Lucire


  latest news   fashion   beauty   living   volante   print and tablet   tv
  home   community   shopping   advertise   contact

New Zealand labels Ketz-ke and By Mishco show off designer masks

Filed by Lucire staff/August 31, 2020/23.12


Top and above: By Mishco’s limited-edition masks have proven to be strong sellers. Below left: Ketz-ke’s bold mask designs.

New Zealand label Ketz-ke, featured in Lucire KSA’s September 2020 issue, has, like numerous other fashion labels, created designer masks. Masks—as predicted in Victoria Whisker’s recent story—have become a fashion item, and Ketz-ke’s more than qualify, with their bold designs. They’re retailing at three for NZ$36·50.
   They’re not alone. A new label set up in August reached a milestone when it sold 50 limited-edition masks per hour. By Mishco, founded by Ayla Bligh, set up to provide work for six women made redundant or suffered reduced hours because of COVID-19, sold out of its limited-edition lines within a week.
   Bligh referred to recent statistics that revealed that over 90 per cent of the 11,000 redundancies in New Zealand during the second quarter of 2020 were faced by women. It was her aim to empower women and keeping production local.
   By Mishco has scaled up production of its cotton–linen blend masks to meet demand, and is launching a line of children’s masks. Locals can collect using contactless methods. The company sold through a Facebook group called Chooice and more information can be found at bymishco.co.nz.

 


Vans × Simpsons collection pays homage to long-running cartoon series

Filed by Lucire staff/August 6, 2020/4.59


The Simpsons might not be part of the cultural Zeitgeist in the same way it was in the early 1990s, but over the last 30 years it’s built up a immense following—enough for it to remain a tempting licensing target. Vans is the latest, and arguably one of the higher-profile, fashion brands to pay tribute to Springfield’s yellow-skinned family, with a collection of footwear, apparel and accessories.
   The Simpsons family appears on the Sk8-Hi shoes, both in their original form from The Tracey Ullman Show and in their definitive form once they were spun off into their own series; individual characters can be found on Old Skool and Sk8-Hi designs. There are Lisa Simpson items with ‘Lisa Simpson for president’ slogans; a Sk8-Lo shoe design features Bart Simpson’s ‘El Barto’ graffiti tag. Subsidiary characters get a look-in, too, with Krusty the Klown, the Bouvier sisters, Otto, Moe, Lenny, Carl and Barney, and even Itchy and Scratchy, and Blinky the three-eyed fish. Socks, caps, fleece hoodies, and T-shirts complete the collection.
   In New Zealand, the collection will be available from August 15. More information can be found at vans.co.nz/thesimpsons.






 


The Body Shop and Wā Collective help get period products to Kiwis in need

Filed by Lucire staff/July 20, 2020/10.23


The Body Shop is teaming up with Wā Collective to provide free, medical-grade silicone period cups to people and schools in need in New Zealand.
   The New Zealand Government is already tackling period poverty by providing free menstrual products in select Waikato schools, but, as the Body Shop points out, this is only as starting-point and the only products available are tampons and pads.
   The Body Shop supports the use of period cups for environmental reasons, among others: each lasts 10 years, reducing waste going to landfill, and can save the individual a considerable amount of money.
   Currently one in three menstruating students have had to skip class because they do not have access to menstrual products.
   As Wā Collective founder Olie Body points out, ‘Nobody should miss out because of being born with a mighty pair of ovaries.’
   Wā Collective has established women’s health collectives and other contacts to help with distribution.
   It estimates that through its work, it has prevented 2·4 million disposable products going to landfill over the past year, saving people NZ$800,000.
   The campaign will go live in 25 Body Shop stores around New Zealand from August 4.
   Customers can support the initiative by purchasing items from Wā Collective (www.wacollective.org.nz), using the code BODYSHOP for free shipping, or simply donating at any of the Body Shop’s stores nationwide or online at www.thebodyshop.co.nz. Each Wā cup sold subsidizes another for someone in Aotearoa.

 


Greed a topical comedy about fast fashion and the practices that support it

Filed by Jack Yan/June 28, 2020/12.01

Greed, the new Steve Coogan comedy directed by Michael Winterbottom (The Trip), is a satirical tale about a thinly disguised version of Sir Philip Green, the head of Arcadia Group, who stood accused by various British government committees of plundering British Home Stores while it was under his company’s control. The phrase levelled at Sir Philip, ‘the unacceptable face of capitalism’, once dealt to Tiny Rowland, is used here at Coogan’s Sir Richard ‘Greedy’ McCreadie, just in case you weren’t sure whom they were parodying.
   Lucire attended one viewing at a packed cinema, where moviegoers were turned away as it proved to be far more popular than anticipated.
   Given the cast—Coogan, Isla Fisher, and David Mitchell—it would be wrong to expect much more than a comedy, and on this count, it delivers, with more topical panache than most films of the genre.
   Up for criticism by the film are fast fashion—McCreadie spends his adult life pushing suppliers in Sri Lanka (the Indian locations are unconvincing) into a race to the bottom—as well as the shallow “unreality” of reality TV, or, as the trade calls it, unscripted drama. Included in the mix are the corrupt practices of modern business and their legal loopholes, and tax havens such as Monaco, where McCreadie’s ex-wife, Samantha, played by Fisher, is resident. Through all of this is the device of the officious bystander, Sir Richard’s biographer, Nick, played by Mitchell, who gets to interview certain parties, which Winterbottom shoots in documentary style.
   Sir Richard’s 60th birthday bash on Mykonos obviously references Sir Philip’s £5 million 50th on Crete in 2002, right down to the togas, and this is where things take a turn that not even Sir Philip’s enemies would wish on the milliardaire. Asa Butterfield, as the McCreadys’ younger son, and Dinita Gohil, as Amanda, a Sri Lankan-born Brit working for McCready, give the film more depth at the points where it’s needed, showing that the farce in which the ultra-rich live have real victims, inside and outside of the immediate family. Whovians will spot Pearl Mackie as Cathy, the director of the reality show in which daughter Lily McCready, played by Sophie Cookson, stars, trying the Method whilst playing herself.
   There’s a sense from earlier reviews—inevitable that we would have seen them given New Zealand’s later release—that the film doesn’t know what genre it is, whether it’s comedy, drama or documentary, an assessment with which we disagree. While the film puts a new spin on the term ‘eat the rich’, the last act wraps up the entirety of the film neatly: namely that for all the lessons that we might have learned, the fictional McGready family ticks on, with little changed. No, the outcome isn’t funny, but it is a call to action—it’s Winterbottom exercising pathos. Showing statistics about fast fashion, the income gap, and the single-digit earnings of Asian garment workers takes that one step further. Are we choosing to fund these lifestyles and the fast-fashion machine, or should we opt for the sort of designers often championed by this magazine, who work with Fair Trade, eschew seasons, and emphasize quality?
   And sometimes it takes a film that is largely entertainment to make us realize just what has been going on. The message could well be lost if this were an out-and-out documentary, which would have had a limited audience; better to have us question our consumerist habits—you know, the ones we still observed as we lavished Amazon with US$11,000 per second as the COVID-19 pandemic panic began—in the form of entertainment, ensuring a wider reach. It’s not the first to do this, and it won’t be the last—it’s a long tradition that includes The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour and South Park on television and, more recently, the oddly slow-moving Brexit with Benedict Cumberbatch, and the German feature Curveball. There’s nothing more appealing in the grey depths of winter, with overseas travel not available to us, than sunny, colourful Greek locales. And when you can travel again, pack those labels with a more ethical background.—Jack Yan, Publisher

 


Beauty round-up: a timeless lipstick, a rich lavender toner, and ’70s-inspired eyeshadows

Filed by Meg Hamilton/June 26, 2020/10.54

Shine on

Living Nature has released a new natural lipstick, Glamorous. As with all Living Nature products, it is natural, using natural waxes, butters and oils, including shea butter and jojoba oil. Not only do your lips shine with Glamorous’s intense colour, they are nourished. There is a single shade, created to suit all complexions. It is available in New Zealand through selected pharmacies and health stores, and online at www.livingnature.com.

For summer skin

001 Skincare London is the luxury brand founded by facialist and acupuncturist for many famous names, Ada Ooi. Her new Pure Lavender Hydrolat Toner, made with 99 per cent first-grade lavender, is the perfect summer accessory, a multi­tasking product that acts as a cleanser, toner, make-up-setting spray and even as a mask. The hydrolat toner instantly lifts dried and tired skin, working to soothe, tone and tighten the skin, effortlessly hydrating and balancing its pH levels. This product is also a complexion booster that can be sprayed directly onto the skin or applied using a cotton pad. Looking to give that extra care to your skin during the summer? This is the perfect product for you. Find out more at www.001skincare.com.—Meg Hamilton

Back to the ’70s

The eyeshadows and highlighters in the new collection by Nomad are the life of the party, taking us back to the glitz and glamour of the 1970s in style. Inspired by the rich scene of Studio 54, a place where many creative minds gathered to create great art and music in the ’70s, the Multi-Chrome Discoshadow collection infuses this energy with the disco era to create a eyeshadow palette and two highlighters that are truly ethereal and out of this world. Packed with glitter, the Multi-Chrome Discoshadow Palette contains four unique shifting shades. Le Freak is a static and striking yellow-gold, I’m Coming out is a party-all-night hot pink and lavender, Got to be Real is a cool silver with subtle hints of green, and Last Dance is the perfect classic ’70s blue with a silver shift. Combine these with the two highlighters, Hot Shot in a shimmering pink inspired by the queens of disco, and Disco Nights, in pure dazzling gold, this collection is certain to keep you dancing all night long.—Meg Hamilton

 


Fashion round-up: different hemispheres, different seasons

Filed by Lucire staff/June 22, 2020/11.22




New Zealand-founded label Icebreaker has shown its autumn–winter 2020 collection, with the staples that we’ve come to love from this outdoor wear label, including tops, vests, shirts, puffer jackets, and leggings. The brand continues to incorporate super-fine merino wool, which in Icebreaker’s case is ethically sourced from growers who have banned mulesing. The wool is biodegradable and annually renewable.



   COVID-19 has forced many to slow down and appreciate what we have. Malo (www.malo.it), the cashmere brand from Firenze, Italy, agrees, with its chairman, Walter Maiocchi, noting: ‘Now it’s time to reflect and slow down. We need to grasp the positive teachings of this new global situation.’ He stresses that his company makes timeless garments that transcend seasons, and this is its contribution to sustainability. The Malo spring–summer 2020 collection, made in Italy, is based around a virtual journey around the country.

   Paradigm Eyewear’s sunglasses have become a favourite among Hollywood celebs, especially its 19-34 model. Both Sofia Vergara (Modern Family) and Hannah Ann Sluss (The Bachelor) have been photographed wearing their Paradigm sunglasses as they went out and about. The 19-34, available in different colours and lenses, retails at US$125 at baxterandbonny.com.

 


Next Page »

 

Get more from Lucire

Our latest issue

Lucire 40
Check out our lavish print issue of Lucire in hard copy or for Ipad or Android.
Or download the latest issue of Lucire as a PDF from Scopalto

Lucire on Twitter

Lucire on Instagram