facebook, thinking that these would entice fans sufficiently to click through. At one stage, we could see referrals from Facebook among our stats, but these days, there is no correlation between the Facebook reach numbers and the actual views of the story on our own site.
   In 2016, NPR posted a headline to its Facebook page, ‘Why Doesn’t America Read Anymore?’ but the contents of the article read, ‘We sometimes get the sense that some people are commenting on NPR stories that they haven’t actually read. If you are reading this, please like this post and do not comment on it. Then let’s see what people have to say about this “story.”’ You can predict what happened: the link got plenty of comments. Anyone who says that Americans don’t get irony is gravely mistaken.
   Even in the late 2000s I was saying we lived in a ‘headline culture’ where people might never read the article itself, and social media have exacerbated this phenomenon. Many social media today, including the largest sites, are little more than glorified Digg sites, places where links are shared, but not necessarily places which drive traffic.
   Of course there will be exceptions to the rule, but generally, social media do not mean engagement. A 2015 study by Parse.ly showed that social media-referred readers engage the least with a given article. Search engine-referred readers were slightly better. But the best came from those who were already loyal readers on the site.
   In an age of “fake news” I do not believe the statistics will have improved, particularly on websites whose businesses thrive on outrage. People are divided into tribes where they seem to derive some reward for posting more links that support that aims of those tribes: a situation rife for exploitation, if certain countries’ investigations are to be believed. Certainly as early as 2014 I was warning of a ‘bot epidemic’, something that only became mainstream news in 2018 with The Observer’s exposé about Cambridge Analytica.
   But none of that bad news broke the addictions many people have to these websites. On our ‘about’ page on Facebook, we note: ‘Fast forward to (nearly) the dawn of the 2020s. We won’t lie to you: we’re not fans of how Facebook says one thing and does another. In our pages, we’ve promoted based on merit, and Facebook wouldn’t actually pass muster if it was a fashion label.
   ‘We know Facebook is tracking you, often more than your settings have allowed. Therefore, we’re consciously trying to limit the time you spend on this website.
   ‘However, we also know that we should maintain a Facebook presence, as there are many of you who want that convenience.’
   Nonetheless, I regularly wonder if that convenience is even worth it if there is no correlation with readership.
   Twice this month I was locked out of Facebook, because, allegedly, there was unusual activity. If checking your Facebook on a far less regular basis—say a couple of times a week—is unusual, then I’ll expect to get locked out far more frequently. As the importing of our Tweets to Facebook is driven by another program (on IFTTT), and that is linked to my personal account (one that I haven’t updated since 2017), then each time Facebook blocks me, it breaks the process. It’s also a website that has bugs that were present when I was a regular user in the late 2000s through to the mid-2010s, including ones where we cannot even share Lucire links because the site automatically ruins the address, rendering the previews anywhere from inaccurate (claiming the page doesn’t exist) to useless (taking you to a 404). Only the text link will work.
   We get the occasional like and share from our Facebook, although these do not inform our editorial decisions.
   We won’t go so far as to proclaim the end of social media, regardless of how angry the US president gets with fact checks; but we’ve been sceptical about their worth for publishers for a long time, and there are increasing days where I wonder whether I’ll even bother reconnecting the sharing mechanism from Twitter to Facebook if Facebook breaks it again. The question I’m really asking is: does the presence of links to our articles matter much to you?
   Ultimately, I care about all our readers, including Facebook users, and that remains the overriding motive to reconnect things one more time after Facebook locks me out. And I suppose the lock-outs in 2020 are much better than the ones during most of the 2010s, where Facebook forced you to download a “malware scanner” on false pretences, planting hidden software with unclear purposes on to millions of computers around the world. Their record is truly appalling, and if Facebook vanished overnight, I wouldn’t shed a tear.—Jack Yan, Publisher

 


British Fashion Council names 37 designers receiving COVID-19 emergency fund support

Filed by Lucire staff/May 13, 2020/10.42

The British Fashion Council has announced the first recipients of its emergency fund, helping members of the fashion industry navigate the COVID-19 pandemic.
   Thirty-seven British designer businesses, out of 220 applications, have been named in the first round, with the BFC using its £1 million fund to support them. A portion has been allocated to students. The amounts range from £5,000 to £50,000 depending on urgency and capability. Recipients would also receive business support and mentoring from the BFC Fashion Business Network, which includes DLA Piper, Eco-Age, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Farfetch, FashionEx, Google, HSBC, Instagram, Lewis Silkin, Lloyds, LVMH, Mishcon de Reya, RSM, Sheridans, Taylor Wessing, Value Retail, and YouTube, and one-on-one mentors.
   The earlier BFC–Vogue Designer Fashion Fund (VDFF) was a £200,000 prize set up for a winning designer. This amount has now been shared with the six designers originally shortlisted for the grand prize.
   The recipients are: Alighieri (VDFF 2020), Ahluwalia, Aries, Art School, Bethany Williams, Bianca Saunders, Chalayan, Charles Jeffrey Loverboy (VDFF 2020), Chopova Lowena, Craig Green, David Koma (VDFF 2020), E. Tautz, E. L. V. Denim, Edeline Lee, Eftychia, Halpern (VDFF 2020), King & Tuckfield, Kwaidan Editions, Liam Hodges, Matty Bovan, Metier (VDFF 2020), Nabil Nayal, Neous, Nicholas Daley, Palmer/Harding, Paper London, Paria/Farzaneh, Per Gotesson, Phoebe English, Raeburn, Rejina Pyo (VDFF 2020), Richard Malone, Richard Quinn, Roksanda, 16Arlington, Stefan Cooke, and Toogood.
   Caroline Rush, chief executive of the BFC said, ‘Over the last couple of weeks, we have seen an astonishing amount of applications come through from British designer businesses all over the country, asking for help to survive the crisis. The need for support is immense. Our hope is to reopen the fund for future rounds, to help as many businesses as possible, and ensure the future growth and success of the British fashion industry.’
   The fund comprised support grants from the BFC–Vogue Designer Fashion Fund, BFC–GQ Designer Menswear Fund supported by JD.com, BFC Fashion Trust and BFC Newgen.
   The BFC estimates that £100 million of support is required over the next 12 to 18 months. The fund will reopen for further rounds every time a £500,000 milestone is reached.
   Alexander McQueen, Browns, Clearpay and Coach Foundation have already contributed to the next round.
   Arch & Hook, BFC Fashion Trust supporters, British GQ, British Vogue, Browns, Burberry, Depop, European Regional Development Fund, HSBC, JD.com, Label/Mix, Mayor of London, Paul Smith, Revlon Professional, Rodial and Value Retail have been contributors to the BFC Foundation Fashion Fund.

 


Supermodel Naomi Campbell photographs herself for Essence’s 50th anniversary issue

Filed by Lucire staff/May 8, 2020/11.53

It’s by no means the only case of a model doing a shoot herself during lockdown—Lucire KSA’s May 2020 edition has Miss Universe New Zealand 2016 Tania Dawson at home with a Playstation in its opening spread—though it is probably the highest-profile, as Naomi Campbell took to doing a series of self-portraits using her Iphone for the 50th anniversary of Essence.
   Campbell, born the same year as the magazine—indeed, the same month—was the ideal choice for the title aimed at black American women. While selfies—even those done with the cellphone camera set to shoot on a timer, and placed in a correct position—will never be a match for having an entire crew, including a professional photographer, stylist, make-up artist and hairstylist, her efforts are still creditable. No doubt having years of experience in front of the camera helped, as well as the high resolutions offered by modern phones.
   The concept was conveyed via Facetime by Essence’s chief content and creative officer MoAna Luu.
   Campbell wears a vintage Chloé dress on the cover—complete with a thick white border, which seems to be a late 2010s–early 2020s graphic design trend—and more images appear in the magazine’s May–June 2020 issue. Part of Lola Ogunnaike’s interview with Campbell appears on Essence’s website.
   It is the first time the supermodel, whose career began in the 1980s, has photographed herself for a magazine cover.

 


Next Page »

 

Get more from Lucire

Our latest issue

Lucire 40
Check out our lavish print issue of Lucire in hard copy or for Ipad or Android.
Or download the latest issue of Lucire as a PDF from Scopalto

Lucire on Twitter

Lucire on Instagram