Lucire: News


October 3, 2016

Summer indulgence: the Body Shop’s Piñita Colada range

Bhavana Bhim/23.24

Summer is just around the corner—why not get yourself ready with a cocktail of coconut and pineapple for the skin? The Body Shop’s Caribbean-inspired Piñita Colada body range is ready to burst your skin with summer freshness.
   The range includes Piñita Colada exfoliating cream, body butter, shower gel and Fresh Body Sorbet. All these products smell divine with the hand-harvested coconuts from the Antilles region of the Caribbean, combined with zesty pineapple from the Santo-Domingo area.
   The Exfoliating Scrub (250 ml, NZ$47·50), smooths and refines the skin with real shredded coconut and pineapple extracts.
   Wash away the heat of the day with the shower gel (250 ml, NZ$17·50). The refreshing lather cleanses the skin.
   The skin-quenching body butter (50 ml, NZ$17·50; 300 ml, NZ$38·95) hydrates the skin in the heat of summer. The butter glides onto the skin without any sticky residue. Immediately the skin is invigorated with the fresh cooling scent.
   Finally, we sampled the Fresh Body Sorbet (200 ml, NZ$27·50). This lightweight product feeds the skin with the cooling moisture of Caribbean extracts.
   Treat yourself this summer and let the happy hour come to you with this limited-edition range. All products will be available in-store in New Zealand beginning October 3.—Bhavana Bhim

September 30, 2016

Hennes & Mauritz opens first store in Auckland, New Zealand, with celebrity launch

Lucire staff/11.17

Chris Park

Hennes & Mauritz held a press launch for its first New Zealand retail store at Sylvia Park, Auckland, on Thursday—and as the New Zealand-headquartered publication with the longest history of covering the Swedish retailer, we were on the scene.
   H&M didn’t take this launch lightly. In anticipation of the official October 1 launch, they rolled out the red carpet, metaphorically and literally, for an eclectic bunch of media, photographers, bloggers, influencers and the usual Auckland celebrity crowd. It was an incredibly well run event.
   Those spotted among the 800-plus attendees included Jaime Ridge, Maia Cotton, Jerome Kaino and Maria Tutaia, and Colin Mathura-Jeffree.
   In keeping with international standards, the H&M store is a two-storey complex, occupying a huge floor space, with separate sections for men’s, women’s and children’s wear. Unfortunately they didn’t bring in an H&M Home, which, with the absence of Ikea, would probably have done incredibly well in New Zealand.
   The concept of the launch event was to have a “luxury H&M experience”, where we were led down the red carpet, given a trademark grey mesh shopping bag, and free reign to buy any of the items at prices specially discounted for the launch. In addition to this, we were treated to bubbles on arrival, followed by bars on each of the floors each making a different cocktail, with canapés floating around the whole night.
   Gracie Taylor, Jupiter Project, Kings and General Lee, and Dan Aux were DJing on the ground floor.
   In anticipation for the crowds on Saturday (when the store is open to the public), H&M flew in staff from Australia and elsewhere to support the New Zealand-based crew and to provide training.
   Mino Kim, one quarter of the well-known New Zealand street style blog Foureyes, is the store manager, so the rest of the Foureyes team were there to provide emotional support and to do a bit of shopping as well.
   Just as there is a space for haute couture, there is equally a space for fast fashion. H&M built its global fashion empire through making basic, affordable clothing which were durable and the store in New Zealand was no exception. It remains to be seen how H&M’s expansion in the New Zealand market will affect other clothing retailers who operate in the same space and price brackets.
   Perhaps in anticipation of the launch, there have been some critical coverage of H&M being implicated in using child labour and outsourcing its production work to countries where workers are underpaid and exploited. However, it is worth noting that H&M has been one of the more proactive clothing companies when it comes to upholding workers’ rights in comparison to many other comparable brands who already have retail operations in New Zealand, including Glassons, Industrie and Forever 21.
   My understanding is that H&M intends to monitor how the flagship store in Sylvia Park goes before considering whether to open additional stores in other centres around New Zealand.
   I anticipate that for those in Auckland at least, H&M will become the go-to place particularly for basics or cheap and cheerful accessories.—Chris Park, Guest Contributor

Chris Park

Courtesy Mango

Chris Park

Courtesy Mango

Chris Park

Courtesy Mango

Chris Park

Geoff Hedley; courtesy Mango

Chris Park

September 23, 2016

Gillian Saunders takes top honours at 2016 World of Wearable Art Awards’ Show, with Supernova

Lucire staff/11.00


New Zealand designer Gillian Saunders has scooped the Brancott Estate Supreme Award at tonight’s World of Wearable Art (WOW) Awards’ Show. Saunders, who had entered 15 garments before her winning entry, Supernova, has won eight awards prior to 2016, but this is the first time she has taken out the top prize.
   Saunders, who was born in England, has been involved in television and theatre for most of her working life. She was trained in Yorkshire, and went on to Christchurch, New Zealand, where she worked as a props’ maker for the Court Theatre.
   â€˜I had been making stage props for theatre and TV for years. WOW was the perfect challenge—could I make props for the body as well?’ she said.
   Supernova was inspired by ‘Thierry Mugler’s Chimera dress [from the autumn–winter 1997–8 collection], … the iridescent spiny fins of the Hippocampus from the Percy Jackson movie The Sea of Monsters, and some incredible NASA images taken by the Hubble Telescope,’ she noted. ‘Once all these elements were combined, Supernova was brought to life.
   â€˜The large gems represent new stars being born and the dark shadows represent deep space. Each scale has been individually cut, shaded with marker pens and then hand-sewn on to the garment. Each gem has had its sticky backing removed and then glued on by hand.’
   Saunders also won the Avant-Garde section in this year’s competition, judged by WOW founder Dame Suzie Moncrieff, Zambesi’s Elisabeth Findlay, and sculptor Gregor Kregar.
   Dame Suzie said, ‘Supernova has the design innovation, the construction quality and vibrant stage presence in performance to win WOW’s top award.’
   Saunders’ 2013 design, Inkling, won the Weta Creature Carnival Award and an internship for her at Academy Award-winning Weta Workshop. It is currently part of the WOW international exhibition, touring around the world, and presently at the EMP Museum in Seattle, Washington, where it will be displayed till January, after which the exhibition will head to the Peabody Essex Museum in Boston, Mass.
   She also won the Avant-Garde section in 2007 with Equus: behind Closed Doors, while in 2009, Tikini was second in the Air New Zealand South Pacific section.
   Designers from New Zealand, China, India, England, Australia, and the USA won awards in each section.
   The American Express Open section this year saw Renascence, by Yuru Ma and Siyu Fang of Shanghai take first place. The Spyglass Creative Excellence section was won by Mai (I), by Pritam Singh and Vishnu Ramesh of Gujarat. Queen Angel, by Adam McAlavey of London, won the MJF Lighting Performance Art section.
   Baroque Star, by Natasha English and Tatyanna Meharry of Christchurch, won the Weta Workshop Costume and Film section, netting the duo a four-week internship at Weta Workshop, plus travel, accommodation, and prize money.
   The Wellington Airport Aotearoa section was won by Maria Tsopanaki and Dimitry Mavinis of London, with their creation Princess Niwareka. The World of Wearable Art and Classic Cars Museum Bizarre Bra section was won by Julian Hartzog of Tarpon Springs, Fla., with Come Fly with Me.
   Of the special awards, Dame Suzie chose Incognita, by Ian Bernhard of Auckland, as the most innovative garment, giving it the WOW Factor Award. Renewal, by Alexa Cach, Miodrag Guberinic and Corey Gomes, won the First-Time Entrant Award. The Knight by Jiawen Gan of the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology won the Student Innovation Award. The Sustainability Award, recognizing the protection of our environment and the use of materials that would otherwise be discarded, was won by Bernise Milliken of Auckland, for Grandeer. Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder of Wellington, won the Wearable Technology Award. The Wellington International Award, given to the best international entry, was won by Daisy May Collingridge of Woldingham, Surrey, England, for Lippydeema. Collingridge also won the UK–Europe Design Award with this entry.
   Khepri, by Miodrag Guberinic and Alexa Cach of New York, NY, won the Americas Design Award. Yu Tan of Shanghai won the Asia Design Award with The Renaissance Happens Again, while Cascade, by Victoria Edgar of Geelong, Victoria, won the Australia and South Pacific Design Award.
   The David Jones New Zealand Design Award was won by Voyage to Revolution, by Carolyn Gibson of Auckland.
   The Cirque du Soleil Performance Art Costume Award, chosen by Denise Tétreault, Costumes Lifecycle and Creative Spaces Director of the Cirque du Soleil, was won by Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder. Mulder receives prize money, flights and accommodation for a one-month internship at Cirque du Soleil’s headquarters in Montréal, Québec.
   WOW runs in Wellington, New Zealand, through to October 9, and will be seen by 58,000 people live during its run. It employs over 350 cast and crew.
   This year, 133 entries by 163 designers (some worked in pairs) were received, competing for a prize pool of NZ$165,000.


Renascence, by Yuru Ma and Siyu Fang, Shanghai.

Mai (I), by Pritam Singh and Vishnu Ramesh, Gujarat.

Queen Angel, by Adam McAlavey, London.

Baroque Star, by Natasha English and Tatyanna Meharry, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Princess Niwareka, by Maria Tsopanaki and Dimitri Mavinis, London.

Come Fly with Me, by Julian Hartzog, Tarpon Springs, Fla.

Incognita, by Ian Bernhard, at AUT, Auckland.

Renewal, by Alexa Cach, Miodrag Guberinic and Corey Gomes.

Grandeer, by Bernise Milliken, Auckland.

Digital Stealth Gods, by Dylan Mulder, Wellington.

Lippydeema, by Daisy May Collingridge, Woldingham, Surrey.

Khepri, by Miodrag Guberinic and Alexa Cach, New York.

The Renaissance Happens Again, by Yu Tan, Shanghai.

Cascade by Victoria Edgar, Geelong, Victoria.

Voyage to Revolution by Carolyn Gibson, Auckland.

September 14, 2016

Little Ghost expands by offering Lime Crime make-up in its new online boutique

Lucire staff/1.18

Little Ghost, known for its wallets, bags and clutches, has added Lime Crime make-up as it kicks off its new online boutique.
   Founder Amber Bibby says that Lime Crime has a similar outlook to her fashion accessories’ label, and selling the two together helps Little Ghost’s boutique become more of a single destination for individualistic, eclectic products.
   Bibby is a make-up artist herself, and is a fan of Lime Crime. ‘They lead the way in the hugely popular liquid to matte lipstick trend and were the first to introduce distinct and radical lip colours. Lime Crime promote expressing yourself unapologetically which made them the perfect launch partner,’ she said.
   Lime Crime is a cruelty-free brand, with no animal testing, and certifies its line as 100 per cent vegan.
   The launch range comprises Lime Crime’s Velvetines and Perlees for the lips, and Venus and Superfoils palettes for the eyes, priced between NZ$30 and NZ$60. For a limited time, the company is offering free shipping to New Zealand and Australian addresses.
   She says that Little Ghost is negotiating with other designers to expand its boutique further.

September 8, 2016

New Zealand singer Sophie Morris releases her first album, Songs from the Stage

Lucire staff/0.27

Aliana McDaniel

Rising star Sophie Morris, interviewed in 2013 in Lucire, will release her début album, Sophie Morris: Songs from the Stage, on October 28—perfectly timed for holiday gift-buying. The album features some favourite musical theatre numbers, including ‘It Might as Well Be Spring’ (State Fair) and ‘Don’t Cry for Me Argentina’ (Evita), and tracks such as ‘Nella Fantasia’ (from The Mission, by Ennio Morricone) and ‘O Holy Night’ (Adam).
   Morris, who is a classically trained soprano, is joined by Dunedin instrumentalists James Davy, Nancy Chen, Meg Davidson, Alan Starrat, John Dodd, Georgie Watts, and Alexandra Wiltshire, an established pianist and musical director.
   Dr Ian Chapman, Otago University senior lecturer in contemporary music, calls Morris ‘a groundbreaker’ and a ‘rare singer who can achieve such a high standard in both singing styles’.
   Marian Poole of the Otago Daily Times, says, ‘Morris is definitely the ascendant star.’
   Morris has recently finished playing Sandy in Grease: the Arena Spectacular Live.
   Two singles are being released in the lead-up: ‘Another Life’ from Jason Robert Brown’s The Bridges of Madison County and ‘Love Never Dies’ from Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Love Never Dies. Both will be available on Itunes.
   Her EP album is currently available for listening and purchase on Bandcamp at

September 7, 2016

The Body Shop’s new eye shadows, foundation, masks—either 100 per cent vegan or vegetarian

Bhavana Bhim/6.40

The Body Shop welcomes the southern spring with 100 per cent vegan and vegetarian products to improve skin instantly, with ingredients from all over the world.
   Its new Down to Earth eye shadow quads and Down to Earth palettes feature blendable, highly pigmented earthy hues that throughout the day. The shades are blended with babassu and sesame oils, which prevent creasing. The formula of the pigment is enhanced to bring out natural beauty. Functionality is key, as each individual shade clicks in and out of the palette casing, so you can mix and match to your own taste.
   The earthy theme resonates as the products are 100 per cent vegan, suitable for sensitive eyes with no traces of petrolatum and mineral oil. The Down to Earth palette (NZ$64·95) contains eight shades inspired by the Earth’s pale sands, cool metals, warm clays and deep gemstones. The shades are named accordingly: Sahara Dune, Aztec Gold, Provence Ochre, Bengal Granite, Peru Clay, Kilmanjaro Rock, Zawar Zinc and Black Canyon Onyx. These allow you to create looks ranging from smooth mattes, glossy satins and glimmering consistencies.
   To accompany the eight-shaded palette, the Body Shop have released new Down to Earth Eye shadow quads (NZ$49·95). The quads are available in five colour combinations, each designed to flatter every eye shade. We sampled Down to Earth quad 3, which contains the shades India Rose Quartz, Atlas Rhassoul, Cerro Rico Silver and Siberia Anthracite. The earthy rose quartz works well as a base, with seamless application. The three grey–metallic tones complement the rose quartz shade to give a statement smoky eye.
   To apply the eye shadow is the 100 per cent cruelty-free double-ended brush (NZ$33·95). The lightweight dual-purpose brush eases application: there is a buff brush to easily blend in the shadow, accompanied by a blunt-angled brush to quickly tight line the eyes. The handle is made from FSC elm wood and cruelty-free bristles. You can dampen the blending brush for a wet vibrant look, or apply dry.
   For a frantic lifestyle, the new Fresh Nude Cushion Foundation (NZ$53·50) is perfect for make-up coverage on the go. Made with 100 per cent organic Community Trade alÅ“ vera and English rose water, the foundation gives the skin a semi-matte texture and a natural yet even tone to the skin. Spare yourself time in the morning with the easy-to-blend cushion applicator which softly massages the foundation onto the surface of the skin. You simply push the cushion down to release the formula to a desired amount. This product is dermatologically tested, non-comedogenic, 100 per cent vegan-formulated, without petrolatum and mineral oil.
   You can bring the spa to your door with the new range of Superfood face masks (NZ$39·95). Superfoods are known to help the body, so why not treat the skin with the Body Shop’s new range? The masks are made from 100 per cent vegetarian ingredients from around the world, inspired by traditional beauty remedies. Formulated without parabens, silicone, mineral oils and paraffins, theses naturally made products feed the skin with goodness.
   The Amazonian Açai Energizing Radiance Mask is 100 per cent vegan and inspired by the rituals of Amazonian tribes. The mask contains ingredients from South America. Açai berry extract is rich in antioxidants and vitamin C which fights off the appearance of fatigue. Guarana extract from Brazil is known for its energy-boosting properties; Community Trade organic babassu oil from Brazil smooths and revitalizes the skin. Apply a generous amount to the skin leave it on for 10–15 minutes and, soon enough, your skin will have its energy back.
   The Ethiopian Honey Deep Nourishing Mask is made from Community Trade honey, marula oil from Namibia and hydrating organic olive oil from Italy. This indulgent mask nourishes the skin, inspired by African healing and soothing rituals. The product is easy to apply to the skin; instantly, the surface appears replenished and rested. After the facial, the skin is softer and smoother in texture. The honey sourced from Ethiopia is rich in nutrients to revive skin. Marula oil from Namibia improves the skin’s elasticity, while the olive oil from Italy is rich in Omega 3 to help prevent dryness. All three ingredients work well to nourish the skin.
   The Chinese Ginseng and Rice Clarifying Polishing Mask brightens and removes unevenness from skin. The mask balances revitalizing ginseng, moisturizing rice extract from China, and Community Trade sesame seed oil from Nicaragua. The result is a creamy exfoliating mask which softens, evens, and reveals the brightness of the skin. Ginseng extract from China has been known for its skin-enhancing properties, while rice extract has traditionally been used to moisturize the skin. The mask smells divine, tingling the skin upon application. After application, skin imperfections are immediately reduced.
   The Body Shop’s British Rose Fresh Plumping Mask enhances the skin’s natural glow. Infused with rose petals, moisturizing rose essence from the UK, toning rosehip oil from Chile and Community Trade organic alÅ“ vera from México, this refreshing gel mask restores the skin’s moisture and gives it that petal-like smoothness. The mask is fragrant with the scent of roses, inspired by European bathing rituals. The ingredients gently calm the properties of the skin for a dewy youthful glow.
   Inspired by Ayurvedic traditions, the tingling Himalayan Charcoal Purifying Glow Mask shakes up the skin’s senses. The mask combines powerful bamboo charcoal from the Himalayan foothills, exfoliating green tea leaves from Japan and potent Community Trade organic tea tree oil from Kenya. These ingredients cleanse impurities and excess oils from the skin, while the green tea leaves exfoliate the surface. This invigorating mud mask gives your skin an exhilarating new lease of life. Apply a generous amount; once the mask hardens and draws excess oil from the skin, gently remove with warm water.
   All products go on sale on September 12.—Bhavana Bhim

September 3, 2016

Tania Dawson crowned Miss Universe New Zealand 2016 in front of sold-out audience

Lucire staff/15.41

Alan Raga

Above: The moment: Tania Dawson hears the news that she’s been working toward for most of 2016, that she is the new Miss Universe New Zealand. Centre: After the announcement, Samantha McClung crowns her successor, Tania Dawson, Miss Universe New Zealand 2016. Above: Second runner-up Larissa Allen (left) and runner-up Seresa Lapaz (right) flank Miss Universe New Zealand 2016 Tania Dawson.

Secondary school drama and music studies’ teacher Tania Dawson, 23, was crowned Miss Universe New Zealand 2016 Saturday night at Skycity Theatre, taking home prizes including a stay at Plantation Bay Resort & Spa in Cebu, Philippines and the use of a Honda Jazz RS Sport Limited for the duration of her reign.
   Dawson, who is of half-Filipina extraction, was also the crowd favourite, with a large group of supporters in the live theatre audience.
   The event proved to be a Filipina one-two, with Seresa Lapaz, who was born in the Philippines but is a naturalized New Zealander, coming runner-up.
   Both ladies hail from Auckland, while second runner-up Larissa Allen comes from Tauranga.
   Dawson was crowned by her predecessor, Samantha McClung, who flew from Christchurch to join 2013 titleholder Holly Cassidy in a special parade featuring the exclusive designs of Ankia van der Berg of Golden Gowns.
   The sold-out audience enjoyed entertainment from special guest performers Stan Walker, Frankie Stevens, and Ali Walker, as well as the cast of Oh What a Night!, who appeared in a recorded segment filmed earlier on Saturday.
   The destination for Dawson, as well as the other national titleholders, is uncertain, but there have been suggestions it could be the Philippines, and already Lapaz has vowed to support her former competitor should she venture there.
   Dawson says she sees herself as an advocate for education, and entered the competition because she wanted to practise what she preached: to challenge herself and overcome any self-doubt.
   Repeating their roles from last year, Stephen McIvor and Sonia Gray hosted. Stevens was also on the judging panel (particularly appropriate given his similar role in NZ Idol), alongside motivational speaker and social practitioner Areena Deshpande, director of Head2Heels and former Miss Universe New Zealand director Evana Patterson, AJPR boss and BRCA cancer gene awareness champion Anna Jobsz, and arguably the top make-up practitioner and educator in New Zealand, Samala Robinson.
   Thanks to the support of Miss Universe New Zealand’s sponsors, including platinum partners Honda New Zealand, Bench, Skycity, the Quadrant Hotels and Suites, Golden Gowns and Beau Joie, and the fund-raising efforts of each year’s finalists, Miss Universe New Zealand cracked the $100,000 barrier with its donations to Variety, the Children’s Charity, this year.
   The stream was carried on Lucire, The New Zealand Herald and Stuff, and a delayed version will appear on 3Now.

August 31, 2016

Mumm showcases Grand Cordon, delivering by drone; Anna White launches; Karl Lagerfeld débuts autumn campaign

Bhavana Bhim/19.24

Karl Lagerfeld

On August 30 and 31, the new Mumm Grand Cordon champagne was exhibited at Croatia’s Hula Hula Beach Club. For each order of champagne at the Club, a bottle was flown over the sea by a drone. Music accompanied the delivery—those receiving the champagne would get a particularly special experience, emphasizing Mumm’s current ‘celebrate’ theme, and its taste for daring innovation.
   The new bottle was created by Ross Lovegrove and has no front label. The G. H. Mumm signature and emblem are printed directly on to the glass, while the Cordon Rouge sash is actually a real red ribbon indented in the glass. The new design meant changes to the traditional champagne production process.
   Karl Lagerfeld Paris has launched its autumn 2016 advertising campaign, Love from Paris, Karl ××, coinciding with the label’s launch in North America. Lagerfeld himself art-directed and photographed the campaign, which was styled by Charlotte Stockdale, and modelled by Joan Smalls and Hailey Baldwin. It’s a predominantly black-and-white collection with colour splashes, featuring prêt-à-porter clothes and accessories.
   Also on the theme of new and luxury: a new leathergoods label, Anna White, has launched in New Zealand, with a contemporary line consisting of the AW1 tote, Liberty shoulder bag and Protagonist clutch. Right now, Anna White is also offering a limited-edition Classique tote, retailing at NZ$650. The range has simple lines with a quality look. It’s the ideal chance to own stylish bags before others jump on board—Anna White’s off to a good start.—Bhavana Bhim with Lucire staff

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