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Reebok and Daniel Moon indulge in colour with Major Reebok capsule collection

Filed by Lucire staff/June 18, 2021/21.48





Daniel Moon, the proprietor of Hair Los Angeles and one of the world’s best known colourists, has brought his love of colour into a capsule-collection collaboration with Reebok, dubbed Major Reebok, releasing on June 24.
   Major comes from Moon’s nickname, Major Moon, referencing his time in the US Marine Corps, and has appeared on some of his products already, including the Major Apron and Major Moonshine, a hair glitter product.
   The collection features a new take on Reebok’s Classic Leather Legacy and Club C Legacy designs.
   Moon, known for encouraging distinctive hair colours for self-expression, aligns with Reebok’s plans to be inclusive.
   ‘The sock liner of the Classic Leather Legacy is a photograph of an actual hair piece that I worked on,’ said Moon. ‘It serves as a blueprint of the shoes.’
   The Classic Leather Legacy’s colour palette was inspired by his most requested hair colours, and the leather material reminds him of a shaved head, says Reebok.
   The Club C Legacy’s bright green and pink colours ‘represent the same feeling of hyper freedom that my hair art brings to my clients. They instantly go in your bloodstream and change your mood to a new tier of exaggerated fun,’ he says.
   The Major Reebok Classic Leather Legacy retails for US$80 and the Club C Legacy for US$100. Both include one pair of fuzzy laces. Sizes range from US 3½ to 15.

 


New Balance releases Everybody’s Welcome collection commemorating Pride 2021

Filed by Lucire staff/June 15, 2021/23.49





For Pride 2021, New Balance has released its Everybody’s Welcome collection of footwear and apparel.
   Queer Hong Kong visual artist Zoie Lam has created the art on the items, conveying an upbeat, positive and colourful mood. The characters are genderless and fun, and show that everyone is welcome, regardless of how they identify. They include T-shirts, singlets and an anorak (from NZ$40), and the Fresh Foam Tempo running shoe (NZ$190), Made in US 574 (NZ$280), 202 sandals (NZ$60) and 57/40 (NZ$220).
   New Balance is supporting InsideOut as part of National Schools’ Pride Week (June 14–20), celebrating rainbow staff and students. The company has donated funds in advance of next year’s week, and gifted the Everybody’s Welcome collection to InsideOut staff across New Zealand.
   InsideOut provides information, workshops and education on LGBTQIA+ issues to schools, workplaces and community organizations.

 


Backyard or beach, Protest Sportswear shows the spirit of travel for summer ’21

Filed by Lucire staff/May 27, 2021/11.34




Protest Sportswear shows that you can’t stop imagination from travelling to exotic locales, whether you’re destined for the backyard or the beach. And for summer 2021, it’s the shores of Bali and Hawai‘i that beckon, with the Dutch brand’s range of dresses, bikinis and other essentials.
   Key to this season are a number of designs. There are great prints as one would expect from Protest, this season with some small floral designs and textured prints. There’s a larger tropical print with its MM Offshore bikini, and some eye-catching stripes. Protest sees layering as part of the summer look, with the Leni tiered dress and the Hope layered skirt. The Heaven bikini has ruffled straps, while the Kitty bikini has a button-down front. They’ve used Lurex on straps for shine, to lift the two colour palettes they’ve employed: earthy tones (sandstone, clay, and warm yellow, contrasted by coral) and candy tones (pink, mint, and icy tellow, matched with black, white and grey).
   Visit Protest Sportswear at protest.eu, or find them on Instagram at @protestwomen.







 


Mercedes-Benz and IC Berlin collaborate on eyewear collection

Filed by Lucire staff/May 21, 2021/10.50




Mercedes-Benz and IC Berlin have collaborated on a capsule sunglasses’ collection comprising five designs that incorporate elements from Mercedes-Benz and Mercedes-AMG vehicles.
   Mercedes-Benz stresses that the arrangement is not just a licensing of a symbol, but that its avant-garde philosophy has been brought into the eyewear.
   Certainly the forms are distinct from what one would normally see in eyewear, and hint at some of the shapes seen in Mercedes-Benz grilles and interiors. They feature stainless steel frames, Zeiss lenses, soft silicone nose pads for wearer comfort, and high-quality temple hinges. The Mercedes-Benz three-pointed star is lasered on to the temples. Colours are also distinctive and metallic, reminiscent of the high-quality finish seen on a Mercedes-Benz or Mercedes-AMG vehicle in the showroom.
   ‘With our new capsule collection, we want to show that something very special can arise in the eyewear segment when two design-savvy brands as IC Berlin and Mercedes-Benz team up,’ said Harry Skinner, IC Berlin’s lead designer.
   The sunglasses are made in Berlin-Marzahn, keeping things local to Mercedes-Benz’s home country.






 


Sophie et Voilà’s wedding gowns adopt a minimalist style for 2021

Filed by Lucire staff/May 20, 2021/10.34




Spain’s Sophie et Voilà, the brainchild of creative director Sofia Arribas and CEO Saioa Goitia, have shown the bridal brand’s 2021 collection, Hydrangea.
   Sophie et Voilà is known for clean, minimalist styles, a welcome departure from some of the overly complex shapes that have been seen on catwalks of late. Hydrangea, meanwhile, has been inspired by the flower itself, which grows abundantly in the Basque country.
   As the label explains, the flower goes from nothing to everything each year: ‘the hydrangea is a flower that sprouts with the security of knowing that every spring it will be spectacular. Like Sophie et Voilà.’
   The designs reflect the different stages of the annual cycle of the hydrangea: minimalist; others like ‘an explosion of leaves’; and the remainder ‘designs that appear like a flowering of clean romanticism.’
   For US readers, the gowns can be viewed and ordered online at https://us.sophieetvoila.com/collections/bridal-collection. Prices start at under US$2,000.





 


Are these the trends we’ll remember the 2020s by?

Filed by Jack Yan/May 12, 2021/23.35

A fashion magazine seems to have a few roles. The first is to create a record of trends, not just reporting on them but preempting them, as a snapshot of where society is at any given moment. The second is arguably to chart culture itself, and just what the Zeitgeist is.
   If the articles in this May 2021 number of Lucire KSA is any indication, there is a complexity in design right now. Perfume bottles, jewellery and watches in our ‘Luxury Line’ pages at the back of the magazine are an indication: we seem to marvel at the intricacies of complex jewellery right now, and the “in” watch is the skeleton type, where the inner workings are exposed for all to see.
   But it’s not just in these accessories and beauty products; Meg Hamilton’s Paris Fashion Week report reveals layered clothing, tweed coats with knitted patterns, Norwegian sweaters, floral prints and padding. Even Stella McCartney, who delivered punchier colours without as much complexity in the patterns, told of volume with bell-bottom trousers.
   Volume is in, and a fashion historian might point to other times when that has been the case. I won’t explore that in this editorial, but I am intrigued about the reasons. Are they reflections of how we view our lives as being complex? Is the volume something we demand because we need protection from such an uncertain world? Meg’s thesis is quite the opposite: we are emerging from our cocoons, and it’s end of the hibernation forced upon us by COVID-19.
   The reality is that we won’t know for sure till some time has passed and we reflect on the times we live in, and each decade falls into a caricature of its one outstanding trend. It’s why westerners think of miniskirts for the 1960s and Laura Ashley for the 1970s, and the 1980s were the decade of power dressing. The 1990s might be summarized by grunge, and logomania might well dominate the 2000s. These are not accurate constructs: they are shortcuts that we give periods of time to convey a sense of nostalgia or, when it comes to film, to purposely set something in a certain era that audiences can collectively reminisce about. And in so many cases, they are ex post facto justifications of those eras, allied with social and political trends.
   If we were to take a punt on how this era will be remembered, we need to keep those non-fashion trends in mind. And maybe these times will be remembered for their complexity, even if every generation thinks they are living through the most complex period in history. The items you see in this issue might well come to represent this decade, more than the necklines of dresses that revealed instead of concealed that we saw out the 2010s on. Ultimately, however, only time will tell.—Jack Yan, Founder and Publisher


Above: From the Stella McCartney autumn–winter 2021–2 collection.

 


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