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Rimmel London officially kicks off its anti-cyberbullying campaign with Rita Ora at launch


NEWS With help from Rita Ora, Rimmel London has officially launched its campaign against beauty cyberbullying, I Will Not Be Deleted
Filed by Lucire staff/November 11, 2018/22.10


As previewed in October, Rimmel has officially kicked off its I Will Not Be Deleted campaign (hashtag #IWillNotBeDeleted), highlighting and combatting cyberbullying around individuals’ personal appearances.
   Rimmel London ambassador Rita Ora was on hand for the start of the campaign. Fellow ambassador Cara Delevingne supports the campaign and had appeared at the earlier launch. Both have shared their own stories as part of the campaign, alongside the young people who appear in the official 2′10″ promotional video.
   Appearing in the campaign video are Tess Daly, a beauty blogger from Sheffield who received hateful comments about her disability; Eden, a model from Birmingham who received hurtful comments saying she should bleach her skin; and Ascia Al Faraj, a American–Kuwaiti blogger, fashion designer, entrepreneur and model, who was bullied over her decision to break cultural norms, namely having piercings and tattoos.
   The campaign partners with the Cybersmile Foundation, and Rimmel London parent Coty has helped the charity create the Cybersmile Assistant, an AI-driven tool that recommends local resources, helplines and organizations to those affected by beauty cyberbullying. The tool will launch in early 2019, initially in English.
   Rimmel research, with a sample of 11,000 women across 10 countries, aged between 16 and 25, revealed that one in four women has experienced beauty cyberbullying, resulting in the deletion of 115 million social media images each year. Fifty-seven per cent of women who have been cyberbullied have not shared their experience with others, and a staggeringly high forty-six per cent women have self-harmed either through an eating disorder, substance abuse or physical self-harm because of cyberbullying.
   Rimmel has also published a white paper, Beauty Cyberbullying—Expression Repression, on the issue.
   In an earlier release, Rimmel outlined that it is against narrow definitions of beauty and prejudices, and that it wants people to express their true selves through make-up.

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