Lucire: News


November 27, 2015

Op–ed: Kiribati’s waking nightmare

Lucire staff/11.22

November 27, 2015

Rt Hon John Key, MP, Prime Minister
Hon Bill English, MP, Deputy Prime Minister
Parliament Buildings
New Zealand

Dear John and Bill,

I’m having a nightmare. I want to tell you guys about it—to tell you to wake me up; shake me if you have to. Scream me awake, and when I am, I want you to tell me it’s not as bad as it seems.
   I’ve landed in Tarawa, Kiribati, where news from New Zealand awaited me that John has declared his faith that climate change can be addressed with technology—scientists have told him the technology isn’t far off.
   At an official dinner, people look at me as though I have some glorious technology news to pass on. I don’t. I went to bed that evening feeling hollow; figures screaming through my head, the voice of that pesky Jim Salinger uttering the most terrifying words I’ve heard in many years: ‘The world has now entered abrupt climate change.’ You know Jim right, the guy with the Nobel Peace Prize? Gosh, I wish he would shut up with all that sense he talks.
   In the same nightmare I wake the next day to be told that 90 per cent of drinking water wells have been contaminated with E. coli, that the crops at vital plantations are no longer growing due to saltwater poisoning the ground. That lagoons which once fed villages have become infested with E. coli, killing a large bounty of marine life. That the ocean-warming and acidification has killed a majority of the coral atoll that forms the very ground I’m stood on. It’s like a really bad apocalypse video game—I’m anxious that zombies are going to duck out from behind the door. I look around at homes whose front doors the ocean now laps, at dead fruit trees once laden with produce killed by the salt seeping into the soil. I’m failing to see what Tony Abbott found so comical about this situation.
   In this nightmare I wonder what kind of technology could possibly solve this. I then remind myself of John’s track record of absolute reliability, and I feel comforted. The law can’t solve this. I mean, even if it could and there were laws to protect these people, there are no lawyers, and they’d be unaffordable for these people if there were. So, technology must be the saving grace.
   I visited the hospital to witness first-hand what an infant mortality rate 10 times that of New Zealand’s looks like. Have you ever seen such a thing? It’s completely shocking; it hit me with a force a hundred times that of any image of a child lying washed up on a shore a world away. I tried to fight back the tears, and the numbing coldness that consumed my body. I tried not to vomit—but later in the privacy of my room I did find solace in a Fiji Airways sick bag. I sat there and waited for the moment I’d be shaken awake. I desperately wanted John to ride in and tell me that the threat of climate migration is many years off and not something to be worried about. I wanted Bill to sit down and tell me that none of it was real, and the sea levels were not rising.
   John, could you go tell that mate of yours Obama to stop being a bloody alarmist; that according to Bill, there’s no proof Alaskan villages are vanishing into the ocean. That entire nations are not facing forced-extinction from the ocean swallowing them alive. You go tell that puffed-up American know-it-all that he’s alarming the masses, causing me nightmares and unwanted anxiety.
   Bill, could you go tell all those apparently credible scientists who’ve won those fancy awards, that 2015 is not the hottest year in history and they’re just plain wrong. Round them up with Malcolm across the ditch (because they give him a hard time as well) and be done with them. Bully them into submission a bit harder. Just shut them up.

Thanks in advance,



I imagined the response coming back something a little like this.

Dear Pearl,

You are far too much of a pretty wee thing to be travelling to such far-flung and irrelevant places like Kiribati in your nightmares; to spend time worrying about such things. Why don’t you pay heed to the advice I gave Keisha Castle-Hughes: try visiting the salon for a bad blow-dry instead?
   Don’t worry about other people. By the time New Zealand starts feeling the full effect of climate change we’ll have the technology available to deal with it.
   I’ve also got Malcolm under control—he’s going to share Nauru so we’ve got somewhere to put all those helpless fellow human beings in the Pacific fleeing the rising sea-levels and food shortages. The ones who think they’re right to turn to us for help. I’m going to stop the boats.
   Meanwhile, the Kardashians have a new season, vote for the fern, and use our new buzz word: technology.
   In the meantime, here’s a Live Lokai bracelet. Hold on to it, because before long the Dead Sea and Everest will be things for the history books.

Merry Christmas,



That’s kind of how this piece came about. I thought I’d write a wee letter. The problem is, the more I wrote and decried the blind buying-in of the latest spin to come out of the ninth floor, the more ridiculous it felt, and the more scared I became in turn. If I’m completely honest, the realization that many—possibly even some reading this piece—didn’t know how absurd the spin had become, worried me to the point of physical sickness. Thanks again Fiji Airways, your sick bags are truly first-class.
   I’m writing this from Kiribati. I’m fully awake. I’m awake in a nightmare. I went to the hospital. I waded through water at high-tide to cross the road infested with human fæces to get there before what they call the ‘morgue’ closed. In a bag at the other end of the room was a pile of clothes and a pair of trainers I never want to see again. I was going to turf them out, but a young woman tasked with showing me around asked if she could have them, since for her wading through the stench of death and fæces was an everyday reality.
   Don’t get me wrong, Kiribati is absolutely beautiful and if it weren’t for the damage wreaked by rising sea levels and climate change, I would focus only on its beauty, but the reality is these threats make the situation people face here far from idyllic. It’s a dire situation, it’s a nightmare.
   A real-life nightmare, there is no amount of shaking that can wake me; though shaking I am, believe me. Shaking from incredulity at the sheer scale of the situation. The problem is I’m not the who needs to be screamed awake. That’s right: if you have ever for one moment entertained the illusion that sea-levels are not rising; that climate change is not the single biggest threat facing humanity; that you can carry on shirking the responsibility to aid in the fight for human survival and dignity, you need to be screamed awake. Will the humanity in you please wake up?
   I’m not saying this with any political leaning. I believe that most of our politicians are drastically failing us all. Who knows what will happen if we leave this to them. I mean, half of those reading this may freak out at the thought of the Green Party controlling the economy, but don’t blink an eyelid at them leading on the issue defined as ‘the single greatest threat to mankind’ by every serious world leader. Why is that? How will the economy exist without our planet?
   Climate change is no longer some far-off theory or problem. It is happening right here and widely through our Pacific backyard. Right now. As you read this climate change is already disrupting our agriculture and ecosystems, our food and water security, our energy, our infrastructure, our health, our safety. Today. Tomorrow. Some more than others but make no mistake it is happening to all of us. It is the issue. An issue that affects all issues, economic included. Everything is and will be impacted. And it becomes more damning with each passing year.
   This matter is far too important to be surrendered to the political domain. This is about humanity. If you think the devastation wreaked by ISIS is as bad as it gets, then please contemplate Mother Nature.
   If the images of parents putting their children into boats because the water was safer than the land left you reeling, then please consider that in the not-too-distant future this will become a reality for many small island states; that many nations in the Pacific will not survive the two-degree cap that Paris is gearing up to gain commitment for in the coming week. They will have to put their children into boats because the water is safer than the land. We have already signed them up for that, and every moment that each of us stands by maintaining the status quo we sign them up for worse—exponentially.
   They will have to flee their homes, forced to migrate due to the lack of food security. Rising sea-levels, along with drastic weather disturbances will make a boat safer than their homes, and these boats will head for our shores.
   Despite this cold hard reality our leaders head into Paris in support of watering a climate agreement down. There’s talk of steps to make the agreement not legally binding. Not many would agree to a marriage or business deal on such terms, I wonder why we are willing to let them negotiate humankind’s survival on such flippant terms.
   During the explosion of the refugee crisis into mainstream media we witnessed both the most hopeful and depraved responses to others’ suffering. I couldn’t help but wonder about the rationale for stopping the boats, for refusing the asylum and migration of those most in need—those least at fault in the destruction of our ecologies, but who will continue to pay the highest price. What possible excuse will we give to keep them out? Do we convince ourselves they’re all terrorists, rapists and murderers to render them exempt from the right to our sympathies, to human dignity? It’s a sad state of affairs that anyone would have to wonder such a thing.
   Leading into the sustainable development goals, New Zealand took a step towards supporting the Pacific, coming out strong and vocal on Sustainable Development Goal 14 (SDG14), which focuses on the conservation and sustainable use of ocean, sea and marine resources. This focus was well warranted, and an open acknowledgement of our responsibility within the region, and our understanding of how many lives depend on the ocean ecologies. I was proud to stand in the General Assembly and hear John Key announce the Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary. It was an important step, but we must be clear that it was but one step in the marathon of steps we need to build a better world.
   In the words of Jim Salinger and virtually every other expert of climate science in the world, the world has entered abrupt climate change. We have already reached tipping-points we cannot mitigate. We are already signed up for things that are going to drastically change life as we know it, this is a cold hard fact. The question that remains now is whether we can summon the courage to turn around and fight for survival. Life is already going to change; but whether we tumble over yet more tipping-points points and the scale of the consequences we face from them is up to us. Sometimes we have little option but to wake ourselves up.
   We have a choice. We can surrender that choice to those who hold offices of power, or we can take that choice into our own consideration. Some say the whole endeavour to pull back from this is hopeless. I’m not willing to accept that. I simply refuse to stand by and let life go without a fight.
   John Key used very interesting rhetoric this week. He used the word ‘faith’. He is placing his faith in technology. Instead I am going to place my faith in humankind—the creators of technology. I am going to place my faith in our ability to comprehend the magnitude of what we face, and choose survival. I ask you to join not just myself, but others around the world in doing so. We still have a fighting chance to make things better. They won’t get better unless we take action and inspire others to do the same. No one is without power: everybody has the capacity to take a few steps.
   I’ve written this for those who know how to challenge the status quo intelligently. The doers, the thinkers, the problem-solvers. I’m not asking anyone to climb something or break laws, just that each person reading this ponders for a minute about how they can contribute, what steps they can take.
   So as we lead into the COP21 talks, billed as a defining moment in human history, at a time when recent events have given us ample reason to desert our faith in our own kind, I encourage every single person reading this to ask themselves what they can do to take action. This weekend millions of citizens around the world are exercising their rights, their freedoms, using their voices and taking to the streets to send world leaders an imperative to act and take meaningful action.
   Mark my words: a decade or possibly two from now it won’t be the Rugby World Cup final you remember with pride. What will be etched in your memory is whether you answered humanity’s call for survival, whether you were one of those who actually did something. Sometimes that something is simply the act of showing up to show solidarity with humankind. In Paris where world leaders have gathered there can be no march, because the worst of humanity put on a display that has left millions of innocent people terrorized. So in the coming week I will be keeping my eyes firmly on Paris, I am marching, I am lending my effort to reinforce the very best in humanity, because if there’s one thing the world needs right now, it’s more of the good.
   It’s only so big, it goes around and we are all on it—Earth. I believe it’s worth saving, do you?—Pearl Going

Disruption, excerpt: ‘Tipping Points’ from Disruption on Vimeo

Above Kiribati President Anote Tong with his TED discussion, ‘My country will be underwater soon—unless we work together’. Click above to watch.

Guest contributor Pearl Going is a global communications’ strategist who has worked broadly across entertainment, human rights and environmental issues. Her most recent work includes the Mercy Campaign, Rohingya Slavery and SIDS. She is an avid climber and has climbed five of the seven summits.

November 26, 2015

Absolut releases dazzling limited-edition Electrik bottles to close 2015

Lucire staff/2.58

The world’s most famous vodka brand, Absolut, has released its limited-edition, celebratory end-of-year bottles, dubbed Absolut Electrik.
   The blue and silver bottles feature semi-transparent coating, representing ‘Absolut’s signature cobalt blue and the electrical conductivity of silver,’ according to the company.
   In a release, Kathryn Love, Absolut’s marketing manager for New Zealand, said, ‘Over the years, we have presented some highly appreciated limited editions, including Absolut Warhol and Absolut Originality. We aim to raise the bar for our limited editions and continue to push creative boundaries. Absolut Electrik follows that tradition.’
   In the New Zealand market, Absolut has even collaborated with local design label Huffer in 2011.
   To make things more interactive this year, Absolut has created an Electrik Mixology platform on, where users can collaborate with an on-screen robot to create a personalized drink. The robot even mixes the drink on the site. Absolut has also released two cocktail recipes for end-of-year parties.
   Absolut Electrik is priced at NZ$55·99 for each one-litre bottle, available from leading liquor retailers throughout New Zealand.

Absolut Electrik Blue Mule cocktail
1 part Absolut Vodka
2 parts ginger beer
Garnish with lime wedge. Built and served in the Mule cup over crushed ice.

Absolut Electrik Neon Lights
2 parts Absolut Vodka
1⅕ parts lemon juice
1⅕ parts pink grapefruit juice
⅘ part simple syrup
⅕ part ginger syrup (1 part freshly squeezed ginger juice with 3 parts simple syrup)
4 raspberries
Top up with soda water. Garnish with raspberries and grapefruit zest. Shake all ingredients except soda, serve in a highball glass with ice.

November 23, 2015

Stolen Girlfriends’ Club creates limited-edition straps for Samsung Gear S2 Classic smartwatch

Lucire staff/10.50

Stolen Girlfriends’ Club has created a collection of four customized leather watch straps for the Samsung Gear S2 smartwatch, in an official collaboration with the Korean electronics’ giant.
   The limited-edition straps, in black and brown crocodile, and green and blue snake, will be made available as a gift to some Samsung customers. They are made in New Zealand.
   The retro styling is intentional. As Marc Moore, Stolen Girlfriends’ Club’s creative director, noted, ‘I was really inspired by vintage watch straps for this collaboration with Samsung on the new Gear S2 Classic. I’ll be honest, I haven’t been a huge fan of some of the smartwatches being launched by brands lately—just because they look so “techy”, it doesn’t leave much option for people that are into fashion. So I was pretty excited when I first saw the Gear S2 Classic, I knew instantly that a vintage-styled strap would work great. We had a bit of fun with the colours and textures of the leather we sourced whilst keeping it really wearable and quite classic.’
   By rotating the face bezel, the Gear S2 goes to different screens, or skips to another track or zooms in on a map, making navigation particularly simple. The watch features health and fitness apps, a two- to three-day battery life, Android Bluetooth pairing, and push notifications via mobile phones. The straps can be changed further and the watch face can be customized via the Samsung Gear app. Retail price in New Zealand for the basic S2 is NZ$549, and the S2 Classic is NZ$649, available both online and at offline retailers.

November 18, 2015

A masterful Graduation Season at the New Zealand School of Dance, with two world premières

Jack Yan/14.14

Stephen A’Court

Top Concerto, part of the New Zealand School of Dance Graduation Season 2015. Above Sarah-Foster Sproull’s Forgotten Things, with the unfamiliar sight of a string of fists, waving in the space.

The New Zealand School of Dance Graduation Season performances, which began tonight (Wednesday), are always a highlight. It’s the culmination of a lot of hard work from second- and third-year students, and the six performances this year offer a very entertaining mix, especially for lovers of classical ballet.
   In previous years, the NZSD has put more contemporary dance on the menu, but the mixture in tonight’s programme was equally welcome. Paquita, the grand-pas, kicked off the evening, choreographed by Anna-Marie Holmes after Marius Petipa. The students showed immense promise, and we wouldn’t be surprised to see many of them dance professionally in ballet before long. Yayoi Matches, in the title role, and Yuri Marques da Silva, who hails from Brazil, danced the role of Lucien, increasingly captivated us during the performance. The costumes were hand-made by Donna Jefferis, assisted by the students of the Diploma of Costume Construction at Toi Whakaari: New Zealand Drama School, according to the NZSD.
   Forgotten Things took us to the other end of the spectrum with an incredibly inventive contemporary performance. With bare arms and hands, contrasting the black outfits worn by every dancer, we were exposed to unusual shapes: what does a string of fists look like as they wave in mid-air like the legs of a squid in the sea, or the hands of two dozen dancers opened out in antler formation? The idea behind the dance was to show cell division, phagocytosis and metamorphosis, translating the microscopic to human size. The beauty came from the fluid movement unusual shapes that we form with our arms, legs and hands when they are put together en masse, and we’d go so far as to say this was the cleverest dance of the evening. Sarah Foster-Sproull, a graduate herself, choreographed in her fourth commission, collaborating with the students: although trained in classical dance while at NZSD, she now choreographs contemporary dance, and, based on what we saw, very successfully. The second- and third-year students here gelled, and this dance showcased their coordination. The level of rehearsal in Forgotten Things, a world première, was evident.
   Cnoditions of Entry (the misspelling is intentional) was another contemporary première, and hugely enjoyable. NZSD alumnus Thomas Bradley (class of 2012), choreographed and provided the score made up of electronica and bass noises, and even designed the costumes along with Jefferis. Bradley’s notes indicate that the dance was in two parts: the first created a mutual understanding between them; the second conveying ‘exhaustion suspension apology and defeat’. It began in darkness, with orange-hooded, androgynous dancers huddled in a group. Abrupt movements, angular, backwards steps conveyed a confusion, as though the society that had been formed was suddenly devoid of structure or rules, feeling like the aftermath of war. Rectangular lights shone on the two sides of the stage as dancers struggled to move toward it, escaping their personal prisons; the term ‘techno-dystopia’ came to mind.
   Tarantella, a George Balanchine ballet with the masterful (and new father, with a one-month-old baby) Qi Huan as the répétiteur, saw us say at the conclusion of the pas de deux: ‘Hire these two now.’ Danced by Megan Wright and Jeremie Gan, this light-hearted yet passionate ballet needed the pair to master some very quick steps and changes of directions, and while inspired by Neapolitan street dance, the foundation is classical. It is not an easy ballet but we couldn’t fault either Wright or Gan.
   Playing the game of contrasts in the programme, the contemporary As It Fades, originally commissioned by T.H.E Dance Company of Singapore and created by Kuik Swee Boon in 2011, was an energetic performance, and showed what the dancers were capable of, with strong, purposeful movements, accompanied by the strings in Max Richter’s ‘Jan’s Notebook’ and ‘November’, which painted a world struggling to understand itself. The tension sharply vanished at the end where a dancer was surrounded by the others, caught in a chair, exhausted, breathing heavily, conveying that notion of defeat and solitude. As the performance ended, the Richter score did not feel out of place in a bleak science-fiction film from the turn of the 1970s, with credits rolling as a dancer walked off-stage into the darkness, making us wonder what lay beyond the abyss. It was very clever, and got us ready for the final performance.
   That final performance was Concerto, an abstract ballet choreographed by Kenneth MacMillan after he joined the Deutsche Oper in Berlin, with a musical score by Dmitri Shostakovich (many audiences will know his work not from ballet but from the theme tune of Reilly: Ace of Spies; this was his ‘Piano Concerto No. 2 in F’), that premièred in 1966, staged here by Lynn Wallis and coached by Stephen Beagley. Two pianists provided the Shostakovich score, while the 29 NZSD dancers were resplendent in yellow, orange and red, in costumes courtesy of the Australian Ballet. How could one not feel upbeat? The three movements began with the allegro, the corps de ballet doing a well coordinated en pointe, with Yeo Chan Yee and George Liang as the central couple performing some very skilful, quick turns. By this point the classical dancers were all in the swing of things, and there was not a single hesitation as Concerto moved to the andante and a romantic pas de deux from Lola Howard and Jerry Wan, before the final movement that opened with a beautiful solo from Georgia Powley before the ensemble brought the performance to a spirited, optimistic close.
   The Graduation Season runs till November 28 at the New Zealand School of Dance at at Te Whaea: National Dance & Drama Centre, 11 Hutchison Road, Newtown, Wellington, New Zealand. Each performance is at 7.30 p.m. except for Sunday and Monday; matinees are at 2 p.m. on Sunday, November 22 and Saturday, November 28. Tickets are NZ$33 for adults, NZ$25 for students, seniors and groups of 10 or more, and NZ$18 for children under 13. Bookings are available online.Jack Yan, Publisher

Stephen A’Court

Top New Zealand School of Dance student Yuri Marques da Silva. Above Georgia Rudd and Christopher Mills.

Amber Griffin

November 17, 2015

MAC Cosmetics’ three December launches: Rebel lipstick, Fluidline eyeliner, and more Huggable lip shades

Lucire staff/13.47

MAC Cosmetics has three débutants for the New Zealand market in December, beginning with MAC Rebel Eyes, hitting counters on the 17th. MAC Rebel lipstick has already been a hit in beauty circles, so this line of gel liners, liners, and an eye pencil is particularly welcome, with prices ranging from NZ$36 to NZ$50 for the Pro Longwear eyeliner.

MAC Cosmetics

   Right after Christmas, on December 26, MAC Fluidline eyeliner, part of its Fluidity range, launches. It combines a pigmented liner with a pen, and MAC describes it as ‘calligraphy for your eyes’. We haven’t tested it yet, but the promotional image suggests that it is a very precise tool and dries very rapidly, and at NZ$40 it hardly breaks the bank. Four shades are on offer: Retro Black, Vintage Brown (a deep, dark shade), Indelibly Blue (navy) and Privet (sea green).

   Finally, on December 31, MAC’s Huggable Lipcolour will be released with even more shades. There are 15 shades that will remain luminous for up to six hours. Plus MAC is releasing Huggable Glass, featuring 12 funkier, long-lasting creamy colours. Retail price is NZ$50.

November 13, 2015

Footwear shopping: Kendall Jenner, Kylie Jenner choose Uggs; Snkr launches in New Zealand for sneaker aficionados

Lucire staff/9.13

Michael Simon

Kendall Jenner and her sister Kylie shopped for Classic Slim styles at the Ugg Australia flagship store at 600 Madison Avenue, New York. The sisters are Ugg fans, Kylie choosing the black Bethany design and Kendall the chestnut-coloured Amie. The Classic Slim line has a slimmer silhouette, as the name implies, and has improved arch support and traction, says the company. Kendall also chose the Ugg Shearling Trapper hat, Alena slippers and the Ugg Classic boots, while Kylie bought the Scuff slipper and Classic boots.
   The Banks Group has launched Snkr, a footwear retailer that focuses exclusively on sneakers, recognizing that they are fashion statements unto themselves. In the words of the company, ‘It’s a celebration of the art of sneaker design and the undying love of sneaker collectors. It’s a place where sneaker addicts feel understood.’ Brands include Nike, Adidas, and New Balance, among others. Like all new retailers, you have the option of ordering online at—though Snkr also has physical branches in Wellington (Lambton Quay store shown), Lower Hutt and Riccarton, New Zealand.

Michael Simon

Nike Air Max Thea Premium, NZ$179·99.

New Balance 530 Athleisure in white, NZ$199·99.

Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Lux Missoni Mid, NZ$159·99.

November 9, 2015

Be in to win with She Loves Golf: Lydia Ko, Toni Street, Laura McGoldrick, Jamie Curry, Amber Peebles promote the sport

Lucire staff/23.17

New Zealand is promoting women’s golf during November, in the wake of Kiwi Lydia Ko regaining her world number-one position after winning the Fubon LPGA Taiwan Championship, with a month of activities—while Lucire readers can get a fantastic giveaway as part of the She Loves Golf campaign (hashtagged #shelovesgolf).
   The campaign, with Ko, Toni Street, Laura McGoldrick, Jamie Curry, and former Lucire contributor Amber Peebles as the five spokeswomen, will be showcasing their golf experiences around the country. Each woman will document them through their social media channels.
   There are pop-up events to take place in Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington on November 13, 22 and 26 respectively. The website at shows what activities women can participate in nationally, as well as gear they can buy and prizes they can win. Clubs are running their own events and offers, all of which can be found on the website.
   All you need to do to be in to win the following prize pack is to like our Facebook page and the post where we mention #shelovesgolf: on top of the golf introductory lessons, there are plenty of goodies. We’re only shipping to New Zealand addresses, and we’ll take entries till the end of November. We’ll draw one name from the likers. Enter now—and enjoy your next round of golf on us!

2 × Whittaker’s chocolate
2 × L’Affarè coffee packs and keep cup
Neutrogena sunscreen
Vita Coco, 1 litre
Faby nail varnish
5 × Schwarzkopf products
IOG 30-minute intro to golf voucher x 2 (value NZ$180)

November 4, 2015

News in brief: Deadly Ponies’ Len Lye tribute collection; Net-a-Porter group launches All for You campaign

Lucire staff/12.04

Deadly Ponies will launch a capsule collection in honour of New Zealand-born artist Len Lye (1901–80) in November. Lye’s experimental films saw him scratch, paint and stencil directly on to film; he was also a gifted and well known sculptor. Working with the Len Lye Foundation and the New Zealand Film Archive, Deadly Ponies has re-created the energy from Lye’s work on to a series of bags, wallets and scarves. The launch commemorates the recent opening in July of the Len Lye Centre in New Plymouth, an initiative between the Foundation and the Govett–Brewster Gallery, which houses much of Lye’s work.
   Net-a-Porter and Mr Porter have launched a joint campaign for the holidays, showing how a package gets from origin to recipient, but with a fanciful twist, where models in chiffon gowns get garments from rails, paper butterflies become pocket squares, and each package gets a spritz of perfume. Released on November 3 and directed by Us, the British creative directors Christopher Barrett and Luke Taylor, the campaign emphasizes the two brands’ personalized service, hashtagged #AllforYou.
   Alison Loehnis, president of the Net-a-Porter Group said, ‘Our first joint campaign, All for You, highlights the year-round mission of our businesses: to deliver exceptional service and style to our customers around the globe, making Net-a-Porter and Mr Porter the ultimate online destinations for luxury gifting this holiday season.’

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