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Campari aligns itself with cutting-edge creators in latest digital campaign

Filed by Lucire staff/October 6, 2020/11.12



Campari has launched a digital campaign, with video content, aligning itself with pioneering artists, rather than models or celebrities. The concept is ‘Red Passion’, Campari’s latest brand concept, described as ‘the urge inside us that is impossible to ignore.’
   As a brand that sees itself as visionary—it has played its part in the creation of the Negroni and the Americano—Campari has teamed up with ground-breaking artists in a series directed by Matt Lambert. The campaign was devised by Wunderman Thompson, with the films produced by Movie Magic, and digital strategy led by We Are Social.
   Participants include bartender Monica Berg, named the most influential person in her industry in 2020, who describes ‘Red Passion’ as ‘It’s a feeling, it’s a vibe, it’s not necessarily something you can force, but when you see it, you know it and you simply can’t ignore it!’
   Jamaican-born choreographer MJ Harper also features, and says of the campaign, ‘What’s interesting about it is, that depending on how it’s pushed or not pushed, you will find people who are actually active in their creativity and people who are very much passive.’
   Saxophonist Bendik Giske performs on his instrument for the campaign, while avant-garde director Margot Bowman features in the clips and worked behind-the-scenes.
   Francesco Cruciani, managing director, Italian Icons, Campari Group said, ‘With a rich legacy and history in fuelling passion and creativity, Campari constantly inspires and challenges people, encouraging them to keep their Red Passions alive in the path to creation. This was true in the time of Gaspare and Davide Campari and still is to this day, where we constantly aim to go beyond the expected. Working with director Matt Lambert to deliver his unique style and artists such as Monica, Bendik, MJ and Margot was truly eye opening as we saw Red Passion in action, front row. We want to invite everyone to follow their lead!’
   The videos hit YouTube, Campari’s website and Instagram on the 5th. More information can be found at campari.com/red-passion.

 


Putting the brakes on fast fashion

Filed by Jack Yan/August 15, 2020/9.10

Lucire is UN Environment’s first fashion industry partner.

Abigail Beall’s statistics in a recent BBC report about clothing recycling make sobering reading. She writes, ‘Around 85% of all textiles thrown away in the US—roughly 13 million tonnes in 2017—are either dumped into landfill or burned. The average American has been estimated to throw away around 37kg of clothes every year. And globally, an estimated 92 million tonnes of textiles waste is created each year and the equivalent to a rubbish truck full of clothes ends up on landfill sites every second.’ Her other statistics show that only 12 per cent of the material for clothing gets recycled, and that the fashion industry is responsible for 10 per cent of all greenhouse gas emissions and 20 per cent of global waste water.
   Meanwhile, on the consumer end, our need for gratification (at least in the UK) has seen us buy 60 per cent more clothing than we did 15 years ago, and no one wants to wait six months after seeing something on the catwalk.
   Beall says that recycling is difficult because while there may be one dominant material, such as cotton, threads and labels are made from other materials. Jeans are usually made of cotton yarn blended with elastane. This makes them all difficult to recycle, and sorting textiles into different fibres is still usually done manually. Techniques to chemically separate blends without losing either natural or synthetic fibres are not yet scalable.
   And what’s donated to charity shops is now of poor quality, with most reaching Oxfam’s Wastesaver plant unsellable, and six tonnes a week are torn up to be used as cloths or stuffing.
   Many fashion labels are recognizing these difficulties, especially as consumers realize the harm the industry is causing the environment. Some have been choosing recycled materials, including ocean plastics that have been turned into new materials in clothes and shoes—over the years Lucire has devoted plenty of space to these. Others are inventing new, sustainable materials.
   There is some hope that the lockdowns that various countries have had to endure during the COVID-19 crisis might wake populations up to the preciousness of the environment. Many enjoyed watching nature return, something covered in an earlier issue of Lucire KSA. And, with many now opting to work from home—and companies adjusting to the new reality of allowing staff to work remotely—the need to dress up for the office has diminished. Casual clothes are very much the norm in many societies now. In such cases, people might not be quite as willing to push for the latest in attire if it isn’t going to be seen in public, and only in the virtual world. Might we embrace quality over novelty once more?
   Beall shows that the rise in consumption is a relatively recent phenomenon, something within living memory for most consumers. It can only be a good thing for the planet if we reduced our clothing consumption to the levels they were at 15 years ago, and even then labels were making money in the clothing business.
   We weren’t so obsessed with fast fashion, and while retailers like H&M and Zara were making headway around the world with cheaply made garments, there were still enough consumers happy to pay more for quality. Until 2004 there was a difference, too: high-end designer style hadn’t been democratized, not until Karl Lagerfeld began the first of many designer collaborations with H&M, giving rise to what this magazine called ‘accessible luxury’.
   We also weren’t as obsessed with the new. When Lucire was first established, some fashion labels were deeply wary of allowing online media to cover their catwalk shows. They were scared of counterfeiters: the sooner they could see something, the sooner the knock-offs would appear. The designers were used to having the advantage, and old media were willing to comply. Lucire, for its part, never ran the catwalk stories live: internet connections weren’t that great then, and neither was digital photography. By the time the film and prints got to New Zealand, and everything was manually laid out, there was a delay. But as coverage democratized, and as designers themselves delighted in showing every­thing live, often to “influencers” who beamed the shows instantaneously via social media, consumer demands also shifted. In an Instagramming generation, being seen with the latest is more vital than before—yet, again, one hopes that the perspective we’ve gained with the pandemic will put the brakes on that.
   We’re not exactly in Luddite position or pining for a return to the past. We’re excited about the innovations, such as Bionic, a polyester made from recycled shoreline waste that H&M, recognizing the shift, has promoted [Natalia Vodianova modelled one such dress three years ago, shown at top]; and the new sustainable materials that our clothes could be made from. But we would like to see the end of the race to the bottom which fast fashion and the insistence on novelty have driven, where garment workers are paid less and less to satisfy the profits of some brands and the appetites of some consumers.
   If we value good design, ethical sourcing and quality over novelty and low prices, then we may be able to reverse some of these frightening statistics. It might even be unfashionable, as the pandemic affects certain countries worse than others, to flaunt the fact you’ve been able to head out shopping (real or virtual) to get the newest. Influencers will need to find something else to promote.
   Even filmmakers are sensing it. The Michael Winterbottom-directed Steve Coogan–Isla Fisher comedy, Greed [covered earlier in Lucire], is a satirical tale about a thinly disguised version of Sir Philip Green, the head of Arcadia Group, who stood accused by British government committees of plundering British Home Stores while under his company’s control. Sir Philip also did not escape criticism in this magazine.
   Coogan plays Sir Richard ‘Greedy’ McCreadie, who spends his adult life pushing suppliers in Sri Lanka (with India standing in for the country in the film) into a race to the bottom. The last act wraps up the film neatly: namely that for all the lessons that we might have learned, the fictional McGready family ticks on, little changed. No, the outcome isn’t funny, but it is a call to action—it’s Winterbottom exercising pathos. Showing statistics about fast fashion, the income gap, and the single-digit earnings of Asian garment workers takes that one step further. Are we choosing to fund these lifestyles and the fast-fashion machine, or should we opt for the sort of designers often championed by this magazine, who work with Fair Trade, eschew seasons, and emphasize quality?
   With such a film part of our 2019–20 Zeitgeist, then it appears that we should call time on the excesses the industry has created, opening the door to those independent designers, many of whom have appeared in this magazine, who invest heart, creativity, and time to make quality fare.—Jack Yan, Publisher

 


Facebook’s demise wouldn’t affect us much

Filed by Jack Yan/May 30, 2020/11.14

Like many other publications, Lucire sends updates to Facebook, Twitter and Mastodon. Occasionally we’ll Instagram an image to a story. However, we’ve had reservations about social media, especially Facebook, for over a decade. In November 2010, we wrote on our Facebook page, ‘We have stopped the automated importing of notes to this Facebook page. These stories receive around 200–400 views each, but that also means that our site loses 200–400 viewers per story.’ At that stage we probably had around 600 fans on the Lucire fan page, showing you just what cut-through pages were getting before Facebook intentionally broke its sharing algorithm to force people to pay to get the same reach. (Reach dropped 90 per cent overnight.) We didn’t feel any desire after that to build social media presences, because we spotted the con—as did this YouTuber:

   Back then, Facebook allowed the importing of articles via RSS, which meant everything from Lucire’s news pages automatically wound up on the social network. It was a crazy idea, when you look back: it wasn’t designed to drive traffic to our main site, it only made Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg rich as you spent more time in their walled garden.
   Even after we stopped, we still shared headlines to Facebook, thinking that these would entice fans sufficiently to click through. At one stage, we could see referrals from Facebook among our stats, but these days, there is no correlation between the Facebook reach numbers and the actual views of the story on our own site.
   In 2016, NPR posted a headline to its Facebook page, ‘Why Doesn’t America Read Anymore?’ but the contents of the article read, ‘We sometimes get the sense that some people are commenting on NPR stories that they haven’t actually read. If you are reading this, please like this post and do not comment on it. Then let’s see what people have to say about this “story.”’ You can predict what happened: the link got plenty of comments. Anyone who says that Americans don’t get irony is gravely mistaken.
   Even in the late 2000s I was saying we lived in a ‘headline culture’ where people might never read the article itself, and social media have exacerbated this phenomenon. Many social media today, including the largest sites, are little more than glorified Digg sites, places where links are shared, but not necessarily places which drive traffic.
   Of course there will be exceptions to the rule, but generally, social media do not mean engagement. A 2015 study by Parse.ly showed that social media-referred readers engage the least with a given article. Search engine-referred readers were slightly better. But the best came from those who were already loyal readers on the site.
   In an age of “fake news” I do not believe the statistics will have improved, particularly on websites whose businesses thrive on outrage. People are divided into tribes where they seem to derive some reward for posting more links that support that aims of those tribes: a situation rife for exploitation, if certain countries’ investigations are to be believed. Certainly as early as 2014 I was warning of a ‘bot epidemic’, something that only became mainstream news in 2018 with The Observer’s exposé about Cambridge Analytica.
   But none of that bad news broke the addictions many people have to these websites. On our ‘about’ page on Facebook, we note: ‘Fast forward to (nearly) the dawn of the 2020s. We won’t lie to you: we’re not fans of how Facebook says one thing and does another. In our pages, we’ve promoted based on merit, and Facebook wouldn’t actually pass muster if it was a fashion label.
   ‘We know Facebook is tracking you, often more than your settings have allowed. Therefore, we’re consciously trying to limit the time you spend on this website.
   ‘However, we also know that we should maintain a Facebook presence, as there are many of you who want that convenience.’
   Nonetheless, I regularly wonder if that convenience is even worth it if there is no correlation with readership.
   Twice this month I was locked out of Facebook, because, allegedly, there was unusual activity. If checking your Facebook on a far less regular basis—say a couple of times a week—is unusual, then I’ll expect to get locked out far more frequently. As the importing of our Tweets to Facebook is driven by another program (on IFTTT), and that is linked to my personal account (one that I haven’t updated since 2017), then each time Facebook blocks me, it breaks the process. It’s also a website that has bugs that were present when I was a regular user in the late 2000s through to the mid-2010s, including ones where we cannot even share Lucire links because the site automatically ruins the address, rendering the previews anywhere from inaccurate (claiming the page doesn’t exist) to useless (taking you to a 404). Only the text link will work.
   We get the occasional like and share from our Facebook, although these do not inform our editorial decisions.
   We won’t go so far as to proclaim the end of social media, regardless of how angry the US president gets with fact checks; but we’ve been sceptical about their worth for publishers for a long time, and there are increasing days where I wonder whether I’ll even bother reconnecting the sharing mechanism from Twitter to Facebook if Facebook breaks it again. The question I’m really asking is: does the presence of links to our articles matter much to you?
   Ultimately, I care about all our readers, including Facebook users, and that remains the overriding motive to reconnect things one more time after Facebook locks me out. And I suppose the lock-outs in 2020 are much better than the ones during most of the 2010s, where Facebook forced you to download a “malware scanner” on false pretences, planting hidden software with unclear purposes on to millions of computers around the world. Their record is truly appalling, and if Facebook vanished overnight, I wouldn’t shed a tear.—Jack Yan, Publisher

 


Instagram round-up, May 27: as some emerge from lockdown

Filed by Lucire staff/May 27, 2020/10.26

As some celebrities and models continue with lockdown, and others are starting to emerge from theirs, their Instagrams are a far more mixed bag than when we began peering into them again earlier this year.
   While a few months ago, there were express acknowledgements of the COVID-19 pandemic, this week there was no caption from Kylie Jenner as she posted a selfie of herself in a bra and jeans, love heart aside, with half-sister Kim Kardashian exclaiming ‘WOW’ with six flame emojis. And being Jenner the photo received 10·6 million likes, and Kardashian’s comment, at the time of writing, had 11,999—it’ll easily be over 12,000 by the time you read this.
   In Milano, where things are beginning to open up again, Chiara Ferragni showed off her pride capsule collection, sharing the link in her Instagram Stories. The home-shot top showcases its rainbow stripes proudly, with ‘Love fiercely’ emblazoned on the front.
   It’s outside for singer–model Hilde Osland modelling Bombshell Sportswear, showing off the red autumn leaves in Western Australia, as that country’s COVID-19 infections dwindle. German actress Franziska Knuppe went further afield, into the Baltic Sea on board a boat for a photo shoot, doing her own make-up (using Shiseido) and hair (using Schwarzkopf), but beyond that, it’s a ‘secret project’ and we’re to wait to see just what this is.
   Bar Refaeli had a far simpler, more relaxed post on her ’Gram, looking natural in Tel Aviv with the simple caption, ‘Favorite time of the day. ME TIME’, a sentiment which many of us would embrace. Just as blissful was a post from Marina Laswick to her one million followers, her husband Kev Dukes holding her up. They’re making a Q&A video to answer questions about their successful marriage, and among the comments is an admission that Kev is usually behind the lens of Laswick’s photographs.
   Silvana Araujo, with nearly a million followers as fans of her fitness advice, is the only one in our round-up who mentions her quarantine (in Bogotá) directly. Wearing a bikini, she’s alerting fans to her upcoming fitness videos.
   Finally, Lucire cover alumna, actress Violett Beane, who turned 24 earlier this month, showed off a new hair colour (‘Extremely-faded-dark-brown-box-dyed’) and ’do.

 


Instagram round-up, April 24: whatever you do, don’t mention the pandemic

Filed by Lucire staff/April 24, 2020/12.19

There’s a lot happening around this time of year, including the Orthodox Easter, Earth Day, the start of Ramadan, and ANZAC Day, and over the last week, celebrities have been Instagramming in a more positive way, even though the COVID-19 pandemic is very much with us.
   Natalia Vodianova (@natasupernova) showed off her dining table spread to commemorate the Orthodox Easter: the Orthodox Church never went with the Gregorian calendar and stuck with when they thought Easter should be, so there is a discrepancy between the two dates. They may well have a point: after all, can one Pope really declare a new starting-point for January 1? Religion aside, Vodianova had a colourful display to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ in her own way.
   American model Kara del Toro (@karajewelll) posed with her vintage Chanel sunglasses, which are arguably in vogue for 2020. Del Toro managed to keep up her high standard of photography on her Instagram—we’re guessing that it pays to have archives! Her most obvious COVID-19-related post was four weeks ago; since then her fans have been able to indulge in escapism through her Instagram account.
   It’s the same with Norwegian-born, Australian-based model and singer Hilde Osland (@hildeee), who gathered up her favourites of her in red, and put them into a single post of nine images. She’s a pro at Instagram: whenever we try to post nine, it crashes! She’s also becoming a pro at TikTok, where some of her content is reposted from.
   Our friend Panos Papadopoulos (@panosofficial) poses with sunnies and a black jacket, with a simple message, and comes close to acknowledging the pandemic: ‘Keep your best mood … the world is changing’, while hashtagging #positivevibes. We’ll gratefully accept!
   We completely admire Samantha Hoopes (@samanthahoopes) for being real and showing off bikini photos taken four months after the birth of her child. She notes, ‘7 months later my skin is still all stretched out! This is a reminder of how fucking awesome our bodies are & our journey into our new bodies is all about Self love & confidence is key! For me it has been a ride from loosing all my weight to figuring out ways to “bounce” back & in all of it I am proud of my new shape, new skin & new body!’ We love her positive attitude and it’s a wonderful message to have in these times.
   No stranger to Instagram, Viki Odintcova (@viki_odintcova) is staying at home in Moskva and playing with make-up, taking a selfie and keeping her message simple.
   Claire Rose Cliteur (@clairerose) poses for a selfie wearing eco-friendly, sustainable fashion brand Pangaia, which has its own material science R&D facility. The label, which was founded last year, may well be the first one that combines this level of research with its own collections.
   Finally, commemorating Earth Day is actress Alexandra Daddario (@alexandradaddario), with a million likes of her image in the forest. The earlier text caption has disappeared in favour of a simple Earth emoji, and maybe that’s all you need.

 


Anne Klein teams up with founder’s granddaughter in COVID-19 initiative

Filed by Lucire staff/April 20, 2020/15.49

The Anne Klein brand, part of WHP, has teamed up with its founder’s granddaughter, Hello There Collective CEO Jesse Gre Rubinstein, to distribute 100,000 face masks through the company’s supply chain to essential workers and community organizations in the US.
   Rubinstein’s agency, specializing in social media, will launch Annie Klein’s social series, featuring individuals who have made a difference and connected communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Rubinstein will host the series on Facebook Live.
   ‘Uniting the brand Anne Klein with the founder’s family at this critical time and making a commitment to distribute 100,000 masks to those on the frontlines helping our communities, is a win–win,’ said WHP chairman and CEO Yehuda Shmidman, who added that the collaboration was just the beginning.
   ‘I am honoured to have the opportunity to play a role in supporting my grandmother’s legacy by highlighting inspiring individuals who even during this time of great uncertainty, embody the vision and strength to empower their community and uplift those around them,’ said Rubinstein. ‘My hope is that this initiative serves as the launch of a powerful network that can both support and inspire others to help not only in the present, but as we begin to rebuild.’

 


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