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AmFAR Gala at Festival de Cannes day nine: Rita Ora, Iris Mittenaere, Jasmine Tookes, Bella Hadid at charity do, raising €20 million


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 26, 2017/20.23




Gareth Cattermole; Anthony Ghnassia; Daniele Venturelli

The AmFAR Gala is traditionally the biggest do during the Festival de Cannes, and this year was no exception.
   The events had kicked off on Wednesday with a party for Persol, the Torino-founded eyewear brand, which celebrated its centenary. In partnership with AmFAR, the event took place on a yacht berthed in Port Pierre Canto, and was attended by Will Smith, Adrien Brody, Toby Maguire, Bérénice Béjo, Jasmine Tookes and Eva Longoria, with Dionne Warwick kicking off the celebrations.
   But all eyes were on last night at the AmFAR Gala, with support from Moët Hennessy, Harry Winston, Bold Films, Persol, Renault, and Harvey Weinstein, held at the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc. Celebrities and VIPs included Will Smith (who livened up the evening by carrying out one of the auctions), Diana Ross, Dustin Hoffman, Leonardo DiCaprio, Nicole Kidman (in Chanel), Christoph Waltz, Jean Paul Gaultier, Jessica Chastain (in Prada), Tobey Maguire, Chris Tucker, Bella Hadid (in a very sheer Ralph & Russo), Diane Kruger (in Alexander McQueen), Eva Longoria (in Elie Saab), David Beckham, Harvey Weinstein, Coco Rocha, former Miss France Laury Thilleman, reigning Miss Universe Iris Mittenaere, Nicki Minaj (in Roberto Cavalli), Adrien Brody, Uma Thurman and her Levon Roan Thurman-Hawke, Irina Shayk, Doutzen Krœs, Olivier Rousteing, Lara Stone, Petra Němcová, Karolína Kurková, DNCE, Lindsay Lohan, Cindy Bruna, Kiwi Victoria’s Secret model Georgia Fowler, Sophie Taylor, Millie Mackintosh, Maria Borges, Valery Kaufman, Carine Roitfeld, Elsa Hosk, Hana Jiříčková, Hailey Baldwin, Jon Kortajarena, Paz Vega, de Grisogono boss Fawaz Gruosi, Jasmine Tookes, Praya Lundberg, Sonia Ben Ammar, Leo Bahadourian and Anne-Sophie Bahadourian, footballer Juan Arbelaez, incoming Hennessy master blender Renaud Fillioux de Gironde, Jean-François Michel, Tommie Pegues, Hani Farsi, Alex Dunnet, Sylvain Ercoli and Dali Ercoli, Costadis Spyropoulos and Elmina Spyropoulos, Nathalie Normand, Camille Charriere, Kanako Sakai and Kouka Webb. Rocha presented the auction lot from Moët Hennessy, featuring a unique lot (no. 84 of 250) of Hennessy 8, a blend of rare eaux-de-vie and a unique companion sculpture signed by artist Arik Lévy, who also attended. Hadid, meanwhile, served champagne on stage, and the AmFAR fashion show, which featured, inter alia, Kurkova, Shayk, Kaufman, Baldwin, Hadid, Hosk, Tookes and Jiříčková, curated by Roitfeld, earned over €3 million for the dresses. Other performers on the night included Ross, Ora, Minaj, and DNCE.
   A Timothy White photo of Elizabeth Taylor went for €80,000. One successful bidder paid €350,000 to play soccer with Beckham, and another paid the same amount for a five-day trek to visit HH the Dalai Lama. A 1958 Jaguar XK150 sold for €600,000, beating a Richard Hambleton-painted van that sold for €250,000. A week in the Maldives sold for over €700,000 (note: it was for 60 people), as did a huge JR sculpture of an Olympic diver. A week on board a Serenity yacht for 30 guests went for €450,000. A Haas Brothers sculpture went for €500,000. A collection of George Hurrell Hollywood portraits sold for €2 million. Some €20 million (down on previous years’ dos) was raised at this year’s gala, the funds going to Aids research.































































Gareth Cattermole; courtesy de Grisogono; Anthony Ghnassia; Cyrille George Jerusalmi; Daniele Venturelli; Tristan Fewings; Pascal le Segretain

Persol centenary









Antony Jones; Jacopo Raule

Three by Ekman: the Royal New Zealand Ballet shows its witty, ingenious side


NEWS  by Jack Yan/May 20, 2017/12.01



Stephen A’Court

Swedish-born choreographer–director Alexander Ekman, it transpires, was the first person Francesco Ventriglia called when he was first appointed artistic director of the Royal New Zealand Ballet. Ekman, says Ventriglia, creates choreography that is ‘different, brave, intelligent, witty and fun,’ and he sees the work as being the equivalent of ‘good food’ for the dancers. The three ballets in Three by Ekman are certainly that: modern and relevant, yet somehow also timeless in their appeal. Tuplet, Episode 31 and Cacti keep audiences gripped, while taking us on a journey into unexplored territories.
   They aren’t fully unexplored, mind: regular RNZB attendees will remember Cacti from last year’s trio of ballets in Speed of Light, but seeing it again this time was a renewed pleasure, and connecting it to two more Ekman ballets gives it an extra dimension. As the third ballet, Cacti was a fitting conclusion: when you’re in Ekman’s world, you almost want to stay in it in an attempt to understand the creativity that drives this talented and important modern choreographer. It’s a world that’s energizing, spontaneous, but cheekily self-aware.
   The first foray into that world is Tuplet, a clever 18-minute introduction where the dancers’ own breaths, voices, and the sounds of their bodies become the rhythm. Composer (and a fellow Swedish-born international talent) Mikael Karlsson’s music has a dose of Bart Howard’s ‘Fly Me to the Moon’ as performed by Victor Feldman helped set the mood. Video projections, which were also designed by Ekman, feature slowed-down black-and-white clips of jazz musicians, highlighting the improvised nature of the dance, performed by six dancers standing on white square mats. New Yorker and Parsons alum Nancy Haeyung Bae designed the costumes, which aided the movement well, and Amith Chandrashaker the lighting, which balanced the the dancers with the video screens above. The conclusion was clever and a taste of Ekman’s humour: he showed silent films of audiences applauding as the live one at the St James Theatre did the same while the curtain fell.
   A video introduction to Episode 31 followed, showing the RNZB’s dancers learning the ballet. It’s a tradition of Episode 31, where a short film is made in the city in which it is performed. The film shows that the dancers were not restricted to the studio, as they ventured out from the Theatre in flash-mob style to various Wellington landmarks such as the cable car and the Botanic Garden; Mayor Justin Lester is caught walking by as the company vigorously dances Episode 31 on the waterfront. (The video is below, though we recommend you don’t spoil the experience.) The dance is a celebration of youth, energy and pace, fitting given its origins as a piece created for Julliard (and first performed in 2011; the video there made use of New York City landmarks such as the Subway). Karlsson once again composed the music, with costumes by Julliard’s Luke Simcock, and lighting by Nicole Pearce. Simcock’s visually deconstructed black and white costumes happily mix genders (e.g. skirts and collared dresses with prints of jackets), as does the make-up on the dancers (mustachioed faces on pale white). The pacy performance itself is contrasted with one dancer who moved in slow motion across the front of the stage; the curtain rose and fell to show vignettes of the action going on behind, leaving you wondering: are we really seeing vignettes or are the dancers repositioning themselves intentionally in preparation for the next reveal? The lighting rig came down, flooring was lifted up and moved, and a second slow-motion dancer wandered with a sign reading ‘Beautiful’ in a stark, all-cap Helvetica (the design of this sign itself is an exercise in irony). As with other Ekman ballets, spoken words accompany the action, with poetry (and this is the programme’s list) by Christina Rossetti, William Allingham, Eleanor Farjeon, Robert Louis Stevenson, William Hughes Mearns and Edward Lear.
   A second video came after the interval, where Ekman is seen on a ferry to Somes Island in Wellington, contemplating choreography and its connection to its surroundings. Will I affect the island or will the island affect me? You can’t but help find Ekman’s quirky personality endearing and you form a connection with the choreographer—and understand that there is a method here, from a man who constantly looks for ways to push ballet forward.
   There’s less chaos in Cacti than in Episode 31. Here, spoken word also features, in an unsubtle dig at postmodernism and the pretentious reviews modern dance might get (one only hopes this article is not an example), with a recording written and voiced by Spenser Theberge. The New Zealand String Quartet accompanies the action here, with both composed and improvised music, at least for the first part of Cacti, before classical music (Haydn, Schubert, and Beethoven) takes over. The 16 dancers move their white tiles, shouting and clapping as they added to the rhythm, before bringing in cactus plants on-stage. Ekman himself designed the set and costumes; Tom Visser also worked on the set and designed the lighting. The second part, a duet between characters Aram and Riley, is another humorous Ekman take, where the audience can hear the streams of consciousness from the pair (played by Alexandre Ferreira and Laura Saxon Jones today). As noted in our review last year, Cacti breaks down the pretence and complexity of ballet into basic statements: the two characters are disengaged from any story and just want to get the dance done. The stuffed cat that is thrown on stage still surprises on a second viewing, and we note that it was a different colour this time.
   When Cacti was part of Speed of Light, we only got a dose of Ekman’s style. This time, we were immersed, and Three by Ekman feels more satisfying and complete. It’s one of the RNZB’s most enjoyable modern ballets, and it’s consistent throughout, not just in the expertise of the dancers, but in the tone and ingenuity of the three works.—Jack Yan, Publisher

Three by Ekman tours till June 15. For venue and booking information, visit www.rnzb.org.nz.

The Body Shop, Botanicals Fresh Care, Ultra Doux: L’Oréal advances natural beauty and environmental initiatives


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/May 9, 2017/23.32



Top: Shidong Yan, director of the Centre for Environmental Education and Communications of Ministry of Environmental Protection; Tom Szaky, TerraCycle founder and global CEO; Haoran Liu; Zhenzhen Lan, Vice President, L’Oréal (China). Above: The Body Shop British Rose Premium Selection (NZ$95·50), and the British Rose collection.

It’s nice that the Body Shop can also source from its home country of the UK, and the British Rose collection ensures that its origins—as well as one of botany’s most celebrated flowers—are in the name.
   The collection is made with organic, hand-picked and air-dried roses, used to create a youthful and fresh scent. These products are rich in vitamin C to give the skin a gentle, soft and silky effect. The British Rose collection includes the Instant Glow Body Essence (NZ$47·25), a body lotion with a lightweight and lasting formula that hydrates the skin over 24 hours, leaving it feeling smooth and soft. The British Rose shower gel (NZ$17·50) is perfumed with essences of hand-picked rose; the Petal Soft hand cream (NZ$9·95) is lightweight, won’t grease the skin, and is absorbed immediately. The British Rose Instant Glow body butter (NZ$38·95) is a velvet-soft moisturizer that is light to the touch but rich on moisture, providing 24-hour hydration; and the exfoliating gel body scrub (NZ$42), with real rose petals, helps reveal smoother, fresher skin. The Beauty Bag (NZ$39·50) includes the shower gel, body butter and hand cream (in 60 ml, 50 ml and 30 ml respectively), and the Premium Selection (NZ$95·50) has the shower gel and body butter but in larger quantities (250 ml and 200 ml respectively), the same hand cream, and a 250 ml bath foam.
   Parent company L’Oréal is getting into the natural beauty market with a second line specifically for hair, called Botanicals Fresh Care. Now available in New Zealand, the new hair care line sources from Egyptian geranium leaves, Cretian safflower, Bulgarian coriander seed oil, and French camelina flowers, from the most sustainable producers.
   Geranium essential oil is an antioxidant rich in fatty acid; safflower oil is rich in lipids; coriander seed oil has Omega 6 properties; and camelina oil is rich in Omega 6 and Omega 9.
   The Botanicals Fresh Care range is divided into four: Botanicals Geranium Colour Radiance for coloured hair, Botanicals Safflower Rich Nourishment for dry hair, Botanicals Coriander Revitalizing Strength for fragile hair and Botanicals Camelina Smooth Ritual for frizzy hair. The products are vegan, free of silicone, parabens, and colourants, retailing at NZ$17·99 each.
   Finally, Ultra Doux—which occidental readers might be more familiar with as a Garnier range—is a separate L’Oréal line in China, aimed at the mass market who wants natural hair care. The brand has teamed up with TerraCycle, a specialist in recycling hard-to-recycle consumer waste. At an event in Shanghai, L’Oréal China VP Zhenzhen Lan, Chinese government rep Shidong Yan, TerraCycle CEO Tom Szaky, and Ultra Doux spokesman Haoran Liu launched the partnership, which is claimed to be the first comprehensive solution for hair care packaging waste in China.
   Individuals or communities can sign up to a recycling programme, and collect the packaging, to be shipped free to charge to TerraCycle. The organizations expect that millions of pieces will be collected, so they do not wind up in landfills or incinerators. For every unit of waste collected, the programme will contribute 1元 to the individual’s charity of choice. All plastic waste collected through the programme will be made into desks and chairs and donated to a school in China.
   Ultra Doux has also opted for renewable, bio-derived plastics and sustainably sourced cardboard for its packaging, as well as more naturally derived ingredients.—Nathalia Archila and Lucire staff



Tailor Skincare launches Your Blend, an innovative, customized two-step moisturizing formula


NEWS  by Jack Yan/May 5, 2017/23.47




Jack Yan

Tailor Skincare, riding high from the award-winning Renew, launched its Your Blend line at Power Yoga Living Studio in Wellington on Friday.
   Founder Sara Quilter, wearing Wilson Trollope and, appropriately for a yoga studio, barefoot, welcomed Tailor staff, clients and supporters—including her parents—and told a confident and heartfelt story on why she created Your Blend.
   Your Blend, described as a ‘personalized multifunctional, morning and night moisturizer’, is a two-step formula, using two extracts as a customized solution for each wearer’s skin and lifestyle. A quick online consultation, which takes into account genetics, environmental factors and skin type generates a recommendation for the two extracts. Your Blend addresses both the skin type (extracts numbered 1–3) and skin concern (4–6), in attractive packaging designed in-house by their communications’ and marketing manager, Stacy Heyman.
   Tailor Skincare recommends adding Renew for best results.
   In a quick post-speech chat to Lucire, Quilter mentioned the inspiration hit her while holidaying in Bali, and she was driven by her belief that everyone should get the best skin care possible.
   The event saw Good Buzz kombucha, Peter Yealands wine, and Soul Organics super juices served to VIPs.—Jack Yan, Publisher

News in brief: bags from Maison 203 and Deadly Ponies; Bird and Knoll shows resort collection


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 3, 2017/23.29




Federico Marin

Maison 203’s new clutches for spring–summer 2017 have a funky, modernist æsthetic with a dash of futurism to them. Designed by Odo Fioravanti, the clutches take inspiration from architecture, and have up-to-the-minute metallic shades for summer, as well as gold and bronze.
   The new clutches, dubbed Bern, Armure and Ivy, are available on the Maison 203 website, or at its store in Venezia (Via Cartizze 5, 31049 Valdobbiadene (TV)). A new store will open in Zaragoza on May 20.
   Deadly PoniesPearlies collection, launching May 5, takes a very different inspiration: that of Henry Croft, a road sweeper who donned a “pearly suit”, clothing decorated with mother of pearl buttons, to charity events. The Pearly Kings and Queens, a charity which arose from Croft’s efforts, still exist today, helping communities in London.
   There are totes and clutches in the pearly tradition, but the highlight is on the wool felt Lucky Charm, an NZ$89·95 piece that can be used as an accessory to one of its bags or as a key holder. All proceeds from Lucky Charm sales will go to Lifewise, an Auckland-based community social development agency dedicated to ending youth homelessness.
   Deadly Ponies’ creative director Liam Bowden said, ‘In New Zealand, our homelessness problem is increasing at an alarming rate. Everyone deserves to have a place they can call home, and this project gives us an opportunity to pitch in and help to house New Zealanders in need.’
   Lifewise’s Victoria Hearn said, ‘Access to housing is a basic human right. Without a safe place to live, it is difficult for young people to access education, gain employment and be independent. I love that Deadly Ponies are acknowledging the very real issue of homelessness in New Zealand and that they’re using their new Pearlies collection to do their bit to help improve outcomes for vulnerable Kiwi youth.’
   Finally, Bird and Knoll has released its Days Like These resort collection for spring–summer 2017, inspired by travels through México, described by the company as one ‘of luxe simplicity with a bohemian edge—perfect for “days like these”.’ There’s no mention of the Matt Monro song ‘On Days Like These’, but the designs convey that same sense of la dolce vita, even if the inspiration is Mexican and not Italian.



Dev Patel honoured for Lionheart charity work at Chivas Icons event


NEWS  by Lucire staff/May 2, 2017/23.22




François Nel

English actor Dev Patel (Slumdog Millionaire, Lion) was the guest of honour at the Chivas Icons event on May 2 at Play at the H Hotel in Dubai, UAE.
   Patel was honoured by the Scotch brand for his work in the Lionheart campaign, which helps vulnerable children in India.
   The campaign was in part inspired by the BAFTA-winning, Oscar-nominated film Lion, the adaptation of Saroo Brierley’s book, A Long Way Home. Patel, who was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar, starred in the film, with Nicole Kidman playing his adoptive mother.
   Each year, 80,000 children go missing in India, and 11 million live on the streets. The campaign supports three Indian charities: Magic Bus, Childline India, and Railway Children India.
   Patel said in a release, ‘I am grateful for my life and the success I have enjoyed. I don’t have to worry about where I’m going to sleep; when I’m going to eat or how I’m going to protect myself. I have the freedom to make my own choices and choose my path in life. Unfortunately, this is not the case for millions of children in India and around the world. For this reason, I want to help others by telling culturally diverse stories that educate and shed light on the human condition. True success means using your own to help others who don’t have a voice or the freedom we take for granted. This is what [the Chivas Regal campaign] Win the Right Way means to me. It shows that success is better shared and is a force for good.’
   Chivas Icons was launched in October 2016 to recognize and celebrate individuals in the Gulf who not only find success, but benefit those around them on their journey. Previous winners were: Dubai restaurateur Silvena Rowe; Dubai-based industrialist and founder of Petrochem, Yogesh Mehta; and Charles Blaschke of Taka Solutions.
   Win the Right Way is supported by celebrities including Javier Bardem, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Chris Evans, Don Cheadle and Oscar Isaac.












François Nel

Vegan and cruelty-free pampering from the Body Shop this season


NEWS  by Nathalia Archila/April 28, 2017/13.20


For this upcoming season, we have a list of must-haves from the Body Shop. They are products that we’ve selected and love from one of our favourite brands, with high-quality cruelty–free products and accessible prices.
   For those who loved the classic Down to Earth palettes, the Body Shop brings a new product: customization eye-shadow palettes. These are 100 per cent vegan, contain babasusu and sesame oil, have no added parabens, mineral oils or petroleum, and are suitable for sensitive eyes. This versatile idea will allow you to mix your favourite colours to create your look, and easily go from day to night. They are priced at NZ$12·92 per shadow.
   The Camomile Sumptuous Cleansing Butter (NZ$32·50) and the Luxury Facial Flannel (NZ$10·25) are perfect for the end of the day when you want clean and fresh skin. The camomile cleanser is a perfect make-up remover that gently and effective melts away the make-up and lets your skin feeling pampered, clean and soft. The camomile is sourced from Norfolk, England, and the butter works on all types of make-up. The flannel, on the other hand, is super-soft, perfect for facial washes and leaves the skin feeling softer and smoother.
   Finally, we are obsessed with the Body Shop’s new range of cruelty-free brushes. They feel really soft on the skin and give you a natural and professional make-up look. Prices range from NZ$22·95 for the pointed liner brush, to NZ$34·95 for the foundation-buffing, slanted contouring and angled blush brushes. There are also the eye-shadow crease and flat shader brushes (NZ$23·75 each), pointed highlighter brush (NZ$32·95), and fan blush brush (NZ$26·95).—Nathalia Archila




Allbirds extends range with Wool Lounger shoes


NEWS  by Lucire staff/April 26, 2017/13.29


Allbirds claims its latest Wool Lounger shoe has ‘soft wool, sleek lines, unstoppable comfort’.
   Already known for the comfort of its existing Wool Runner shoe, the US-based, New Zealand-heritage brand introduced a second style earlier this month.
   Environmentally friendly, the new shoes are breathable and made from the same super-fine New Zealand merino wool, which the company claims makes them ideal to be worn year-round, and even sockless.
   Four shades are available at launch: lemon, navy, pine and slate. Men’s and women’s styles are offered.



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