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April 28, 2016

Wataru Tominaga, Vendula Knopova win top prizes at 31st HyĂšres fashion and photography festival

Lucire staff/14.21



Villa Noailles

Above: Winners of the two grand jury prizes at HyĂšres: Vendula Knopova for photography and Wataru Tominaga for fashion.

The 31e Festival International de Mode et de Photographie Ă  HyĂšres was held from April 21 to 25 at the Villa Noailles, with exhibitions running from April 28 through to May 22.
   The Festival was chaired by Paco Rabanne artistic director Julien Dossena for fashion, and American–French photographer William Klein for photography.
   Founder Jean-Pierre Blanc says, ‘Here we launch a competition, people take part. It’s demanding, it costs money, it takes a lot of energy and people want to come. They want to come more and more. That is what makes it such high quality, as first and foremost we take gifted, interested and interesting people.
   â€˜It’s pretty impressive to see these young people evolving in such a tough world. We think we’ve grown up in a tough world, but for them it’s even harder, and despite it they are energetic, they are happy, they adore colour. I just love this genration.
   â€˜Fashion has to be connected with life, and I hope the HyĂšres festival is. People say it is anyway, and honestly that is the most rewarding thing for me to hear, and the biggest compliment you could give me.’
   One of the contestants in the photography section, AnaĂŻs Boileau, says they could spend as much time with the jurors, including Klein, as they liked, even up to an hour.
   Dossena says, ‘It’s great to be able to actually select and rank candidates that I believe in for different reasons.’
   The Grand Jury Prize was awarded this year to Wataru Tominaga for the fashion section, for his colourful menswear collection.
   Tominaga says he has been interested in colour in fashion from the 1960s and 1970s. ‘Young people did not care whether it’s women’s or men’s, they make [their own] styles.’
   Vendula Knopova won the photography prize.

April 21, 2016

Renault releases first details of Koleos II, its most upscale SUV yet

Jack Yan/13.11

We had anticipated this announcement since Salvatore Marti, operations’ manager of Renault New Zealand, told us to wait till April 21 to see photographs of the Koleos II, the company’s latest SUV.
   He never said Renault Maxthon, which was the name bandied about by the media for part of 2016. There’s a logic to having another name with a hard k sound at the start, tying in to Captur and Kadjar, Renault’s other own-brand SUVs.
   We had been concerned that the new Koleos wouldn’t match the Kadjar in looks, since the current model was conceived by Samsung of Korea, one of Renault’s subsidiaries, and never had the flair of some of its rivals.
   Marti assured us that we shouldn’t worry, and he was right: Koleos, which has the same 2,705 mm wheelbase as the Nissan X-Trail, is arguably better looking than the Kadjar. It’s also slightly bigger, in the same way the X-Trail is bigger than its sister car, the Nissan Qashqai, by the same amount. Both sets of Renault’s and Nissan’s SUVs are on Renault’s CMF–C/D platform.
   However, the Koleos will only be a five-seater, with Renault design boss Laurens van den Acker saying that the company was already catering to the seven-seat market with its ScĂ©nic IV and Espace V.
   The grille is similar to that of the international (as opposed to the Chinese-market) Renault Talisman, which had been fĂȘted as the Most Beautiful Car of the Year by the Festival Automobile International in Paris. It also ties in to the look of the Renault MĂ©gane IV. It appears that Renault is looking to target more upscale buyers with the Koleos.
   The Koleos II is one of the dĂ©butantes at the Beijing Motor Show next week, with CEO Carlos Ghosn officially unveiling it on the 25th. It will be built in Wuhan for the Chinese market, but no announcement has been made on where other countries’ Koleoses will be sourced from. Chinese buyers will get 2·0- and 2·5-litre petrol models, with a choice of front- or all-wheel drive.
   The Koleos II will be sold in New Zealand, but the Kadjar will not, said Marti.—Jack Yan, Publisher

April 18, 2016

Fashion Cities Africa gives a snapshot of four cities on a varied, rich continent

Jack Yan/3.51

The second largest continent on the planet is, logically, home to a massive number of fashion designers and movements, although out of Africa, there hasn’t been as much recognition of them till recently. Fashion Cities Africa, the book, inspired by the exhibition of the same name at the Brighton Museum & Art Gallery that opens at the end of April, is one high-profile development which seeks to shine a light on the variety present on the continent, while on a similar note, next month’s Africa Fashion Festival in Wellington will do the same for its designers.
   Hannah Azieb Pool, who edits the new book, is a Eritrean-born, London-based journalist, who, along with Helen Jennings, has co-writing duties, resulting in a cohesive, beautifully presented book that examines contemporary fashion in Nairobi, Casablanca, Lagos and Johannesburg. It doesn’t pretend to be a fully comprehensive guide, stating from the outset it is meant to provide mere glimpses on a continent that is incredibly diverse. The foreword by Binyavanga Wainaina, a flĂąneur, reminds us that there are clusters scattered throughout the land that have their own tendencies, and that her favourite designer is Nigerian, Chioma Chukwulozie.
   The reader is thrown in to the colour of Nairobi, where sibling bloggers Velma Rossa and Papa Petit (a.k.a. Oliver) take one half of the first spread with their ĂŒber-stylish and proudly urban Kenyan clothes, and stylists, musicians, designers, bloggers and artists profiled on following pages give slices of their lives that shake occidental sensibilities with their own palettes and ensembles. Nairobi, for the most part, emphasizes comfort, and the clothing shot on these pages by Sarah Marie Waiswa demonstrate that the city’s fashion could easily translate to other places, spanning everything from casual to luxury. AdĂšle Dejak has shown in Milano, for instance, and appeared in Vogue Italia with her collaboration with Salvatore Ferragamo, while John Kaveke and Nick Ondu show the sort of sartorial elegance that could easily influence menswear in other fashion capitals.
   Profiles of some of the personalities from the city follow, reminding us that Nairobi is a crossroads: Ami Doshi Shah is of Indian descent, her family brought there by the British when both countries were under Crown rule, while Ann McCreath is a Scots Ă©migrĂ©e who fell in love with the fashion there. There’s a dose of youthful energy, too, with Anthony Mulli, a jewellery designer who started when he was 16, pointing the way forward.
   The book follows a similar structure for subsequent cities, moving on to Casablanca next.
   Lucire readers will be familiar with Morocco thanks to travel editor Stanley Moss’s writings, and Jennings’ chapter, with photographs by Deborah Benzaquen, takes us on a similar journey through the country’s largest city. It was, of course, a home for Yves Saint Laurent at one point, as well as a drawcard for many western celebrities, when a first wave of Moroccan designers became known outside of the region. A second wave, Jennings explains, emerged in the 1980s and 1990s, with Zineb Joundy a graduate of the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture. A greater sense of artistic freedom and Casablanca’s position that blends Arabic, European and indigenous cultures has resulted in some looks that may seem familiar—perhaps thanks to the likes of Saint Laurent and his influence. Again the profiles are well selected, a cross-section of the highly varied cultures in the city: Amine Bendriouich, Amina Agueznay, Yassine Morabite, SaĂŻd Mahrouf, and Zhor, Chadia and Aida RaĂŻs each cover a very different parts of the fashion spectrum, from T-shirts to traditional caftans.
   Once the book gets to Lagos, it’s apparent that there’s a sense of “bubbling under”, with Lakin Ogunbanwo’s photographs, paired with Jennings’ words again, showing slightly more subdued looks for men, but prouder, more flamboyant looks for women. Jennings notes that civil war and Nigeria’s military juntas stalled its fashion scene for some years, before a revival when democracy returned in 1999. Foreign labels were seen as cool till recently, with the country discovering its confidence in its own ĂŠsthetic, to the point where one of her interviewees, stylist Bolaji Anumashaun, says that fashion can be one of Nigeria’s ‘greatest exports’. Anumashaun founded thestylehq.com with a pan-African fashion focus, and Arise magazine, founded in 2008, also stepped up the promotion for Nigerian designers. With Nigeria’s GDP now greater than South Africa’s, that confidence is bound to increase, and Jennings looks at Nike Davis Okundaye, who owns the biggest gallery in West Africa in Lagos, and happy to promote young talent. Others, such as Yegwa Ukpo and Amaka Osakwe, both were schooled in the UK before returning to Lagos to found their brands, while PR consultant Zara Okpara and luxury concept store owner Reni Folawiyo complete their city’s picture.
   Johannesburg completes Fashion Cities Africa, and it’s perhaps fair that Pool chose to put it last. Many mistakenly think of South African fashion when they refer to ‘African fashion’, spurred in part by the Republic’s sporting ties to many other countries in the Commonwealth. Victor Dlamini has the photographic duties here, and Pool pens the words, and she goes through the various Jo’burg neighbourhoods, noting that its fashion is more established than Nairobi’s but less self-conscious than Lagos’s. There is a western infusion here in some parts, she notes, but on closer examination there are accessories that reference Soweto streets or Zulu culture. The city even has two fashion weeks: South Africa Fashion Week and Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Joburg, making the city spoiled for choice when it comes to giving its designers a platform. David Tlale, whom Lucire readers will have heard of, and who has shown at New York Fashion Week, hails from here, and Jo’burg designs have a greater sense of familiarity thanks to western media exposure. It oozes colour and vibrancy, much like the photos chosen for Pool’s first chapter on Nairobi, and in similar fashion (pun unintended) there are profiles from across the spectrum: designer Thula Sindi, creative collective, the Sartists, accessories’ and shoe designer Maria McCloy, and womenswear designers Marianne Fassler and Anisa Mpungwe.
   It’s our hope that we can cease talking about ‘African’ fashion and instead replace the dialogue with specific cities or countries, just as we do for smaller continents such as Europe. Just as there is no such thing to fashion observers as ‘European’ fashion, there is equally no such thing as ‘African’ fashion: it is impossible to generalize at a continental level. Both as an informative volume and a coffee-table flick-through (as it is softcover), Fashion Cities Africa succeeds, and it’s exceptionally good value with full-colour photographs (needed for its story, over 196 pp.) at ÂŁ20 (available via Amazon UK here, or Book Depository here) or US$28·50, (Amazon link here). It is published this month by Intellect Books, as part of its Street Styles series.—Jack Yan, Publisher

April 3, 2016

Gala honours Naomi Campbell, with guests Lena Gercke, Catherine Hummels, Eva Padberg, Franziska Knuppe

Lucire staff/12.49




Gisela Schober

Gala magazine in Germany celebrated its 20th anniversary Spa Awards at the Brenners Park-Hotel & Spa in Baden-Baden, awarding the best names in the cosmetics and hotel industries.
   Supermodel Naomi Campbell was named Beauty Idol of the Year, with the judges citing her various careers in modelling, acting and authoring, and her support of social projects.
   A Special Prize was awarded to Prof Michael Braungart, founder of environmental consulting institute EPEA and a supporter of conservation and the cradle-to-cradle principle.
   Other awards went to Givenchy for its Le Soin Noir Masque Dentelle (Luxury Concepts award), Dr Grandel for Beautygen Renew Body (Innovation Concepts), Weleda for Skin Food Hautcreme (Cult Concepts), Skinceuticals for Metacell Renewal B3 (Men Concepts), Börlind for Beauty Shots Intensiv Konzentrate (Organic Concepts), Clarins for the Art of Touch (Treatment Concepts), Royal Mansour of Morocco (Luxury Hotel City–Resort), and the Four Seasons Maldives at Landaa Giraavaru (Innovative Spa Concepts).
   Guests at the event included Eva Padberg, Stephanie Stumph, Ursula Karven, Catherine Hummels, Julia Dietze, model Lena Gercke, Dagmar Kögel and her daughter Alana Siegel, Jochen Llambi and Motsi Mabuse, Jorge Gonzalez, Franziska Knuppe, Stefan Konarske, Lisa Martinek, Erol Sander and Caroline Godet, Jochen Schropp, Carolina Vera and Birthe Wolter. Barbara Schöneberger was MC and singer Philipp Dittberner performed live at the event.
   Other sponsors included BMW, Cadenzza, Emcur Bio Matcha, Fabletic, Moroccanoil, Pommery, Talbot Runhof and Und Gretel.

























Gisela Schober, Axel Kirchhof

March 23, 2016

In full bloom at the School of American Ballet

Lola Cristall/15.13



Erin Baiano

Like music, dance is a universal language which is internationally celebrated. The School of American Ballet (SAB) held their lavish Winter Ball at Lincoln Center’s beautiful David H. Koch Theater in March featuring dinner, dance and fun, all for a good cause while indulging in the arts. An exclusive performance took centre-stage by the SAB students, with choreography by Peter Walker, who was chosen for the second consecutive year by the Artistic Director and Chairman of Faculty of SAB, Peter Martins. Their pliĂ©s, pirouettes and arabesques were delivered with such grace and poise as the dancers followed the beat of the music. As a group, they performed in harmony, while the solo performance was conducted with such elegance. The celebrated French jewellery brand Van Cleef & Arpels sponsored the gorgeous event, stunningly designed by Ron Wendt, who added a touch of sophistication to the ambiance with European elegance. Simplicity and glamour illuminated the room with white floral arrangements and long candlesticks serving as centrepieces. Fifteen-foot-tall gold and silver mobile chandeliers dangled from above the dining hall, adding a rich radiance to the setting.—Lola Cristall, Paris Editor










Erin Baiano

March 16, 2016

Cara Delevingne models Chanel’s spring–summer 2016 eyewear campaign, shot by Karl Lagerfeld

Lucire staff/4.18



Model Cara Delevingne will model the spring–summer 2016 Chanel eyewear campaign, wearing a tweed and cotton cap, a tweed jacket and a sleeveless top with silver embroideries and ribbon bows from the Chanel Airlines ready-to-wear collection. The campaign breaks in April.
   The advertising will showcase frames from the Plein Soleil and Bijou 2016 collections, and a mirrored mask with a laser-engraved effect from the spring–summer 2016 ready-to-wear catwalk show.
   The Plein Soleil collection has a two-tone look (black merges into blue on the cat-eye frames, and black to white on the oval optical) and is inspired by tie-dye motifs. The Bijou collection features the camellia motif extensively.
   Delevingne appears in blue when modelling the mask, and in more conventional lighting when showing off the regular frames.
   Karl Lagerfeld himself chose Delevingne and shot the campaign.



March 15, 2016

News in brief: Fossil shows new smartwatches at Baselworld; Acorelle creates its extraits d’Ă©motion

Lucire staff/21.04


Fossil has announced slimmer Android Wear smartwatches (Q Marshal and Q Wander) as well as new activity trackers and smarter analogue watches at Baselworld. The new smartwatches have a silicone strap option, and cases measuring 44 mm and 46 mm. The Q Wander comes with an interchangeable leather strap, while the Q Marshal has a rugged case and vintage-inspired leather straps. The displays are always on, and allow wearers to track their commutes, flights and appointments with Google Now cards. They work through tapping or voice commands, and their faces can be customized. Prices start at US$275.
   The analogue watches alert wearers to incoming calls and notifications through the turn of the watch hands, and are capable of tracking calories, sleep, time zones, and can connect to an Android smartphone or Iphone via Bluetooth.
   Acorelle, the modern French fragrance house founded in 2005, has released its new extraits d’Ă©motion, fragrances that have been certified by Ecocert and NSF as all-natural and organic. It’s a rare honour, yet Acorelle has managed to create fragrances with no synthetic scent compounds, aartificial preservatives, parabens or phthalates.
   Bottled in Agen, France, with ingredients grown in Grasse, Acorelle takes pride in creating its scents, and this latest line uses a palette of c. 200 all-natural plant and flower extracts and oils.
   Master perfumer Philippe Collet and aromatherapist Patty Canac have created three collections in the new line, Energizing (Tea Garden, Pure Patchouli and Land of Cedar), Balancing (Silken Rose, Absolu Tiare, and Vanilla Blossom), and Soothing (Divine Orchid, Citrus Infusion and Lotus Dream). They are available as eaux de parfum, eaux fraĂźches, and a roll-on.



March 3, 2016

H&M Studio shows its autumn–winter 2016–17 collection at Paris Fashion Week

Lucire staff/9.23




H&M

Swedish retailer H&M showed its Studio collection for autumn–winter 2016–17 at Paris Fashion Week, at the Bourse de Commerce, last night, on a catwalk patterned after a frozen lake.
   The company says the collection was inspired by ‘strong women and the beauty of independent minds.’
   The collection had a sense of glamour mixed with Bohemian chic and Swedish folklore, with oversized coats, soft forms, ruffles, sheer fabrics, gaucho hats and cowboy boots.
   Amber Valletta, Jourdan Dunn, Freja Beha Erichsen, Ashley Graham, Soo Joo Park and Hari Nef walked the catwalk, while Emma Roberts, Ciara, Atlanta de Cadenet, Olivia Palermo, Pat Cleveland, Ashley Graham, Pernilla Tiesbaek, Suki Waterhouse, Gabriel Day Lewis, Hari Nef, Andreja Pejić and Kate Mara were among the 600 guests attending the show.
   Hennes & Mauritz’s Ann-Sofie Johansson and Margareta van den Bosch were also present for the big night.
   Music was composed by Nicolas Godin of Air, with his track, ‘Mystery Lake’, created especially for the show. A choir performed its track live at the venue.
   The collection goes on sale in 200 stores and online from September 8, 2016.















H&M

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