Lucire: News


November 18, 2015

A masterful Graduation Season at the New Zealand School of Dance, with two world premières

Jack Yan/14.14

Stephen A’Court

Top Concerto, part of the New Zealand School of Dance Graduation Season 2015. Above Sarah-Foster Sproull’s Forgotten Things, with the unfamiliar sight of a string of fists, waving in the space.

The New Zealand School of Dance Graduation Season performances, which began tonight (Wednesday), are always a highlight. It’s the culmination of a lot of hard work from second- and third-year students, and the six performances this year offer a very entertaining mix, especially for lovers of classical ballet.
   In previous years, the NZSD has put more contemporary dance on the menu, but the mixture in tonight’s programme was equally welcome. Paquita, the grand-pas, kicked off the evening, choreographed by Anna-Marie Holmes after Marius Petipa. The students showed immense promise, and we wouldn’t be surprised to see many of them dance professionally in ballet before long. Yayoi Matches, in the title role, and Yuri Marques da Silva, who hails from Brazil, danced the role of Lucien, increasingly captivated us during the performance. The costumes were hand-made by Donna Jefferis, assisted by the students of the Diploma of Costume Construction at Toi Whakaari: New Zealand Drama School, according to the NZSD.
   Forgotten Things took us to the other end of the spectrum with an incredibly inventive contemporary performance. With bare arms and hands, contrasting the black outfits worn by every dancer, we were exposed to unusual shapes: what does a string of fists look like as they wave in mid-air like the legs of a squid in the sea, or the hands of two dozen dancers opened out in antler formation? The idea behind the dance was to show cell division, phagocytosis and metamorphosis, translating the microscopic to human size. The beauty came from the fluid movement unusual shapes that we form with our arms, legs and hands when they are put together en masse, and we’d go so far as to say this was the cleverest dance of the evening. Sarah Foster-Sproull, a graduate herself, choreographed in her fourth commission, collaborating with the students: although trained in classical dance while at NZSD, she now choreographs contemporary dance, and, based on what we saw, very successfully. The second- and third-year students here gelled, and this dance showcased their coordination. The level of rehearsal in Forgotten Things, a world première, was evident.
   Cnoditions of Entry (the misspelling is intentional) was another contemporary première, and hugely enjoyable. NZSD alumnus Thomas Bradley (class of 2012), choreographed and provided the score made up of electronica and bass noises, and even designed the costumes along with Jefferis. Bradley’s notes indicate that the dance was in two parts: the first created a mutual understanding between them; the second conveying ‘exhaustion suspension apology and defeat’. It began in darkness, with orange-hooded, androgynous dancers huddled in a group. Abrupt movements, angular, backwards steps conveyed a confusion, as though the society that had been formed was suddenly devoid of structure or rules, feeling like the aftermath of war. Rectangular lights shone on the two sides of the stage as dancers struggled to move toward it, escaping their personal prisons; the term ‘techno-dystopia’ came to mind.
   Tarantella, a George Balanchine ballet with the masterful (and new father, with a one-month-old baby) Qi Huan as the répétiteur, saw us say at the conclusion of the pas de deux: ‘Hire these two now.’ Danced by Megan Wright and Jeremie Gan, this light-hearted yet passionate ballet needed the pair to master some very quick steps and changes of directions, and while inspired by Neapolitan street dance, the foundation is classical. It is not an easy ballet but we couldn’t fault either Wright or Gan.
   Playing the game of contrasts in the programme, the contemporary As It Fades, originally commissioned by T.H.E Dance Company of Singapore and created by Kuik Swee Boon in 2011, was an energetic performance, and showed what the dancers were capable of, with strong, purposeful movements, accompanied by the strings in Max Richter’s ‘Jan’s Notebook’ and ‘November’, which painted a world struggling to understand itself. The tension sharply vanished at the end where a dancer was surrounded by the others, caught in a chair, exhausted, breathing heavily, conveying that notion of defeat and solitude. As the performance ended, the Richter score did not feel out of place in a bleak science-fiction film from the turn of the 1970s, with credits rolling as a dancer walked off-stage into the darkness, making us wonder what lay beyond the abyss. It was very clever, and got us ready for the final performance.
   That final performance was Concerto, an abstract ballet choreographed by Kenneth MacMillan after he joined the Deutsche Oper in Berlin, with a musical score by Dmitri Shostakovich (many audiences will know his work not from ballet but from the theme tune of Reilly: Ace of Spies; this was his ‘Piano Concerto No. 2 in F’), that premièred in 1966, staged here by Lynn Wallis and coached by Stephen Beagley. Two pianists provided the Shostakovich score, while the 29 NZSD dancers were resplendent in yellow, orange and red, in costumes courtesy of the Australian Ballet. How could one not feel upbeat? The three movements began with the allegro, the corps de ballet doing a well coordinated en pointe, with Yeo Chan Yee and George Liang as the central couple performing some very skilful, quick turns. By this point the classical dancers were all in the swing of things, and there was not a single hesitation as Concerto moved to the andante and a romantic pas de deux from Lola Howard and Jerry Wan, before the final movement that opened with a beautiful solo from Georgia Powley before the ensemble brought the performance to a spirited, optimistic close.
   The Graduation Season runs till November 28 at the New Zealand School of Dance at at Te Whaea: National Dance & Drama Centre, 11 Hutchison Road, Newtown, Wellington, New Zealand. Each performance is at 7.30 p.m. except for Sunday and Monday; matinees are at 2 p.m. on Sunday, November 22 and Saturday, November 28. Tickets are NZ$33 for adults, NZ$25 for students, seniors and groups of 10 or more, and NZ$18 for children under 13. Bookings are available online.Jack Yan, Publisher

Stephen A’Court

Top New Zealand School of Dance student Yuri Marques da Silva. Above Georgia Rudd and Christopher Mills.

Amber Griffin

November 17, 2015

MAC Cosmetics’ three December launches: Rebel lipstick, Fluidline eyeliner, and more Huggable lip shades

Lucire staff/13.47

MAC Cosmetics has three débutants for the New Zealand market in December, beginning with MAC Rebel Eyes, hitting counters on the 17th. MAC Rebel lipstick has already been a hit in beauty circles, so this line of gel liners, liners, and an eye pencil is particularly welcome, with prices ranging from NZ$36 to NZ$50 for the Pro Longwear eyeliner.

MAC Cosmetics

   Right after Christmas, on December 26, MAC Fluidline eyeliner, part of its Fluidity range, launches. It combines a pigmented liner with a pen, and MAC describes it as ‘calligraphy for your eyes’. We haven’t tested it yet, but the promotional image suggests that it is a very precise tool and dries very rapidly, and at NZ$40 it hardly breaks the bank. Four shades are on offer: Retro Black, Vintage Brown (a deep, dark shade), Indelibly Blue (navy) and Privet (sea green).

   Finally, on December 31, MAC’s Huggable Lipcolour will be released with even more shades. There are 15 shades that will remain luminous for up to six hours. Plus MAC is releasing Huggable Glass, featuring 12 funkier, long-lasting creamy colours. Retail price is NZ$50.

November 14, 2015

Aigner creates fashion at Bambis for Toni Garrn, Franziska Knuppe, Nazan Eckes, Lena Gercke, Luisa Hartema

Lucire staff/10.16

Alexander Koerner

Exclusives are the name of the game at the Bambis, with Aigner providing clothing and accessories for numerous VIPs as a partner of Germany’s biggest entertainment awards.
   Held at the Berliner Stage Theater, Aigner’s generosity extended to accessories to the celebrities who walked the red carpet at the Potsdamer-Platz. Toni Garrn wore a custom seafoam-coloured crêpe trouser suit with a low-cut back; Garrn will continue to model Aigner beyond its current 50th anniversary year. Jasmin, Miss Bambi 2015, was also decked out in Aigner, while Hans Sigl (in a red tuxedo), DJ Antoine (in a camouflage-patterned tux), Senta Berger, Ursula Karven, Anja Kling, Jana Pallaske, Christine Neubauer, Franziska Knuppe, Lena Gercke, Luisa Hartema, Regina Halmich, Sonja Kiefer, Yvonne Catterfeld, Nazan Eckes, Mareile Höppner, Alexandra Polzin, Palina Rojinski, Mariella Ahrens, Ruth Moschner, and Antoine Konrad all had items from the label. Reinhard Mätzler, Mousse T., Simon Verhoeven, Jose Campos, and Susanne Sigl were also snapped at the event. Aigner CEO Sibylle Schoen and chief designer Christian Beck were present to pose with many of the actors.
   The after-party at the Atrium Tower saw the award winners from the night receive a trophy case from Aigner.

Alexander Koerner

Kryolan works its magic at Bambis: Heidi Klum, Marie Nasemann, Sylvie Meis, Franziska Knuppe among celebs

Lucire staff/9.48

Isa Foltin

The Bambi Awards for 2015, held on Thursday at the Berliner Stage Theater at Potsdamer Platz, partnered this year with family-run cosmetics’ company Kryolan, which created unique looks for attending celebrities.
   Among the celebrities were Heidi Klum, Sylvie Meis, Franziska Knuppe, Marie Nasemann, Oliver Pocher, Lena Gercke, Regina Halmich, Alexa Volquarts, Sabine Lisicki, Hilary Swank, Petra Döhler, Toni Garrn, Rita Ora, Pamela Anderson, Til Schweiger, Eva Padberg, Wolfgang Joop, Alexander Fehling, Nina Ruge, Jessica Schwarz, footballer Mesut Özil and Mandy Capristo, Stefanie Giesinger, Peter Weck, Judith Rakers, Uschi Glas and Dieter Hermann, and Hannah Herzsprung. Representing Kryolan were CEO Wolfram Langer and director Dominik Langer.
   With its origins in theatre make-up, Kryolan has since expanded into other cosmetics, and partners regularly with high-profile events in Germany and abroad. However, it remains the choice for many film and TV productions, and its make-up artists worked on the Bambi celebrities in styling lounges at the venue. ‘Glamorous make-up with a harmonious complexion and accentuated lips or eyes is ideal for an evening event like the Bambi Awards,’ said Dominik Langer in a release. ‘We are pleased to contribute to Bambi with our many years of experience as professional make-up artists.’ As part of the partnership, Kryolan offered two looks for customers, products for which they could get at Kryolan retailers.

Andreas Rentz

Isa Foltin

November 13, 2015

Footwear shopping: Kendall Jenner, Kylie Jenner choose Uggs; Snkr launches in New Zealand for sneaker aficionados

Lucire staff/9.13

Michael Simon

Kendall Jenner and her sister Kylie shopped for Classic Slim styles at the Ugg Australia flagship store at 600 Madison Avenue, New York. The sisters are Ugg fans, Kylie choosing the black Bethany design and Kendall the chestnut-coloured Amie. The Classic Slim line has a slimmer silhouette, as the name implies, and has improved arch support and traction, says the company. Kendall also chose the Ugg Shearling Trapper hat, Alena slippers and the Ugg Classic boots, while Kylie bought the Scuff slipper and Classic boots.
   The Banks Group has launched Snkr, a footwear retailer that focuses exclusively on sneakers, recognizing that they are fashion statements unto themselves. In the words of the company, ‘It’s a celebration of the art of sneaker design and the undying love of sneaker collectors. It’s a place where sneaker addicts feel understood.’ Brands include Nike, Adidas, and New Balance, among others. Like all new retailers, you have the option of ordering online at—though Snkr also has physical branches in Wellington (Lambton Quay store shown), Lower Hutt and Riccarton, New Zealand.

Michael Simon

Nike Air Max Thea Premium, NZ$179·99.

New Balance 530 Athleisure in white, NZ$199·99.

Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lux Missoni Mid, NZ$159·99.

November 11, 2015

Sponsored video: and Chandon get spontaneous

Lucire staff/5.41

A Lucire special promotion

We’ve often believed in being spontaneous ourselves, so it’s great to see Chandon express this very notion in its latest campaign, starring Dasha and Colin Gold of It’s a wonderful three-minute slice of life into the couple’s journeys around the world as they cover fashion event after fashion event, filmed in Melbourne, London and Paris.
   There’s no better way to traverse the world than with doing those unplanned things—and for the Golds, they’re accompanied by Chandon at all the important moments, whether they’re sharing it with each other, or entertaining friends. ‘It’s a mindset, it’s how we can all live,’ says Dasha, and the sparkling wine, co-started by the Moët Hennessy brand, is as international as they come.
   While champagne can only come from Champagne, Chandon is made with the same care and spirit as its more famous sister brand, from wineries around the world.
   And unlike The September Issue, a wonderful film to all except those of us in the industry because it came across too much like our own diaries and what we had to do this week, the spot is entertaining in reminding us that the best stories, in this fashion media business, also come from those spontaneous moments. At fashion weeks, where we decide on a whim to catch something outside the catwalk grind, or exploring a little alleyway in a big metropolis away from the tourist traps.
   #LiveLifeUnplanned, then, is a reminder and a call for us to embody those unexpected moments, because only then do you live life to the full. Pop over to Chandon’s Instagram with your #LiveLifeUnplanned moments, and let’s create some great memories!

Post sponsored by Chandon

Filed under: fashion, London, Paris

TAG Heuer launches Connected Watch with Intel and Google, based on classic Carrera design

Lucire staff/5.30

Rob Kim

While it might not be surprising to see Apple and Huawei introduce smart watches, Swiss watchmaker TAG Heuer has created its entry, revealed at the weekend at LVMH Tower in Manhattan at an event hosted by Jean-Claude Biver, CEO of TAG Heuer, Brian Krzanich, CEO of Intel, and David Singleton, VP of engineering for Android at Google.
   The TAG Heuer Connected Watch with Intel Inside blends Android Wear technology with the quality and pedigree of the Swiss brand. TAG Heuer worked with Intel and Google to pack its watch with apps—including exclusive ones on lifestyle, golf, motor racing and trailing—as well as voice control, an Intel Atom Z34XX processor, 4 Gbyte of memory, all-day battery life, wifi, Bluetooth and audio streaming, all in a water-resistant 46 mm diameter grade 2 titanium case with a textured rubber strap. Of course there are also timer, alarm and stopwatch functions.
   There is a sapphire crystal touch-screen, and by default the watch retains its classic appearance, with the most pertinent information appearing inside the three chronograph counters at the 12, 6 and 9 o’clock positions. One can choose from one of three digital watch faces, inspired by the TAG Heuer Carrera range. When you want more, you touch the counter, and the app goes into full-screen mode. It will remain connected to the cloud as long as there is wifi. Its base applications remain running regardless of connectivity. The retail price is US$1,500, €1.350 or £1,100.
   For those who fall out of love with the digital world, TAG Heuer says customers can exchange it for a mechanical watch at the end of its two-year warranty period.

Rob Kim

Sponsored video: Dublin, second best means first in experiences

Lucire staff/1.51

A Lucire special promotion

Elyse Glickman

The World Travel Awards are the “Oscars” of tourism, and leading the honours for Europe’s leading city break destination was Genève. Meanwhile, Sydney was named the World’s Friendliest City.
   But trust the Irish to heavily promote the fact that Dublin came second on both counts. Dublin is home to a lot of seconds, including the country’s second most important river, and apparently it’s the second best place for Americans to live. It’s second in terms of property investment and partying, too, according to the cheeky Visit Dublin promotion, but all of this just makes it more appealing—because it’s all there, in a compact form, so close to the mountains and the sea. It mightn’t have come first, but it does have an awful lot of things that some of the winners of these separate categories can’t boast, all in one spot.
   There are, after all, firsts: Dublin’s incredibly walkable, with great museums and landmarks all within walking distance of St Stephen’s Green, Dublin Castle and Trinity College. The food is fantastic, with world-class restaurants, and if you want to shop, Grafton and Nassau Streets in town are destinations for the savvy fashionista. Louise Kennedy, Fran and Jane, and some impeccable tailors can be found in Dublin.
   It all ties in with Dublin’s tagline, ‘A Breath of Fresh Air’, and a fresh new logo promoting the city. A €1 million push sees Dublin go from a party city to one where there’s everything for everyone, a place that’s spontaneous, and, as the latest promo underlines, just a little distinct and irreverent.

Post sponsored by Visit Dublin

Filed under: travel, Volante
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